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THE OFFICIAL GAY MAGAZINE OF THE GULF SOUTHâ„¢

A Biweekly Publication Celebrating LGBTQ Life, Music & Culture Since 1982 VOLUME 38 ISSUE 01

AY, January 14, 2020 TUE TUESD SDA

Happy New Year & Martin Luther King Jr. Day

www.AMBUSHMAG.com


THE “OFFICIAL” DISH by TJ ACOSTA, PUBLISHER

Dear Ambush Nation, As we march into 2020, I hope everyone had an amazing holiday season. Now that the holidays have passed, we can begin to focus on the greatest holiday season of all - CARNIVAL! With 12th Night behind us and a slew of Gay Mardi Gras balls ahead, I encourage everyone to follow along as Ambush documents the highlights of Carnival! As we announced in the last issue of Ambush, we are thrilled that Felicia Phillips will be this year’s King Cake Queen. Phillips is KCQ XXVI, the Ruby Queen, and will reign over Gay Mardi Gras 2020. As we get closer to Mardi Gras we will have more information about the Official Gay Mardi Gras bead toss and other events. Speaking of Gay Mardi Gras, there are a number of Gay Krewes who have their balls over the next several weeks. I would encourage everyone to try and make at least one of the balls. The members of each Krewe spend countless hours making some of the most amazing costumes you’ll see during the Carnival season. It truly is incredible to see some of the over-the-top costumes that are presented at these balls. Before last year, I had never been to one of them. During the 2019

Carnival Season, I made it a point to go to ALL of the balls. It was a wonderful experience and while I may not make ALL the balls again this year, I know that every year I’ll definitely make several. They are a valuable part of LGBTQ culture in New Orleans. LGBT+ ARCHIVES PROJECT OPEN HOUSE The LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana will hold an open house from 6 to 8pm on Wednesday, January 22. The event will be at their new space at 636A St. Ann in the French Quarter. The Archives project recently took over the space and currently use it to promote their mission while having a more visible presence in the community. The LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana aims to promote and encourage the protection and preservation of materials that chronicle the culture and history of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community in Louisiana. Ambush Magazine is committed to supporting the Archives Project as we feel we play a vital role in documenting the life, music and culture of the LGBTQ Community along the Gulf South. I would encourage everyone to attend the open house. If you

Inside this Issue of Ambush Magazine Community Announcements

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Arts & Culture

10

Health & Wellness

28

Hot Happenings Calendar

34

Business & LGBTQ Owned & Friendly Business Directory

48

Comics, Puzzles & Horoscopes

54

Sports

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Gulf South LGBTQ Entertainment & Travel Guide Since 1982 New Orleans, Louisiana | info@ambushpublishing.com | (504) 522-8049

can’t, I would ask you to take a minute next time you’re in the Quarter to stop by and see the displays along with the timeline of gay history in New Orleans. I think you’ll be impressed. BETTY’S AT 700 BURGUNDY UPDATE We are still on schedule for a late January opening. I am hoping that by the time the next issue of Ambush comes out we will be up and running. We are currently working on giving the space some much needed TLC. The entire staff is super excited to get back to work. We will definitely have information on a grand opening in the near future. You can follow us on Facebook for pictures of our progress and more updates. You can find us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @BettysBarNola. Thank you for your patience as we get ready to open! MARK YOUR CALENDARS New Orleans Advocates for GLBT Elders (NOAGE) will have their next potluck dinner on Wednesday, January 29 from 6:30 to 8:30pm. The event will be held at St. Anna’s Episcopal Church located at 1313 Esplanade Ave. If you are able to attend please consider bringing a dish (although not required) or a non-perishable food item for St. Anna’s Food Pantry. All ages are welcome to this event! Come eat, network and make new friends! The 43rd Annual Krewe of King Arthur Parade will be held on Sunday, February 16, starting at 1 pm. The parade will roll down the Uptown parade route. There are over 1700 members in this Krewe, many of whom are members of the LGBTQ community. This year marks the Krewe’s 20th year in New Orleans. This year Easter Sunday will be on April 12th. The 21st Annual Gay Easter Parade will once again roll through the French Quarter on Easter Sunday at 4:30pm. Keep reading Ambush for an announcement about this year’s Easter Grand Marshals and updates on Gay Easter Parade events!

Gulf South Entertainment/Travel Guide Since 1982 • Texas-Florida ANNUAL READERSHIP OVER 1M+ 260,000+ Print & 780,000+ Online Official Gay Easter Parade Guide™ Official Gay Mardi Gras Guide™ Official Gay New Orleans Guide™ Official Pride Guide™ Official Southern Decadence Guide™

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR info@ambushpublishing.com

PRINT CIRCULATION

Alabama - Birmingham, Mobile; Florida - Pensacola; Louisiana - Baton Rouge, Lafayette, Lake Charles, Metairie, New Orleans, Monroe, Alexandria; Mississippi - Bay St. Louis, Biloxi, Jackson; Texas Houston

PUBLISHER TJ Acosta

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Reed Wendorf

SENIOR EDITOR Brian Sands

OPERATIONS & EVENTS Chris Leonard CONTRIBUTORS Adam Radd, Andrew Watley, Brian Sands, Catherine Roland, Charles Pizzo, Dorian-gray Alexander, Frank Perez, Jim Meadows, Kevin Assam, Lynn Stevens, Rev. Bill Terry, Ryan Rockford, Scot Billeaudeau, Tony Leggio & Crescent City Sports PHOTOGRAPHERS Andrew Hopkins, Charles Pizzo, Doug Adams, Dwain Hertz, Glenn Melancon, Persona Shoulders, TJ Boudreaux, Tony Leggio

LOCAL ADVERTISING sales@ambushpublishing.com NATIONAL ADVERTISING Rivendell Media (212) 242-6863 Ambush Magazine is published on alternate Tuesdays of each month by Ambush Publishing. Advertising, Copy & Photo DEADLINE is alternate Tuesdays, 5pm, prior to publication week, accepted via e-mail only: info@ambushpublishing.com. The Publisher assumes no responsibility for the claims of advertisers and has the right to reject any advertising. The inclusion of an individual’s name or photograph in this publication implies nothing about that individual’s sexual orientation. Letters, stories, etc. appearing herein are not necessarily the opinion of the Publisher or Staff of Ambush Magazine. ©1982-2019 AMBUSH PUBLISHING LLC, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NOTHING HEREIN MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE PUBLISHER INCLUDING AD LAYOUTS, MAPS & PHOTOS.

4 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


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NEWS & COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS Spotlight on Saints and Sinners LGBTQ Literary Festival Speakers The annual Saints and Sinners LGBTQ Literary Festival will take place in New Orleans March 27-29. In this series, we introduce you to some of the writers in the all-star lineup for #SAS20 held in the heart of the French Quarter. Ariadne Blayde is a playwright and novelist. Her plays have been finalists for The Arts and Letters Prize, the Tennessee Williams Playwriting Contest, Lark Playwrights Week, and more. Her play The Other Room won the VSA Playwright Discovery Award and has had more than 300 productions around the world. Ariadne lives in New Orleans and moonlights as a ghost tour guide in the French Quarter. “The Sultan’s Palace” is an excerpt from her (as yet) unpublished novel, Ash Tuesday. Jeff Mann has published five books of poetry, Bones Washed with Wine, On the Tongue, Ash, A Romantic Mann, and Rebels; three collections of essays, Edge, Binding the God, and Endangered Species; a book of poetry and memoir, Loving Mountains, Loving Men; six novels, Fog, Purgatory, Cub, Salvation, Country, and Insatiable; and three volumes of short fiction, A History of Barbed Wire, De-

Ariadne Blayde

Jeff Mann

Paula Martinac

sire and Devour, and Consent. With Julia Watts, he co-edited LGBTQ Fiction and Poetry from Appalachia. The winner of two Lambda Literary Awards, he teaches creative writing at Virginia Tech. Paula Martinac is the author of five novels, most recently Clio Rising (2019) and The Ada Decades, a final-

ist for the 2018 Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBTQ Fiction. Her debut, Out of Time, won the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction, and her second novel, Home Movies, was a Lammy finalist. She has also published three nonfiction books, including The Queerest Places: A Guide to Gay and Lesbian Historic Sites. Martinac teaches

fiction writing at UNC Charlotte and at the Charlotte Center for the Literary Arts. For registration information: Sasfest.org Ambush readers can register with a 20% discount by using the code Ambush20 when registering.

6 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


Obituary for Brian Craig Pettus Brian Craig Pettus, age 63, passed away on December 30, 2019 at his home in New Orleans. Brian, a native of Anniston, AL, was a resident of New Orleans since the late 1980s. He was employed by Hancock Whitney Bank and worked for many banking institutions in New Orleans in his 30 years of calling New Orleans home: Hibernia Bank, Crescent Bank & Trust, Capital One and Metairie Bank. Brian is the son of Fay Jean Zaner Pettus of Anniston and the late Lowery Van Buren. He is also survived by his sister, Deborah Crosson of Anniston and brother, Lowery Kieth Pettus (Pam) of Carrollton, GA and uncle to Meredith Leigh Crosson. Brian was a longtime friend of Rodney Thoulion locally, his neighborhood family on Bungalow Court and Mark Mooneyhan of Lancaster, PA.

A quiet and unassuming guy, Brian was much of a loner who enjoyed working on his house in the historic City Park Triangle. He was an avid football fan and always rooted for his Alabama teams despite the bitter LSU rivalry here. Those who knew Brian best knew him for his sweet, quiet demeanor, and his charming good looks. A funeral was held in Heflin, AL on January 6, 2020. A lover of nature and the outdoors Brian’s wish was to be cremated and his ashes scattered from Mount Cheaha in Alabama where he, his brother Kieth and many childhood friends spent much of their time. A memorial service will be held in New Orleans at a later date. Remembrance donations may be made to CrescentCare in New Orleans at www. crescentcare.org. Brian Pettus

The Krewe of King Arthur Celebrates “20 Years in Downtown New Orleans” The Krewe of King Arthur kicked off Carnival Season this weekend with its 43rd Bal Masque at the Hyatt Regency. More than 900 guests attended the formal event consisting of a presentation of the court, a seated three-course meal, and entertainment by the NOLA

Dukes. The Krewe of King Arthur was founded in 1977 by the current Captain, Philip Fricano, and paraded on the Westbank until 2000. In 2001, the parade moved to the current Uptown route. 1,700 riders will participate in

this parade, which is the largest parade on the first weekend of Mardi Gras, and 6th largest parade of Carnival. The Krewe of King Arthur prides itself on being one of the most diverse Krewes in the city with many riders coming from the LGBTQ Community,

as well as individuals from nearly every state, and several countries. The Krewe of King Arthur rolls on Sunday, February 16, 2020 at 1pm.

LGBT+ Archives Project Announces Open House The LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana is pleased to announce it will host an Open House on Wednesday, January 22, from 6:00pm to 8:00pm at 636 St. Ann Street. In addition to complimentary wine and hors d’ouvres, the Open House will feature a Timeline of New Orleans LGBT+ History as well as vintage photographs of Gay Carnival, Southern Decadence memorabilia, old issues of The Rooster, Impact, and Ambush magazines, and video footage of Just for the Record, an LGBT+ themed television talk show that aired on open access cable in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Attendees to the Open House will also have an opportunity to win two free nights at Harrah’s Hotel and a complimentary dinner for two at Harrah’s Steakhouse. Founded in 2013, the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana is a non-profit statewide collective that works to preserve and promote local LGBT+ history. Essentially, the Archives Project reaches out to the community and encourages individuals and organizations to donate their records and other items to an institution that can properly preserve them and make them accessible to the public and future researchers.

These records range from personal letters and journals to organizational records to Carnival Ball costumes to long-gone LGBT+ magazines and newspapers to posters for LGBT+ related events to video footage to bar memorabilia and much more. The LGBT+ Archives Project also boasts an active Oral History program. In addition to preserving primary historical sources, the LGBT+ Archives Project also hosts, sponsors, and funds events throughout Louisiana that chronicle queer history. The following institutions are collaborative partners with the LGBT+ Archives Project. The Archives Project has facilitated donations to each of these institutions: Amistad Research Center, Center for Louisiana Studies, Louisiana Research Collection (Tulane Univ.), Louisiana State Museum, Louisiana State University, Newcomb College Institute (Tulane Univ.), New Orleans Public Library, The Historic New Orleans Collection, and the T. Harry Williams Center for Oral History. The Open House on the 22nd is free and open to the public.

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 7


Southern Rep Theatre to Host Masquerade for Metal Health A FUNDRAISER TO BENEFIT LOYOLA CENTER FOR COUNSELING & EDUCATION AND CARE FOR CREATIVES NEW ORLEANS (January 7, 2020) – Southern Rep Theatre will host a Masquerade for Mental Health fundraiser on Tuesday, February 4th from 6:30 - 9:30 PM at 2541 Bayou Road in the Sanctuary Bar. The fundraiser will benefit the Loyola Center for Counseling & Education and Care for Creatives. Masquerade attendees can look forward to entertainment by New Orleans’ own Dat Band who play a variety of jazz, rock, funk, dance, and pop music. VIP guests receive a mask to wear and access to the VIP Healing Lounge for services including massage, reiki, and NADA ear acupuncture. Silent auction items, masks to wear, cuisine by Bogan’s King Que and beverages from the Sanctuary Bar will be available for purchase a la carte. No mask, no entry. Tickets are available for purchase

at www.SouthernRep.com/MasqueradeForMentalHealth or by calling the Southern Rep Box Office at 504-5226545. Southern Rep is located at 2541 Bayou Rd., New Orleans, LA, 70119. Loyola Center for Counseling & Education Loyola Center for Counseling and Education (LCCE) is committed to providing effective mental health counseling services on a sliding scale to underserved families, couples, groups, and individuals at every stage of life. In tandem with clinical services, LCCE supervises exemplary training for graduate students in Loyola University New Orleans’ Department of Counseling. Care for Creatives Care for Creatives extends Southern Rep Theatre’s mission to sustain and nurture those who encompass New Orleans’ cultural economy by collaborating with the New Orleans Musicians’ Clinic’s You Got This goal to promote optimal mental health self-

care amongst creatives. Together we strive to ensure the wellbeing of New Orleans’ creative community by providing accessible, effective outreach programs with measurable outcomes. Care for Creatives programs unite New Orleans’ creative community with mental health practitioners in a sanctuary space to promote resilience through activities centered around personal development, psychological education, and healing with drama, music, visual art, movement, guided relaxation, and other expressive forms. ABOUT SOUTHERN REP THEATRE Now in its 33rd Season, Southern Rep Theatre produces award-winning productions that are engaging, educational, and accessible for audiences of every socioeconomic background. Under the leadership of Producing Artistic Director Aimée Hayes, Southern Rep Theatre’s Mainstage Season work includes bold World and Regional Premieres as well as the best of Broadway, off-Broadway, and classic plays.

Southern Rep Theatre’s Lagniappe Series and “School to Stage Pipeline” of Arts Education Programs reflect the company’s ongoing commitment to new play development by providing resources for students and burgeoning theatre professionals and supporting a more diverse theatre community. A mainstay of New Orleans’ arts community, Southern Rep Theatre continues to build on its unique position as a sector leader, creative force, and important resource for contemporary American theatre. Season programming is supported in part by a Community Arts Grant made possible by the City of New Orleans; and by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts, Office of Cultural Development, Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism in cooperation with the Louisiana State Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a Federal agency.

New Orleans Pride: 10 Years and Beyond The New Orleans Pride Organization is celebrating its 10th Anniversary June 12-14 and has announced the Grand Marshals to lead the festivities.

Frank Perez / LGBT+ Archives Project: Frank Perez serves as President of the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana. He is a columnist for Am-

bush Magazine and has authored several books on New Orleans history, including In Exile (with Jeffrey Palmquist), Treasures of the Vieux Carre,

and Southern Decadence in New Orleans (with Howard P. Smith). He is also the co-editor of the anthology My Gay New Orleans: 28 Personal Rem-

8 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


iniscences on LGBT+ Life in New Orleans. The mission of the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana is to promote and encourage the protection and preservation of materials that chronicle the culture and history of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender community in Louisiana. Princesse Stephaney: Being the Grand Marshal for Pride should not only consist of being proud of who you are as a person but being equally proud of those who strive to be their own version of a rainbow. Danny Starnes aka

Princess Stephaney (bartender Mags 940) embodies that. She represents the community with grace and dignity, while acting as a mentor and friend to those questioning their own existence around her. She loves discussing the City’s uniqueness and helps blast misconceptions of those coming from a more conservative background and lifestyle. In the process she shatters unnecessary stereotypes which leads to a greater understanding of our gay community. Often seen supporting different Gay Krewes and charitable organizations throughout the City,

Stephaney selflessly offers her time through humorous prose and style at different fundraising events. Halloween New Orleans: For 35 years, Halloween New Orleans has been raising money for Project Lazarus, an assisted-living home for those with HIV/AIDS in New Orleans. HNO is run with an all-volunteer staff and all the money raised each year goes directly to Project Lazarus. The story of Halloween New Orleans is a story of the New Orleans gay community – a community coming together to share their love and sense of family, a

community celebrating its unique culture and love of showmanship, a community coming to the aid of its own in the dark days of the AIDS crisis, and a community triumphing over challenges with a resilient, joyful spirit. The Pride Organization is excited to have a diverse mix of Grand Marshals to celebrate 10 years of New Orleans Pride. For more information on events, fundraisers, and the Pride Organization, visit NewOrleansPrideFestival.com

Duaine Daniels Named Grand Reveler VI Duaine Daniels was named Grand Reveler VI at the Mystik Krewe de la Rue Royale Revelers annual Twelfth Night Party. Daniels is a well-loved and respected member of the New Orleans gay community, having been a firefighter, the founder of the Renegade Bears, a volunteer with the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana, a former bar owner, a former deputy sheriff, the coordinator of the annual Christmas gift drive for those living with HIV, and numerous other civic contributions and volunteer services. The party, which was held at the Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture, was the largest Twelfth Night Party the krewe has ever held with over 400 attendees. Krewe Captain Frank Perez said, “The party was a tremendous success and the venue was perfect.” Museum founder and owner Carl Mack agreed and has invit-

ed the krewe to hold its 2021 party at the museum again. The highlight of the evening was the arrival of the “League of Distinguished Revelers” and the revelation of the new Grand Reveler. Scantily clad show boys hoisted Mardi Gras flags along a velvet rope line as the Lord of Misrule, followed by two Swiss Guards and the Royal Standard Bearer, made their way to the stage. The Lord of Misrule then read the following proclamation: “WHEREAS THIS NIGHT MARKS THE BEGINNING OF THE CARNIVAL SEASON, AND WHEREAS THE REST OF THE COUNTRY (WHICH I UNDERSTAND, EXISTS SOMEWHERE ACROSS THE LAKE) IS SETTLING DOWN TO WORK AFTER THE HOLIDAY SEASON, AND WHEREAS NEW ORLEANS IS JUST GEARING UP FOR MARDI

GRAS, AND WHEREAS MARDI GRAS IS THE MOST AWESOME DAY IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD, I, THEREFORE, AS THE LORD OF MISRULE, DO HEREBY DECLARE IT’S CARNIVAL TIME! AND NOW, LADIES AND GENTLEMEN, THE ROYAL PROCESSION OF GRAND REVELERS AND THEIR LIEUTENANTS.” The previous Grand Revelers and their lieutenants then made their way to the stage. Former Grand Revelers include: Grand Reveler I, Jeffrey Palmquist; Grand Reveler II, Will Antill, the Financial District Reveler; Grand Reveler IV, Felicia Phillips, the Cheese Reveler, and Grand Reveler V, Frank Perez, the Faux Reveler (Grand Reveler III, Rip Naquin, The Award Winning Reveler, passed away in 2017). To the surprise and delight of almost all in attendance, the Lord of Misrule then

introduced Duaine Daniels as Grand Reveler VI and dubbed him “The PegLegged Reveler.” Daniels, a former firefighter, lost a leg in a work related incident. After some mutual roasting between the Lord of Misrule and the new Grand Reveler, the Lord of Misrule then asked Grand Revelers I and V to pin Daniels. This was followed by the traditional Meeting of the Courts of the Krewe de la Rue Royale Revelers and the Krewe of Queenateenas. Outgoing and incoming King Cake Queens Tiffany Alexander and Felicia Phillips and Queenateenas Captain Tomy Acosta proceeded to the stage for the toast. Unlike some Rue Royale Reveler parties in the past, this one did not end with emergency response vehicles; nonetheless, a grand, gay time was had by all as the Krewe kicked off the 2020 Carnival Season.

SNAP PAPARAZZI Out & About at Flip Side Mobile PHOTOS BY B SANDS

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 9


ARTS & CULTURE

Trodding the Boards Brian Sands bsnola2@hotmail.com

Curtain Up On 2020

With the Holidaze over and Carnival not quite yet fully kicking in, the first part of our annual theater season is upon us. The following are some shows that should get you in the mood for Mardi Gras...and some others for those who prefer some seriousness amidst the marvelous madness. Writer/director Nari Tomassetti’s 3 Ring Circus definitely falls in the former category. This combination of classic circus and a musical tells of a love story between a rotten egg and a bad peanut, whose romance can only blossom under the Big Top. Promising death-defying feats of jaw-dropping beauty and the most amazing human and “animalistic” acts in the South, you will be dazzled by cavorting clowns, rubberized heroines, and flying acrobats. With live music by Matt Bell and His Orchestra, 3 Ring Circus features Chris Wecklein and Allee Peck as the Conjoined Twins Ringmaster, Owen Ever as the Egg, Daisy Konfused as the Peanut as well as Elizabeth Seleen, Jillian Krasley, Riot Mueller, Sydney Calderon, Sarah Bobcat Inman, Hillary Neeb, and Laney GoGoGo. This extravaganza runs January 9-19 at the Old Iron Works (612 Piety St.). Another spectacular will take place on January 25 when Night of 1000 Stevies New Orleans returns to One Eyed Jacks (615 Toulouse St.) for its second annual incarnation here. Neither a contest nor a karaoke show, NOTS promises the ultimate Stevie Nicks celebration, a profusion of shawls, lace, baby’s breath, twirling, tambourines and performances by “Legends of Stevie Realness” from all over the country.

Samantha Beaulieu, Te’Era Coleman and Michael Pepp in Harry and the Thief (Photo by Spencer Gregory)

I described last year’s finale, the “Battle of A Thousand Stevies” to the tune of Stand Back, as “fabulous and surreal”. I expect nothing less this year. Tickets at https://www.ticketweb.com/event/the-jackie-factorypresents-night-one-eyed-jacks-tickets/10111775?pl=oneeyed Though it may not be as surreal as NOTS, Goat in the Road Productions’ The Uninvited should be pretty fabulous if their previous production, the award-winning The Stranger Disease, is any indication. This new, im-

mersive, original, historically-inspired performance takes place at and follows nine people who live in, or orbit around, the Gallier House (1132 Royal St.). Six years after architect James Gallier, Jr.’s death, his wife, two of his daughters, and household staff members Charity and Rene are preparing for an evening of entertaining when a mob of young men passes by, seeking to re-segregate the integrated school next door. News of the mob and an uninvited guest disrupt the household and expose the race & class divisions embedded in the characters’ lives. During the show, audience members will be able to explore this historic property as they follow characters and storylines of their choice. Running through February 14, The Uninvited is based on a real-life incident that took place in December 1874. The NOLA Project, likewise, continues its season with a history-inspired show but one that also tosses science fiction and comedic farce into a “genre blender.” In Sigrid Gilmer’s new play Harry and the Thief, Mimi’s cousin Jeremy has a PhD in physics, a brand-new time machine, and a plan-he’s sending Mimi, a professional thief, back to 1863 to alter history by providing Harriet Tubman with modern-day

guns. Lots and lots of guns. Sounds like a cross between Peabody’s Improbable History and a Quentin Tarantino movie. This regional premiere runs a mere 10 performances (Jan. 16-26) at the Contemporary Arts Center (900 Camp St.). See it now unless you too have a time machine. The late, great poet/playwright Ntozake (For Colored Girls...) Shange effected some time travel of her own with her adaptation of Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Her Children, in which she transposed the action from Europe during the Thirty Years War to the American Southwest of the Civil War. The play, which earned Shange an Obie Award and has never been published or performed since its premiere at New York’s Public Theater in 1980, asks “How do we survive, in the darkest of times, with our humanity intact?” Southern Rep Theatre (2541 Bayou Rd.) has acquired the script from the archives at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture (a division of NYC’s Public Library) for this highly anticipated production which runs from January 22 through February 3. Le Petit Theatre (616 St. Peter St.) travels even further back than the

10 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


1600s of the Thirty Years War with the regional premiere of Something Rotten! (Jan. 17–Feb. 2) Written by Baton Rouge natives and brothers Wayne & Karey Kirkpatrick (along with John O’Farrell), Rotten takes place in Elizabethan times as two brothers try to find theatrical success equal to their rival, Shakespeare; in so doing, they create the template for the modern musical comedy. Though it shares some of the same winking DNA of The Producers, Spamalot and The Book of Mormon, I enjoyed the 2015 Broadway production more than all three of those put together. Its two-and-a-half hours of blissfully sophisticated silliness delivers pure entertainment. The book is a sturdy, and hysterical, structure from which hangs all sorts of jokes, a little romance, and boisterous songs. In fact, starting with the opener Welcome to the Renaissance, I can’t remember the last musical that had one great production number after another after another. Sure, some of Rotten’s targets are easy ones, but I didn’t want this magnificent merriment to end. Speaking of modern musical comedies, Playmakers Theater in Covington (19106 Playmakers Rd.) presents the classic You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown from January 17 until February 2. Bossy Lucy is still hopelessly in love with piano prodigy Schroeder

who doesn’t give her the time of day. Perfectionist Sally mocks blanket-toting Linus. Snoopy is in the doghouse, and the “blockhead” himself, Charlie Brown, looks at life philosophically. Charles Schulz’s beloved characters haven’t been seen on stage here in a long time; happiness is having them back again. A more modern classic, Miss Saigon, lands at the Saenger Theatre (1111 Canal St.) January 21-26. Alain Boubil & Claude-Michel Schoenberg’s retelling of Puccini’s Madama Butterfly is set in the era of the Vietnam War and was the third of the British blockbusters to reach Broadway, after Les Miserables and Phantom of the Opera. Superior to Phantom’s pap, it lacks Les Miz’s narrative sweep and range of detailed characters. But enough good songs (Sun and Moon, Last Night of the World, and its 11 o’clock number, The American Dream) poke out from the otherwise vanilla score so that, combined with David Belasco’s still-absorbing tale and the passions that that ill-advised war continues to elicit, Miss Saigon makes for an eminently entertaining and thought-provoking evening of theater. Following Miss Saigon at the Saenger will be Charlie & the Chocolate Factory (Feb. 11-16). Though it ran only nine months on Broadway (it did have a much longer run in London),

April Louise and Brian Egland in The Uninvited (photo by Josh Brasted)

Roald Dahl’s winningly sinister and surreal children’s story with its “appropriately fanciful” (as per the NYTimes) sets and costumes might be just the thing to kick off the first weekend of parades. If you can visit Viet Nam and the “world of pure imagination” at the Saenger, the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra’s (LPO) evening of “Folk Rhythms” will take you to Spain, Arabia and Russia on January 30 at the Orpheum Theater (129 Roosevelt Way). Roberto Sierra’s Fandangos, with its zesty traditional Spanish dance

forms, opens the program. Following that, a lute-type, pear-shaped instrument, a staple of music from Persia to Andalusia, highlights Concerto for Oud written by and featuring Simon Shaheen, which combines Middle Eastern, Western, and jazz sounds. Sergei Rachmaninov’s Symphonic Dances concludes the evening, all under the baton of LPO Music Director and Principal Conductor Carlos Miguel Prieto. New Orleans Opera presents Joan of Arc by Rachmaninov’s countryman, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky.

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 11


This lesser-known 1881 opera by the gay Russian composer relates how a 17-year-old, humble peasant girl won the confidence of the future King Charles VII of France by revealing information only a messenger from God could know. Appointed leader of the French army, the Maid of Orleans lifted the siege of her namesake city and fearlessly won battle after battle to defeat the English. Her capture led to one of the most celebrated trials in history with its charges of witchcraft and heresy that resulted in her execution at the stake. Maestro Robert Lyall conducts the production, which stars mezzo-soprano Hilary Ginther as Joan of Arc, on February 7 and 9 at The Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts. Though it sometimes seems as far away as Russia or France, the North Shore is a pleasant car ride away and two classic 20th century plays can be enjoyed without even the need for a passport. 30 by Ninety Theatre in Mandeville (800 Lafayette St.) currently has Of Mice and Men (thru Jan. 26), an award-winning adaptation by John Steinbeck from his 1937 novel. This

story of two drifters, George and the dangerously powerful man-child Lennie, deals with dreams and delusions, loneliness, and the desperate need for companionship. At Slidell Little Theatre (2024 Nellie Dr.), the focus is on fun with Noel Coward’s Blithe Spirit (also thru Jan. 26), co-directed by Karen Shields & Kaula Johnson. When skeptical novelist Charles Condomine invites the eccentric, self-proclaimed medium Madame Arcati to his home for a séance, hoping to gather material for a new book, the hapless psychic accidentally summons the spirit of Condomine’s late wife Elvira. Condomine’s home and life are quickly turned into a shambles as his departed wife’s ghost torments both the writer and his new bride, Ruth. Hilarity ensues. Another famed British work is being done at JPAS’ Jefferson Performing Arts Center in Metairie (6400 Airline Dr.). Agatha Christie’s mystery The Mousetrap (Jan. 31-Feb. 9) is the world’s longest-running play; I saw the original West End production, which continues to this day, when I was 13. All you need to know is that a group of strangers is stranded in a boardinghouse during a snow storm,

THE ROCKFORD FILES

It’s good to be King. Ryan Rockford RyanRockfordNYC@gmail.com I never much cared for homework when I was a kid. I’m pretty sure I wasn’t the only one. There were so many other things I would have rather been doing. And you might be surprised to find out just how much you can accomplish when you should be doing something else. There are few to choose from, but one of my most memorable homework assignments came from Mrs. Green’s English class. Each student was to look up the origin and meaning of their first name. I was intrigued. I had never

given any thought to where the name ‘Ryan’ might have originated, or had any idea as to what it may have meant. Back then, the assignment was pretty straightforward and not nearly as complicated as it might be in today’s classroom. By today’s standards, the names of the students in my classroom were rather bland. We had a Billy, two annoying girls named Melissa, a Sally, a Ronnie, three Davids and a Michael or two. In the early ‘70’s, the name Ryan was one of the more unusual ones.

H N S A R C A E RA T EX

one of whom is a murderer and everyone is a suspect. I won’t say anything more, unlike a friend of mine who revealed the ending to me before I saw the show...and for which I have never forgiven him. If you’re in Metairie on January 18, head over to Andrea’s (3100 19th St.) for a few laffs and three hours of tuneful jubilation with the charmingly impish “Uncle” Wayne Daigrepont. If you don’t, you may never forgive yourself. To get you into the naughty Mardi Gras spirit, at Westwego Performing Arts Theatre (177A Sala Ave.), you can catch JPAS’ presentation of Viagara Falls (Jan. 17-Feb. 9) which serves up two old buddies, a call girl, and a little blue pill. More seriously, this comedy by Joao Machado and Lou Cutell examines the importance of friendships, the realization that emotions don’t diminish with age, and the idea that feeling wanted can be the difference between living and just existing. And if Viagara Falls doesn’t get you into the mood for Carnival, on January 17, Daniel Nardicio’s 2nd Mr. Nude Orleans Pageant certainly will. From the people who brought you Southern Decadence’s Bette Bathhouse and Beyond comes the deep-South’s only all-male nude beau-

ty pageant at the AllWays Lounge (2240 St. Claude Ave.). Contestants get a chance to show off their wares in a swimsuit competition, a strip-off, a hilarious Q’n’A portion, and the last part, the big reveal. The winner takes home $300 and the chance to reign as Mr. Nude Orleans. “They’ll be opening malls in Natchitoches,” laughs Nardicio. So far there are six contestants, but that could change as folks step up to the plate (bat in hand, of course) or chicken out. All males are invited to compete. Think ya got what it takes? Sign up by emailing Daniel at daniel@ dworld.us. You can even join the contestant pool as late as 12am on the night of the contest which will begin at 1am. Nardicio expects that “the competition will be stiff.” Tickets are available at https://www.brownpapertickets. com/event/4423567

That was then. Now, parents have become much more creative in naming their children, especially celebrities. I don’t know how much background information Bronx Mowgli (Ashlee Simpson’s son), or Jermajesty (Jermaine Jackson’s son) are going to find on Google. I imagine that Bob Geldof’s daughter Fifi Trixibelle and Frank Zappa’s daughter Diva Thin Muffin could keep them company while they wait on Rob Morrow’s child, named Tu – who is doomed to a life of procrastination. “Not today, Tu Morrow”. Poor thing. Unimpressed with anything this world had to offer, Steven Spielberg chose to invent a word, naming his daughter Destry. Like it or not, it does however work in The Name Game, so who are we to judge? (You’re singing it right now, aren’t you? ) Celebrities are not alone in con-

demning their children to years of adolescent schoolyard banter. Proof of some parents’ cruel sense of humor can be found within recent birth registries, which document the increased popularity of names like: Tesla, Fanta, Baretta, and ESPN. Maybe it’s me, but any parent who names their child ESPN should have the word ASSHOLE stamped on their driver’s license. In contrast, a medal of some sort should be bestowed upon the dad who stepped up and delivered his own child when his wife went into labor and was forced to give birth on the LA expressway in the back seat of their Mazda. The result was a healthy baby boy named Carson. True story. The school bell rang and another English class with Ms. Green came to an end. After class that day, I did a very unusual thing, something most students today cannot comprehend - I went to a library. Not only that, I utilized the archaic Dewey Decimal system to track down the information I needed. Today, I’d pay good money to watch a millennial get tossed into a public library, without a cell phone and forced to find a book’s Dewey call number. As a TV show, it would be comedy gold for the over-40 demographic. In the library, it wasn’t long before I discovered what I had felt all of my life: I was royalty. There it was in black and white: “Ryan is a male name of Irish origin and means, ‘little king’.” My first thought was, “Duh.” Royalty was in my DNA from the start, and in only a few short

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Afterwards there’ll be a huge dance party with music by legendary DJ Johnny Dynell. Sounds like nobody will go home a loser. Happy Mardi Gras! Please send press releases and notices of your upcoming shows to Brian Sands at bsnola2@hotmail.com.

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years this ‘little king’ would mature into a big queen. I knew I was superior to those two Melissa cunts and to that kid who sat in the back and smelled like sausage, and now I had proof! Sadly, not many people were as impressed with my ‘Highness’ as I was. Especially my family. I pulled the ‘little king’ card on my father once: “In this kingdom, he who brings home the gold makes the rules,” he said. “I bring home gold. How about you?” he asked, before ending the discussion with, “No gold? No rules.” But, if I WAS king? At the moment, I happen to be wearing an ermine jockstrap and feeling rather royal. I’m also four beers into a six-pack and feeling no pain, so let’s run with it. If I were king… Every grocery store would have a designated “I have my shit together” checkout lane. That means I’m not on my phone, or in conversation. My wallet is out, my music isn’t playing through my headphones. I’m listening to the cashier, anticipating the total cost and I am conscious that at some point I will have to pay for my items and carry them out of the establishment. If you’re one of those idiots who stare into space until all of your items are bagged before you realize that you have to pay and start digging in your purse, can’t find your wallet, or some other bullshit, you will be fined a ‘Dipshit’ tax. But not before you are escorted by security back to the end of the line where you will wait, again, and have time to gather your thoughts and get your shit together. By law, every citizen over 18 will serve a minimum of one year working in the service industry. Anyone who’s worked as a waiter, bartender, hotel concierge, etc. can tell you that the general public is not a rational body of people. By and large, people are jerks. If everyone had the experience of having to wait or serve versions of themselves, there might be a little less snapping for the busboy and a little more respect for the person pouring their drink, accommodating their ridiculous substitutions or sifting the sugar on their gluten-free waffles. Within nightclubs, Fruit Flies (girls who insist on accompanying their gay friends out to gay clubs) must be tethered to their hosting Fruit by 2am. We’ve all seen this scenario: It’s three-thirty in the morning and some poor intoxicated girl, looking several moments past her glamour, has been abandoned and left to stumble through the crowds in search of her ride home. Meanwhile, her ‘bestie’ is sucking off the DJ or getting plowed in a bathroom stall, doing lines of coke on the toilet roll dispenser. Fruits, mind your Flies, or be swatted from the guest list. Substantial resources will be devoted to the research of a pill capable of dissolving the stick that is stuck up www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 13


SNAP PAPARAZZI Out & About with Frank AT THE RUE ROYALE REVELERS 12TH NIGHT PARTY | PHOTOS BY CHARLES PIZZO

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SNAP PAPARAZZI Out & About with Frank AT THE RUE ROYALE REVELERS 12TH NIGHT PARTY | PHOTOS BY CHARLES PIZZO

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the asses of most gay men. A common condition causing those affected to exhibit extreme rudeness in support of an unsubstantiated ego. It’s an epidemic that needs to be eradicated. Men with the most severe cases lack the capacity to understand that sometimes a “hello” is just a “hello” and not a sexual invitation. Our ancestors and relics like myself call it being friendly. But that concept requires a personality, which is usually lacking among the dicks with sticks. Crocs and flip-flops are forbidden to be used as casual daywear, except within 100 feet of swimming pools or other bodies of water used for recreational purposes. If your toes look like they could snatch salmon out of a stream, they belong locked away in a closed-toe shoe, not picking up sidewalk crud and shuffling through Saks

Fifth Avenue. No more speakerphone for pedestrians. The use of speakerphone will be limited to transit operators only. Broadcasting your life’s latest drama or family argument is not a treat for those of us standing in line, or at the movies, or sitting on the train. In fact, we don’t give a flying fuck about listening to you argue with customer service. Not in my kingdom. I’ve noticed that as King, what I am concerned with most is improving my kingdom’s consideration of others. Our lack of consideration for others is a phenomenon I cannot wrap my head around. Most of us spend our lives in the trenches, under the thumb of The Man, forced to live in a society of miserable, self-serving curmudgeons. And ironically, with so much technology at our fingertips, we seem to have lost

COMMUNITY VOICE

The 2010s: A Decade in Review Jim Meadows Executive Director, NOAGE info@noagenola.org If you’re anything like me, it probably seems that the past decade went by fairly quickly. Wasn’t it only yesterday that we were ringing in 2010? (OK, honestly? I don’t remember much about that year at all. The year 2000 definitely made a deeper impression.) In any case, there have been some

pretty monumental changes for the LGBT community in the last ten years. Here are just some of them. Policy and Law The first major victory for LGBT people in the 2010s was the Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Repeal Act of 2010. The full repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,”

touch with, well, touch. Advancements in AI are rapidly erasing the value of being human. It has certainly tainted and diminished our interpersonal skills. It’s harder than ever for people to make friends because we don’t know how. Mankind seems to be regressing back to the age when grunts and gestures served as communication. Sometimes I’ll watch the high school students as they leave class and make their way down the street, or watch the interaction of strangers at rush hour. When did it become cool to have no manners and act like an asshole? If I were king, I would remind my kingdom that we are all in this world together. We only have each other and we will never experience this life, in this way, and with these people ever again. Why waste what little time we have only being concerned with ourselves?

Life is so much more fulfilling when it’s shared with others. To share, we have to connect and to connect, we have to take risks and perhaps feel vulnerable. Tomorrow is promised to no one. Connect with people and find out what’s possible. You might be surprised to discover what amazing things can happen just by holding the door open for someone, practicing a random act of kindness, looking a person in the eye or being sincere when you say ‘Thank you’. That’s how you connect with the universe and with each other. If you’re reading this, welcome to my Kingdom. The gates are always open and everyone is welcomed. Let 2020 be a year of connection and possibility.

(a policy, enacted in 1993, that allowed gay people to serve in the military only if they kept their sexual orientation secret) was implemented in September of 2011. Marriage equality now seems to be the most significant legal victory we’ve had in recent years, or possibly ever. Given the rampant discrimination against LGBT people in more critical areas (housing, employment, etc.), few activists considered it to be a top priority. Indeed, a fair proportion of LGBT people viewed – and still view – the drive for marriage equality as an attempt to conform to heterocentric standards. And yet…many of us wanted to marry the person we loved. As a number of state Supreme Courts determined that denying same-sex marriage was against their constitutions, other state supreme courts ruled otherwise, so for a while, the right to marriage for gays in the United States depended on which state you lived in. It became inevitable that the Supreme Court would have to determine the ultimate fate of marriage equality. In 2013, in the case of United States v. Windsor, the Supreme Court ruled that Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) was unconstitutional. DOMA was a law that defined marriage (for federal purposes) as between a man and a woman. With the Windsor ruling, gay couples who had been married in states with legalized same-sex marriage began to enjoy the federal rights, benefits, and privileges of other married couples. Two years later, on June 26, 2015, the Supreme Court gave their ruling on the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, finding that marriage is a fundamental right, one that would be guaranteed to same-sex couples in every state. Increased Visibility There was a time, not so very long ago, when you’d have been hardpressed to name more than a few – if any – major public figures who were truly out of the closet. That began to

change, as I remember it, around the mid-1990s with celebrities like Melissa Etheridge and Ellen DeGeneres. It became more common in the 2000s, but I feel safe in saying that probably more public figures have come out of the closet in the last ten years than in every previous decade of human history combined. 20 years ago, if a celebrity came out as gay, you’d see their face on the cover of Time. Nowadays, they’d be lucky to have it noted on Page Six. Much more surprising than pop culture celebrities outing themselves has been the ever-increasing number of politicians who are out of the closet…and getting elected. This was unheard of when I was growing up. But in the “Rainbow Wave” of the 2018 midterm elections, at least 399 openly LGBT people ran for office, at all levels of government, and 164 of them won. Now we even have a major candidate for the office of President of the United States who is openly gay. Equally astounding, in my opinion, has been the tremendous shifts in the ways we think about gender, and the rise of transgender rights. In 2007, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC, the United States’ largest LGBT advocacy and lobbying group) was willing to support the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA, which still hasn’t been passed), even though it excluded protections for transgender people. Such a decision would be unthinkable for any major LGBT organization today. (In the late 1990s, PFLAG became the first national organization to adopt a transgender-inclusive policy.) In the past decade, transgender people became more visible than at any time in human history. As trans visibility grew, various institutions also began to change. In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) removed the term, “gender identity disorder,” from its fifth edition, replacing it with “gen-

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der dysphoria,” nothing that “gender nonconformity is not in itself a mental disorder.” Other groups, organizations, and religious denominations (e.g. Girl Scouts of America, the Episcopal Church, etc.) also became more affirming for trans, gender nonconforming, and non-binary people in the past decade. HIV In 2012, the FDA approved the first drug for reducing the risk of contracting HIV. Truvada prevents the transmission of HIV, and researchers are working to find new HIV prevention tools that do not require taking a pill every day. Meanwhile, the U=U campaign has been educating people on the fact that people with undetectable viral loads cannot transmit the HIV virus, which has gone a long way towards destigmatizing people who are

living with HIV. New Orleans New Orleans’s LGBT Community has seen a good deal of change as well. The last lesbian bar in town, Rubyfruit Jungle, closed in 2012. Meanwhile, a long list of LGBT organizations and groups have launched here (BreakOUT!, NOAGE, Stonewall Sports, the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana, Last Call, to name just a few). And in 2019, New Orleans citizens voted to amend the city’s charter to include a Human Rights Commission, with greater power to investigate complaints of discrimination by businesses in the city than previous protections. Backlash On June 12, 2016, 49 people were gunned down at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando. It was the largest

AMERICAN THINGS

A Look at MLK Day Lynn Stevens

Martin Luther King Jr. Day was originally promoted by labor unions and, shortly after the civil rights leader’s death, it was brought to Congress for a vote. President Ronald Reagan signed the ensuing bill and it became law in

1983. Some states, however, refused to recognize the holiday or celebrate it. It was finally acknowledged by all 50 states for the first time in 2000. Assumptions can be made as to why it took so long for that to happen; they shouldn’t be too hard to figure out.

mass-murder of LGBT people in United States history. According to the most recent Hate Crime Statistics Report by the FBI, hate crimes against lesbian, gay, and bisexual people increased almost six percent from 2017 to 2018 (the most recent year with available data). Hate crimes against transgender people increased by 41 percent in the same time period. In 2017, President Trump tweeted that he would ban transgender people from the military again, a major change from just a year earlier, when President Obama announced a policy which would let trans people serve openly. As of today, no openly trans people can join the U.S. military. The Future Since the 1970s, lawmakers and activists have been working to include LGBT people in the Civil Rights Act of

1964. The Equality Act of 2019 was passed by the House of Representatives in March of last year, but it has yet to pass the Senate. If passed, it would “prohibit discrimination on the basis of the sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition of an individual, as well as because of sex-based stereotypes.” This would mean an end to discrimination against LGBT people in areas like housing, employment, and public accommodations, across the United States. Given the current makeup of the Senate, it’s easy to think to yourself, “yeah, that’s not going to happen.” Well, maybe not this year. But you never know. If the 2010s have taught us anything, it’s that things can change a lot quicker than we thought.

Whatever the reasons, the work Dr. King and others did in their lifetimes is all the more necessary to remember now. MLK Day is not just a day to celebrate the important steps Dr. King himself took because he did not take them alone. He stood as the figurehead of a movement with many people behind the scenes organizing and planning. One of those people was Bayard Rustin. Pacifist, Socialist, Quaker, Activist, Black, Gay – it is not generally an ad-

visable task to encapsulate a human life in such labels. Bayard Rustin, however, had the qualities that make his life inspiring, in part, because of them. Spit and you’ll hit a political article saying we are a divided nation, split between two poles with each side refusing to bend. With the increased influence of the far right wing, it seems like we are living in a political powder keg ready to explode into chaos and brutality. While they might be disappointed in our lack of progress, King and Rus-

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tin, I believe, would see just another challenge, a hurdle to be surmounted, non-violently, and with open ears. One could write, “Bayard Rustin organized the March on Washington where Dr. King gave his ‘I Have a Dream’ speech,” and call it a day. What else needs to be said? Isn’t that enough organizing for a lifetime? Prior to the entrance of America into World War II, Rustin participated in the planning of a march in Washington, DC, to protest the exclusion of black Americans in the defense industry. President Roosevelt caught wind of this and not wishing to deal with whatever this march could turn into, perhaps recalling the debacle of the Bonus Army protests in ‘32, reversed his position. Rustin joined a pacifist group and began speaking out publicly against segregation. He was arrested for “failing to appear” at the draft board and “refusing alternate service as a conscientious objector.” He served more than two years in prison because of this and ended in a high security facility after pissing off the people in charge with his protests and out-of-the-closet lifestyle. After his release, he traveled to India to continue studying non-violence. When he returned to the US he wrote, “We need in every community a group of angelic troublemakers, the only weapon we have is our bodies, and we need to tuck them in places so wheels

don’t turn.” In 1956, Rustin went to Birmingham to meet and help with Dr. King’s bus boycott. Rustin introduced Dr. King to Gandhi’s teachings of non-violent protest. Later, he also helped King establish the South Christian Leadership Conference. The SCLC, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica, was, “established by the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., and his followers in 1957 to coordinate and assist local organizations working for the full equality of African Americans in all aspects of American life.” Rustin was a dangerous man at the time. J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI, for one, had been keeping an eye on Rustin for more than a decade at this point. Rustin was openly gay and a socialist during the repressed Cold War era. King, for his part, was the powerful face of the Civil Rights movement. Some were scared of the effect these two men could have on society, white society, polite society, straight society, so a wedge was placed between them. Rustin had been arrested in California in 1953 when he was found having sex with two men in a car and served 60 days in jail. Shortly before a march that he and King were planning, there were threats that, if the protest occurred, a story would find its way into the papers that Rustin and King were

Open House Wednesday, January 22 6:00pm - 8:00pm 636 St. Ann Street Exhibit includes a Timeline of Local LGBT+ History, Southern Decadence Memorabilia, "Just for the Record" video footage, old Gay Carnival photos, early Gay Appreciation Awards, and old issues of Impact, The Rooster, and Ambush from the 1980s. Enter for a chance to win two free nights at Harrah's Hotel and a complimentary dinner for two at The Steakhouse. Open House will feature complimentary wine and hors d'ouvres

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“gay lovers”, which, it appears, was never actually the case. Rustin was the “chief organizer” of the aforementioned March on Washington in which King played a most important part, but the men would never work together again publicly. Some say King had to be persuaded to turn his back on Rustin. Some say King knew he had to and did what was necessary for the so-called larger good of the movement which Rus-

tin understood was more important than his pride. Rustin chose to resign from the SCLC and continued his fight alongside, but not with, Dr. King. In 1970’s and ‘80’s,. Rustin shifted his focus from black rights to gay rights. He once remarked, “Twenty-five, 30 years ago, the barometer of human rights in the United States were black people. That is no longer true. The barometer for judging the character of people in regard to human rights

is now those who consider themselves gay, homosexual, lesbian.” Rustin saw it as a moral imperative to be out. He lived at a time when it could and did lead to serious consequences. However, he knew from a young age that he had to be honest about himself and to stand as an example to those who felt they didn’t have the voice when he knew he did. Rustin died in 1987, survived by his partner Walter Naegle who has

served as the executive director of the Bayard Rustin Fund which is committed to preserving Rustin’s legacy. We’re lucky to have had people of such caliber to look to as examples. Dr. King, for one, had his faults but as an old song goes, “Heroes don’t have to be role models.” Heroes are a marker we hold ourselves to and the public work of Bayard Rustin and Dr. King is a marker well worth aspiring to.

THE HERE AND THE NOW Create your Path Through Words to Live By Catherine Roland catherineroland12@gmail.com

When I was an undergraduate English major, some friends and I would play a game to help us recall words to broaden our vocabulary. Exciting, right? Ok, I’ll admit I might have been a bit of a nerd, but I loved words, writing and creating poems & stories. While I’ve never really put much stock into New Year’s resolutions, I do enjoy picking a group of words and building a conceptual picture of moving forward at any given time. This year, our new 2020 decade, seems like just the time for some positivity in moving forward and choosing words to live by. Take a letter of the alphabet that allows you to think of specific words that are meaningful to you. I chose the letter “C”, the first letter of many words that can be useful in building a picture of how you’d like to proceed through the future, a kind of verbal tower that houses your “Words to Live By”. Why spend time doing this, you might ask? It can be seen as a game to pass the time, but more importantly, it can enable us to consider powerful words and feelings upon which to build a new foundation, or construct a new set of goals as we contemplate the words. Quickly, think of words that begin with “C” that are positive, and could be life-giving. How many can you name, and how might they be important as we embark on the 2020 journey? Perhaps some of these below would appeal to you. 1. Champion. Be a champion for an individual or for a cause, or hope for someone to be your champion, supportive and uplifting. 2. Celebrate. Embrace your good heart, your good deeds, and your substance, and celebrate them all. 3. Confess. Your confession of deep desires and long-time dreams can allow them to manifest over time. Once confessed, even if just to yourself, your inner wants become more achievable. And they can be very achievable! 4. Conjure. Imagine how you’d like some situation to go. This positive conjuring can be empowering.

5. Care. “Take care”, you may say to a friend as they leave, and that’s a sentiment you can say to yourself as a calming salve. Caring for others is vital for our own self-worth and our positive mental and emotional health. Your heart can do many things, one of which is to reach out and express that you care. 6. Calm. Staying calm can be powerful, distinctive, and strategic. If we proceed with a calm demeanor there may be no limit to our choices. A calm presence is usually appreciated, and can gain much ground. Learn to really breathe. 7. Connive. Learn how to spot a conniving individual, one who searches for your weak spots and vulnerabilities. Keep those individuals at arm’s length. 8. Cease. When negative or hateful messages enter your mind, use a mind-strength exercise, say “Cease”, and continue to whisper that word until you stop. Reframe that negativity to a more positive outlook so as to help yourself to shape your current and future attitude. 9. Centered. To be centered in your life is a gift, one that can be given to yourself. If you can find balance, some sort of wholeness in daily routine, you will become more centered. A positive self-concept, renewed self-confidence and lust for life, and a sense of well-being can all be linked to a feeling of centeredness. Once you are feeling centered, you will be able to model that gift and how to achieve it. 10. Captivate. Use your charm! Captivate those around you. Everyone has it, we just don’t always know it. Sometimes being captivating can be as simple as telling the truth to a person who has straight out asked you for your opinion. It can be a level of honesty and caring that simply cannot be denied. Stun those around you with your sense of style, your creativity, your sense of SELF! 11. Control. The concept of control can appear complicated. We often think of a person who wants his or her

own way and verbalizes that, as someone with “control issues” which is taken in a negative tone. But control of your own behavior, addictions, your life plan, or your future is a necessary part of your life satisfaction. You do have control of most decisions, although at times, that control isn’t quite so clear. It takes strength to believe in your own ability to control your life. It can also be quite circular, the toss-up between taking control of your own life and behavior, as opposed to the energy spent attempting to control others. Concentrate on YOU! 12. Congratulate. Do you usually

acknowledge when someone achieves a goal, like a graduation, a new job, or has made a beautiful dinner? Congratulating individuals you know, using the word, is important. “Congratulations” is a powerful, positive word that we all understand. I fear we simply don’t congratulate folks enough! 13. Connect. There are so many ways to connect with others in our LGBTQ+ community, and in our world. Connections can be intensely personal, as we are with our partners and lovers; connections can also be fleeting, perhaps occurring only on the basis of someone attending a monthly potluck,

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a chorus rehearsal, or a drag show downtown. It’s still a connection, and each holds potential for going a little deeper, and growing a little stronger over time. Gift yourself with new connections and new outreach. 14. Create. Do you enjoy doing things in an artistic way, like acting, painting, writing, photography, or designing fabric? You’re in the right place, being in the New Orleans area, if you have any interest in such creative endeavors. But there are other ways to be creative with your life. If you have a friend group you typically attend activities with, you could open it up, include a few others, therefore creating

an entirely new energy for the group. For those who are a large part of the French Quarter scene, imagine reaching out to folks who seldom come to the Quarter, those who don’t frequent bars that hold shows and serve the community as gathering places. Broaden the scope of the activities to be more inclusive. Publicize it, issue invitations, use your charm, captivate! 15. Cats. I have to save this as the last word. Cats are calming, charming, and demand to control their situation. They create havoc at times, and help you to be centered at other times. The warmth and love coming from cats, if you allow it, can change your life, make

you softer and instill a feeling of being loved, unconditionally. There are literally medicinal qualities that come from pets, and cats are spiritual, independent, and intuitive – fur balls of love and play. This new decade has so much potential. We can best gain control of our lives if we concentrate on the issues before us, politically, socially and environmentally. If I think about it too long, read too much in detail on a daily basis, it can engender a feeling of helplessness. That feeling, however, quickly transforms into a quest for change. Words are power, language is the pathway to influence. Take a chance,

don’t miss an opportunity to try out a few concepts listed here. Reach out, congratulate yourself when you do, and practice inclusion, openness and a real sense of yourself. Dr. Catherine Roland, LPC, is a therapist in private practice, specializing in our LGBTQ+ community for 25 years. Catherine is a member of the Board of Directors of both CrescentCare-NO/AIDS Task Force, and NOAGE - New Orleans Advocates for LGBTQ+ Elders.

BOOK REVIEW

Buying Gay: How Physique Entrepreneurs Sparked a Movement Frank Perez frankearlperez@gmail.com Buying Gay: How Physique Entrepreneurs Sparked a Movement. David K. Johnson. Columbia University Press, 2019. 320 pages. $32.00. Before Grindr and Growler and the internet, before X-Tube and a thousand other porn sites, before Blue Rays and DVDs and VHS tapes, before roadside adult “bookstores” and before magazines like Obsession and Blueboy, there were the physique magazines.

These magazines featured well chiseled male bodies in tiny briefs in wrestling poses or alone striking poses that showed off their muscles. The thinly veiled homoeroticism of it all was the closest thing to gay porn our forebears could get their hands on. The history of these physique periodicals has largely been neglected by scholars, which is why David K. Johnson’s new book, Buying Gay: How Physique Entrepreneurs Sparked a

Movement, is so important. As the title suggests, Johnson argues that the men who published and consumed these magazines were instrumental in the early homophile movement of the 1950s. In 1951, a new type of publication appeared on newsstands―the physique magazine produced by and for gay men. For many men growing up in the 1950s and 1960s, these magazines and their images and illustrations

of nearly naked men, as well as articles, letters from readers, and advertisements, served as an initiation into gay culture. The publishers behind them were part of a wider world of “physique entrepreneurs”: men as well as women who ran photography studios, mail-order catalogs, pen-pal services, book clubs, and niche advertising for gay audiences. Such businesses have often been seen as peripheral to the gay political movement. In this book,

20 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


Johnson, an associate professor of history at the University of South Florida, shows how gay commerce was not a byproduct but rather an important catalyst for the gay rights movement. Offering a vivid look into the lives of physique entrepreneurs & their customers, and presenting a wealth of illustrations, Buying Gay explores the connections―and tensions―between the market and the movement. With circulation rates many times higher

than the openly political “homophile” magazines, physique magazines were the largest gay media outlets of their time. This network of producers and consumers helped foster a gay community and upend censorship laws, paving the way for open expression. Physique entrepreneurs were at the center of legal struggles, especially against the U.S. Post Office, including the court victory that allowed full-frontal male nudity and open homoeroticism.

Buying Gay reconceives the history of the gay rights movement and shows how consumer culture helped create community and a site for resistance. The only disappointment in the book (and this is a minor point) was the lack of any information on New Orleans’ own Pops Whitesell, the photographer who was a part of the French Quarter Renaissance in the 1920s and who in later years photographed models for a physique magazine. But oth-

erwise, Buying Gay is an imminently interesting read and fills a gap in the historical record of the pre-Stonewall gay liberation movement. David K. Johnson is also the author of The Lavender Scare: The Cold War Persecution of Gays and Lesbians in the Federal Government (2004), which was made into an award-winning documentary.

SNAP PAPARAZZI Out & About with King Arthur PHOTOS PROVIDED BY KING ARTHUR

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A COMMUNITY WITHIN COMMUNITIES

Navigating a World, Social, and Spiritual Landscape The Very Rev. Bill Terry+ Rector St Anna’s Episcopal Church fr.bill@stannanola.org It’s 2020 and the Saints are NOT going to the Super Bowl. It is now just past the Feast of the Epiphany and Mardi Gras is upon us. The world, as our news reports show us, seems to be getting more polarized and divided. The social discourse is virulent and getting more so. Apart from the various wars and conflicts we are involved in,whether geopolitical or economic, we also seem to be engaged in social wars. “Assault, harassment and vandalism against Jews remain at near-historic levels in the U.S. The deadly attacks in synagogues in Pittsburgh and Poway have made American Jews feel more vulnerable than they have felt in decades.” -- Anti-Defamation League Not only Jews but members of the LGBTQ+ community. “The number of Americans 18 to 34 who are comfortable interacting with LGBTQ people slipped from 53% in 2017 to 45% in 2018 – the only age group to show a decline, according to the annual Accelerating Acceptance report. And that is down from 63% in 2016.” USA Today Religious frameworks are also

starting to show some wear as well. The Pope offers hope and kindness yet the Curia has not changed doctrine. Bishops in South America are rebelling and calling for the ordination of women. The Roman Church is rocked. Domestically Christianity Today a historically Evangelical news source called for the removal of Trump from office. “Consider what an unbelieving world will say if you continue to brush off Mr. Trump’s immoral words and behavior in the cause of political expediency...” Christianity Today It also appears that in some fashion the United Methodist Church will split, intentionally, over the issue of LGBTQ+ inclusion. They have been wrestling with this topic for quite some time as have other denominations with varying outcomes. Yet in our own community such things seem to subside, hiding below the surface of our social agenda in New Orleans and, perhaps, the region. We celebrate, as we should, with gusto our common lives. I have had the privilege of engaging with and becoming educated by several LGBTQ+ organizations including social clubs based on

preferences, social clubs based on the Mardi Gras cycle (our great Krewes) as well as by attending several drag shows and becoming well aware of the performance requirements and stresses that come from such a life. I have been blessed. I, and several of my colleagues, have enjoyed great times in local bars, clubs, and pubs. In at least a few of those spots the bartenders or customers know us by name, and yes by cocktail, and I am not sure if that is a great thing. Just kidding--it is a GREAT THING. Navigating faith, spirituality, or religion is fraught with all manner of psychic peril and payoffs. This just might be the time to try to begin navigating those seas again. Yet, such a mission can be daunting. I once met a man who is very popular in the community. We ran into each other on several social occasions. Just call me a party animal because we saw each other a lot. Each time we’d do this verbal dance. “Hey Father why not join me at my table for a drink?” I would reply with a smile, “Sure if you join me at my house and my table for a drink.” It was all in good fun. But, one day he did come to “my house”, the church, to talk about his faith. He had fond memories of a childhood in church. He’d sing and was loved. Then, as he grew older something changed. I believe that when he came into his own and maybe when he came out he (1) felt rejected and (2) saw an abundance of hypocrisy in that little church. He became bitter and left never to return. Yet, he sat there telling me how he was looking for that same warm faith again. Despite my best efforts to point toward churches that are not only safe, but lack hypocrisy, at least as much as any human institution can, he would push back. Despite my best efforts to point toward real communities of faith that walk the talk he pushed back. He wanted his childhood faith without risk and without even a low-key commitment. I pray daily that he’ll give it a shot. He’s been through enough. I hope that he finds a home that will unleash that spiritual being inside and give him a loving place to be. I am friends with another delightful man whom I dearly care for; he is such a sweet fellow. He was caught up in an evangelical church. He sang in that church and sang his heart out. His story was that when he sang, he felt his heart in union with God. That is

a feeling one cannot understand until you experience it; like a great cocktail, once you’ve tried it, you want more. Like so many others, however, when he came out, he was invited to leave. That kind of rejection does permanent damage. He is surrounded by folks who do attend a loving accepting church that has no barriers to care and affection. Yet despite the encouragement of not only myself but others, he just cannot bring himself to “taste and see.” Others are simply so shut down by “religion” that they don’t even want to go there. I understand that. If all I saw was a bigoted, misogynistic, homophobic, bible-thumping, blaring, racist excuse for religion I’d run away too. Navigation requires skill, insight, and discernment. By definition, it requires that a course be set and that rocks and shoals be marked and steered clear of. When one discerns a clear passage, however, the benefits are profound. No one should be put into a box labeled “those queers.” You are you and that is exceptional. In the same way “religion” has exceptional benefits and wonderful gifts to offer, but you need to discern and learn to trust even just a little bit. If it is not comfortable or if it seems off, steer clear. But if you don’t navigate, you go nowhere. I along with several churches and synagogues offer you not only a safe space but a special place to reconnect with El Shaddai, Elohim, Allah, Yeshua, Jesus, to be taken for who you are, and to join a journey to connect with the divine. Navigate, get your compass, and know that you are so worthy of love and a doctrine of love, and allow it to pour in. If you need a recommendation or want to talk about reconnecting to a faith tradition that will speak to you, reach out. I think of myself as much as a chaplain as I do a priest. As a chaplain my job is not to sell you on my version of faith but to help you connect or reconnect with your faith. Faith is a powerful and wonderful thing when it is well worked out. Navigate and be wise. Remember that even the Jesus story starts with faith followed by betrayal and deceit even in the birth narratives. Yet, the narrative always rises above that fray offering us hope, love, charity, and that thing called Grace. You have an invitation to navigate. And in this world that is seemingly coming apart, perhaps that isn’t a bad idea.

22 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


MUSEUM SPOTLIGHT

American Italian Cultural Center Did you know that according to the 1910 census, 80% of the residents of what we now call the French Quarter were Sicilian immigrants? Or that the lower Quarter was once commonly referred to as Little Palermo? Or that New Orleans has had two Italian-American mayors? Ever wonder why St. Joseph’s Day altars are so popular in New Orleans?

The American Italian Cultural Center promotes the culture and heritage of the American-Italian community by offering Italian language and culture classes, seminars, concerts, and events. As the leading institution preserving and celebrating the American-Italian history of Louisiana, the American Italian Cultural Center is worth a visit, especially for anyone

interested in learning how the American-Italian community has shaped local, regional, and national history and culture. The new American Italian Museum honors and celebrates the journeys of Italians to New Orleans and the “New World.” The museum tells the story of the Italian immigrant beginning with their departure from the old country to their arrival and assimilation in their adopted home in America. We shed light on their struggles, their successes, and the influences they imprinted on the shared history of the Crescent City and its surroundings. The museum

features exhibits on the Great Sicilian migration, Italians in early Jazz, and St. Joseph’s Day altars. There is even an American-Italian Sports Hall of Fame. The Piazza d’Italia is adjacent to the American Italian Cultural Center and is open to the public. Located at 537 South Peters Street, the museum is open Monday through Saturday from 10am until 4pm. Guided tours are offered at 11am and 1pm. Guided tours are $20 for adults and $10 for students and seniors. Self-guided tours are $10 for adults and $7 for students and seniors.

SNAP PAPARAZZI Out & About at Crossing AT CROSSING NOLA | PHOTOS BY DWAIN HERTZ

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MOMENTS IN GAY NEW ORLEANS HISTORY It’s a Wonderful Life, Historically Speaking Frank Perez frankearlperez@gmail.com The enduring appeal of Frank Capra’s classic holiday film It’s a Wonderful Life is its premise—that the quality of a person’s life is measured by how it affects others. George Bailey’s guardian angel, Clarence, tells him, ““Dear George, remember no man is a failure who has friends.” By that measure, Charlene Schneider, legendary lesbian bar owner, was amazingly successful. One of her friends was Valda Lewis—a young woman who left her small town in England to move to New Orleans to explore her sexuality. In 1986, Charlene Schneider called Valda and told her that she and her girlfriend Loretta Mims needed to attend a City Council meeting. The Council was considering a non-discrimination ordinance to protect lesbian and gay city employees. A similar measure had been voted down two years earlier by the council, despite heavy lobbying from LAGPAC (Louisiana Lesbian and Gay Political Action Caucus) and other groups. The City Council Chamber was packed as people testified. Those opposing the ordinance cited religious

objections. One woman testified she had obtained secret information that a national conspiracy was underway and that the gay powers coordinating it had selected New Orleans as a test city to try to take over the government. The non-discrimination ordinance was not passed that day. Valda Lewis was astounded at the misinformation and downright ignorance on display at the Council meeting as the ordinance was being debated. Resolved to do something to clear up the prevalent misunderstanding of homosexuality, she began producing a television show called Just for the Record. She recalls, “We needed a better image.” Just for the Record was a weekly cable access television show produced on cable channel 49 from 1987—1993 and covered both local and national topics of interest to the gay and lesbian community. The shows ranged from 30—60 minutes. In addition, Lewis and Mims also published a monthly newsletter of the same title from 1989 to 1993. After the show’s run, Lewis produced another show called Queer Street Live, which ran for thirteen weeks.

Valda fell in love with the camera producing these shows and began recording other events relating to the LGBT+ community. A sampling of what she recorded includes four annual conferences of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force Policy Institute, the second HIV/AIDS Regional Summit, the thirteenth National Lesbian and Gay Health Conference, the National Commission on AIDS “Sex, Society, and HIV” Hearings, several Bourbon Street Awards contests, Armeinius and Amon Ra Carnival Balls, and just about anything else queer-related that was happening in New Orleans. In all, Valda Lewis recorded almost 800 hours of living history. In 2019, Valda Lewis reached out to the LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana to help her find a permanent home for her vast video collection. Archives Project President Frank Perez then set up meetings with a professional archival appraiser and several area repositories. Lewis, who currently lives in Cleveland, Ohio, then traveled to New Orleans where she and Perez met with representatives from several archival institutions. Ultimately, Lewis

donated her collection to the Amistad Research Center. In recent years, the Amistad Research Center has made increasing its LGBT+ holdings a priority. The LGBT+ Archives Project of Louisiana awarded the Amistad Research Center a grant to digitize footage of the Just for the Record shows. Those videos are now available to the public on the LGBT+ Archives Project website (https://www.lgbtarchiveslouisiana.org/) and Amistad’s Vimeo channel. These recordings and their preservation are just one aspect of Charlene Schneider’s profound legacy. Near the end of It’s a Wonderful Life, Clarence tells George, “Strange, isn’t it? Each man’s life touches so many other lives. When he isn’t around he leaves an awful hole, doesn’t he?” Charlene Schneider had a wonderful life and the world is better for it.

24 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


CHOP CHOP

New Years: The Daily Beet Proves Healthy Can Be Delicious Charles Pizzo pizzocharles@gmail.com Made a New Years resolution to eat healthier in 2020? Most of us start January with good intentions about food, fitness, and finances that fall by the wayside as we yield to temptation. In the words of New Orleans-born entertainer Bianca Del Rio, “not today Satan!” The biggest change one needs to make is to one’s attitude. Once you make the decision to do something, stick to it. Yes, honey, we’re talking discipline—and not the kind you get during role play. Focus on looking and feeling better. Think about the benefits, not the process. One key to finding healthy food is knowing where to look. Guess what? There’s an app for that. Locally, Eat Fit NOLA—a program from Ochsner Hospital and its Fitness Center—has been working with restaurants to create healthier food choices that also taste good. The program is now expanding across Louisiana, and you can download the free Eat Fit app to help guide your dining decision-making. https:// www.ochsner.org/eat-fit On a night when I was contemplating yet another indulgent dinner, a friend mentioned a place he wanted to try. I looked it up on the app and we were sold by the delicious-looking photos. The Daily Beet has three locations; all of them feature fresh juices, smoothies, sandwiches, soups, and salads to which you can add proteins such as eggs, lox, or tofu. We opted for their restaurant in the CBD and started with a namesake dish: Beet Hummus. A royal purple schmear of silky hummus sat atop a slice of country toast from Bellegarde Bakery. It’s quite flavorful yet not overpowering. The cucumber tahini slaw towering over it is acidic and a refreshing counterpoint. Feta cheese offers a pungent note, and smoked paprika brings a nice twist to the whole melange. Definitely a winner. The lox plate was good but curiously did not include lemon; the lox needed more acidity than was provided by capers. It sits on the same country loaf as the beet hummus, and is topped with a mild herb cream cheese. The plate itself is arranged artfully, with a salad of pickled onions (terrific!), cucumbers, tomatoes, and arugula (the latter providing a sharp, slightly bitter edge). Rice bowls have caught on with runners and others who want to carb up. One choice (presumably new as it

Outstanding beet hummus on Bellegarde bread topped with a creative and tasty slaw

neither appeared on the printed menu nor the online version) is the Wellness Bowl. Warm wild rice is tossed with grapes, toasted pistachios, & currants, and served over arugula dressed with sesame balsamic vinaigrette. Topped with goat cheese, it’s sweet, grassy, bitter, soft, and crunchy. This is a complex and balanced dish that is satisfying and filling. Another rice bowl, the Thai Peanut, also features wild rice (a complex carb) with mango, red bell pepper, cucumber, carrot, green onion, coconut flakes, and mild Thai peanut dressing. It sounded terrific, but left us wanting more. Grab a bottle of the excellent house-made pineapple or blueberry habanero chili sauce to add sweet heat to the dish. We rounded out our sampling with a Mexicali Blues salad that frankly left us with the blues. It needed a sharper dressing, or perhaps more of the jalapeño lime vinaigrette. Despite a nice combination of romaine, spring mix lettuce, avocado, black bean, corn, tomato, red onion, cilantro, corn chops, and Cojita cheese, it fell flat. We only tried one juice: watermelon ginger. It was overpowered by ginger. There are some health benefits to that, but the delicate taste of watermelon was completely lost. For dessert, we grabbed a PB&J smoothie. Okay, we fought over it. Blueberry, pineapple, banana, and peanut butter are deftly combined into a luscious drink with a nice protein pick me up. Order this! Would we go back? For lunch, as an alternative to burgers, chicken, or pizza, yes. If I wanted something more adventurous, I would head to Seed or the newly reopened Sneaky Pickle. That said, for a grab-and-go place in the CBD, The Daily Beet is a welcome addition (and the counter service was super friendly). Epilogue: all these healthy dish-

The new Wellness Rice Bowl is complex, hearty, and recommended

es…yet so much cheese (albeit of good quality and in manageable quantities)? Our taste buds are fat soluble. In the absence of any fat (which your body needs), food really does taste like cardboard. You already knew the secret: everything in moderation! The Daily Beet, 1000 Girod St (additional locations on Magazine St and in the St. Roch Market), 8am - 8pm, seven days a week, all major credit cards, (504) 605-4413, thedailybeetnola.com (online ordering in advance

available) Charles Pizzo is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America. If you’re interested in having your dining establishment covered by Ambush Magazine, please contact him. Charles Pizzo is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America. If you’re interested in having your dining establishment covered by Ambush Magazine, please contact him.

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INTERVIEWS FROM KEY WEST Richard Scot Forste Uses Good Ol’ Hate Sex to Divide Restaurant Duties Kevin Assam kevin-assam@hotmail.com Richard Scot Forste is the co-owner of one of Key West’s long time island eats favorite, The Flaming Buoy Filet Co. Armed with his wit, new digs at 424 Eaton, and Indiana Jones and Star Wars memorabilia, Scot talks paper straw alternatives, splitting restaurant responsibilities with partner, and that time John Waters probably made him sick. Are hard individual pasta noodles better alternatives to paper straws? Scot: Did you know, according to me, there are more than one type of pasta worldwide? Curiously, all but one, end in a vowel. Unless you suffer from celiac disease, in which case, pasta ends with something else. [Insert bad “vowel movement’ joke here] My point is, this could be a very long, if not tedious, answer. I will, however, spare your readers a rather thorough and well-considered response and, simply suggest glass to mouth as an adventurous alternative. Was Julia Child or the works of Sigmund Freud more influential on your earliest culinary creations? Scot: Another motherfucker of a

question. I’d have to say Freud. I was exposed to Freud at a very Jung age and it involved not time travel, but astral projection. Quid pro quo, Clarice. You will let me know when those lambs stop screaming, won’t you? Did your dark humor hinder your chances of becoming involved with the military as a young adult? Scot: No. I’m proud to confess I’ve been involved actively with all branches of the military on numerous occasions. Is a hot dog considered a sandwich? Scot: During my years riding the rails with a traveling circus, entertaining Okies, and occasionally grifting the simple folk of the plains out of corn cob teeth during the Dust Bowl, I frequently stole foods and racist jokes from a hobo named Boxcar BJ. Never did I hear him yell, “Hey, that boy stole my sandwich!” when I absconded with a hotdog on a bun. “That boy stole my hotdog!” he’d holler. And sometimes, “Wait! What? You’re how old?” Never ‘sandwich.’ That’s science. The kind you can only get in the school of life. Were your parents believers in

Richard Scot Forste

having dinner together every night? Scot: We very nearly ate dinner together every night. No TV. But, like a lot of kids during the ‘80s, there was a time my brother and I ate at our leisure. It was during this time that I learned to cook. What was your first successfully prepared meal? Scot: I don’t remember my first, but I remember my favorite: BBQ ribs. The recipe was my grandmother’s. I would call her on the phone after school and she would walk me through the directions. How did Key West get on your radar? Did the queers have anything to do with it? Scot: My straight friendly best friend from Cincinnati used to visit Key West. One year he left for vacation and never came back. Naturally, I got to visit. [Pause] I just realized that answer sounds like my friend disappeared while in Florida. I want to be clear. It’s true. Where was he found? Scot: Atlantic Shores. Was that where you found your husband, Fred? Scot: No. I’ve known Fred for almost 30 years. We met in Cincinnati and moved together to Key West. I did find a lot of other husbands at Atlantic Shores, however. How did the concept for The Flaming Buoy Filet Co. arise? Can you clear up the pronunciation of “Buoy”? Scot: A brazen display of audacity. And by “audacity,” I mean hubris, overweening pride. We pronounce it “booie”, but Webster’s says “boy” is acceptable if you don’t know any better. You and Fred were aware of the probability of failure in the restau-

rant business. What pushed you over the edge to do it anyway? Scot: We were blissfully unaware. It wasn’t until after we were up and running that friends and family told us that opening a new restaurant was the worst idea ever. That and snitching on the same cell mate that taught you how to make shivs out of toothbrushes in the yard. And we were, like, “What!? You’re [telling] us this now?” How did you choose to divide responsibilities for the restaurant? You’ve particularly taken on the role of being the face of it. Scot: Lots of hate sex. How long were you at your former Packer Street location? Scot: A month shy of nine years. The Flaming Buoy Filet Co. [made] ten years [last] October 23. Without a sufficient amount of wine, I consider it inappropriate to divulge the sordid details that prompted our move, as we were involved by proxy only. Collateral damage, as it were. They know who they are and what they did. Our first choice was definitely not to move. We loved the neighborhood and the many people who were supportive of us from the start, and, gratefully, are yet. We ultimately made a decision that was in our best interest. What were some of the other locations you considered moving into? Was shuttering the restaurant permanently ever an option? Scot: I feel like we looked at every available location on the island — and then some, from run down shacks to people handing us blueprints and asking us what we wanted. Closing permanently was never an option of ours. Why was the 424 Eaton Street location so attractive? Scot: The blocks around where Ea-

26 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


ton and Duval Street meet is this wonderfully vital cultural intersection unlike any other in downtown Key West. The Tropic Cinema is an absolute treasure for movie lovers. Few things are more essential to my well-being than the shared experience of watching a movie in a theater with a bunch of friends and strangers. The Studios of Key West’s support and showcasing of art, music, and theater is indispensable. I failed on the stage of The Key West Theater. The same stage that hosted John Waters. I got to meet John Waters. In Key West. Think about that for a minute. I think he gave me the flu, but that’s another story. The Red Barn Theater, too, is just a couple blocks from us. Having spent more than half my life in

the book industry, Books & Books and Key West Island Books — my first job in Key West — hold very special places in my heart. I beg all of you, please read a book! Uva Wine Shoppe on Fleming is the closest place Key West has to a salon. The most multifaceted collection of local characters can always be found perched in front of–and behind– the bar. Opining while wining, they are. We’ve shared a great relationship with The Saint and Banyan Tree Resort for many years. And then there’s Wendy’s. Keeping it real. Eaton Street felt familiar. It felt right. Did you send a bill to John Waters for that bout of viral plague? Scot: Of course not. He warned me not to touch him, but I couldn’t re-

sist.

What are the growing pains of your success at Eaton? Scot: Besides growing hair in strange new places? I don’t think we experienced growing pains. Certainly, navigating our new surroundings and how we needed to adapt functionally in the new space was a fun exercise in trial and terror. And let’s not get ahead of ourselves on that success thing. Are you trying to curse us? You’ve gained notoriety for responding to critical reviews of the restaurant you deem inaccurate. What were some of your latest orations? Scot: I’ve only ever responded publicly to three critical reviews, and

the last one was about five years ago. But, when fact becomes legend, right? What will your legend be? Scot: That’s not really up to me. How would you want to be remembered? Scot: Fondly. Please, sir, you may now enter the casket. Scot: No. Kevin Assam is an average writer and hilarious interviewer originally from the Caribbean. He can be best described as a forty year old imaginative mind trapped in a pint sized twenty something year old body. His upcoming book is a collection of outrageous things overheard in Key West.

SNAP PAPARAZZI The Order of Pan AT THE ORDER OF PAN BALL | PHOTOS BY B. SANDS

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HEALTH & WELLNESS HEALTH & WELLNESS HIV Healthcare in 2020: Building Community Awareness Chenier Reynolds-Montz Director of Outreach & Development for Access Health Louisiana CReynolds@accesshealthla.org The start of a new year comes with resolutions not only for individuals and businesses, but for those working in healthcare and leading the fight against HIV. 2020 creates an opportunity to get new people engaged in preventing the spread of HIV and reaffirming the commitment that a positive test result for an HIV patient does not mean a death sentence. “HIV and Hepatitis C (HCV) are both diseases that we have all the necessary tools now to end transmissions,” says Christopher Adkins, Manager of Access Health Louisiana’s AIDS Education & Training Center (AETC) in New Orleans. “The only thing we need now is the resolve to dedicate adequate resources to doing so. Many health professionals in the field were trained in healthcare when HIV and HCV were complex and difficult to treat, thus relegated to specialty care providers.” Social determinants are common risk factors to both diseases. This

includes poverty, mental illness, substance abuse and sex. Providing upto-date information on treatment, disease management and best practices in behavioral health help arm medical professionals with the tools they need to treat HIV and HCV patients. This is doubly important because as people living with HIV/AIDS live longer, their medical care needs move from the realm of infectious disease into chronic medical problems best managed by generalists and family practitioners. The South Central AETC located in New Orleans trains medical professionals in the best practices for caring for these patients long-term. The AETC program was established by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in 1987. It is administered by the Division of Training and Capacity Development in the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program of HRSA’s HIV/AIDS Bureau. The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program provides HIV-related services to more

than half a million people each year who do not have enough health care coverage or financial resources to cope with HIV disease. Access Health Louisiana (AHL) is a Ryan White Grant recipient and helps numerous patients living with HIV in New Orleans. The local AETC has three major resolutions (goals) for its program this year. First, two major conferences are planned for 2020 in New Orleans – St. Patrick’s Day and Boo=Boo (a play off the U=U movement). The conferences are tied into the festivities for the uptown St. Patty’s Day Parade, as well as the Krewe of Boo parade, respectively. Healthcare professionals spend the day learning about the latest surveillance data, treatment options & implementable strategies, and resources proven to work to improve treatment outcomes. “We also address the existence of stigma by health care providers and their staff that arises from fear of HIV that affect patient care.” After the seminars are over, everyone participating celebrates by attending the parades. Attendees also receive continuing education credits for completing the conference program. The AETC’s second New Year’s resolution includes offering sex education classes through the New Orleans Recreational Development Commission (NORDC). An online curriculum is being developed for students that will be offered jointly with in-person instruction. The AETC will also provide additional trainings for sex education instruction for professionals interested in developing and implementing age-appropriate sex education in their communities that is LGB and all-gender inclusive. Trainings will be offered for parents on how to talk to their kids about sex and sexuality. Dates for classes will be released soon. Finally, more HIV awareness will fill the airwaves in 2020 with Resistance Radio. Tune into WHIV 102.3FM on Monday nights with Dr. MarkAlain Déry. He will be joined by guest Ra-

nord J. Darensburg, a local attorney and Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW). Darensburg has more than 25 years of experience dealing with cases in the juvenile justice system. He and Dr. Déry will be addressing issues and perspectives on topics not traditionally associated with HIV. “As Judicial Administrator, Mr. Darensburg works to eliminate barriers to justice for the youth and families serviced by the Orleans Parish Juvenile Court,” explains Adkins. “Darensburg is instrumental in creating programming to address the behavioral and mental health challenges of court-involved youth and families. He is collaborating with us to address the social determinants of HIV to the social work community.” Tune in for their first show on January 20th, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. The topic: addressing how the Civil Rights framework applies to HIV. Panelists for the evening talk show will include Judge Calvin Johnson (retired), Deidra D. Hayes-DSW, BCD, LCSW-BACS and Reverend Darrell E. Woullard, Jr. The hosts and panelists will focus on the role of social work in the civil rights movement as well as a social worker’s role in providing equal access to resources for HIV and HCV patients to meet their basic needs such as healthcare. 2020 promises to be a big year for HIV awareness in New Orleans. Dr. Déry and his team, including Chris Adkins, Sydney Soublet and Lauren Fidelak, are furthering the mission of the national AETC to “improve the quality of life of persons with or at-risk of HIV through the provision of high-quality professional education and training.” Chenier Reynolds-Montz is Director of Outreach & Development for Access Health Louisiana, a registered 501(c)3 organization. She can be reached at creynolds@accesshealthla.org. For information about our services, log onto our website at accesshealthla.org

WELLNESS

Let’s Get Real About Anxiety Dr. Andrew Watley Professional Counselor in the State of Louisiana 28 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


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If you’re reading this, congratulations! You have successfully survived the holiday season. You have spent time with the family, budgeted your way through Christmas gifts, and have toasted a new and exciting year. Most importantly, you have managed your anxiety. As a therapist, that is probably the most common word that I hear in my office. My clients love to come in to talk about their anxiety. We all have it, and it affects us in different ways, but what is it exactly? Webster’s secondary definition of anxiety is “an abnormal and overwhelming sense of apprehension and fear often marked by physical signs (such as tension, sweating, and increased pulse), by doubt concerning the reality and nature of the threat, and by self-doubt about one’s capacity to cope with it”. When we anticipate an unpleasant situation, our brains freak out and cause our bodies to react. I remember my first encounter with anxiety. I was in the 8th grade, dressed in my cap and gown for graduation, and prepar-

ing to give my valedictorian speech. Everything was fine, leading to the big moment until I thought about all the eyes and cameras on me. Suddenly, my stomach began to feel like cannon balls were being fired inside of it. My mind began to wander, “What if I stutter?” “What if people laugh at me?” “What if I cry?” Sweat began to drip down my face as I ran to the restroom multiple times before I was able finally to give my speech. Anxiety is our mind’s way of letting us know that we are uncertain of what’s going to happen in the future. Most people like control, and the future is one thing that we cannot immediately take control of. So we start to worry. It is a natural part of being a human. How we handle it, however, is where the problem may emerge. Some people have debilitating anxiety that causes a roadblock in their daily functions. Often, this anxiety results from an unpleasant past experience. I will use my mother as an example. She had gotten into a small car accident in Texas, slightly after Hurricane Katrina.

The experience was traumatizing for her. To this day, she flinches when a car comes to a sudden stop or she will slam on her imaginary passenger seat break. It isn’t uncommon for our trips to have the infamous, “Andrew, you need to slow down” conversation. But she does it to protect herself from danger. That is the point of anxiety! Granted, her case can be considered minor in comparison to others. Some people do not leave their houses because of the fear that lies beyond their front doors. What starts off as a traumatic experience can lead to people being trapped inside their own thoughts and fears. So how can we deal with anxiety? For those who have the debilitating type that hinders them from everyday functioning, medication is often the best solution. For others, I suggest cognitive behavioral therapy. This is the type of therapy that I often use in my practice. It encourages my clients to view situations differently, which will then lead them to behave differently. Our anxiety

A NEW COLUMN

A Fistful of Wishes, Part 1 Dorian-gray Alexander proofpoz@gmail.com

Our legacy is yours. New Orleans Advocates for GLBT Elders (NOAGE) provides services and advocacy for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults in the New orleans metro area. We host regular social events for LGBT older adults and their allies, and we provide cultural competency trainings for healthcare and other service providers. To learn more, visit www.noagenola.org, or call (504) 517-2345

Whether the new decade begins Jan 1, 2020 and ends Dec 31, 2029 or starts Jan 1, 2021 and finishes Dec 31, 2030, one thing is certain: it’s been nearly forty years of the HIV/AIDS era, which began in 1981. While we cannot predict what it brings, or decide how the decade is determined, we can wish for a bright future. Here’s part one of twenty things you might want to get straight [not in that way] in 2020 and for decades to follow. #1 U=U (Undetectable equals Untransmittable), Talk about it, Y’all! Undetectable is the real deal that we CANNOT pass HIV to an intimate (sexual) partner. For the uninitiated, achieving an undetectable viral load (viral suppression) with effective treatment is the “holy grail”. Scientific re-

search proves that medication keeps us healthier, and means ZERO risk of passing HIV along to anyone. This makes being undetectable frontline prevention. The only risk is we fall in love with someone and have great sex without fear. We work hard to reach undetectable. Let’s celebrate and enjoy this together. #2 Stop HIV Stigma It’s really, really hard to share HIV with someone. We know how it can happen and we know how it cannot. The ignorance and fear that feeds stigma hurts us and confuses everyone. We beat ourselves up and get bullied already. A recent study from the Kantar Group has Generation Z and millennials admitting to avoiding “hugging, talking to, or being friends with some-

causes us to think of the worst outcome of future situations, but what if we focused more on the possible positive outcomes? When you change your perspective, you can change your life. Other techniques such as breathing and meditation before a stress-inducing event can also limit the anxiety that is associated with it. Next time you are faced with an emotionally stressful situation and you feel anxiety rearing its head, take a moment to breathe and remind yourself that you can handle it. You are stronger than your anxiety! Dr. Andrew Watley is a licensed professional counselor in the state of Louisiana. His practice is geared toward helping adolescents, members of the LGBTQ+ community and men who experience concerns with their masculinity and body image. More information about Dr. Watley and his practice can be found on his website, www. drandrewwatley.com.

one with HIV.” So, repeat after me: “In 2020, I will hug a person with HIV and shake their hands because casual contact poses no threat of HIV to me.” #3 Use HIV preferred language Words are dynamic and change like the wind. Remember when we downloaded everything? Now we stream it. Language around HIV changes too. Use person first language. We are people living with HIV. Oh, you can’t get to AIDS without HIV first. So, let’s drop the A-word. It’s outdated like “full blown A-word”. We can honor lost loved ones and respect the survivors in a less stigmatizing way. #4 Housing is health care We need more options for affordable housing in New Orleans. This is a challenge for everyone. Stable housing is the first step for good health. Housing is basic to everything else we do like being employed, going to the doctor, and functioning to our maximum. Sadly, when it comes to housing for HIV (fyi, it’s a disability), there’s still discrimination. We need more protections against that too. #5 HIV experts As people living with HIV, we are experts with lived experience of existing with this. Don’t make decisions about us without us. Have a seat at the table and make sure we can eat there too. We’re not tokens. Having us in the room is not enough. Create channels for input and use that to inform change. #6 Routine HIV testing Everyone has an HIV status. Know yours. Encourage testing everywhere and make it routine. When was your last HIV test? Every sexually active person needs an HIV test at least once in a lifetime. The more sex you have, the more often you might want to be

32 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


tested. Has your health care specialist (doctor, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant) ever offered one? Why not just make it a routine screening for every adult and give them choice to opt out or refuse it? #7 Same Day HIV treatment Starting treatment the same day you learn you’re living with HIV keeps your immune system intact and gets you to undetectable faster (see #1). You’re now in the driver’s seat. There’s plenty of evidence to show that starting treatment early could mean living longer. #8 Common Sense to prevention

We have the tools to prevent HIV: U=U, PrEP, Condoms, and common sense. I could add abstinence but that’s not common sense to anything. PrEP is pretty new here but we cannot put all our eggs in a single basket. Let’s break it down: U=U prevents sharing HIV with someone else; PrEP prevents acquiring HIV from another; condoms are a barrier for this and for sexually transmitted infections (syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia). #9 Affordable access to medications We have dozens of new HIV medications that are used to treat and to

prevent HIV now. They are all expensive. Monthly out-of-pocket costs, even with insurance, can stop us from getting the care we need. Yes, there are programs to help, but there has to be a better way. Support efforts for real reform to affordable and accessible health care for all. #10 Elections AND Erections Matter 2020 is an election year and every vote counts. Make sure you’re registered to vote in the presidential election. Regardless of your persuasion (okay, it personally matters to me) just be prepared to vote. Vote in every elec-

tion and keep it up [smile]. Learn about platforms, candidates, and ballots on every level. Help with voter registrations. Take a neighbor to vote. It’s a right and privilege we can’t waste. Be sure to check in the next issue for A Fistful of Wishes, Part 2 … until then. Dorian-gray Alexander is an opinionated person living with HIV and activist who hosts a regular talk show, the Proof Positive Show, on 102.3 FM WHIV-LP. Send topics of interests on HIV proofpoz@gmail.com

SNAP PAPARAZZI The Order of Pan AT THE ORDER OF PAN BALL | PHOTOS BY B. SANDS

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HOT HAPPENINGS UNDER THE GAYDAR New Orleans Hot Happenings Tony Leggio ledgemgp@gmail.com Happy 2020! Carnival season has started and we are now in the new year, so get ready for all the fun the Crescent City has to offer. Here are just a few of the things to keep your days (and nights) busy. (If you have a fundraiser, party, show or event coming up and would like to be listed in the calendar, please email me at ledgemgp@gmail. com.

WEEKLY EVENTS EVERYDAY

Happy Hour: The Crossing; 439 Dauphine St.; 7 days a week from open until 9pm (7AM to 9PM). It’s $3 domestic beer and well drinks. $1 off everything else. 777 Happy Hour: Kajun’s Pub; 2556 St. Claude Ave.; 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. Happy Hour: Golden Lantern; 1239 Royal St.; 7 days a week from 8 a.m - 8 p.m. Happy Hour: The Bourbon Pub;

801 Bourbon St.; 10 a.m. - 12 p.m. (except Monday) Happy Hour: GrandPre’s; 834 N Rampart St.; 12 p.m. - 9 p.m. $3 Well/ domestics Happy Hour: Oz New Orleans; 800 Bourbon St.; 4 p.m. - 8 p.m. Kajun’s Karaoke: Kajun’s Pub; 2556 St. Claude Ave.; Karaoke from 5 p.m. until. Happy Hour: The Bourbon Pub; 801 Bourbon St.; 5 p.m. - 8 p.m. (except Sunday) Happy Hour: The Corner Pocket; 940 St. Louis St.; bargain prices starting with draft beer or Schnapps for only $1.50—plus six more specials. Weekdays: Noon - 7 p.m., Weekends: 10 a.m, - 6 p.m. | Boys dancin’ on the bar nightly 9 p.m. till close.

WEEKDAYS

Happy Hour: Good Friends Bar; 740 Dauphine St.; 5 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Happy Hour: The Phoenix Bar; 941 Elysian Fields Ave.; 6 a.m. - 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. - 7 p.m.

MONDAY

Martini Mondays: Crossing; 439 Dauphine St.; (all day) Tito’s and Deep Eddy martinis will be $3. Service Industry Night: Four Seasons Bar; 3229 N. Causeway Blvd.; Open to close. $2.50 domestic beers; $3 well cocktails; $3.50 imported beer; $5.50 Tito’s; $6 Jameson. Happy Hour All Night: The Page Bar; 542 N Rampart St.; Open to close. Well, domestic, and wine. Primal Nights: Bacchanal Wine; 600 Poland Ave.; 5:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. $20 donation. Guest Chefs grill a personalized menu and the plate donations go to the charity of their choosing. NOAGE & Stonewall Sports Walk/ Run Club: Lafitte Greenway; 6:15 p.m. Join Stonewall Sports New Orleans and NOAGE starting at 6:30 p.m.. Meet for the walk/run at Bayou Beer Garden. The Stonewall Run Club joins every 3 weeks. This group is for ALL fitness levels, and you can go at your own pace. Whether that’s running, jogging, leisurely walking, or using a wheelchair or walker, this group is for you. If you are worried that you’ll be left

behind, don’t worry; someone will walk with you. If you are the fastest person there, we’ll see you at the finish line. If you need assistance or have questions, call Jim at (504) 228-6778. Queer Meditation: Mid City Zen; 3248 Castiglione St.; 6:15 p.m. A queer and trans centered meditation group meeting regularly on Monday evenings. Practice includes sitting and walking meditation, as well as sensory and body based awareness exercises. Open to all LGBTIQ+ people, and all folks interested in holding and sharing an intentionally queer-centering mindful space. Free/by donation. Karaoke Monday: The Bourbon Pub; 801 Bourbon St.; 7 - 9 p.m. Enjoy happy hour prices all night long. Hosted by Denny with VJ Dollabill. Lazy Susan Karaoke: Oz New Orleans; 800 Bourbon St.; 9 p.m. – 1 a.m. Join bartender Mark and a revolving cast of drag queen hostesses for Lazy Susan Karaoke with music by DJ Lucius Riley. Mondays are a drag, so make them fabulous and sing the night away. Underwear Night: The Eagle at the Phoenix; 941 Elysian Fields Ave.; starting at 9 p.m. The Eagle now is open EVERY Monday night. Happy Hour prices if you’re in your underwear.

34 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


SNAP PAPARAZZI The Corner Pocket MEET ME ON ST. LOUIS—WHERE THE BOYS ARE DANCIN’ NIGHTLY ON THE BAR | PHOTOS BY CHARLES PIZZO

THE CORNER POCKET Where the Boys are dancing nightly on the bar starting at 9PM!

OPENING HOURS Everyday Noon - TILL ADDRESS 940 St Louis Street, New Orleans, LA 70112 Phone: (504) 568-9829 www.cornerpocket.net

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SNAP PAPARAZZI Out & About with Frank AT THE RUE ROYALE REVELERS 12TH NIGHT PARTY | PHOTOS BY CHARLES PIZZO

36 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


SNAP PAPARAZZI The Order of Pan AT THE ORDER OF PAN BALL | PHOTOS BY B. SANDS

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Doors open at 9 p.m. and No Cover. Night of S.I.N.: The Corner Pocket; 940 St. Louis St.; from 9 p.m. till close. Get your S.I.N. (Service Industry Night) card from Ashlee to unlock Happy Hour prices every Monday night. | Boys dancin’ on the bar 9 p.m. till close. Pool Tournament: Rawhide 2010; 740 Burgundy St.; 9:45 p.m. $2 PBR and $50 gift certificate for Rawhide S.I.N.: Kajun’s Pub; 2256 St. Claude Ave.; 1 a.m - 4 a.m. 2 for 1 drinks.

TUESDAY

Tequila Tuesdays: Crossing; 439 Dauphine St.; (all day) Tequila drinks $5. Tunes Tuesday: Four Seasons Bar; 3229 N. Causeway Blvd.; Open to close. Free Jukebox credits with a $4 drink purchase. Happy Hour: The Page Bar; 542 N Rampart St.; 5 p.m. - 8 p.m. Burlesque Bingo with Lefty Lucy: The AllWays Lounge; 2240 St. Claude Ave.; 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m There’s no cover for this grown-up game show where everyone’s a winner! Just buy a drink from the bar & Tsarina Hellfire will give you a Bingo card. Each round winner gets a bucket of prizes including exclusive prints & a grand finale prize from Abita Brewing Company! Just for showing up you get to enjoy the free burlesque side of this unique game.

Between every round, Lefty Lucy performs an improvised striptease to a song the crowd selects, removing only one item per round—don’t miss your chance to win the finale prize, and to see the tassels twirl! Trivia: Cutter’s; 706 Franklin Ave.; 7:30 p.m. Join your host, bartender and local music legend Johnny Sketch. Join a trivia team or bring your own and test your knowledge across multiple categories to win an often odd and useful assortment of prizes! Queens Against RuManity: Kajun’s Pub; 2256 St. Claude Ave.; 7:30 - 9 p.m. Welcome to Queens Against Rumanity, a new game night at Kajun’s Pub with Laveau Contraire and some of her fabulous friends for a RuPaul’s Drag Race themed game of Cards Against Humanity! If you’ve never played, it’s a fill in the blank game where each player tries to come up with answers using cards with iconic drag race quotes on them. Join them for Queens Against Rumanity featuring live drag performances, fun prizes and drink specials. Tito’s Tuesday: The Bourbon Pub; 801 St Ann St.; 8 p.m. - close. $5 Tito’s cocktails Country Dance Lessons: GrandPre’s; 834 N. Rampart St.; 8 p.m. Tuesdays are Country Dance lessons with the Big Easy Stompers from 8 - 11 p.m. Bourbon Boylesque: Oz New Orle-

ans; 800 Bourbon St.; 8 p.m. See the Men of Oz like you have never seen them before. The show stars Atomyc Adonis, Bobby B, Franky, Phathoms Deep and other special guests. Hosted by Trixie Minx. Tacos, Tequila and Tiaras: Buffa’s Bar and Restaurant; 1001 Esplanade Ave.; 8 p.m. Tacos, Tequila, and Tiaras is one of New Orleans’ only family friendly drag shows! Join hostess Vanessa Carr Kennedy every Tuesday, have a taco or two, and learn a little bit about the art of drag. Trivia Night: MRB; 515 St. Philip St.; Starts at 8 p.m. Every Tuesday at 8 you can join us for Who Wants A Dollar? Trivia! Free to Play. Plenty of Prizes. Tons of Fun. Teams of 1-6 welcome. Enjoy some killer drinks, amazing food from Woodies @ MRB, and out of this world trivia. Weekly Pool Tournament: The Phoenix; 941 Elysian Fields Ave.; 8 - 11 p.m. Tuesday Night Pool Tournament! 8 p.m. with $5 buy-in, winner takes all. $3 Abita Brewing Company during the tournament! Hosted by Wayne Nettles. Afterward, stick around for Strip To Your Jockstrap Pool. Kocktail Karaoke: Good Friends Bar;740 Dauphine St.; 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. Join us at Good Friends Bar for Kocktail Karaoke. The winner gets a $25.00 bar tab. $5 Fireball.

WEDNESDAY

Hump Day: Rawhide 2010; 740 Burgundy St.; 4 - 9 p.m. 2 for $4 wells, draft, and domestic beers. Wine Night: Four Seasons Bar; 3229 N. Causeway Blvd.; 5 p.m. close. $15 bottles of wine. WednesGays at LPK Uptown: Louisiana Pizza Kitchen; 615 South Carrollton Ave.; 5 p.m. Join us every Wednesday to celebrate diversity. See old friends or make some new ones and find out what’s happening in the Nola community. All this while enjoying 1/2 price drinks from the bar. Invite your friends. Happy Hour: The Page Bar; 542 N Rampart St.; 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.. Honey Bee Trivia: GrandPre’s; 834 N. Rampart St.; 7 p.m. Wednesdays are Trivia with Honey Bee at 7 p.m. with free jello shots and Bar Tabs. Show Tunes Night: The Bourbon Pub; 801 St Ann St.; 8 p.m.- Midnight Video Game Night: GrandPre’s; 834 N. Rampart Street; 8:30 p.m. midnight; The bar is doing Video Game Night starting at 9 p.m. Come and compete for prizes and Grab some Drinks. Kafe Karaoke: Cafe Lafitte in Exile; 901 Bourbon St.; 9 p.m. – midnight. $25.00 Bar tab and Free Shots & Givea-ways with Happy Hour All Day. Bingo with Bridget Tunnel: Dat Dog; 601 Frenchman Street; 9 p.m. Biggest, baddest, brassiest Bingo with superstar Bridget Tunnel starting at 9

p.m. Prizes for every round to keep you drunk and fed. Oz Show Night: Oz New Orleans; 800 Bourbon St.; 10:30 p.m. This popular drag show is hosted by Persana Shoulders and features Connie Hung, Anastascia Davenport; ChiChi Rodriquez and Dominique DeLorean.

THURSDAY

Happy Hour: The Page Bar; 542 N Rampart St.; 5 p.m. - 8 p.m. Honey Bee Trivia: GrandPre’s; 834 N. Rampart St.; 7 p.m. Thursday is Honey Bee Trivia at 7 p.m. Four rounds with jello shots to the winner of each round and a Bar Tab to top person/team of the night. Drag Race UK Viewing Party: Kajun’s Pub; 2256 St. Claude Ave.; 7 p.m. Join us every Thursday for RuPaul’s Drag Race UK Season 1 Viewing Party at Kajun’s Pub! Laveau Contraire has invited some of her best squirrel friends to come give insightful commentary, sickening drag numbers, and a healthy dose of SHADE. See you every Thursday at Kajun’s Pub for RuPaul’s Drag Race viewing on all 5 TV screens at 7pm! Prime Time Trivia: Four Seasons Bar; 3229 N. Causeway Blvd.; starts at 9 p.m. Come out and enjoy trivia with great prizes with your host Honey Bee. Retro Night: The Corner Pocket; 940 St. Louis St.; from 9 p.m. till close. The Hits of the 80’s and 90’s. $3 well vodka drinks and $4 Long Island iced teas. | Boys dancin’ on the bar 9 p.m. till close. The Jeff D Comedy Cabaret: Oz New Orleans; 800 Bourbon St.; 10 p.m. The Comedy Cabaret stars Jeff D. featuring Gia GiaVanni. Enjoy hilarious comedians, amazing talent and the Ladies of Oz. Strip Off: Oz New Orleans; 800 Bourbon St.; Midnight. Persana Shoulders hosts the Strip Off every Thursday night. Sign up begins at 11 p.m. and the show features a spotlight performance by Miss Gay Louisiana America 2013 Mercedes Ellis Loreal. Winners receive 1st Place - $100 Cash • 2nd Place - $50 Bar tab

FRIDAY

Fireball Fridays: Four Seasons Bar; 3229 N. Causeway Blvd.; Open to close. $4 Fireball Shots. Happy Hour: The Page Bar; 542 N Rampart St.; 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. Take It Off Fridays: Four Seasons Bar; 3229 N. Causeway Blvd.; 5 p.m. - 12:30 a.m. Includes $2.50 domestic beers and $3 well drinks from 5 - 9 p.m.; $15 drink and drown from 9 - 11 p.m. all well cocktails; and Underwear Party with free well. Cocktails for those who strip down to their underwear from midnight to 12:30 a.m. New Meat Dance Contest: The Corner Pocket; 940 St. Louis St.; 10 p.m. Amateurs and pros compete to

38 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


SNAP PAPARAZZI Crossing PEOPLE ARE CROSSING NOLA TO SEE AND BE SEEN AT CROSSING NOLA | PHOTOS BY CHARLES PIZZO

CROSSING

Neighborhood video bar with a steampunk theme in the historic Vieux Carré.

HAPPY HOUR DAILY 7 AM – 9 PM OPENING HOURS 7 AM – 1:30 AM ADDRESS 439 Dauphine Street New Orleans, LA 70112 Phone: (504) 523-4517 www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 39


ALL THAT DRAG Weekly Drag Shows in New Orleans

TUESDAY

Tacos, Tequila, & Tiaras - 8PM - Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant Hosted by Vanessa Carr Kennedy

WEDNESDAY

Show Night - 10:30PM - Oz New Orleans Persana Shoulders presents this production featuring the fabulous ladies of Oz and music by DJ Tim Pflueger. Hello Gorgeous - Every third Wednesday - Southern Rep Theater DeDe Onassis hosts this circus cabaret alongside aerialist Liza Rose that includes contortion, music, drag, and more.

THURSDAY

Turnin’ Da Page - Every other Thursday - 9PM - The Page Serenity L. Lord emcees this bi-weekly marvel

FRIDAY FRID

Misc4Misc - 9PM - Oz New Orleans A weird and wonderful show presented by Apostrophe and featuring a new cast every week. Play Girlz - 10PM - Golden Lantern Hosted by Gia Giavanni Illusions - 10:30PM - The Bourbon Pub The Queens of Illuisons offer up superstar female impersonation

SATURDAY

Drag Brunch - 11AM & 1PM - The Country Club Enjoy bottomless mimosas at one of the most popular drag events in the city. Reservations are recommended. Drag Brunch - 11AM & 1PM - Trinity Swing by Trinity in the French Quarter for a Saturday morning show starring the Ladies of Trinity. Divas R Us - 10PM - Golden Lantern Hosted by Monica Synclaire Kennedy Illusions - 10:00PM - The Bourbon Pub The Queens of Illuisons offer up superstar female impersonation Showtime on Rampart - 10PM - GrandPre's 1st, 3rd & 5th Saturday,.Hosted by Moanalot Fountaine & Sable Starr

SUNDAY SUND

Mama Honey’s Drag Brunch - 11AM & 1PM - Cru Bottomless beverages, a decadent brunch prepared by Chef Marlon Alexander, and the talents of Vanessa Carr. Diva Drag Brunch at the Fillmore - 11:30 AM Weekly drag brunch featuring some of New Orleans best drag queens and fun themed shows. The Reba Douglas Jubilee - 5PM - Golden Lantern Hosted by Reba Douglas Divas at the Dive - 5PM - Kajun’s Pub Hosted by Vanessa Carr Lipstixx - 8PM - The Bourbon Pub Oz Show Night - 9:30PM - Oz New Orleans Hosted by Persana Shoulders Are we missing your show? Email us at info@ambushpublishing.com

win cash prizes ($100 winner, $200 if on the first attempt). Open call; guys register with ID (21+) by 9 p.m. | Boys dancin’ on the bar 9 p.m. till close. Music of Senator Ken: Golden Lantern; 1239 Royal St.; 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. Enjoy live music with Senator Ken playing all your favorites. Bayou Blues Burlesque: The Allways Lounge and Cabaret; 2240 St. Claude Ave.; 8-10 p.m. An intimate night of live blues music accompanied by burlesque and variety acts. Drink specials and comfy seating to enjoy the art of the striptease. Music by The Delta Revues; burlesque by Andrea Louise Duhe´ (Ooops C.) Cherry Brown and special guests. Doors: 7:00pm; Show: 8:00pm; Cover: $10. Jock Night: The Eagle at the Phoenix; 941 Elysian Fields Ave; 9 p.m. Happy hour prices for wearing a jock or singlet. Misc4Misc: Oz New Orleans; 800 Bourbon St.; 9 p.m. Enjoy this wonderfully weird drag show hosted every week by Apostrophe. Cover is $5. Play Girlz: Golden Lantern; 1239 Royal St.; 10 - 11:30 p.m. Drag show featuring Gia GiaVanni and special guests. Late Night Happy Hour: Cru NOLA; 535 Franklin Ave.; 10:30 p.m. - 2 a.m. Executive Chef Marlon Alexander and sushi & vegan Chef Kelseay Dukae serve delicious drink specials and amazing food during late night happy hours. Come chill out in the iconic courtyard.

SATURDAY

Queer Meditation: Mid City Zen; 3248 Castiglione St.; 10:30 a.m. A queer and trans centered meditation group meeting regularly on Saturday mornings. Open to all LGBTIQ+ people, and all folks interested in holding and sharing an intentionally queer-centering mindful space. Join for a sit, breathe, notice, rest; to cultivate presence and kindness together. Free/by donation. Burlesque Brunch: Cru NOLA; 535 Franklin Ave.; Join the incomparable Angie Z and friends for a boozy, burlesque brunch every Saturday from 11-3pm. For reservations, go to www. opentable.com. Happy Hour: The Page Bar; 542 N Rampart St.; 3 p.m. - 8 p.m.11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Beer Bash: The Bourbon Pub; 801 Bourbon St.; 3 p.m. - 6 p.m. $10 pitchers of beer, $9 pitchers of Miller Light draft (upstairs only) Piano Bar with Trey Ming; Good Friends Bar; 740 Dauphine St.; 4-7 p.m. Sing along with your favorite songs with talented piano player Trey Ming. Drag Dingo: Oz New Orleans; 800 Bourbon St.; 6 - 8 p.m. Catch ChiChi Rodriquez, Persana Shoulders for Drag Bingo! 11 games of Bingo, 11 chances

to win prizes! All the fun starts at 6 pm and goes till 8 pm in the upstairs bar with your favorite bottom, Jake, slinging drinks for you all night long! Music of Vanessa Carr Kennedy; Golden Lantern; 1239 Royal St.; 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. Enjoy songstress Vanessa as she sings some of the top hits of yesterday and today. Divas R Us; Golden Lantern; 1239 Royal St.; 10 - 11:30 p.m. This wonderful drag show directed by Monica Sinclaire Kennedy includes special guest stars. Late Night Happy Hour: Cru NOLA; 535 Franklin Ave.; 10:30 p.m. - 2 a.m. Executive Chef Marlon Alexander and sushi & vegan Chef Kelseay Dukae serve delicious drink specials and amazing food during late night happy hours. Come chill out in the iconic courtyard.

SUNDAY

Mama Honey’s Drag Brunch: Cru NOLA; 535 Franklin St.; 11 a.m. Vanessa Carr presents Mama Honey’s Drag Brunch featuring Chef Marlon Alexander’s amazing menu and the phenomenal talents of Vanessa Carr Kennedy and Friends! For tickets, go to www.crunola.com Bottomless Mimosas: Cafe Lafitte in Exile; 901 Bourbon St.; 1 - 4 p.m. Bottomless Mimosas are offered upstairs from 1 - 4 p.m. for $12. Happy Hour: Good Friends Bar; 740 Dauphine St.; 1 p.m. - 11 p.m. $3.75 well drinks and domestic beer. The Half Assed-Straight Boys: Golden Lantern; 1239 Royal St.; 3 - 5 p.m. Beer Bash: The Bourbon Pub; 801 Bourbon St.; 3 p.m. - 6 p.m. $10 pitchers of beer, $9 pitchers of Miller Light draft (upstairs only) Happy Hour/ Drink Til You Drop: The Page Bar; 542 N Rampart St.; Happy Hour 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. and Drink Til You Drop $12 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. The Original Trash Disco: Cafe Lafitte in Exile; 901 Bourbon St.; 4-10 p.m. Includes the original napkin toss and the best music videos to sing along with. Jubilee: Golden Lantern; 1239 Royal St.; 5 p.m. This Sunday Funday show stars Reba Douglas and special guests. Divas at the Dive: Kajun’s Pub; 2256 St. Claude Ave; 5 p.m. Vanessa Carr LIve. 6:30 p.m. Drag Karaoke. 8 p.m. Audience Karaoke Sinful Sunday: Crossing; 439 Dauphine St.; 5 - 8 p.m. Drink & Drown, $15 well drinks or top shelf & bottled beer $25 - includes free burger cookout. Drag Dingo: Oz New Orleans; 800 Bourbon St.; 6 - 8 p.m. Catch ChiChi Rodriquez, Persana Shoulders for Drag Bingo! 11 games of Bingo, 11 chances to win prizes! All the fun starts at 6 pm till 8 pm in the upstairs bar with

40 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


SNAP PAPARAZZI Oz New Orleans PHOTOS BY DWAIN HERTZ AND ANDREW HOPKINS #OZNEWORLEANS & SUBMITTED BY PERSANA SHOULDERS

OZ New Orleans 2-story, 24/7 gay dance club with DJs, drag shows, go-go dancers & a balcony for people-watching.

OPENING HOURS

FRI, SAT & SUN: 24/7 MON–THURS: Opens at 1PM

ADDRESS 800 Bourbon Street New Orleans, LA Phone: (504) 593-9491

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 41


your favorite bottom, Jake, slinging drinks for you all night long. Drink Drown and Drag: The Bourbon Pub; 801 Bourbon St.; 6 - 9 p.m. Sunday Funday upstairs at The Parade. $15 Drink and Drown from 6 – 9 p.m. with a star studded drag show starting at 8 p.m. Zingo!: The Corner Pocket; 940 St. Louis St.; 6 p.m. Play for free to win prizes or bar tabs. Late night: The Barry Bareass Booty Contest, $50 cash prize. | Boys dancin’ on the bar 9 p.m. till close. You Better Sing Karaoke: GrandPre’s; 834 North Rampart St.; 7 p.m. Join DJ Dereesha as he plays Karaoke. Sunday Swing: The Allways Lounge and Cabaret; 2240 St. Claude Ave.; starts at 8 p.m. Every Sunday, local swing dance instructors offer a community class from 8-9pm. From 9 till midnight there is live, local music and social dancing! There is NO cover, but a one drink minimum is required per set. Jock Night: The Eagle at the Phoenix; 941 Elysian Fields Ave; 9 p.m. Happy hour prices for wearing a jock or singlet. Oz Show Night: Oz New Orleans; 800 Bourbon St.; 9:30 p.m. This popular drag show is hosted by Persana Shoulders and features Connie Hung, Anastascia Davenport; ChiChi Rodriquez and Dominique DeLorean.

SPECIAL EVENTS TUESDAY 1/14

Blueberry Muffins with Nathan Lane Bryant: The Allways Lounge & Cabaret; 2249 St. Claude Ave.; 9 11:30 p.m. Fresh off his Pageant win Nathan Lane Bryant would like to informally invite you to a night of warmth, laughter, community and muffins. Join us as these performers share performances centered around people and things that make them feel comforted. Featuring performances from: Danny Girl, Holden Doves , Lash Wednesday, Maryboy, Mother and Father (Tarah and Napoleon), Nathan Lane Bryant, TITIBABY and Qween Quan. $10 cover; doors at 8:30 p.m. TransSiberian Nightmare - New Year, Same Me: Carnaval Lounge; 2227 St. Claude Ave.; 9 p.m. - midnight. Co-hosted by Stink and Rev. Carina von Tuna, starring Gayle King Kong (Mosquito Valentine) and featuring special guest Shelby Have. This month’s featured competitors are Pablo Picante and Scorpia Reign.

WEDNESDAY 1/15

Misti Gaither’s Spotlight Project: Carnaval Lounge; 2227 St. Claude Ave.; 8:45 - 10:30 p.m. Each month Misti will be inviting a different guest to share the stage, collaborate and perform in this intimate setting. This

month’s guests will be Marshall Harris and Adam Rohr. Doors open at 8pm .. Showtime 9:00, $5.00 @ door.

THURSDAY 1/16

Queer Root - Mädchen in Uniform: The LGBT Community Center; 2727 S. Brian Ave.; 7 - 9 p.m. Join Queer Root Films for a showing of the 1931 lesbian drama Madchen in Uniform. The film, made under the spectre of rising fascism, miraculously survived Nazi Germany’s attempts to censor and destroy it. Discussion and interaction with the film is welcome. Note: This film will be subtitled. Queer Root is Tylyn, Lizxnn, and Sally. The project is intended to share queer and trans cinema classics, hidden gems, modern masterpieces, and the occasional smut. Talk To The Hand! 3rd Thursdays Totally ‘90s/00’s: GrandPre’s 834 N. Rampart St.; 10 p.m. Join the fun at GrandPre’s for their monthly Third Thursday Totally ‘90s (and early ‘00s) Dance Party! It’s gonna be a retrolicious rewind. No cover! Untitled Drag Show: The Allways Lounge & Cabaret; 2249 St. Claude Ave.; 10 p.m. - 1 a.m. [untitled drag show] seeks to let some of New Orleans’ drag artists explore deeper into the realm of drag as art. This revealing approach to drag brings the unexpected to the surface in a show that has shown itself equally capable of being moving, silly, sad, and sexy. This monthly showcase is hosted by Siren and the January edition will feature works by: Puddin Tain, Smokestack Lightning, Saint S and Qween Quan. Doors at 10. Show at 11. $10 admission at the door.

FRIDAY 1/17

The 2nd MR NUDE ORLEANS Pageant and Party: The Allways Lounge & Cabaret; 2240 St. Claude Ave.; 10 p.m. - 4 a.m. From the creator of Mr. Nude York comes an allnude, all-lewd, all-dude beauty pageant in New Orleans. Daniel Nardicio, the man responsible for bringing John Waters, Alan Cumming, Dina Martina, Sandra Bernhard, Bette Bathhouse and Beyond and others to New Orleans announces his most titillating event in NOLA yet. Contestants get a chance to show off their wares in a swimsuit competition, a strip-off, a hilarious Q and A portion, and the last part, the big reveal. The winner takes home $300 and the chance to reign as Mr. Nude Orleans. Tickets may be purchased at https://www.brownpapertickets.com/ event/4423567.

SATURDAY 1/18

The Queens of Carnival Drag Brunch: Nole Restaurant; 2001 St. Charles Ave.; 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Join the Queens of the Carnival for a fabulous Drag Brunch. $55 all inclusive

includes: Brunch Buffet starting at 10:00am; Performance at 11:30am; Bottomless mimosas and margaritas and Free Valet Parking. Limited Seating! For tickets, go to www.eventbrite. com. Krewe of Stars Show Ball 4: Jefferson Performing Arts Center; 6400 Airline Dr.; 7 p.m. Come out to the Krewe of Stars’ Show Ball 4 themed Media Circus. This year’s royalty is Margaret Orr and Eric Paulsen. Tickets are online at www.kreweofstars. com. Roar into Roe with NOAF: The Allways Lounge & Cabaret; 2240 St. Claude Ave.; 8 - 10 p.m. Join the New Orleans Abortion Fund for Roar Into Roe, our annual comedy show celebrating “Roe v. Wade,” the 1973 Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion, upholding a woman’s right to self-determination, agency and bodily autonomy. Suggested donation of $10 - $20. Hosted by comics Benjamin Hoffman and Paul Oswell, and featuring local comics! All proceeds benefit the New Orleans Abortion Fund. It’s Showtime on Rampart Street; GrandPre’s; 834 North Rampart St.; 10 p.m. Come out and catch this exciting drag show starring Moanalot Fontaine and special guests. R + B - A Night of Synsuality: Cafe Istanbul; 2372 St. Claude Ave.; 10:30 p.m. - 1 a.m. Come celebrate the sensuality of music of the African Diaspora from Reggae to Ratchet. Tickets are $20.

SUNDAY 1/19

Laughing with GRIFF Comes to New Orleans: Algiers Auditorium 2485 Guadalcanal St.; 7 p.m. The first “Laughing with GRIFF” will be held in the New Orleans Metropolitan area. For additional information about the upcoming show contact Laurel Hill Productions at 504-210-5178. Tickets now on sale at http://laughingwithgriff. eventcreate.com.

TUESDAY 1/21 – SUNDAY 1/26

Miss Saigon: Saenger Theatre; 1111 Canal St. Performance schedule is: Tuesday – Thursday: 7:30 p.m., Friday: 8 p.m., Saturday: 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. and Sunday: 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets for Miss Saigon start at $30. Tickets can be purchased at BroadwayInNewOrleans.com, all Ticketmaster outlets, by calling (800) 982-2787 or at the Saenger Theatre Box Office located at 1111 Canal St. Miss Saigon tells the story of a young Vietnamese woman named Kim, who is orphaned by war and forced to work in a bar run by a notorious character known as the Engineer. There she meets and falls in love with an American G.I. named Chris, but they are torn apart by the fall of Saigon. For three years, Kim goes on an epic journey of survival to find

42 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


SNAP PAPARAZZI Sipps Bar Gulfport, MS PHOTOS BY DWAIN HERTZ

SIPPS BAR GULFPORT Our beer is cold, patio is shaded, and pool tables and nightlife dance floor are waiting for your moves at Sipps bar Downtown Gulfport.

OPENING HOURS Everyday 5pm - TILL ADDRESS 2218 25th Ave, Gulfport, MS Phone: (228) 206-7717 Email: sipps25th@gmail.com

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 43


her way back to Chris, who has no idea he’s fathered a son. This new production features stunning spectacle and a sensational cast of 42.

TUESDAY 1/21

Frankie Boots, Juno Dunes; Quantlebaum (Portland) and The Sam Chase (San Francisco): Carnaval Lounge: 2227 St. Claude Ave.; 9 p.m. - midnight. Local buds team up with distant pals for an evening of sweet Americana revelry. $5 cover. Clown Town Presents Vive La Revolution Featuring Eddie Lockwood: The Allways Lounge & Cabaret; 2240 St. Claude Ave.; 10 p.m. - midnight. Featuring performances by: Tsarina Magalena Hellfire, Flutterbug, Porkchop, Stanley Roy, Scabies the Clown and starring: Eddie Lockwood. $10 cover.

WEDNESDAY 1/22

F-NO Presents Stories of Water Injustice: Zeitgeist Theatre & Lounge: 6621 St. Claude Ave.; 6 - 8 p.m. F-NO: Film New Orleans is committed to elevating the voices of independent artists, particularly cinematic storytellers and is the filmic branch of 102.3 WHIV FM - New Orleans community radio dedicated to human rights and social justice. L’eau est la Vie: Water is Life (Melissa Cox); Bayou Bridge Pipeline (Alex Glustrom); LOCKED (Patrick and Daneeta Loretta Jackson). Repre-

sentatives from the films and panelists will be present after the screenings to share methods for civic engagement. Recommended: a $5-10 dollar contribution in support of the venue and our non-profit organization. Tickets will be available first come, first serve at the venue.

THURSDAY 1/23

F-NO Presents Stories of Water Injustice: Zeitgeist Theatre & Lounge: 6621 St. Claude Ave.; 6 - 8 p.m. F-NO: Film New Orleans is committed to elevating the voices of independent artists, particularly cinematic storytellers and is the filmic branch of 102.3 WHIV FM - New Orleans community radio dedicated to human rights and social justice. The film Fear No Gumbo tells the story of ongoing institutional racism and injustice occurring in the Lower 9th Ward. Kimberly-Rivers Roberts portrays her neighborhood which has remained in plight since Katrina. Kimberly will be present after the screenings to share methods for civic engagement. Recommended: a $5-10 dollar contribution in support of the venue and our non-profit organization. Tickets will be available first come, first serve at the venue.

FRIDAY 1/24

The Truffle Honeys: Cafe Istanbul; 2372 St. Claude Ave.; 6:45 - 9:45

p.m. Join The Truffle Honeys at Cafe Istanbul! They will be performing many of our classics as well as a new 80’s set! Joining us are Jeffrey Pounds on piano, Bryan Barberot on drums, Mickey Hayes on guitar and Nabil Muquit on saxophone. $10 door cover. The Year of the Quarter Rat: The Allways Lounge & Cabaret; 2240 St. Claude Ave.; 9:30 - 11:30 p.m. Stanley Roy & Laveau Contraire present: The Year of the Quarter Rat. Join Laveau, as they dance and skip through the night, meeting an assortment of fantastically magical Characters who will paint your hearts rainbow-swirl and ring the queerest of gay-bells! Special Appearance by: Devonix----> The King of the Night and creature of Darkness! $15 cover.

SATURDAY 1/25

Exotic Animal Racing: The Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots: 1751 Gentilly Blvd.; 1:30 - 9 p.m. Exotic Animal Racing returns to the Fair Grounds Saturday, January 25th! Come and see Ostriches, Zebras, and Camels race throughout the day in addition to the excitement of thoroughbred racing and the After 8 Band playing in the Club House. Doors at 1:30 pm, first race at 3:00 pm, and the After 8 band plays in the Club House from 5 – 9 pm. $5 General Admission, $10 Club House admission, children 12 and under are free. When It Breaks - New Orleans: Zeitgeist Theatre & Lounge: 6621 St. Claude Ave.; 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. When It Breaks is the inspiring story of Special Education teacher Konrad Wert and his personal journey to avoid becoming another victim of teacher burnout. Stepping away from the classroom, Wert turns to his musical side career as a means to tour the country with his family and engage teachers, parents, and audiences in a conversation about the current state of Special Education. As opportunities arise for his music, Konrad must decide how his service is most effective- as an advocating artist or as a teacher in the classroom. Big Easy Sister Bingo: The Phoenix; 941 Elysian Fields Ave.; 6 - 9 p.m. A brand new year with a brand new BINGO! Drink specials, fabulous prizes and fun.

SUNDAY 1/26

Drag Diva Sunday Brunch - The Magic of Queendom: The Fillmore; 6 Canal St.; 10:30 a.m. For tickets, go to http://www.fillmorenola.com/. It is always best for your group to purchase tickets together to ensure that you’ll be seated together. Large groups, please call 504.872.3303 or email FillmoreNOLABoxOffice@livenation.com for accommodations. Buffet Includes: Scrambled Eggs, Country Potatoes, Bacon, Sausage, Baked Chicken, Fried Catfish, Baked Macaroni, Asparagus Salad w/ Grape Tomatoes, Spring Mix Salad w/ Honey Basil Vinaigrette, and an Assortment of Pastries and Desserts. Towards Together - A Vision For A Kinder, More Inclusive World; The Allways Lounge & Cabaret; 2240 St. Claude Ave.; 7:30 p.m. The week of January 27-31, we are going to flood Instagram in a collective movement called #TowardsTogether. Learn more: TowardsTogether.com. TICKETS: $15 general admission. Mallory Whitfield is building a movement that will change the way people think about diversity and inclusion. Through her one-person show, Towards Together, she is redefining what “normal” means, reimagining how we relate to other people, and guiding us along the path to a kinder, more inclusive world.

WEDNESDAY 1/29

NOAGE Potluck: St. Anna’s Episcopal Church; 1313 Esplanade Ave.; 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Join NOAGE for the first potluck of the year at St. Anna’s Episcopal Church! If you are able, please bring a dish. We’ll need main dishes, meats, sides, soups, salads or vegan/vegetarian dishes, desserts, and beverages. The potluck is in the back of the Parish House (the building to the right of the church itself, located at the corner of Esplanade Ave. and Marais St.) PLEASE ENTER FROM THE BACK DOOR; the front door remains locked at all times. There is limited parking and an accessible ramp on the Marais Street side of the building. Please consider bringing non-perishable food items for St. Anna’s Food Pantry.

ARE WE MISSING YOUR EVENTS? Email Us at info@ambushpublishing.com

44 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


Mobile Hot Happenings WEEKLY AT B-BOB’S 213 Conti St., Mobile, AL (251) 433-2262

TUESDAY

Gay Bar BINGO 9:30 & 11PM

THURSDAY

MONDAY

Service Industry Night

TUESDAY Karaoke

p.m. No Cover. Ladies drink half off

Ladies Night w/ Piano 6pm

THURSDAY

Movie Night with Chris 8pm

Drag Bingo & Show

Drink & Drown Karaoke; $10 selective alcohol with $1 refill

PENSACOLA THE ROUNDUP

Amateur Drag Night 11PM

WEDNESDAY Rock n Roll Bingo 8PM

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

THURSDAY

Karaoke; 9 p.m. - 2 a.m.

SATURDAY

Speed Quizzing Trivia; 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Midnight Drag Show

WEEKLY AT FLIP SIDE 54 S. Conception St., Mobile, AL (251) 431-8819

Karaoke

SEC Football

SUNDAY

Along the Gulf South BATON ROUGE MON-FRI

Happy Hour: The Park Pub & Patio; 4619 Bennington Avenue; 3-7p.m.

Upstairs Karaoke: Splash Nightclub; 2183 Highland Rd; 9pm $1 Martinis 9-10pm

SATURDAY

MONDAY

Non-stop Dance Music: Splash Nightclub; 2183 Highland Rd Dancing in the Park: The Park Pub & Patio; 4619 Bennington Avenue;

TUESDAY

Sunday Social Brunch: The Park Pub & Patio; 4619 Bennington Avenue; Noon-3:00p.m. $20 Buffet with Bottomless Mimosas, Bloody Mary’s and Draft Beer

WEDNESDAY

LAFAYETTE BOLT BAR & PATIO

Game Night: George’s Place; 860 St. Louis St; 10p.m. Hosted by Chance SIN Night: The Park Pub & Patio; 4619 Bennington Avenue; 30% Off

Fat Tuesdays & Billiards & Darts Tournaments: The Park Pub & Patio; 4619 Bennington Avenue

Queens Karaoke: George’s Place; 860 St Louis St; 10p.m. Hosted by Alvin McGee Free Cover Wednesdays: Splash Nightclub; 2183 Highland Rd; 9pm Open Mic w/ Ryan Jenkins: The Park Pub & Patio; 4619 Bennington Avenue; 9p.m.

THURSDAY

Double Trouble Thursday: George’s Place; 860 St Louis St; 7pm. $6 Double Wells and $10 Double Calls Show Night: Splash Nightclub; 2183 Highland Rd; 11:30pm. Featuring the Bombshells of Baton Rouge Think and Drink Trivia: The Park Pub & Patio; 4619 Bennington Avenue;

FRIDAY

$5 Fridays: The Park Pub & Patio; 4619 Bennington Avenue;

560 E Heinberg St

TUESDAY

THURSDAY FRIDAY

Drag Bingo with Monica Heart; 6 p.m. - 8 p.m. Win cash and prizes

Funday with Karaoke

WEDNESDAY

WEDNESDAY

GALVESTON 23RD ST. STATION

1706 23rd Street Happy Hour every day until 7 p.m.

MONDAY

Texas Hold ‘Em 7pm

TUESDAY

THURSDAY FRIDAY

Live Entertainment 6pm

SATURDAY

Live Entertainment 9pm

SUNDAY

Sing Along Sundays w/ Piano 4pm7pm

RUMORS

3102 Seawall Blvd. Happy Hour every day until 7 p.m.

FRIDAY & SATURDAY Show Nights 11 p.m. & 12:30 a.m.

SUNDAY THRU THURSDAY Karaoke 8 p.m.

SUNDAY

The Sunday T with Carly & Kymber 4:30 p.m.

Tube-ular Tuesday with Jim 8pm

SUNDAY

114 McKinley St

THURSDAY

Thirsty Thursday; No Cover. $4 Double Wells and $2 wine

FRIDAY

The Ladies of Bolt; 11:30pm. $5 cover

SATURDAY

Dance Night; No Cover. Happy Hour 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.

LAKE CHARLES CRYSTAL’S DOWNTOWN 720 Ryan Street

TUESDAY

Anything But Techno Tuesdays; 10

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 45


Party Down Tony Leggio ledgemgp@gmail.com Christmas, New Year’s and 12th Night have swirled together in a magical mixture of revelry, cocktails and glitter to make this one of the most special holidays. My two weeks were full of parties, theater, restaurants, fireworks, and costumes! While most people in other cities make resolutions for the new year like giving up alcohol, sweets and other enjoyable things, we in New Orleans begin Mardi Gras season with parades, king cake and, of course, more cocktails. Let’s steamroll into this new year! The Monday before Christmas, I met some friends for happy hour at The Crossing. In case you are not familiar, this bar kicks off the week with one of the best happy hours in the city. All Tito’s cocktails are $3 including different martinis. Since a dirty martini up with extra olives is my drink of choice, you can imagine my happiness in discovering this special deal. Speaking of special things and festive parties, on Christmas Eve, my friend Matt Dow and I hopped around to three fabulous soirees to celebrate the holiday. Our first stop on this party train was Rodney Thoulion and RJ Buras’ event

at their beautiful home on the Westbank. Their party is always a warm and inviting mix of family and friends. They have a pretty delicious spread for guests to enjoy. It was a perfect fall evening with a nice chill in the air making it ideal to gather either inside or outside in their spacious backyard. Guests in attendance included Annie Gingrich, Princesse Stephaney, Andrea Halstead, Blake Robertson, Jeff Bater, Tim Irving, Vinson Alford and Julie & Clarence Cavignac. Stop two that evening was the lovely home of Jim Tomeny. Jim’s house is another showplace with one of the most incredibly designed courtyards I have ever seen. Guests enjoyed food, drink and beer pong if they dared. I am not sure how Jim gets some of the hottest college guys at his party, but he does. Guests included Michael Shlenker & Don Schwenn, Brian Johnston, Rob Gerhart & Jerry Fredieu, Michael Styles & Ambush’s own Reed Wendorf. My last stop of the night was Joey Bean’s (aka Debbie with a D) party at his newly renovated home in the Holy Cross neighborhood. Once again, there was scrumptious food and drink

(the homemade spiked eggnog was everything). What they also had was carols at the spinet. Joey, as well as several of the guests, played and sang not only holiday songs but show tunes and original numbers. This memorable event was filled with entertainment and happiness. Joining for the festivities was actor Jay Canova, President of Armeinius Kevin Hemenger, and Ambush’s own contributor & theater expert Brian Sands. Three parties, three different groups of friends, both old and new, and three wonderful memories. I could not think of a more lovely way to ease into Christmas Day. Christmas was all about friends and family. I helped Mama Dawn host our family and some close friends at her home in River Ridge. We had an abundance of food. I know because I helped cook it all, as well as lots of libations. It is always nice to see my friends interacting with my family. It was truly a house filled with love (and unfortunately lots of carbs). Later that evening, I went to my friend Laura Tennyson’s home where she and her husband (who is an amazing chef) Gary fixed a gourmet meal. It was a relaxing way to end the holiday. After the event, I rolled myself back to my house. Christmas 2019 was done. On Friday, I saw the last theater show of the year, John, at the Beauborg Theatre located in the CBD. John, a play by Pulitzer Prize winner Annie Baker, was directed by Xavier Juárez. The action takes place at a B&B in Gettysburg, PA. The show

starred Troi Bechet, Janet Shea who added most of the comic relief, and Joe Fredo & Maile G Zox as a neurotic couple. The play ran right under three hours and it was whittled down from its original form. The actors did a tremendous job and the new theater is quite an impressive space. The following night, my friend Matt and I went on a foodie tour through the Marigny and Bywater area. We started at a new place called Galaxie located at 3060 St. Claude Avenue. Once a service station (I used to get brake tags there), it’s now the home of a gorgeous new taqueria. This place is fantastic. The designers did an excellent job in transforming this once dilapidated 1940s gas station, tho it’s listed on the National Register of Historic Places, into a hip new space. The main focus is their bar which is right through the roll-up garage doors. They have several delicious craft cocktails many with Mezcal (over 30 different kinds as well as flights) and Tequila as you would imagine. The prices are very reasonable. Galaxie takes its lead from the taquerias and culture of Oaxaca and Mexico City. Chef Hank Shackelford, most recently of Marjie’s Grill, Zasu, and Cochon Butcher, heads up the kitchen. Their menu is delightful with some tasty treats like Tacos al Pastor, Oaxacan-style barbacoa, and Baja-style fish tacos along with openfaced quesadillas, sides, and starters like grilled queso. Next we drove down a few blocks to Luna Libre at 3600 St. Claude. This eatery serves Ark-La-Tex Mex food

46 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


featuring tacos, cheese dip, chicken enchiladas verde with vegan and daily fish specials. They also have breakfast tacos on the weekend. But what we really enjoyed was the flaming margaritas, they were simply divine. They also have an outdoor spacious garden space and on certain days offer live music. We then made our way to the Franklin located at 2600 Dauphine Street. The restaurant is housed in a former corner grocery store, and is a nice mixture of both a neighborhood and trendy spot. They have a great craft cocktail selection and delicious snacks like BBQ Spiced Pecans and Warm Olives. Our final stop was directly across the street, the gay neighborhood watering hole Cutter’s which was the perfect laid back way to wrap up the night. The walls are adorned with art from talented local artists available for purchase. So you can shop and drink at the same time. My first Sunday Funday was more relaxing than partying, but I did make it out in the afternoon to the home of Marc Behar and Jeff Sbisa’s Hanukkah party at their Garden District home. The event brought a lot of well-wishers and culminated with the story of celebration and a naughty gift exchange. There was lots to drink and eat, especially their various homemade latkes which were mouth-watering. Guests included Matt Dow, Brian Sands, Lawrence Gobble, William Sparks, Michael Shlenker & Don Schwenn, Glenn Reames, Angie Bowlin and Martin Robinson. Afterwards, Matt and I ducked out to catch the new Star Wars movie The Rise of Skywalker. I am not sure why

there was so much negativity for it. It may not have been perfect, but it was a satisfying way to end the series with enough twists and action to keep the storyline moving nicely. It was also wonderful to see the delightful Carrie Fisher grace the screen once more. With all the Christmas celebrations behind me, it was New Year’s Eve and time to leave 2019 behind and usher in 2020. I rang in the new year at the first event on the new riverboat City of New Orleans with friends Barrett & Beaux Delong-Church and Bizzie & Matt Dow. The new boat is gorgeous and had four floors of beautiful event space with their top deck being a prime spot to watch the fireworks-- literally right in front of us. Good food, great cocktails, lovely space and wonderful friends, welcome 2020! After the Fleur di Lis dropped, the fireworks were done and the bar closed, we made our way into the French Quarter and stopped to play at the gay establishments, ending at the Corner Pocket. It was quite a night. Very excited about the new year and all the possibilities. I was extremely hung over on New Year’s Day but I managed to meet some friends for brunch at Who Dat Cafe in the Marigny. They had a blackeyed peas and cabbage special in order to get my luck and money fix for the year. The food here is always good and the service is superior with a friendly staff both in the cafe and coffee bar area. The rest of the day was reserved for my couch and binging television shows I wanted to catch up on. Not a bad way to spend day 1 of 2020. Saturday was an easy day, with me hanging out with Mama Leggio, but I did try a new restaurant that re-

cently opened up in Mid City. Junior’s on Harrison is a new eatery that is welcoming, open and warm. It is two stories with the downstairs being family friendly and the upstairs being more adults only. They are open for lunch and dinner, and have classic food as well as some contemporary dishes. It is definitely a neighborhood place with delectable food with healthy portions. If you are like me and prefer a more children free zone when you dine, I suggest upstairs, but either up or down you will have a great meal. Even though my two weeks ended on a down note with the Saints stunning loss to the Vikings in overtime, I knew the following day would make it all better with the start of Carnival Season. Before I tell you about my 12th Night escapades, tho, I just want to thank The Crossing for being one of my favorite spots to show the sports ball shows. The Crossing is not just a great place to watch games it is an incredible social experience. First, they have televisions all over the place so no matter where you stand, you have a perfect view of all the action. Second, they normally serve food and for the Saints game, they went all out with a delicious sausage medley and meatballs (all meat, there is a gay joke somewhere in there). And last, when the Saints score, shots were given all around to guests. Free (and inexpensive) cocktails, food and friends, who could ask for more? Afterwards, I made the long walk back to the Marigny from the French Quarter making a quick stop at Mags 940 to have one more cocktail with Princesse Stephaney who can always cheer you up! On 12th Night, I knocked one off

my annual bucket list by participating in the Krewe de Jeanne d’Arc parade that honors the Saint’s birthday. I was privileged to be asked to be in Margarita Bergen’s entourage for the parade. Margarita was this year’s Queen Yolande. The king was French-born sign-making master Simon, and the horseback-riding Maid of Honor (representing Joan of Arc as a young girl) was Lusher High School student Zoe Kanga. The parade was an amazing event not only to watch, but to be part of. The crowd was wonderfully festive and it was hysterical interacting with them. I handed out custom matchbooks, and talked about lighting up the night. The parade’s groups (if you pay attention carefully) tell the history of Joan’s life. I especially love the Flaming Heretics. Margarita was a beautiful queen and it was an honor being a part of the parade. Item one scratched off my list. Nine to go. Afterwards, I attended Frank Perez’s 12th Night Soiree at the Mardi Gras Museum of Costumes and Culture. A fabulous party, guests were either dressed to the nines or in full costume regalia. I wore my Sassy Gay Monk outfit that I had on in the parade complete with glittered sword courtesy of costumer extraordinaire Daryl Dunaway (aka Countess C. Alice). There were cocktails and merriment as guests enjoyed an evening of Carnival fun. And congratulations to Duaine Daniels who is our new Grand Reveler. Until next article, Happy Mardi Gras everyone! Do you want your party or event covered? Invite me! ledgemgp@gmail.com

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 47


BUSINESS FINANCIAL & BUSINESS

Financial Wisdom for College Students Scot I. Billeaudeau, JD, LL.M. ADPA® s.billeaudeau@ampf.com Is your son or daughter heading to college? If the answer is yes, it’s an exciting moment in your child’s life. But, financially, it can also be a paralyzing time if they do not have a principled approach for managing money. Out on their own for the first time, your child has an opportunity to sharpen their financial skills for the future, but they are vulnerable to mistakes. Thankfully, regular chats about money can help get them on the right path. Here are some suggested financial topics to cover with your college-aged child: Expected financial contributions. College costs have skyrocketed in recent years. Tuition, room and board, books and travel can readily exceed $100,000 depending on what school your child attends. Your family situation will dictate how you manage these costs. Students who carry some financial responsibility for their education tend to be more invested in the outcome. Before your child starts college, be clear about whether or not you

expect them to share some of the costs and how much they need to contribute. If you or your child take out loans for school, discuss who will be responsible for repayment after graduation. Budgeting and spending. For many young adults, college is the first time they will be responsible for their daily living expenses. Help your student create a realistic budget for campus life. Encourage smart decisions around discretionary spending. For example, it’s not uncommon for students with meal plans to eat out several times a week, but that’s an expense that can be avoided. Likewise, indulging in a latte or late-night pizza on a regular basis adds up over four years. Risks to financial reputation. Help your student see how their financial actions in college can affect their future. Some employers run credit checks on prospective employees, meaning if your child has debt or unpaid bills, it can adversely affect hiring decisions. Landlords and mortgage

lenders also look at credit scores. So, talk to your child about how to use credit cards responsibly. Property protection. Most students bring a cell phone and a laptop to school with them. They may have other valuables that would be costly to replace. College campuses are not immune from theft. Let your student know they need to be vigilant about keeping their personal possessions safe. Discuss whether rental insurance makes sense. It may provide the protection your student needs while at school. Daily account monitoring. Cell phones and laptops are not just for homework and social media. Help your student get in the habit of monitoring their bank account on their electronic devices. Daily check-ins can help students avoid overspending and spot fraud if it occurs. They also should take care to avoid using public or unsecured wi-fi when conducting financial activities online. Financial check-ins. Talk about

how you will discuss money matters while they are away at school. Set up weekly or monthly financial chats so you can review expenses, reset expectations, adjust budgets and so on. If problems arise, you have a standing appointment to work things out. These conversations can help prepare your son or daughter for a relationship with a financial advisor. When the time is right, encourage them to find a professional who can help them set and achieve financial goals over a lifetime. Scot I. Billeaudeau, JD, LL.M. ADPA®, is a Financial Advisor with Waterfront Wealth Management, a private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. He specializes in addressing the unique needs of the diverse LGBTQ community, fee-based financial planning and asset management strategies, and has been in practice for 11 years.

Beyond Burger Beyond Clover

G N I V R E S NOW

Beyond Clover Burger 48 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


SNAP PAPARAZZI Out & About with Rue Royale Revelers AT MYSTIK KREWE DE LA RUE ROYALE REVELERS | PHOTOS BY DWAIN HERTZ

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 49


LGBTQ Owned & Friendly Business Directory NEW ORLEANS

ACCOMMODATIONS

The Burgundy Bed and Breakfast, 2513 Burgundy St, (504) 261-9477, theburgundy.com Aaron Ingram Haus, 1012 Elysian Fields Ave, (504) 949-3110, ingramhaus.com Blues60 Guest House, 1008 Elysian Fields Ave, (504) 324-4311, blues60guesthouse.com The BEARigny Suites, 2226 N Rampart St, (504) 309-0062, thebearignysuite.com

BARS & CLUBS

Four Seasons & Patio Stage Bar, 3229 N. Causeway Blvd, (504) 8320659

Bourbon St, (504) 593-9761

(504) 523-4517 Friendly Bar, 2301 Chartres St, (504) 943-8929

700 Club, 700 Burgundy St, (504) 5611095, 700nola.com

Golden Lantern, 1239 Royal St, (504) 529-2860

Black Penny, 700 N Rampart St, (504) 304-4779, facebook.com/ blackpennynola

GrandPre’s, 834 N Rampart St, (504) 267-3615 Kajun’s Pub, 2256 St Claude Ave, (504) 947-3735 Mags 940, 940 Elysian Fields Ave, (504) 948-1888 Oz New Orleans, 800 Bourbon St, (504) 593-9491, ozneworleans.com Phoenix Bar, 941 Elysian Fields Ave, (504) 945-9264, phoenixbarnola.com Rawhide 2010, 740 Burgundy St, (504) 525-8106, rawhide2010.com

Bourbon Pub/Parade, 801 Bourbon St, (504) 529-2107, bourbonpub.com

The Page Bar, 542 N Rampart St, (504) 875-4976

Café Lafitte in Exile, 901 Bourbon St, (504) 522-8397, www.lafittes.com

VooDoo Lounge, 718 N Rampart St, (504) 265-0953

Corner Pocket, 940 St Louis St, (504) 568-9829, www.cornerpocket.net

The Country Club, 634 Louisa St, (504) 945-0742, thecountryclubneworleans. com

Cutter’s Bar, 706 Franklin Ave, (504) 948-4200 Crossing NOLA, 439 Dauphine St,

Phillips Bar, 733 phillipsbar.com Lafitte’s

Blacksmith

Cherokee

St,

Shop,

941

Big Daddy’s, 2513 Royal street, (504) 948-6288 Big Easy Daiquiris, Several locations throughout the French Quarter Good Friends Bar, 740 Dauphine Street, (504) 566-7191, goodfriendsbar.com Napoleon’s Itch, 734 Bourbon St, (504) 237-4144 Tropical Isle, 721 Bourbon St, (504) 529-4109, tropicalisle.com Allways Lounge and Cabaret, 2240 St. Claude Ave

BOOKSTORES

Faubourg Marigny Art and Books, 600 Frenchmen St

CIRCUIT / EVENT

Gay Easter Parade, Easter Sunday, gayeasterparade.com Gay Mardi Gras, gaymardigras.com

New Orleans Pride, June 7-9, 2019, NewOrleansPrideFestival.com Southern Decadence, Labor Day Weekend, SouthernDecadence.com Halloween New Orleans, October 25-27, 2019, HalloweenNewOrleans. com Gay Appreciation ambushpublishing.com

Awards,

GALLERIES

Casell Bergen Gallery, 1305 Decatur St, (504) 478-6744, casellbergengallery.com

GROCERIES

Matassa’s Market, 1001 Dauphine St, (504) 412-8700, https://www. matassas.com Quartermaster Deli, 1100 Bourbon St, www.quartermasterdeli.net Robert’s Fresh Market, 2222 St. Claude Ave, (504) 207-0162, robertfreshmarket.com

GUIDES

Official Gay Easter Parade Guide, gayeasterparade.com Official Gay Mardi Gras Guide, gaymardigras.com

50 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


LGBTQ Owned & Friendly Business Directory Official Gay New Orleans Guide, gayneworleans.com Official Pride Guide, neworleanspridefestival.com Official Southern Decadence Guide, southerndecadence.com

HAIR SALONS

FiFi Mahony’s, 934 Royal St, (504) 525-4343, fifimahonys.com Head Quarters Hair Salon, 906 Bourbon St, (504) 522-2666 Micky Nolan Salon, 717 Toulouse St, (504) 587-7782, mickeynolansalon. com Two Guys Cutting Hair, 2372 St Claude Ave #125, 215.519.5030, (504) 239-2397

HARDWARE

Mary’s Ace Hardware, 732 N Rampart St, (504) 529-4465, acehardware.com

HEALTHCARE

Odyssey House, 1125 North Tonti Street, ohlinc.org Access Health Louisiana, 3300 South Broad Street, 234 Loyola Ave. Ste 300B, accesshealthla.org UMC - HIV Outpatient Program, 2000 Canal Street, 4th Floor, 4C Clinic, (504) 702-4344, umcno.org/ infectiousdisease CrescentCare, 1631 Elysian FIelds Ave, (504) 821-2601, crescentcare. org

MUSEUMS

Mardi Gras Museum, 813 Bienville St, (504) 523-5433

ORGANIZATIONS

Louisiana Trans Advocates, (877) 565-8860, latransadvocates.org NOLA Softball League, nolasoftball. org Crescent City rougarouxrugby.org

Rougaroux,

Stonewall Sports, facebook.com/ groups/stonewallneworleans Krewe of Petronius, PO Box 1102, kreweofpetronius.net The Mystic Krewe of Amon-Ra, PO Box 57783, kreweofamonra.com Krewe of Apollo de New Orleans, P. O. Box 770973, www.mkaneworleans. com Krewe of Armenius, 433 N. Broad St,

armenius.org Krewe of Mwindo, PO Box 51031, (504) 913-5791 Krewe of Stars, 1010 Conti St, kreweofstars.com Krewe of Narcissus, PO Box 3832, (504) 228-9441

The Chamber is a network of LGBT and ally business owners, corporate partners, and community leaders that support business development and equality.

Mystic Krewe of Lords of Leater, 1000 Bourbon Street #B415, lordsofleather.org Renegade Bears of Louisiana, PO Box 3083, renegadebearsoflouisiana@ gmail.com Crescent City Leathermen, 941 Elysian Fields Ave, crescentcityleathermen.org NOAGE, noagenola.org The Krewe of King kreweofkingarthur.com

Mission To promote an inclusive business environment by connecting LGBT-owned/operated and allied businesses in the Gulf South.

Arthur,

LGBT Community Center, 2727 S Broad Ave, (504) 333-5412 Gulf South Chamber of Commerce, (504) 754-5279, gulfsouthchamber. com Friday Night Before Mardi Gras, fridaynightbeforemardigras.com Krewe of Queenateenas/ King Cake Queen Royalty Club, gaymardigras. com

Vision A society where individuals and businesses have equal rights, equal representation, and equal opportunities.

P-Flag New Orleans, (504) 617-5987, alberto.oliver@cox.com Mystic Krewe of Apollo de New Orleans, mkaneworleans.com

PHARMACY

Mumfrey’s Pharmacy, 1021 W. Judge Perez Dr., (504) 279-6312, mumfreyspharmacy.com Avita Pharmacy, 2601 Tulane Ave Ste 445, (504) 822-8013

PHOTOGRAPHY

G Douglas Photography, LLC, Wedding and Portriat Photography, By Appointment Only, gdouglasadamsphotography.com

Values Respect Diversity Inclusivity

Equality Knowledge Community

Craig Fremin Photography, By Appointment Only, craigfremin.com Graham/ Studio One, By Appointment Only, grahamstudioone.com Parker Studios, By Appointment Only, halle.parker15@outlook.com

REAL ESTATE

Steve Richards Properties Latter & Blum, 712 Orleans Ave, (504) 258-

gslgbtchamber.org

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 51


LGBTQ Owned & Friendly Business Directory 1800 Michael Styles Realtor, Engel & Volkers, (504) 777-1773, nolastyles. com, Michael specializes in helping first-time homebuyers and real estate investors find the perfect New Orleans properties.

RELIGION

St. Anna’s Espicopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave, (504) 947-2121, stannanola.org Metropolitan Community Church New Orleans, 5401 S Claiborne Ave, mccneworleans.com

Louisa Street, (504) 945-0742, thecountryclubnreorleans.com Cru, 535 Franklin Ave, (504) 446-0040, crunola.com

The Bombay Club, 830 Rue Conti, (504) 577-2237, bombayclubneworleans. com

Dat Dog on Frenchmen, 601 Frenchmen St, (504) 309-3362, datdog.com

The Ruby Slipper Café, 2001 Burgundy St, (504) 525-9355, therubyslippercafe.net

EAT, 900 Dumaine St, (504) 522-7222, eatnola.com

Who Dat Coffee Cafe, 2401 Burgundy St, (504) 872-0360, whodatcoffee. com

Envie Espresso Bar & Cafe, 1241 Decatur St, (504) 524-3689, cafeenvie.com

RESTAURANTS

Kingfish Kitchen & Cocktails, 337 Chartres Street, (504) 598-5005, kingfishneworleans.com

Broussard’s Restaurant & Courtyard,

Lousiana Pizza Kitchen, 615 S. Carrollton Ave, (504) 237-0050, louisianapizzakitchenuptown.com

801 Royal, 801 Royal Street, (504) 581-0801, 801royal.com 819 Rue Conti, (504) 581-3866, broussards.com

Cafe Sbisa, 1011 Decatur Street, (504) 522-5565, cafesbisanola.com Chef Ron’s Gumbo Stop , 2309 N. Causeway Blvd, (504) 835-2022, gumbostop.com Clover Grill, 900 Bourbon St, (504) 598-1010, www.clovergrill.com Country

Club

Restaurant,

634

(504) 948-0077, santafenola.com

Mona Lisa, 1212 Royal St, (504) 5226746, monalisaneworleans.com, NOLA Poboys, 908 Bourbon, (504) 655-3312, nolapoboys.com Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar & Bistro, 720 Orleans Ave, (504) 5231930, Orleansgrapevine.com Royal House Oyster Bar, 441 Royal Street, royalhouserestaurant.com Santa Fe Restaurant, 3201 Esplanade,

Who Dat Coffee Cafe, 9207 W. St. Bernard Hwy, (504) 354-8452

RETAIL

Mr. Binky’s Boutique, 107 Chartres St, (504) 302-2095 QT Pie Boutique, 241 Dauphine St, (504) 581-6633 Skully’z Recordz, 907 Bourbon St, (504) 592-4666 Bourbon Pride, 909 Bourbon Street, (504) 566-1570 COK (Clothing or Kink), 941 Elysian FIelds, Located inside the Phoenix Bar XXX Shop, 1835 N. Rampart St, (504) 232-3063

SERVICES

Formal Connection, 299 Belle Terre Blvd, 985.652-1195 Washing Well Laundryteria, 841 Bourbon St, (504) 523-9955 Bear Hebert Yoga and Life Coach, bearteachesyoga.com NOLA Healer: Lawrence Gobble, nolahealer.com , Massage Therapy A&B Errand Services, (504) 3197227, aandberrandservices.com Flambeaux CrossFit, 505 N Causeway Blvd, Metairie, flambeauxcrossfit.com

THEATERS

Cafe Istanbul, 2372 St. Claude Ave #140, (504) 974-0786, cafeistanbulnola.com Southern Rep Theater, 2541 Bayou Road, (504) 522-6545, southernrep. com

TOURS

Crescent City Tours, 638 St. Ann, (504) 568-0717, Gay New Orleans Walking Tours

HOUSTON

BARS & CLUBS

Rich’s, 2401 San Jacinto Street, www. facebook.com/richshouston

52 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


LGBTQ Owned & Friendly Business Directory JR’s, 808 Pacific Street, (713) 5212519, jrsbarandgrill.com

Acadiana Pride, acadianapride.org

Eagle Houston, 611 Hyde Park Blvd, (713) 523-2473, houstoneagle.com

Pride of SWLA, Date TBA, prideofswla. org, info@prideofswla.org

Guava Lamp, 570 Waugh Drive, (713) 524-3359, guavalamphouston.com

Date

TBA,

HEALTHCARE

Pearl Houston, 4216 Washington Ave281.757-3229, facebook.com/ pearlbarhouston/

HAART (HIV AIDS Alliance Region Two, Inc), 4550 North Blvd. Ste 250, Baton Rouge, (225) 927-1269, haartinc.org

Neon Boots Dancehall & Saloon, 11410 Hempstead Rd, (713) 6770828, neonbootsclub.com

Krewe of Apollo de Baton Rouge, apollobatonrouge.com

Ripcord, 715 Fairview St, (713) 5212792, theripcord.com

Krewe of Apollo kreweofapollo.com

The Ranch Hill Saloon, 24704 Interstate 45 Ste 103, (281) 298-9035, ranchhill.com Axelrad, 1517 Alabama St, (713) 5978800, alexradbeergarden.com Poison Girl Cocktail Lounge, 1641 Westheimer Rd. Ste B, (713) 5279929, poisongirlbar.com

CIRCUIT / EVENT

Houston Pride, June 22, pridehouston. org The Woodlands Pride, September, thewoodlandstxpride.wordpress.com QFEST, Houston Gay & Lesbian Film Festival, q-fest.com

ORGANIZATIONS

UH LGBTQ Resource Center, 4465 University Drive, (832) 842-6191, www.uh.edu/lgbtq The Montrose Center, 401 Branard Street, (713) 529-0037, montrosecenter.org AIDS Foundation of Houston, 6260 Westpark Dr. Suite 100, (713) 6236796, aidshelp.org

PHARMACY

Avita Pharmacy, 6800 West Loop South Ste 225, (713) 592-0211, avitapharmacy.com

SOUTH LOUISIANA BARS & CLUBS

Splash, 2183 Highland Rd, Baton Rouge, (225) 242-949, splashbr.com

ORGANIZATIONS de

Lafayette,

PHARMACY

Avita Pharmacy, 5551 Corporate Blvd, Baton Rouge, avitapharmacy. com

NORTHERN LOUISIANA, MISSISSIPPI & ALABAMA BARS & CLUBS

Club Pink, 1914 Roselawn Avenue, Monroe, myclubpink.com Central Station, 1025 Marshall St, Shreveport, (318) 222-2216 The Korner Lounge, 800 Louisiana Ave, Shreveport, thekornerlounge. com BAR 3911, 3911 Northview Drive, Jackson, (601) 586-1468, Open: Thurs & Fri 8PM–2AM, Sat 8PM–4AM Our Place, 2115 7th Ave Birmingham, (205) 715-0077

S,

Club 322, 322 N Lawrence Street, Montgomery, club322.business.site Icon, 516 Greensboro Ave, Tuscaloosa

CAMPING

CIRCUIT / EVENT

CIRCUIT / EVENT

Gulf Coast Pride, June 29, 2019, Biloxi, MA, gcpride.org

Birminham,

RELIGION

Safe Harbor Family Church, safeharborfamilychurch.org Joshua Generation joshuageneration.rocks

MCC,

GULF COAST BARS & CLUBS

Sexacola, May 23, Pensacola, FL, sexacolabeach.com Memorial Weekend Pensacola, Pensacola, FL, johnnychisholm.com Pensacola Pride, June 15-16, facebook.com/pensacolapride

HEALTHCARE

The Midtown Pub, 153 Foorida Street, Mobile, (251) 450-1555

Oasis Florida, 25 E Wright Street, (850) 429-7551, oasisflorida.org

Gabriel’s Downtown, 55 South Joachmin Street, Mobile, (251) 4324900

Coastal Family Health Care, 1046 Division St, Biloxi, coastalfamilyhealth. org

B-Bob’s, 213 Conti Street, Mobile (251) 433-2262, b-bobs.com Flip Side Bar & Patio, 545 S. Conception Street, Mobile, (251) 4318819, flipsidebarpatio.com

HIV CARE AND SERVICES

My Brothers Keeper, 407 Orchard Park, Ridgeland, MS, (769) 257-7721, mbkinc.org

ORGANIZATIONS

The Roundup 560 East Heinberg Street, Pensacola, (850) 433-8482

Order of Osiris, PO Box 1991, Mobile, AL, orderofosiris.com

Cabaret, 101 S Jefferson Street E, Pensacola, (850) 607-2020

Order of Dinoysus D’Iberville, MS, https://www.facebook.com/Order-OfDionysus

Rumors Biloxi, 3540 Bienville Blvd, Biloxi, (228) 875-4131 Just Us Lounge, 906 Division Street, Biloxi, (228) 374-1007 Sipps Bar Gulfport, 2218 25th Ave, Gulfport, (228) 206-7717, sippsgulfport.com

Gulf Coast Transgender Alliance, (850) 332-8416, gulfcoasttransgenderalliance.com, gctransgenderalliance@gmail.com Gay Grassroots, 6847 N. 9th Avenue, Ste A, Box 317, Pensacola, ggnwfl. com

Chapel Bar, 620 27th Street S, Brirmingham, (205) 703-9778, chapelbarinfo@gmail.com

The Park Pub & Bar, 4619 Benningotn Ave, Baton Rouge, Facebook @ theparkbr

Baton Rouge Pride, June 15, brpride. org

Krewe of Apollo mkabirmingham.com

Quest Bar, 416 24th Street S, Birmingham, (205) 251-4313, info@ quest-club.com

George’s Place, 860 St. Louis St, Baton Rouge, (225) 387-9798, georgesplacebr.com

Crystals, 112 W. Broad St, Lake Charles, (337) 433-5457

CIRCUIT / EVENT

Mobile Pride, October 5, 2019, Mobile, AL, mobpride.org

Al’s on 7th Street, 2627 7th Ave S, Birmingham, (205) 422-4218

Wildwoods Hideaway, Eutaw, AL, (205) 860-0836, wildwoodshideaway. com

Bolt, 114 McKinley St, Lafayette, (337) 534-4913, facebook.com/boltlaffy

ORGANIZATIONS

The Spectrum Center, 210 S 25th Ave, Hattiesburg, (601) 909-5338

CENLA Pride, May 31 - June 2, Alexandria, LA, facebook.com/ cenlaclasspride

Get Listed for $10 per Issue Want to see your business, organization, or event in our next issue?

Email Ambush sales@ambushpublishing.com

Oxford Pride, April 28-May 5, Oxford MS, oxfordmspride.rocks Central Alabama Pride, June 1-10, 2019, Birmingham, AL, facebook. com/centralalabamaprideinc Druid City Pride, October 2019, Tuscaloosa, AL, druidcitypride.org

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 53


COMICS, PUZZLES & HOROSCOPES CROSSWORD & WORD SEARCH ACROSS

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2) The _____ is one of 2 New Orleans’ friendliest bars, located on Rampart St. 4) The _____ Lounge offers a traditional Dive 8 Bar atmosphere for those looking to wind 9 10 down after a night in the quarter 7) Upstairs at Good Friends Bar, is the Queen’s _______ Pub. 9) The _____ is Gay Dive Bar complete with 16 17 males dancing on the 18 bar each night Coyote-Ugly style. You are sure to have a lively time at this bar. 11) Very cozy gay bar located Uptown. 20 12) Neighborhood bar with lots of beer choic21 es. 18) Located in the Marigny, The _____ Bar is known for its great, inexpensive drinks and a must-try happy hour. 19) This steampunk bar was once the famous Double Play Bar. 20) _______ Bar, located in the Marigny, has bar games, fast service and great cocktails. 21) Napoleon’s Itch is known for signature drinks and its annual Bourbon Street ____.

DOWN

1) Down-home watering hole with karaoke, a jukebox, elevated bar bites, drinks & late hours. 3) This bar was established in 1966 and has a cozy atmosphere and is home to Southern Decadence. 5) This two story bar is one of New Orleans most famous dance clubs. 6) Big Daddy’s is a great dive bar in the Marigny with great drinks and great conversation. 8) New Orleans’ newest gay bar, opening in Jan-

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uary, that has delicious late night bites. 10) French Quarter’s leather/Levi bar. 13) The _____ Bar caters to the leather crowd but is welcoming to everyone. Open 24/7. 14) This Marigny bar also includes a bed and breakfast and is home to many fundraisers, bluegrass music, and drag shows. 15) The Bourbon Pub & Parade is New Orleans’ largest gay and lesbian bar. 16) ________ is the official starting point of the Gay Easter Parade. 17) Cafe Lafitte in Exile is the ____ gay bar in the United States.

Ideals for a crossword? Email us at info@ambushpublishing.com!

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PUZZLE WORD BANK PIMMS CUP HURRICANE PURPLE DRINK BLOODY MARY CHERRY BOMB MIND ERASER HAND GRENADE ABSINTHE SAZERAC GIN FIZZ BRANDY CRUSTA ABITA BEER MINT JULEP DAIQUIRI SEPARATOR

Want More Puzzles? Email us at info@ambushpublishing.com with ideas, suggestions, feedback, etc. on content for the comic/ puzzle section. 54 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


HOROSCOPES

Messages from the Oracle in New Orleans Dan Beck, #1 Astrologer in New Orleans dan@innermakeup.net Once upon a time, humans engaged with the possibilities of the future through omens, prophecies, and oracles. The art of astrology evolved out of these practices and now emphasizes your moment of birth, the celestial reflection of who you are. This combination of your birth chart and the usage of that document to divine the past, present, and future is here for your taking. Astrology offers the LGBTQ community a chance to reclaim a space lost to modern science and religion. Ancient pagan cultures venerated divination and celebrated what we now recognize as modern gay elements. These horoscopes are for your entertainment, so let’s start the party that will take us to the stars! The most important astrological events of the beginning of 2020 are the lunar eclipse and the coming together of Saturn and Pluto. They don’t literally bump into each other in space but do appear next to each other from the vantage point of earth, although Pluto is not visible. Saturn is the Roman equivalent of Chronos, father time, and Pluto is the equivalent of the Greek God Hades, Lord of the Underworld. Around two millennia ago the concepts of the Gods became embodied in the planets, a move that formalized spirit into planetary form. Now we view the movements of the stars and planetary bodies as a clock through which we can understand ourselves in relation to the universe. But what specifically can these astronomical phenomena tell us about ourselves and the events yet to come? I believe it is the heralding of the death of cold, calculating ambition in favor of the structures that truly serve ourselves and each other. Too often are ambition and success treated as God. This eclipse and Saturn & Pluto coming together indicate the letting go of that striving part of ourselves while maintaining the security that ambition and structure grant. Family and friends are where we make karmic gains giving further credence to the old saying, “it’s lonely on top.” There are more images than ever flooding the screens before us, appropriating true human connection that gives deep gratification. These images are blinding and chaotic but lead us, if we are attuned, to the reality that each of us is trying to triumph because, deep down, we seek love.

ARIES

March 21 - April 19

You take up arms for your beliefs this year. Understand these ideas take on a rebellious nature. You will probably engage in some battles. Choose your fights wisely, and make sure you enlist a mentor who has learned to tame his demons in the service of wisdom worth fighting for.

TAURUS

April 20 - May 20 You have a stupendous social year this year. You attend many social gatherings where the food and drink are excellent. However, this can only happen if you don’t think too conservatively about yourself. Getting out and having fun might not seem important but in fact it is the key to your success.

GEMINI

May 21 - June 20 The structuring of your investments come to the fore this year. Some of the conservative moves you have made will do you well, but others will topple. You will need to discern which is which. The way to go is to see this as a juggling act with long term rewards and value what gives you psychic relief above all else.

CANCER

June 21 - July 22 I’ve been writing about this for a while but the karmic gains you’ve hopefully made come to a culmination through this eclipse. You will feel the effects of this through the first half of the year. This has to do with you personally. Relationship-wise you’re due for some change, and when you open your mind to balancing relationship and self, you achieve more than you thought possible.

There you can really confide in others your hopes & wishes, and allow spirit to help make them come true.

LIBRA

September 23 - October 22 This year, like Taurus, you also have a great social life. However, there is a subtle difference. You bring some insights that you’ve gained recently to the larger group. Ultimately, the lessons you learn individually are best expressed to a wider group. Otherwise, that wisdom exists in a vacuum. And because you’re Libra, it is your will to relate to others.

SCORPIO

October 23 - November 21 Your pocketbook grows this year, but only if you take some calculated risks. Lean on a wise mentor who took some risks and, at some point, suffered the slings and arrows. You’ll be able to avoid those same mistakes and make great gains in the process. You’ll also be put in a position to give back some of the wealth you’ll accrue.

SAGITTARIUS

November 22 - December 21 You’re on fire this year, even more so than usual. Watch out that you don’t burn yourself out. Your mind and body are in a compulsively aggressive state. A good way to burn off this energy, and make psychic gains, is in the bedroom.

CAPRICORN

December 22 - January 19 More than any sign, you’re the planetary star of the zodiac this year. With so much emphasis on yourself, you’ll need to rely on a relationship or partnership to nourish you emotionally. Too much focus on the self will have you crippled. You make gains when

you put yourself in a state of mind of letting things go that you can’t control.

AQUARIUS

January 20 - February 18 This started last month, but you have gotten into a loving mood. This is wonderful. The trick is to put this energy into your daily life. It can be hard to see, but how do the daily pleasures in life bring you love? When you open up to this, you value the things that matter more than the sheer brute force of materiality.

PISCES

February 19 - March 20 This eclipse screams romance for you. Though your emphasis in the coming year will be on friends, you have to make sure romance and creative expression don’t get washed out. In fact it’s being washed away that will lead you to a mad romance that will do you well. Just make sure to protect yourself along the way. Astrology was originally understood as omens, prophecies, and oracles. Whenever you go to a psychic, tarot reader, or astrologer like me, you’re engaging with the possibilities of the future. Modern astrology, however, is also the alignment of the heavens at your moment of birth that serves as the signature of your personality. This combination of your star chart and sun sign—Aries, Taurus, etc.—and the usage of that tool to divine the future is here for your taking. I’m Dan Beck, #1 Astrologer in New Orleans. Contact me for readings, parties, events, corporate trainings, and more at dan@innermakeup.net or by calling 504-313-8706. Visit http:// www.innermakeup.net

LEO

July 23 - August 22 Your daily life has taken on a very ambitious tone in recent months. You have a lot of pots on the stove and have big plans. But how do you feel about all of this? If you don’t process your emotions and protect yourself, it will be your undoing.

VIRGO

August 23 - September 22 Ever the worker bee, you have been loving your work more recently. You are also very determined to succeed creatively. However, you truly make gains amongst the friends and social networks that nourish you.

www.GayMardiGras.com · www.GayEasterParade.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · 55


SPORTS Omission of Brees from NFL anniversary top 100 borders on absurdity Ken Trahan, Crescent City Sports The do-it-all man for the Saints is a restricted free agent. Does anyone really believe that New Orleans will not retain Taysom Hill? Though not a betting person, I would be willing to bet my paid for home that Hill will be a Saint in 2020. For that matter, Hill should be a Saint for many years to come. While just three years into his NFL playing career, Hill is no spring chicken. He is more of a summer delight, blossoming in the fall months of the year as an outstanding NFL player. Therein lies the dilemma. What is Hill to the New Orleans Saints? We know he is the consummate jack-of-all trades. Unlike many who fit that description, he is a master at virtually everything he does. Hill covers kickoffs extremely well. He is the best punt rusher, responsible for multiple punt blocks and many other pressures. He is an excellent lead blocker on the edge on offense.

He is an outstanding runner from the quarterback spot. He has displayed a strong arm, with the ability to push the ball down the field on offense. He has become an outstanding receiver. Where do you go from here with Hill if you are Sean Payton? If you truly believe that he can be a starting quarterback in the NFL, when is that going to occur? He is 29. The life-span of playing in the NFL is certain for many, though quarterbacks are playing deep into their 30’s, even their 40’s (see Drew Brees, Tom Brady). With regard to Brees, the expectation is that he will return and why not? Yes, Brees is in the winter of his brilliant career. While not the best quarterback in the league, at this point, Brees remains an elite quarterback. He is conservatively a top 10 player at his position and perhaps still top five. Brees led the league in completion percentage again in 2019 and nearly broke his own record. He was second in the league in quarterback rating, behind only Ryan Tannehill. Then, there is the league trend.

Lamar Jackson is poised to become the 2019 Most Valuable Player. Russell Wilson figures to finish second in that department. Deshaun Watson has become a star. Patrick Mahomes is the most talented quarterback in the league. In recent years, Cam Newton won the league MVP award. They all have one thing in common. All can throw the ball effectively, accurately and push the ball down the field. Just as importantly, all can extend plays and damage defenses immensely with their ability to run the football. You can say the same about Aaron Rodgers, Kyler Murray, Josh Allen and Dak Prescott. Hill is that type of guy. He is a physical runner. He is a fast runner. He is a gifted runner. Defenses must account for such quarterbacks, typically by taking a player out of coverage and spying on the quarterback to guard against him taking off for big yards. The questions remain about the most intriguing player on the New Orleans Saints roster. Would you trust him with the keys to the kingdom if you are Sean Payton? Is he your future quarterback? While the speculation surrounds whether Brees signs another shortterm deal or not, the next logical step and the constant discussion is whether Teddy Bridgewater will be here next year. If Brees returns, the odds of Bridgewater returning decrease dramatically. Bridgewater got the resume building audition he needed when Brees was hurt in 2019. In the process, he proved he can still play in the league and start in the league, leading the Saints to a 5-0 record. No, it was not all about how well Bridgewater played. The defense stepped up big-time in that stretch. The Saints found a running game. Bridgewater was not asked to carry the team. What he did was to manage the game well and protect the football while making the throws he needed to make, what every coach desires of a quarterback. Bridgewater can start in the NFL. He is a solid player, a solid person and respected teammate. Bridgewater is younger than Hill at 27. He is 22-12 as an NFL starter. He completed 67.9 percent of his passes, throwing nine touchdown passes with just two interceptions this season.

If Brees surprises virtually everyone by deciding not to return to the Saints in 2020, Bridgewater would be a safe, solid investment to hand the keys to. If you build a good enough roster around him, you can succeed. Of course, whether Brees or Bridgewater returns, the Saints clearly need another playmaker on offense. Of course, if Hill were to be that quarterback at some time in the future, he gives you another playmaker as a runner. Can he do so as a passer? Can he throw accurately enough? Can he read defenses well enough? When, or better yet, will you find out? It is a dilemma. Do you maintain the unprecedented role Payton has defined for Hill? The evidence reveals there is tremendous value in that role. With Hill doing what he has done, he saves you a roster spot, if not two. If he is your quarterback, that is not the case. Hill got a late start on his NFL career due to serving a Mormon mission and his vast ability was short-circuited at BYU due to numerous injuries which curtailed his visibility, availability and productivity. Based on what we watch now, it is hard to believe that he was an undrafted player. Hill was amazing this season. In the regular season, he completed 3-of-6 passes for 55 yards, rushed 27 times for 156 yards and a touchdown and caught 19 passes for 234 yards and six touchdowns. In the playoff game with Minnesota, he was sensational, giving the Saints a chance. He completed his only pass for 50 yards to Deonte Harris. He rushed four times for 50 yards, forcing five missed tackles on those runs with all resulting in first downs. He caught two passes for 25 yards and a touchdown. Of course, that was all on offense. On special teams, he had a huge blocked punt against the Falcons this year, just as he did to change a game in Tampa a year ago. The dilemma is obvious. Do you bring back your Hall of Fame quarterback who will be 41 next season? How much can you afford to pay him? How long of a contract will you award him? The answers are yes, well but not at the highest level in the league and for no more than two years, preferably one year.

56 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


SNAP PAPARAZZI Out & About with Ambush AT THE CLOVER GRILL | PHOTOS BY CLOVER GRILL MANAGER

Out & About with Ambush AT THE PUB | PHOTOS BY DWAIN HERTZ

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Do you try to convince Bridgewater to return as the bridegroom in waiting? The answer is yes, with the full understanding that Teddy is ready to have a chance to start somewhere in the NFL and may depart. Do you retain Hill and take a serious look at him as a quarterback? The answers are yes and yes.

As Brees takes one more shot at reaching the promised land and getting that elusive second Super Bowl championship, give Hill more reps, more playing time in the preseason and more snaps at quarterback in the regular season. Further discussion and speculation is that the Saints should invest in

a quarterback early, perhaps in the first round, in the 2020 draft. With the 24th pick overall, your chances of getting Joe Burrow, Tua Tagovailoa or Justin Herbert or slim and none and slim just left the door, unless, of course, you are willing to trade major assets to move up in the first round. Do you really believe in Jake Fromm and

Jacob Eason? Read whole article here: https:// crescentcitysports.com/contemplatingthe-future-for-taysom-hill/ This article was originally published by Crescent City Sports. For the most comprehensive sports coverage in the Big Easy, visit crescentcitysports.com.

Tulane, Fritz deserve credit for raising the bar Ken Trahan, Crescent City Sports On our 3 Tailgaters Show on 106.1 FM NASH ICON this past Saturday morning, Tulane was in the midst of not playing well in the first half against Southern Miss. Justin McMillan was off the mark throwing the football, passing for just 22 yards. Tulane was not running it well enough and the defense was not holding up the way you wanted it to. A caller lamented the number of penalties against the Green Wave in the 2019 season and how badly the team was playing. The show runs from 10 a.m.-noon and the game in Fort Worth started at 10:30 a.m., to put timing in perspective. Tulane trailed 13-0. The Green Wave looked like a team that had overslept, missing its alarm. It looked the part of a team that had not played in five weeks. Golden Eagles quarterback Jack

Abraham left the game with a shoulder injury at the end of the first half. Then, running back De’Michael Harris left with a hamstring injury. Then came the second half. Those injuries unquestionably affected the Golden Eagles. Tulane picked off Thad Whatley twice after Abraham departed. While the injuries were a factor, the biggest factor was that Tulane awakened, adjusted, McMillan became more accurate and a better team from a better conference prevailed in solid fashion. Southern Miss was geared and determined to stop the vaunted running game of Tulane. Willie Fritz and Will Hall adjusted and obliged in the second half. McMillan threw three touchdown passes in the third quarter. He completed 9-of-10 passes for 193 yards

and the three touchdowns in the second half. It was a great end to his solid two-year stint as the Tulane starting quarterback. It was a sweet homecoming for McMillan, who played at Cedar Hill High School, about 35 miles from where the game took place Saturday. Back to the caller and the initial premise. Tulane started the 2019 season 5-1 and expectations rose to massive levels. The only loss was a respectable road loss at Auburn. Then came the tough part of the schedule and some tough losses to tough teams. The criticism of the program first occurred in whispers, then with regular talk. It got loud following the 37-20 loss at SMU to end the regular season at .500. In retrospect, Tulane lost to good teams in a good conference. That is the next level that Fritz must grow his program to. Tulane has been able to beat the lesser teams in the league. It will take better players to rise to the top level to beat the better teams. Keep in mind that lost by three at Navy, by eight points at Temple and by three points at home against UCF. The Green Wave trailed 21-17 in the fourth quarter at SMU. Tulane is close. 247 Sports ranks Tulane’s 2020 recruiting class third out of the 12 AAC teams, trailing only Cincinnati and East Carolina. Rivals.com and Scout.com rank Tulane’s 2020 recruiting class fourth, trailing only Cincinnati, East Carolina and UCF. Tulane has won bowl games for the first time ever. The Green Wave have posted winning seasons in succession for the first time since 1997-98. With a good recruiting class coming in, the chances of making it three straight in each category are real. Then, there is the matter of playing Southern Miss regularly. There was no greater rival for Tulane than Southern Miss. The Battle for the Bell was and is real. Tulane took it home Saturday from Fort Worth. Hattiesburg is just two hours away. I was blessed to cover and even call a few of the Tulane vs. Southern Miss games on television.

This was the first meeting between the two teams since 2010. The Green Wave and Golden Eagles played each other quite a bit, including annually from 1979-2006. Then, the two became charter members of Conference USA but did not play each other in the latter stages of that affiliation, being on different sides of the conference before Tulane departed for the American Athletic Conference in 2014. Southern Miss has dominated the series with a 23-8 edge. The Golden Eagles had won six straight meetings, nine of the last 10, and 13 of the last 15 and 19 of the last 21 in the series. Both fan bases would regularly travel to the other’s game site back in the day. Let us hope those days return with normalcy in the future. As for now, Tulane is set to host Southern Miss in 2022 and will travel to the Golden Eagles in 2023. Tulane will again host USM in 2026 and travel to Hattiesburg in 2027. It was great to see the two teams play each other again. It was great to see Tulane win another bowl game. It was great to see Tulane post another winning season. It was great to see Fritz remain as head coach. He is a good coach with a good staff which has done a good job. With winning comes higher expectations. It increases fan interest. With more attention comes more of a focus on winning. Fans will get frustrated with losses and understandably so. That comes with the territory. Fritz should be appreciated. Winning should always be appreciated at Tulane. It has not come easily. He has raised the bar. Now, the quest is find a starting quarterback, to become more consistent in the passing game, to create more of a pass rush and to improve on the back end of the defense. Of course, that conversation comes off of a winning season and bowl win, a positive step forward for Tulane football. This article was originally published by Crescent City Sports. For the most comprehensive sports coverage in the Big Easy, visit crescentcitysports.com.

58 · The Official Gay Magazine of the Gulf South™: www.AmbushMag.com · January 14 – 27, 2020 · Official Southern Decadence Guide™ · www.SouthernDecadence.com


Profile for Ambush Publishing

Ambush Magazine Volume 38 Issue 01  

Ambush Magazine Volume 38 Issue 01