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MARINA-VILLE Design Journal

Amar Sall SAL15456981 Studio 6 - The Island


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CONTENTS I. DESIGN AGENDA

5

II. THE ISLAND An Introduction to Canvey Island

9

III. CANVEY CONVERSATIONS Tile-Making on the Beach & Pub Quiz Night Engagement

13

IV. CANVEY ISLAND: EAST Researching Local Areas of Interest

17

V. OYSTER CREEK & SMALL-GAINS MARINA Identifying Issues & Potentials within Site Context

21

VI. THE RIPARIAN ZONE Defining Site Choice through Tectonic Feature

25

VII. MATERIAL INVESTIGATIONS Responding to the Site Environment for Construction

29

VIII. CHOSEN SITE: THE POINT Analysing Specific Building Site

33

IX. MARINA-VILLE Masterplan Proposal

37

X. BIBLIOGRAPHY

41

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4


I. DESIGN AGENDA

5


6


MARINA-VILLE “I wish our classroom could be on the beach.”

The concept of maritime is etched into the fabric of Canvey Island. Sailing and Yacht clubs, Marina workshops and the iconic Chapman Lighthouse still carry significance towards the identity of Canvey today. Traditional nautical themes still resonate around Canvey, yet over the years, the impact has diminished and now fades into obscurity. Marina-Ville will change that. Throughout the Island’s history, Oyster Creek was a main entry point for trade, providing development for Canvey and the areas further up Benfleet Creek. Located in Oyster Creek is, SmallGains Marina, constructed from local skill and talent, once provided a hub of activity from construction to leisure, offering opportunities of experiencing tradition and bridging a generational gap. Its importance described here by local Steve Tolton, “I use it as a reference point when I try to capture what Canvey was like. It was a real gem of a time capsule.” During the latter part of the 20th Century, the marina fell into disrepair and a lack of care caused it to lose its heritage significance as landmarks such as the Chapman Lighthouse were demolished. Rendering the surrounding areas useless due to its dilapidating condition, the marina is now severely under-developed, and used purely as a mooring site with a skeletal workshop force maintaining the area. After conducting an engagement with the Canvey Community, a tile-making workshop for children on the beach, and a Quiz Night with the seniors of the local Rotary Club, from our interactions, it is clear there is a generational gap between the youth and seniors. Interviews conducted with the locals prove that there is tension between the age groups. Canvey Archiver Graham Stevens stated that, “Despite efforts to engage with the youths, there is still an air of intimidation for us, the spikes in crimes committed by the young isn’t positive at all, yet their skills and ambition is something that never goes noticed or utilized. I believe something can be done to bridge this ever-widening gap.” 7


8


Concerned parent Lisa Pain raised her wishes of her children not to follow the older kids and fall into anti-social behaviour, apparent with the rise of the Canvey “Boy Racers,” due to the lack of spaces for youths on the island. Lisa’s daughter Chloe explained that the lack of youth-friendly spaces encourages a disinterest of the island, as there is “nowhere to go,” and as a response to our tile-making engagement, “I’ve never done this before, our school doesn’t give us these opportunities, I want to learn more.” The increase of anti-social teens and their negative impact on the community through their behaviours show that there is something or somewhere missing for them to go. Can there be a place for the youths to flourish? Can there be a place for the seniors to maintain and reclaim tradition? Perhaps the sharing and co-maintaining of a space can help ease these tensions and return, in particular, The Point, to a formerly iconic status. This proposal, Marina-Ville, aims to target the distancing generations and create a masterplan to regenerate the Marina environment by reviving a forgotten community. Island seniors can help share knowledge of craft and history, through construction and archiving, teaching new skills to engaged youths. In turn, youths will help maintain the area, through the management and development of new skills, helping run the area and preserve the “reviving” maritime tradition. This agenda aims to set up several spaces enforcing a generational bridge featuring a Lighthouse Archive, Tidal Pool Classrooms (extracting educational potential of the natural environment), Boat and Mechanical Workshops (providing jobs and opportunities such as apprenticeships), surrounded by Tidal Social Spaces, using submersible structures to help link both the land and the sea. The Lighthouse Archive, a permanent space for Canvey Islander’s to aid the chronicling of traditional history, this building being rooted in maritime practice, is maintained by the shared responsibility of Marina-Ville members. The proposal will offer a contemporary and feasible solution to renovating the existing run-down area of Oyster Creek and breathe a new life back into the Marina. Focusing on The Point of Canvey Island, the proposal will address making and learning within a natural and artificial landscape.

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II. THE ISLAND Studio Brief Site Information Local Research Project Interests Site Trip Photos

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Studio Brief & Response

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Studio 6’s Brief strength lies in Narrative, beginning with site intervention. To tackle the brief head on, we thrust ourselves into an engagement activity with local Islanders and their Rotary Club Institution. The outcomes of this interaction provided the basis for the development of the proposal of “Marina-Ville” and laid the foundations for a generational “bridge” to be built through the creation of my site intervention. The Brief began our investigations through an over-arching analysis of the Thames Gateway plan, and it’s intention for Canvey Island.

13


Site Information

Canvey Island lies in the South East of the United Kingdom, and is only a 45 minute journey by train from London. Situated at the Southern-most point of Essex, Canvey Island lies in the River Thames. A man-made Island, Canvey is regularly breached by river water but over time has developed countermeasures to help defend itself from the shifting landscape. Canvey Island still retains elements of quintessential British Lifestyles, exacerbated through their political stance, including on overwhelming majority vote on the current “Brexit� Issue.

South East of the U.K.

Central London to the Thames Estuary via Train 14


Canvey Island

6

1

7 8

2 4

9 3 5

15


1

Benfleet Creek - The Gateway to Canvey Island from the mainland approach.

2

Oyster Creek - The Gateway to Canvey Island from the Sea/River Thames.

3

The Labworth Cafe - A Canvey Island Icon that flourishes all year round, a tourist hotspot.

4

Dutch Cottage- Canvey Island’s European Heritage in the form of a Thatched time capsule.

5

Oikos Storage & Industrial Plant- Central source of Industry jobs for local Canvey and Benfleet residents.

16


6

Benfleet Creek Marshland - At Low Tide 7

Canvey Island Nature Footpath - Circles the Island 8

Canvey Island Marsh - Leading towards the Thames Estuary 9

Canvey Island Sea Wall Defence - Follows the perimeter of the Island 17


Local Research through Echo News LOCAL ISSUE - Age of Population

LOCAL ISSUE - Employment

A clear and apparent disconnect in the area is the tension between the Youths and Seniors. Created through clashes of ideologies and mentalities, youths push an intimidation upon the seniors, even with a push-back on leisure control. With a heavy demographic of elderly citizens and a large, upcoming new generation, a line needs to be drawn and a connection forever made between the two.

Canvey’s heavy development sector has led to the rise of franchising in the area and the removal of traditional and local businesses and skills. Canvey Island’s Sea Wall has now become a major source of income due to it’s popularity and location on an extremely accessible seafront. An injection of money into the maintenance and upkeep of the wall and its surroundings will provide many more jobs and help improve Canvey’s local economy.

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LOCAL ISSUE - Education

LOCAL ISSUE - Crime

Education is a consistently recurring theme on the Island. It’s lack of achievable grades, qualifications and educational enthusiasm has led to the rise of vandalism and less experienced graduates. Even so, local schools have been pushed to the point of monitoring attendance to the extreme to ensure their facilities are able to remain open and functionable. A volatile area, education, for there is a clear split of those wanting and not wanting it.

Crime rates have spiked on Canvey over the past few years, and is partially linked with education in the area, or lack thereof it. Ray Howard aka Mr Canvey himself has decided to push for a more controlled and civilised area for the safety of all Islanders

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THE future of a classic car show on Canvey has been thrown into doubt after a school refused use of its facilities, it is claimed.

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Project Interests

Loss of Heritage & Tradition

Rise of Canvey Typologies

Canvey’s Dutch Heritage still maintains a strong presence on the Island in the form of the Dutch Cottages sprinkled about the Island. These cottages themselves have become museums and archives of a lots time, but a series of institutions that do not have nay intention of being forgotten. The Island’s Heritage strength also comes from it’s nautical values. The Yacht Club, The Marina, the now decommissioned and de-constructed Chapman Sands Lighthouse. These Institutions formed the basis of Canvey’s Legacy, of which, their values are now, sadly, fading away through each generation that passes. A degrading Marina, a lost Lighthouse, and a dated Institution. Such a rich heritage and tradition should not be lost.

Residences are littered throughout the majority of Canvey, from self-build homes to motor homes, there is a vast range of typologies on the island. In particular, the self-build, apex-Dutch influenced structures that have formed new residencies have highlighted how the community on the Island have begun fashioned and translating their own typologies and style, reflective of the traditional island structures, but with a fresh twist of design and construction. Not one structure is the same, this language is beginning to be translated throughout the new, developing structures on the Island. This breath of fresh design could potentially develop a rebirth of construction on the Island, but does this is have to solely be for home owners?

20


Forgotten Landscape

Fading Landmarks & Industry

Despite it’s mainly artificial construction, Canvey Island boasts a tremendously large amount of open space. Granted, over time the space has reduced for constructing space, but what remains still beats green space sizes in heavy urban areas. The mixture of solid land, through to marshland, to the beach and sea shows that there is a relationship between the land and the sea, This gradual gradient proves that much more can be achieved out of the land instead of just building on it, there is potential in, and all around it. The open nature plan of the Island allows a resident to walk the entire perimeter of the Island in one day. This subconsciously allows a relationship to form between the land and the user, can it go further?

As a Seaside Town, Canvey gets a large amount of Tourism, in particular towards the time of Summer where it’s beaches are crammed with holiday makers. Over the ages, the Island’s old heritage sites have slowly dropped off and been removed, hardly any still remain, or stay with a purpose. The Labworth Cafe, now the iconic landmark of Canvey, stands proud facing out to the sea. Besides public landmarks, Canvey’s industry still goes on today. Plants still operate providing jobs and security for both those who live on and off the island. These provide the income to keep Canvey maintaining itself, but that’s just about it. Responding to data of the area, how can the industry and a new development of the area help contribute towards a stronger Canvey?

21


Site Trip Photos

Benfleet & Canvey Gateway

Public Path and Nature Trail

Flood Drainage Slipway

Canvey Ad-hoc Typologies

22


Small-Gains Marina

Oyster Creek

Self-Build Homes

Sea Wall Defence

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III. CANVEY CONVERSATIONS Canvey Myths & Legends - Make-a-Monster Workshop Mayor of London’s Thames Gateway Masterplan Testing Tile Casting and Stencils Tile-Making and Pub Quiz Engagement Event Video & Stills Social Media Storyboard

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Canvey Myths & Legends - Make-a-Monster Workshop

1.

2. 3.

1.

Make-a-Monster Workshop

Children and their Parents

2.

- Engagement through schools and local clubs

Issues & Potential Target Audience

- Canvey Conversations -

Canvey Conversations is an attempt to engage and ignite a dialogue between the designer and community. We aim to achieve this by directly engaging the children with model making, storytelling and drawing; using the myths, legends and folklore of Canvey Island. This engagement will introduce an open conversation about Canvey Island, its residents, cultures and the communities. Moreover, the workshop will allow us to interview and extract stories of the area in general, which in turn, will help us build encompassing narratives and identities in the local area.

Make-a-Monster Workshop

Approach & Idea

- Canvey Conversations -

The “Make-a-Monster” Workshop will form the basis of our engagement. Our main interaction with the younger residents will help us open a dialogue between them and the senior citizens of Canvey and aid in extracting, recording and developing narratives as well as experiences. Using the theme of Myths and Legends of Canvey Island, we hope to engage the participants in discussion and interaction of local folktales which will inform a larger discussion about the history and culture of the island. The workshop itself will be split into two parts. The first, being a creative and constructive activity for children to come and “create” their own monsters through model-making, whilst embracing the stories of local phenomena, these could take the form of drawings of physical models (clay, mud, sand, local materials). The second part is largely focused on obtaining and recording these narratives through recorded interviews and conversations with resident, which will be edited into a podcast. These recordings will be open for all generations to come and retell experiences or stories of the Island that have impacted the community, people and life on the island. Children from the model making workshop can come and tell their own fictional stories to help enrich the Canvey Island folk-tale scene and add to their own history. This podcast will aid further investigation into the island and help the community define its own place and identity.

We intend to create a structure that will accommodate all aspects of the workshop. This includes, a space for group discussion for the recording of interviews and stories, as well as areas for displaying models and drawings that have been created. We will use segmented construction techniques to create several ‘panels’ that can be slotted together to create a semi-circle booth. Inside will be recording equipment, seating for conversations and moderate spacing for group discussions. The exterior of the structure will house a peg-shelf system, where the children’s physical models will be displayed, as well as an integrated chalk board for drawings and sketches. The models, drawings and conversations will then fuel our initial investigations into the island and inform our totem designs. Initial proposed materials: Plywood M.D.F. Chalkboard Paint Recording Equipment Clay/Mud/Sand (model-making) Fabric (for seating) -

From the workshop, we intend to obtain: Stories of the area Folk-tales and Fictional Narratives Community Intentions Dialogue with residents Greater understanding of the area In the form of: Podcast Physical models Drawings Website Instagram T-shirts? -

Make-a-Monster Workshop

Method & Intended Outcome - Canvey Conversations -

26

Podcast - Direct engagement with first hand narratives from all demographics

Senior Citizens

3.

- Generational narratives through isolated experiences

Canvey Island has a fascinating history and a rich history of culture. Our aim is to identify several of these through public engagement. Myths, legends and storytelling spans generations on the island and we wish to bring them together through monster model making and storytelling; attempting to create a tapestry of local identities through social enquiry, harmonizing local narratives.


27


Mayor of London’s Thames Gateway Masterplan

28

>1900s

1900 2000

Woolwich has a rich military history with it being host to the Royal Arsenal. It’s financial stability and rise came from manufacture and industry with the addition of accessible docks and piers towards the Thames estuary. This was the area’s main sources of work and income for its demographic at the time.

From the Napoleonic Wars to the end of World War 2, the area flourished with industry. It was not until the Post-War decline of 1968 did the area begin to fall into a rapid state of unemployent. Throughout the 20th century, the area was slowly begin to regenerate High Streets, Precints and academic buildings to warrant further use and extended life.

<2000s

Looking forward, Woolwich and Thamesmead have started to become a central focus of regeneration projects to influence the levels of residency and Industry. Currently, Peabody have a £1.5 billion reg. project finalised to commence in 2018 in Thamesmead. Woolwich now has a directly addressed speculative generation plan of becoming a national hub for experiential arts.


29


Test Tile Casting and Stencils

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31


Tile-Making and Pub Quiz Engagement What began as an interior workshop, formulated into an exterior one. Using plaster as a casting material, we developed stencils, conveying rich Canvey Narratives, such as the 1953 Flood, Monsters, Heritage, etc. To make an accessible activity for the children, these stencils illustrated Emily, 9 key moments from these narratives “We don’t get much chance to that could be passed onsail, to keep the even though there’s lots of water stories going. The Children and boats. The Yacht Club should do posed questions seniors of Canvey much more, likefor the the Rotary Club Raft event theus Summer.” to inaid with our next activity.

32

Tallulah, 9 “I didn’t know about any of these stories. My mum and dad probably don’t even know them too. They’re exciting but we should know more if we live here.”

Hayley, 9 & Maddie, 6

Grace, 9

“My parents work off the island, but are thinking of coming back because of the new shops coming here.” “My dad works at the gas plant, but there’s not a lot to do there anymore.”

“I’ve only been up to the cottages once before but I’ve never been inside. I want to understand more but people live there now.”

Chloe, 11

Sailing9 Emily,

Tall

“Grandad tells me the stories of what happened during the flood. We don’t worry about the dangers anymore, but all his friends moved away after and never came back.”

Sailing is aget major trait on Canvey “We don’t much chance to sail, Island. Littered alonglots most of the even though there’s of water island’s shoreline areClub sail boats and boats. The Yacht shouldand do jettys. more, It’s a proud pastmuch like thehobby Rotaryand Club Raft time of event in the the islanders. Summer.”

“I did storie don’ excit we li

Myths & Legends

Dutch Heritage Hayley, 9 & Maddie, 6

Gra

Canvey has an extremely rich tapestry of folklore and local legends. Ranging from Sea Monsters to Viking Ghosts and from Haunted Houses to hidden Smuggler Tunnels.

Original Canvey “My parents work settlers off the have island,left but theirthinking mark on Island. Small, are of the coming back because habitable are of the new Dutch shops Cottages coming here.” spread island a “My dadacross worksthe at the gasas plant, reminder it’safounders’ culture. but there’sofnot lot to do there anymore.”

“I’ve once insid but p

Industry & Agriculture

The 1953 Chloe, 11 Flood

Sail

The original development of Canvey Island was down to Agriculture. Recently, it’s industry has moved towards the local Gas Plant and a hub for it’s transportation.

In 1953, atells massive flood hit Canvey “Grandad me the stories of Islandhappened and 59 people what during lost the their flood.lives. Since then, there has been massive We don’t worry about the dangers construction Wall moved and anymore, buton all ahisSea friends reinforcement localcame drainage. away after andof never back.”

Sailin Islan islan jettys time

Myths & Legends

Dut

Canvey has an extremely rich

Orig


Councillors, members and a President of local Canvey Institutions joined us for an evening of socialising and a Quiz put on by us. We questioned the seniors on the knowledge of Canvey before posing them questions asked by the children we had met earlier. The seniors expressed strongly how the concept of Heritage and Institution is fading with them as younger demographics move out of the island. Their responses can be seen on their answer sheets on the nect few pages. Q U E S T I O N In August 1954, a strange creature washed up on Canvey Island. It became known as the Canvey Island Monster, can you identify it?

1

S H E E T

11 12 13

2 The Viking Ghost of Canvey“, is a tall, burly Viking standing on the mudflats at “The Point,” waiting for his ship to return. Can you guess form the reasons below, why the Viking Ghost supposedly still waits, to this day?

A. B. C.

He was abandoned after the Battle of Benfleet in 894 BC His ship was destroyed in a storm off the coast off Denmark He stayed behind with his wife on Canvey Island

3

Agriculture Sailing industry Salt making industry

4

A Dutch engineer drained and embanked Canvey Island in the 17th Century, do you know his name?

A. B. C.

Cornelius Vermuyden Johannis de Rijke Jan van der Heyden

According to local legend, smugglers 5 constructed numerous tunnels under Canvey Island for the transportation of goods. One of the most famous connections is still rumoured to be underneath the Lobster Smack Pub. Can you tell me where this tunnel under the Lobster Smack leads to?

6

14 15

Canvey Island’s development depended on which industry?

A. B. C.

As you may know, in 1953, the North Sea flood hit Canvey Island. As a consequence, 58 people died, what was the solution?

A. B. C.

Sea Wall Reinforced drainage Reinstatement of the coastguard service

7

[TILE 1]

17

[TILE 2]

18

[TILE 3]

19

[TILE 4]

20

[TILE 5]

21 22

Can you match the famous Canvey Resident to their description?

A. A war artist who lived on Canvey from the mid-1960s until his death in 2001 B. Walt Disney artist and co-creator of Poddington Peas C. The hero who saved 35 from the East Coast flood D. The founder of The Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen Kars Pruim

16

Ashley George Old

Ebenezer Joseph Mather

Colin Wyatt

23 24 25 Notes:

8 9.

9

10 A. B. C.

What Year was Canvey Island F.C. founded?

Canvey Island F.C.’s use the grounds at Park Lane, what is the total capacity for a crowd in the stadium itself? How long is the sea wall is along the perimeter of Canvey Island? 20 miles 15 miles 30 miles

To understand the site and it’s local users, we embarked on a GROUP PROJECT entitled, Canvey Conversations. We used this engagement event to ignite an interaction between us and the locals in order to achieve a greater understanding of issues that are currently raised about the site and how to discover the potentials for developing our proposals. The event was broken into two segments. Casting Tiles on the beach with Children from a local school, and a Pub Quiz Event with the Island’s Rotary Club, with the hope of providing interesting statements from both sides of the generational gap that is appearing heavily on the Island.

33


Q U E S T I O N In August 1954, a strange creature washed up on Canvey Island. It became known as the Canvey Island Monster, can you identify it?

1

S H E E T

11 12 13

2 The Viking Ghost of Canvey“, is a tall, burly Viking standing on the mudflats at “The Point,” waiting for his ship to return. Can you guess form the reasons below, why the Viking Ghost supposedly still waits, to this day?

A. B. C.

He was abandoned after the Battle of Benfleet in 894 BC His ship was destroyed in a storm off the coast off Denmark He stayed behind with his wife on Canvey Island

3

15

Canvey Island’s development depended on which industry?

A. B. C.

Agriculture Sailing industry Salt making industry

4

A Dutch engineer drained and embanked Canvey Island in the 17th Century, do you know his name?

A. B. C.

Cornelius Vermuyden Johannis de Rijke Jan van der Heyden

According to local legend, smugglers 5 constructed numerous tunnels under Canvey Island for the transportation of goods. One of the most famous connections is still rumoured to be underneath the Lobster Smack Pub. Can you tell me where this tunnel under the Lobster Smack leads to?

6

14

As you may know, in 1953, the North Sea flood hit Canvey Island. As a consequence, 58 people died, what was the solution?

A. B. C.

Sea Wall Reinforced drainage Reinstatement of the coastguard service

7

[TILE 1]

17

[TILE 2]

18

[TILE 3]

19

[TILE 4]

20

[TILE 5]

21 22

Can you match the famous Canvey Resident to their description?

A. A war artist who lived on Canvey from the mid-1960s until his death in 2001 B. Walt Disney artist and co-creator of Poddington Peas C. The hero who saved 35 from the East Coast flood D. The founder of The Royal National Mission to Deep Sea Fishermen Kars Pruim

16

Ashley George Old

Ebenezer Joseph Mather

Colin Wyatt

23 24 25 Notes:

8

What Year was Canvey Island F.C. founded?

9.

Canvey Island F.C.’s use the grounds at Park Lane, what is the total capacity for a crowd in the stadium itself?

9

10 A. B. C.

34

How long is the sea wall is along the perimeter of Canvey Island? 20 miles 15 miles 30 miles


35


36


37


38


Event Video & Physical Outcomes Canvey Conversations: The Movie Film (stills) covering the event and audial testimonials from participants.

39


Social Media (Instagram Publicity)

40


Storyboard

C A N V E Y

C O N V E R S A T I O N S

A TILE-MAKING ENGAGEMENT WITH CHILDREN and QUIZ NIGHT WITH THE CANVEY ISLAND “ROTARY CLUB” Oysterfleet Hotel

Labworth Cafe

Sourcing Venues. Phoning, emailing and correspondence with local establishments, from Pubs, Yacht Club and Schools. Ultimately, The Rotary Club.

Lobster Smack Pub

Off-site research. Group insight the current Thames Gateway masterplan imposed by London Mayor, Sadiq Khan

Site Visit. Group walk around perimeter of the island. Primary contact with community, Sue’s Cafe & local landmarks.

Pub Quiz. Our initial proposal became the foundation for our updated strategy in the form of a Pub Quiz and Tile Workshop.

CANVEY SAILING COMMUNITY

THE 1953 FLOOD

Contact at The Rotary Club. Rod, a member of the club conversed us with ideas of meeting and organising an event.

Stories. We wanted to focus our Tile Workshop around 5 major Canvey Stories that were “need to know” for local children.

Myths & Legends. Original proposal was formed from local folklore and led to “Make-aMonster” Workshop for children.

MYTHS & LEGENDS

DUTCH SETTLERS

INDUSTRY

Venue. Our contact Rod, planned a meeting with us at the local Snooker Club on the Eastern Esplanade of the island.

Enacting Event. Friday 3rd November. 13:30 pm

Laser Cutting Stencils. To aid us in our workshop, we created stencils to help the children relay the narratives in their tiles.

Children’s Tiles. All 5 tiles were made and produced by children on the beach. They were later cast and set.

Testing. Stencils and casting methods were tested before heading out to enact event onsite.

Tile Workshop. On the beachfront just outside the Labworth Cafe, we enacted our tile workshop, with many attendees from after school. Asking Questions. Where else best to obtain data from than the kids themselves, what do they want? Places to go!

Interviewing Parents. Further primary research came in the form of the participants parents. In particular, Paul and Lisa Pain emphasised how Canvey Island really has nowhere for “Kids to be kids.”

Returning Questions. Our quiz required us to obtain questions from the children for the adults, in order to understand the connection between the two generations.

“We just want somewhere that will keep our children active but not fall into unruliness.”

Completion of tiles. Stencils Imprinted and left to be cast post-event.

Meeting the Rotary Club. Introduced through Rod, we met Graham, Joan and Malcolm, Rotary Club President.

Quiz Night. Our Quiz event contained several rounds of Canvey Knowledge from both on and off site research. General Canvey Knowledge. Questions from local children. Guess the tile. Research Questions.

Receiving Certificates. All the children who participated in the event recieved a Canvey Conversation certificate and details to find us on Social Media.

Asking Questions Back. In response to the children’s questions for the adults from the earlier event, the adult’s returned questions. We hope to see responses on our social media page.

Recording Statements. We asked The Rotary Club to comment on Canvey at the moment and where they would like to see it going.

Joan Liddiard. Canvey Councillor. Resident on Canvey Island for 70+ Years. “My grandfather laid the cement on these roads, I will continue to do his work for Canvey for the rest of my days.”

Malcolm Tugwood. President of the Rotary Club. Resident on Canvey Island for 17 Years. “Tradition is important, but so are the younger generations, we must find a way to bridge the gap.”

Rod Bishop. Member of the Rotary Club. Resident on Canvey Island for 60+ Years. “Canvey is becoming a hotbed for diversity, we’ve had a growth in the Jewish Community here and we want to learn more.”

Graham Stevens. Rotary Club Member & Archiver. Resident on Canvey Island for 70+ Years. “What better way to preserve Canvey than through the memories of it’s fondest inhabitants.”

Social Media Responses. Follow us: @canveyconversations for more insight and discussion

Rotary Club’s Canvey Conversation. (Left to Right) Rod, Chris, Ciel, Henry, Morgie, Amar, Joan, Graham

Editing and Transcribing. Synthesising our collected data into the forms of transcription and a film. The process to be relayed in a storyboard.

The Review. All our collected data synthesised for our first engagement. Join in on the conversation: @canveyconversations

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IV. CANVEY ISLAND: EAST Generational Space Mapping Key Personality Interviews

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Generational Space Mapping (Refer to Portfolio for more detail)

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5

Castle Point Golf Course

Jewish Congregation of Canvey Island

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4

Canvey Island Rugby Union Football Club

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Smallgains Hall

Oysterfleet Hotel & Restaurant

Canvey Island Town Centre

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The Paddocks Community Centre

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3

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Lubbins Primary School

Deadmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay

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Ca Co

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Labworth Cafe

Eastern Esplanade

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Canvey Tidal Pool

Kismet P


anvey Heights ountry Park Lido

Park

Oyster Creek & Small-Gains Marina

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8

Canvey Island Yacht Club

LEGEND

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2 +

Canvey Island Football Club

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The Point

1

Personality

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Institution Youth Spaces Teen Spaces

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Senior Spaces

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Chapman Sands Sailing Club & Essex Powerboat School

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Roads Mudflats Beach High Tide

Chapman Lighthouse (Location pre-demolition)

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Low Tide 45


Key Personality Interviews (Obtained via Engagement)

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Darren Bowen

Occupation: Labworth Cafe Owner Age: 52 How long have you ran the Labworth Cafe? Came 18 years ago, been here ever since, who gets this “Sea View” everyday? I’m lucky. But summer here, summer is a killer. Summer trade is something we don’t depend on, unlike traditional seaside towns, but we get it all when it comes. We even had people queing today and it’s November! The Labworth is such a landmark on Canvey, how do you find the community here? At first it was daunting, everyone knew everyone here, overtime, I got to be a part of that, the spirit here is great. It does need a little sprucing though, but Canvey doesn’t need much change I believe. The Town Centre near Knightswick should be regenerated. However, the community centre near The Paddocks needs to be addressed. We don’t have much in terms of social community space. When I was a kid there was nothing, its inevitable, kids getting up to no good, but bring something to do into Canvey, you might just achieve that change. There’s also the Independence malark going on, we don’t want independence per say, we just want control of the island

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Graham Stevens

Occupation: Canvey Island Archive Age: 72 What position do you have at the Rotary Club? I mainly deal with archiving and the heritage side of Canvey, you want to know anything about Canvey, I’m your man! Awesome! What interests you most about archiving? I’m particularly interested, due to my life being here, on preserving the history of the place. Particularly through people’s memories. What better way to preserve something through memories, right? Canvey’s history is just so rich and it’s about time it’s noted down, as of course, times are changing! Do you feel that there is a disconnect between your generation and the youths of Canvey today? It’s interesting because obviously with our own families, no, but generally speaking it’s very difficult. I do presentations to the club and try to at schools, but engaging them is difficult. Within our community some elderly folk find it intimidating, but I believe that something can be done to fix it. I’m trying to “update” and my work is now online so the youngsters can access it easily, it’s still a work in progress, but you’ve gotta start somewhere!

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Joan Liddiard

Occupation: Canvey Island Councillor Age: 70 How long have you lived on Canvey? I’ve been here all my life. I was about 6 years old when the ‘53 flood hit the island, that was such an awful time. But Canvey Island is a lot like marmite, people love it or hate it, and I love it. Does the flood still have an impact on today’s Canvey? Well obviously, there have been changes for the better, the sea wall etc. It’s mainly my generation that it really affected. A friend from school, lost his life in the flood. As a result a lot of people left the island, it was a very sad time. My grandfather helped rebuild and as a part of the council today, I continue his work. The youth of Canvey, how do you find the Island for them? Well, I was never allowed out when I was younger but there was so much more back then for us to do. Disco. The Ballroom and the Casino were places to be, but now they’ve all gone. Kid’s don’t want to go to Youth Clubs nowadays, they’d rather do stuff themselves. Imagine a cafe, run by the Youths, a place to hang out. That would be great. Listen to music and chat. I’m trying but it’s not cheap! I’d love to see a mix of young and old.

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Malcolm Tugwood

Occupation: Rotary Club President Age: 65 How long have you lived on the Island? I find this question quite ironic, especially amongst these folk. I’ve only been on Canvey for 17 years. I’m known in the club as the “temporary resident” even though I’m the President this year! I like it here, hence why it’s been 17 years, if you can believe it. 17 years is long! What is running the Rotary Club like? Everyone is game to do events and activities and fundraising, we actually do quite a lot. We fund-raise for Polio, recently sending out vaccines to Africa. We have a charity Christmas sleigh ride around the Island. In summer we have a raft event, and get all the families down for the best day in Canvey’s calendar! So kids are a part of the Rotary Club? Unfortunately not, the club is very traditional, however, we do try and appeal to the youngsters, but I think they prefer our informal Rotary Club “The Satellite Club”. It’s a shame because tradition is great, without it Canvey would lose its character. We do have an island mentality and that’s what makes us individual and potentially appealing for the future, we’ll see!

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Rodney Bishop

Occupation: Canvey Island Councillor Age: 68 Rod, you know Dave Blackwell quite well, the local councillor, what have you two been up to recently? We recently had an event with the new Jewish Community that have formed on the Island. We though it was only right to break bread and introduce Canvey to them. Break Bread? Yes. We gathered the heads of their community, and ours, and had a meal. Our two communities are very different, it was a nice culture clash. We had to get our kitchen’s blessed for them to prepare food and in the end they brought pre-prepared food. It was quite a nice meal. It will take time to become accustomed to their ways, but we are open, Canvey is slowly diversifying. What do you think of the Jewish migration to Canvey? Well, it’s definitely much cheaper to live here than London that’s for sure! I don’t blame them, Canvey is such a lovely place. We don’t want them to feel alien. We are trying for another event, not to say the meal wasn’t a success, it was, but more has to be done if we are mix with such a strict community.

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Billy Baxter

Occupation: Canvey Island Resident Age: 25 Some of my friends are part of the “Boy Racer” community on the island, and it’s becoming a major problem here. They’re wasting their skills and time by recklessly fooling around and endangering others. They know how to build and make their own cars and engines, they can be put to good use if given the opportunity. Racing is obviously fun, but being in trouble is not. Given the space, I believe they can finally bring something back to the community, instead of terrorizing it.

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Paul Pain

Occupation: Parent Age: 42 Have you lived on Canvey long? Yeah actually, 37 years this year, been here since I was a kid. It’s changed a hell of a lot I tell you. What’s surprised you? In terms of changes. Well it’s a shame, but a lot of the old buildings are coming down and tons of flats are replacing them. Lots of pubs are going. We’re now getting a Drive-Thru Starbucks, an Aldi and an Argos. We don’t need all of that! Shame about the old buildings, do the flats go fast? Yeah, they get snapped up before you know it. We live near the industrial estate and there’s a lot of building going on there. It’s a shame for the kids. What would you change for your children? More places for them. There’s very little here. I mean, we went to the Arcade earlier, the first one we went to had closed, it cost them more to run the machines than the custom they were getting. The second had no change from no customers coming at all! It’s a shame, all they have is school and the seafront really.

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Lisa Pain

Occupation: Parent Age: 41 How long have you lived in Canvey? I moved here 18 years ago for my husband, and I’ve really enjoyed it. We both commute to work together now, which is a hell of a lot easier than it used to be. You see, we used to use public transport to get to work in Benfleet and it would be a nightmare, at least an hour to get off the island! Do you commute via car now? Yes, it’s a fraction of the time now. You spoke fondly about Canvey, can you tell me more? Yes, it’s got a lot to it, more than people realise, I mean, who has a short walk to the beach so close to London? The kids love it, my youngest just turned 9 and comes down here every Friday. Is there a lot for kids to do around here? Actually no, it’s very difficult for the children, apart from school, there’s hardly any spaces for them to go apart from the arcade, cinema and indoor play area, which after 8 or 9 years of age, there’s no point. There should be loads more, otherwise I fear for them to start being unruly as they grow older.

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Chloe Pain

Occupation: Primary School Student Age: 6 We only have the beach to go to by ourselves after school, and usually on a Friday. Me and my friends really want to go and do stuff elsewhere but there’s nowhere to actually go. We walk our dogs a lot along the sea wall and that’s nice. I love my dog. But we need more places to go and do stuff, I like making these tiles, can I keep them? I’ve never done this before, I want to do more like this, our school doesn’t let us do anything like this in art, I want to learn more.

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V. OYSTER CREEK & SMALL-GAINS MARINA Site History and Timeline Issues & Potentials Site Drawings SIte Analysis

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Site History and Timeline

1930

Small-Gains began land development, constructing mooring posts, boats remaining in the creek, catalysing industry growth.

1950

Chapman Sands Lighthouse, taken down in the 1950s due to financial reason. The first beacon of Canveyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nautical heritage.

1953

Flood defences were majorly improved. Businesses established themselves and turned into a leisure and activity hub on the Island.

1970

The Chapman Sands Sailing Club was founded and became a nautical centre for all educational sea activity, leaving the marina.

2008

Prince Edward visits Small-Gains Marina, commends the skills of craftsmen and engineers of the marina, boosting commerce.

2017

The Marina and the Creek are littered with boats, waste and remainders of local businesses.

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Site Photos Small-Gains Marina

Oyster Creek

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Site Mapping

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Canvey Heights Country Park

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14 Cycle Wizard

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Marina Workshop

Southend Airport Taxis

Garland Theatre School

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Street Unique Clothing

Retro Heroes

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LEGEND

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Institution Site Active Sites Residential

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Chosen Study

Small-Gains Cafeteria

Businesses

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Island Yacht Club

Riparian Beach High Tide

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Silver Point Care Home

Lifestyle Fitness Gym

Island Treasure

Low Tide

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Issues and Potentials “Always loved tinkering with things, and ever since coming here, not once have a thought about stopping. Seeing boats go out everyday and return, knowing that’s your doing is what makes this workshop worth running, albeit on it’s last legs.”

JOBS AND SECURITY

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Name: Anthony Jeffries Age: 62 Occupation: Marina Workshop Manager

“I run the workshop here in the Marina, done so for a few years now, it’s not improved much to be honest. It’s a shame because I love spending my time here at The Point.”

“£3.5m plans for a new Canvey sports venue at Small-Gains Hall”

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OPPORTUNITY

“This will be something for the whole community, not just the football club. Most of us at the club were born here or been here since we were very young so we know Canvey and know what’s needed. When we took the building over, it was getting targeted left right and centre by vandals. Since we took it on residents have said how much better the area is.”

“I’ve just left school and there’s not much opportunity for crafts in the area, it’s just a lot of commercial jobs. I was lucky to get something here, I love building and making, it’s just such a shame the workshops and marina aren’t kept well.”

IDENTITY

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Name: Marie Smith Age: 17 Occupation: Part-Time Worker 70

“I work here at the workshop during the weekend. We’re usually hired out by local sail-boat owners do to odd jobs, but it helps pass the time.”


“My father owns a boat thats moored here. We come often to look after it and sail it a lot in the summer.”

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Name: Sam Jones Age: 8 Occupation: Student

AMBITION “There is nowhere to hang out with my friends when our parents are busy. A lot of my kids from my school like to cause trouble and come here to do it, The Point is so nice but this Marina just gets worse and worse.”

Essex Powerboat School

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TRADITION “No-one is interested anymore with our school. Over summer we still get a few members on the waves, but each year it is dropping, I blame the lack of enthusiasm enforced by the schools!””

“We love this place, coming out to the boat, especially in the summer. It’s so close to the Yacht Club that we can stay overnight in the Marina if we have an event on there.”

Name: Glenn & Natasha Richardson Age: 63 & 59 Occupation: Retired

14

FAMILIARITY “The Marina is a bit of a tip but that’s it’s character. Moving the boat about, now that’s a problem, and those youths mucking up the place. All this place needs is a good sprucing up and a proper clean out, this is the best spot on the Island, it can be better than this.” 71


Site Materiality

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RUSTICATION

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OXIDISATION

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METAL

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EXPOSED AGGREGATE

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ROPE

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EXPOSED RUBBER

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WEATHERED SURFACES

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SMOOTH STONE

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DIRT

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BRICK

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ALLOYS

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WOOD

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SITE CHOSEN AREA OF STUDY - PLAN VIEW

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Site Structure

SEA WALL DEFENCE

The Sea Wall uses piles to support its standing on the coastline and edge and is rooted well into the original ground surface so that any ground below sea level will be packed against the wallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surface, causing any sea/water to lap against the wall, not underneath or over.

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CONCRETE PLATFORM

Piles are constructed through poured concrete into low capacity soil, right the way into high capacity soil to strengthen its foundations. The outcomes a friction pile with a ground beam that supports its emergence from the ground into the open space.


This section highlights the undulating landscape of the Creek and how the Marina’s structure have been forced to adapt to the landscape. The decking platforms are held up by stilts, this structural form, is the most commonly used in the area due to it’s capabilities of standing deep within the ground and having the least resistance tot he water as possible.

DECKING STILTS

RIPARIAN ZONE BARRIER

The riparian zone barrier is the most affected from of structure on the site. The constant appearance of the changing tide upon the barrier surface slowly degrades the materials and gives way to loosening and ruin. A natural intervention can’t only be the best way around this.

In this case, not as strong as piles, stilts are numerous in number and span the entire length of decking. They too go deep into the ground below the water level but using timber as it’s main material instead of concrete. Over time, this material will wither and rot.

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Site Environment

AVERAGE SUMMER SOLSTICE

JULY 15th

APRIL 15th

OCTOBER 15th

JANUARY 15th

AVERAGE WINTER SOLSTICE

The site is exposed to sunlight during all times, due to its naturally open space and low altitude terrain. With January being it’s lowest point in the sky, the weather itself is affected due to it’s colder climate of the angle of the sun. July is where it is peak sunlight and weather, this provides a time for users to come to the site due to the weather itself. The weather also manipulates the tides and every day raises and lowers the water levels. The lower angle of the sun allows sunlight to access low levels of the site this can be restrictive in the summer

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for working habits as natural light is key for healthy working attitude and mentality. In the summer months, ,with the high point of the sun, it is clear there is hardly any shading due to the openness of the site, perhaps this is something to consider for the proposal moving forward.

The sites high precipitation levels have shown the toll it’s taken upon the site itself, weathering down surfaces and site materials. However, it’s constant wind levels make up for the fact that it is right on the edge of the island, leading into the Thames itself, so it is expected to have some form of resistance in terms of ventilation. Perhaps moving forward the site could use the natural disadvantage and turn them into advantages by manipulating the natural environment to help expand and enrich the local area and narrative, something this areas

has seemingly heavily lost over time.


AVERAGE PRECIPITATION AND TEMPERATURES OF SITE July 15th Sunrise: 04:48 Sunset: 21:08

April 15th Sunrise: 05:56 Sunset: 19:52

CLOUDY, SUNNY, OVERCAST AND PRECIPITATION DAYS

October 15th Sunrise: 07:20 Sunset: 18:00 AVERAGE PRECIPITATION BASED ON MONTH

January 15th Sunrise: 07:52 Sunset: 16:16

AVERAGE WIND BASED ON MONTH

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VI. THE RIPARIAN ZONE Defining the Riparian Space Site Drawings Related Precedents

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Site Tides and Flooding After the Great 1953 Flood on Canvey island, there has been major improvements to the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sea defences and observations. The Main form of natural event that really affects the Island now is TIDES. Being in the Thames Estuary, the Island itself rests as a man-made structure below sea level specifically. The island reaches to about 6 meters below sea level before joining the River Thames itself. This area in between the island and its connection to the river and sea is the most affected and interesting area of study.

The tide levels for the Island are constantly varying throughout the day, about every 6 hours. The highest tide point is just under 6 metres, with the 1953 flood being above that value. The lowest tide point is usually about 0.3 meters in level. The constant change of level impacts the island in many different ways, in particular the marina, which as seen before can affect everything lying in the riparian zone.

The landscape in the marina is constantly changing along with the tides, boats will float on the water level at high tide, but as shown above, when it is low tide, the boats lie in the ground and sediment when the water leaves the creek. This constant shift in the landscape creates a very exciting series of opportunities for designing and technically supporting the proposal. This constant evolution creates a kinetic relationship between the natural space and the built space. Using the varying water levels, the marina should be allowing the natural influence to help drive the structural elements into adapting to the spaces created by the changing material. The sluice of the creek expanded below highlights the deepest points of the area compared to the highest points (darker the blue, deeper the area). I have also highlighted a central area of investigation, the RIPARIAN zone. This area is integral to my progression of the site and is an intriguing conflict of space where materials and environment clash, this emerging tension through the built environment and something I wish to expand on.

21 32 43 65

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21 32

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High TideLow Tide (meters)

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Defining the Riparian Zone DEFINITION: the RIPARIAN ZONE is the interface between land and a river or stream In the case of Oyster Creek and Small-Gains Marina, the Riparian Zone Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve identified as the space that ranges from the low tide level all the way through the high tide level, to the peak flood level. This area has to be ultimately braced and prepared for constant contact with the changing levels of water. This presents a series of interesting challenges technically due to its ever evolving landscape. On Canvey itself, the Riparian zone is mainly constructed of marshlands, mudlfats and wetlands that have just been left to form. These unstable grounds have proved to be too complex a building surface for the residents so have been left alone, especially in the creek.

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The Riparian Zone in this particular study in the marina is situated in the purple (side) ele

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This investigative area is highlighted on the above site plan, this particular area is of interest due to itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s importance in the marina. The entrance and main emergence point creates the perfect place to begin an analysis of my main tectonic study, the RIPARIAN zone.

Diagram explaing the location of the RIPARIAN zone

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RIPARIAN SPACE

TIDE LEVEL 1953 Flood Level 6.3m >

5.3m > 4.9m <

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Precedent Study - Chapman Sands Lighthouse ARCHITECT: James Walker LOCATION: Canvey Island, Essex PROJECT YEAR: 1849 (dem. 1958)

The original Canvey Landmark, taken down in the 1950s due to financial reasons. The structure still reigns significance today. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s construction amongst the sand and mud is a feat of engineering. To bring Youths and Seniors together might need the help of resurrecting the past. Situated on the Chapman mudflats in the River Thames, the purpose of this lighthouse was to warn passing boats of the mudflats. A screw pile lattice construction allowed no resistance from the water upon the structure. Built as an off-grid dwelling for up to 3 inhabitants.

Screw pile lighthouses extend up to three times the length underwater as above water. As shown in the diagram above there is about an equidistant for each section of the foundations, this is to ensure that the stability of the structure isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t compromised or weak under the pressure provided by the resistance from the body of water it is situated in. 84


The raft is situated where the legs meet the bed of the body of water.. Usually it comprises of timber, concrete and waterproofed metal to provide the integrity needed to stabilise the meeting point. Here the lighthouse is stable under the pressure exerted by the spread of its legs and distribution circumference provided by its raft. This embedded feature provides a stable ground to perch on compared to the unstable ground it is situated in.

A diagram explaining the weight distribution placed upon the screw pile when in action. the screw itself will dig down as long as it is turning but once optimum depth is reach it is locked in place. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s depth give the screw the stability needed.

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Precedent Study - Canvey Tidal Pool ARCHITECT: Castle Point Borough Council LOCATION: Canvey Island, Essex PROJECT YEAR: 1930 (Canvey owned in 2011)

On the seafront, Canvey’s Tidal Pool welcomes visitors to a leisurely time facing out onto the sea. The structure uses the tide to sustain the pool and it’s concrete structure provides stability within the pool itself. Built into the beach, it’s constructions methods highlight strength in structure on Canvey. The tidal pool is situated on the seafront of Canvey. Deep concrete foundations dig into the beach-front and resist water. A a kinetic relationship between user and the site. This creates an indirect interaction with the estuary and sea without entering the full body of water itself.

WIND WATER DIRECTION

The Canvey Tidal Pool itself replicates what the example section shows but on a much larger scales. The Pool foundation itself is piled into the sub-grade providing that space for stability and retaining load. Amongst the moving water element, sand is a major factor, it is an element that doesn’t come from the open sea but from the inland area. Here we have a contrast, water from the open body and sand from the inland zones. The pools concrete and stone structure provides the basis for these elements to rest and maintain throughout the cycle of the stay and only when natural environmental factors cause them to leave will the pool reset. A basin like shape that contains the elements of the external forces at play. 86


Being on the beach-front, the tidal pool is constantly open to the natural environment. From tide changes for its function, to winds from the open water and constant sunlight, the tidal pool fits perfectly into it open surroundings. As shown in the diagram to the right, the most impacting features are the tides and the wind. The tides useful for the pools function, and the wind to help push the water into the pool itself. The inclusion of rain also helps enhance the pools function, the collection of rainwater helps the pool fill up even when the tide is fully out, without any water in itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surroundings. The particular area of interest of the tidal pool in general is the point at which the natural source of water informs the man made pool itself. This meeting point provides the natural relationship between man made structure and natural elements. The structure itself doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to adapt to the rising levels, the structures is built to accept the adapting water levels and work in tandem with it. Once the water level decreases after it is rises it retains the water overlap.

Open to the public, the pool is constantly attracting attention, especially in sunnier weather. There is much maintenance required for the pool itself, in rare occasions, the structure may need to be tended to, but it is a very self functional structure that can just be left alone and it will perform itself.

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Precedent Study - Querini Stampalia ARCHITECT: Carlo Scarpa LOCATION: Venice, Italy PROJECT YEAR: 1949

Scarpaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restoration of the ground floor is a reminder of architectureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capacity to embody qualities without being literal. Scarpa uses water as an unsettling force, allowing it to enter and exit the space, in constant motion. It keeps the users on edge constantly. Water is absent, but always present.

Situated in Venice, the Querini Stampalia is constantly submerged in water. The idea behind this restoration was to allow the water into the space and create a relationship between nature and the user. As shown in the diagram to the left you can see how the rising tide influences the space using a gradient rise which allows the users to be able to be in a space that is usually unusable. Scarpa builds the remainder of the interior well above the high tide level but leave the space open for the water to encompass the room. Even with rainfall for example there are enough drain-ways to empty the spaces if there is even a glimpse of the water level rising above the designed level. 88


Above, Scarpa uses the structure materials and manipulates them into a forming special locks and structural elements for combining separate materials. Here the iron element is manipulated around the stone slab to encompass the edge in order to secure a fitting for decking/stairs.

Scarpa’s inspiration for the project came from the water canals of Venice with its high and low tides. The idea was to move people, like water, cascading them up and down various levels while suspending them above the actual water. The water enters from the channel, which the Palace overlooks through water gates along the inner walls. It is located in the garden, in a capacious many-leveled copper basin made of cement. The idea was that the water would enter the building and full the basin during high tide. Scarpa is best known for his expertise to combine old and new elements, as well as on a great workmanship of the materials. The diagram above shows a section of the interior channel and steps created by Scarpa, which becomes a spatial joint linking the interior to the exterior environment.

Querini Stampalia stands on Venice’s Foundations as a beacon of hope for places introducing and containing a relationship with the natural environment. Through the Stampalia’s front gates, the water levels sneaks through and joins the interior space. The tide level allows the relationship between artificial and nature to be exacerbated. The open plan nature of the structure itself welcomes in the element just as it welcomes in its users. It’s ever changing and constant contact with the water level provides the structures materials with a constant test of observing how the surfaces react over time. Stone, brick and concrete provide not much response in that sense but provide an interesting contrast to what else could’ve been. The open stone surfaces allow the water to creep up and around the non-raised spaces without much affect, still keeping a separation between user and the element but nevertheless remaining in the same space. As an entrance corridor, this restoration provides an acute description of Venice through the use of materials along with water alone. 89


Precedent Study - Wadden Sea Centre ARCHITECT: Dorte Mandrup LOCATION: Okholmvej 5, 6760 Ribe, Denmark PROJECT YEAR: 2017

Using traditional materials, Wadden Sea Centre is an active cultural hub. Housing activities for nature watching and interventions, whilst its structure uses local thatch to react with the mudflat, marsh and water salt to harden and give natural strength and protection to the building.

THATCH

90

TIMBER

The Wadden Sea Centre’s streamlined structure allows for little resistance from wind which aids natural ventilation, especially due to it’s thatch consistency. The building itself is situated on mudflats which are unstable and consistently full of moisture. Luckily, it’s structural features are partly environmental features, with the thatch reacting to the moisturised salt in the air and water, thus hardening on touch. Its low and elongated shape, prevents a lot of natural light coming in from above so only works during the start and end of the day, when the angle of the sun is quite low, especially in later seasons it is more effective. It’s open arrangement allows for the inclusion of natural wildlife which also aids the buildings primary function of being a nature reserve/sea centre.


Water Heavy Area

Natural Light Intake

Mudflat Zones

The Wadden Sea Centre foundations are derivative of timber beam foundations only this time with thatch as an added layer of protection (highlighted). The local thatch on site hardens when the presence of sea salt is apparent. Whether it is in the water or in the air, the reaction with the thatch causes it to harden and solidify. This process negates the need for a strengthening wall much. The thatch itself acts as a natural wall and barrier against environmental impacts and physical interactions. Mainly in the roof and foundations, especially since it stands upon the mudflats, a notoriously wet area, and its potency is regularly, since its situation is next to the sea.

The air gap in-between the thatch and the timber in this detailed section explains how the dryness of the thatch is key to itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s structural success. Without it being dry, the moisture of the thatch would keep its retention high and strength down. Thus the air gap in between these two elements is needed to keep the materials dry and ready for a reaction with the local sea salt. The hardening of the thatch, an essentially light material, negates the need for tiling or any type of build on roof a the natural aspect of the material is used to develop a relationship between the natural environment, natural materials and the built environment. Bringing these three elements together has enhanced and strengthens not only the programme of the sea centre, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s function as well, seeing is believing.

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VII. MATERIAL INVESTIGATIONS Material Choices Material Experiment & Tests Material Totem & Resolution

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Material Choices

Concrete (Pure) Recipe: Cement Aggregate (Sand and Stones) Water Ratio: 3 (Aggregate): 1(Cement)

Grass-Crete Recipe: Cement Grass Mud Water Ratio: 3 (Grass): 2 (Mud) : 1(Cement)

Timbercrete Recipe: Cement Sawdust Water Ratio: 4 (Sawdust): 1(Cement)

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Concrete (Stone) Recipe: Cement Large Stones Water Ratio: 3 (Stone Portions): 1(Cement)

Papercrete Recipe: Cement Pulped Paper Hot Water Ratio: 4 (Pulped Paper): 1(Cement)

Thick Latex Recipe: Cement Latex Ratio: 5 (Latex): 1(Cement)

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Concrete (Broken Brick) Recipe: Cement Broken Brick Water Ratio: 4 (Brick Pieces): 1(Cement)

Rammed Earth Recipe: Cement Mud, Sand and Dirt Minimal Water Pressure Ratio: 2 (Dirt): 2 (Sand): 2(Mud): 2(Cement)

Moulding Latex Recipe: Cement Latex and Thickener Ratio: 6 (Latex): 1(Cement)

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Clay (&) Concrete Recipe: Cement Clay Water Ratio: 4 (Clay): 1(Cement)

Concrete (Glass) Recipe: Cement Broken Glass Water Ratio: 3 (Broken Glass): 1(Cement)

Jesmonite & Concrete Recipe: Cement Jesmonite (AC100) Sand Ratio: 5 (Jesmonite): 2 (Sand): 1(Cement)

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Brick-Crete Recipe: Cement Ground Brick Sand Water Ratio: 5(Ground Brick): 2 (Sand): 1(Cement)

Jesmonite (Pure) Recipe: Jesmonite (AC100) Terracotta Pigment Ratio: Jesmonite 1:1

Modelling Clay Crete Recipe: Cement Modelling Clay Water Ratio: 3 (Modelling Clay): 1(Cement)

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Material Experiment Concrete exposed to seawater is susceptible to its corrosive effects. The effects are more pronounced above the tidal zone than where the concrete is permanently submerged. In the submerged zone, magnesium and hydrogen carbonate ions precipitate a layer of brucite, about 30 micrometers thick, on which a slower deposition of calcium carbonate as aragonite occurs. These layers somewhat protect the concrete from other processes, which include attack by magnesium, chloride and sulfate ions and carbonatation. Above the water surface, mechanical damage may occur by erosion by waves themselves or sand and gravel they carry, and by crystallization of salts from water soaking into the concrete pores and then drying up. Pozzolanic cements and cements using more than 60% of slag as aggregate are more resistant to sea water than pure Portland cement. Sea water corrosion contains elements of both chloride and sulfate corrosion. EXPERIMENT

Objective: The Objective of this Experiment is to determine the extent of degradation of concrete and my chosen alternatives to salt water. Over a week, this experiment will be carried out using a sped up time-frame compared to that of tides, but still at a similar ratio. The water itself will be salted, reflective of the water on site as it is situated in the Thames Estuary. The experiment will be documented photographically to record the degradation of concrete surfaces and any developments in terms of corrosion to the material itself. The test bricks will be fully exposed to water and will be moved around in salt water to mimic tides and current flow. They will be left in the water for over a week and taken out at regular intervals. There condition at the start versus the end will allow to come to a conclusion of suitable materials for my totem. I will be calculating also their percentage of degradation of their weight over time and resolve how long they would last in salt water for. PROCEDURE: 1. Pour salt water into container, filling up to top of mould. 2. Place brick in container for 8 hours - moving the piece around every 2 hours. 3. Remove for 8 hours to leave to dry. 4. Repeat for a week. 5. Weigh Brick at end of process and record visually. 6. Complete after 7 days of intervention for conclusion/results. Corrosion from Diluted Road Salt

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Stained Orange from Rusting (Iron Oxide) being deposited along with Calcium Carbonate


The purpose of this series of tests is to help define structural materials for particular uses in my proposal and programmes, represented through a material totem. I propose that this particular Tidal Pool Totem will be a fully realised element of my proposal that is resistant to water. These particular materials will be place inside a water resistant container and exposed to water several times a week in which their degradation will be recorded visually. Exposure to Water V Time. These results will help inform my construction on the Riparian Zone and mudflats.

Rotating a material test sample at interval times throughout the experiment. Mimicking the motion of teh tides and flow of the natural waterscape.

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Material Tests

Concrete (CONC)

Brick Pieces + Concrete (BPC)

Glass + Concrete (GLAC)

Concrete proved to have little if not any degradation throughout the week. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resistance to water amongst the other tests seems to be at it peak with this material. One of the best outcomes.

Brick Pieces as aggregate to cement to hybridise concrete proved to be a lighter method of construction and casting and equally as good as concrete at resisting water.

Glass as aggregate towards a concrete cast materials emphasizes teh recyclability of glass as a building material, weighing heavier than brick pieces but not as pure concrete. Strong resistance.

RESULTS:

RESULTS:

RESULTS:

Before Test: 980g Wet (Post 1-week): 986g After Test: 973g

Before Test: 844g Wet (Post 1-week): 840g After Test: 837g

Before Test: 950g Wet (Post 1-week): 953g After Test: 943g

DEGRADED: 7g

DEGRADED: 7g

DEGRADED: 7g

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Stones + Concrete (STOC)

Jesmointe + Concrete (JESC)

Stones as aggragate is the natural and Jesmonite and Concrete, a peculiar typical way of forming concrete, however, hybrid of acrylic compound and concrete in contrast to the other materials, is perhaps one of the best outcomes the stones provide a much weightier with a <1% of degradation. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s negative, outcome but an equally resistant one however is its costly makeup. nonetheless. RESULTS: RESULTS: Before Test: 672g Before Test: 1,041g Wet (Post 1-week): 665g Wet (Post 1-week): 1,039g After Test: 671g After Test: 1,037g DEGRADED: 1g DEGRADED: 4g

Jesmonite (JES)

Jesmoniteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s compound make up makes it a costly venture in construction, aimed more towards ornamental features rather than structural. However, its water resistance is still very effective. RESULTS: Before Test: 615g Wet (Post 1-week): 612g After Test: 612g DEGRADED: 3g

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Mudcrete (MUD)

Mudcrete, despite its consistency being mainly out of natural mud and soils still provided a hardened, solid outcome, however, it was a much different story once exposed to salt-water.

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Clay + Concrete (CLAYC)

Grasscrete (GRA)

Clay and Concrete was not a Grasscrete, the most naturally composed combination I had thought would set mixture of the series, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s test definitely together, however, similar to mudcrete, proved that natural materials do not react once exposed to water, its hardened, solid well at all with moisture, they may hold nature began to unravel, fast. it, but not resist it.

RESULTS:

RESULTS:

RESULTS:

Before Test: 558g Wet (Post 1-week): 565g After Test: 513g

Before Test: 620g Wet (Post 1-week): 619g After Test: 608g

Before Test: 550g Wet (Post 1-week): 576g After Test: 504g

DEGRADED: 45g

DEGRADED: 12g

DEGRADED: 46g


Modelling Clay + Concrete (MODC)

Papercrete (PAP)

Brickcrete (BRI)

Modelling clay and concrete, upon mixing, did not go as smoothly as its relative. However, upon testing the air dried mix in water, there was much more resistance than anticipated.

Papercrete, comprised of recycled papers and an easy home-made recipe provided the most interesting solid sample, lightweight, yet strong. However, this would come to pass soon after.

RESULTS:

RESULTS:

A personal favourite, Brickcreteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s textural quality and colour derives from its ground brick mixture as aggregate. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s binding took to very well and its degradation outcome is a welcome surprise.

Before Test: 353g Wet (Post 1-week): 357g After Test: 340g

Before Test: 403g Wet (Post 1-week): 429g After Test: 308g

DEGRADED: 13g

DEGRADED: 95g

RESULTS: Before Test: 547g Wet (Post 1-week): 548g After Test: 546g DEGRADED: 1g

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Rammed Earth (RAME)

Concrete + Latex (CLAT)

Latex (LAT)

Rammed Earth’s pressurised construction provided its consistency, packed with tension. Still degrading even when solid and interacted with, it wasn’t until the movement in the water was it really put to test.

Concrete and Latex provided a spongy consistency that provided friction upon interaction and a squishy but firm retention to pressure. In water, it was quite a success

Latex with a slight percentage of concrete contrasted it’s sister test with a much more responsive body of rubber to resist and cause friction. Less concrete however means more loss. RESULTS:

RESULTS: Before Test: 862g Wet (Post 1-week): 842g After Test: 837g DEGRADED: 25g

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RESULTS: Before Test: 280g Wet (Post 1-week): 284g After Test: 280g DEGRADED: <1g

Before Test: 252 Wet (Post 1-week): 250g After Test: 251g DEGRADED: 1g


Material Test Outcomes After the experiment, I have determined the most successful and unsuccessful outcomes and ordered them into groups of structural material versus programmatic materials. Structural materials will go into the actual construction of the design proposal and respond to the building itself. The programmatic materials will respond to the assortment of activities in my proposal, involving model making, casting and crafts. STRUCTURAL MATERIALS

PROGRAMMATIC MATERIALS

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Material Test Successes

Chosen Structural Materials: (From left to Right of Top Image) Brickcrete Jesmonite Jesmonite and Concrete Concrete and Stones Concrete and Glass Concrete and Brick Pieces Concrete These materials, in particular those that are not Jesmonite can be made and cast with the use of recycled materials from the site, such as bricks, stones and glass. All of which can be obtained through local structures and businesses as waste.

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Material Test Failures

Chosen Programmatic Materials: (From left to Right of Top Image) Latex Concrete and Latex Rammed Earth Papercrete Modelling Clay Grasscrete Mudcrete Clay and Concrete This set of materials are comprised using natural materials with a high decay rate. These could be used for temporary structures for programme enhancement, all of which can be found naturally on-site. (Left) Unsuccessful attempt at Timbercrete.

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Material Experiment Conclusion and Data To formulate and wrap up this experiment into a Material Totem Response and Resolution, I need to take the data from these tests and formulate a rationale into the reasoning behind my next steps in creating a material totem with materials and experiences from this experiment. In order to do this, I will be calculating a decay rate for the materials just testes and a predictive outcome for how fast they would decay over, days, week, months, and even years. This way I can choose appropriate materials for my Totem Response.

MATERIAL

BEFORE TEST (g)

WET WEIGHT (g)

AFTER TEST (g)

Rammed Earth (RE)

862

842

837

Jesmonite (JES)

615

612

612

Papercrete (PAP)

403

429

308

Brickcrete (BRI)

547

548

546

Grasscrete (GRA)

550

576

504

Concrete & Latex (CLAT)

280

284

280

Latex (LAT)

252

250

251

Mudcrete (MUD)

558

565

513

Jesmonite & Concrete (JESC)

672

665

671

Modelling Clay & Concrete (MODC)

353

357

340

Clay & Concrete (CLAYC)

620

619

608

Brick Pieces & Concrete (BPC)

844

840

837

1,041

1,039

1,037

Concrete (CONC)

980

986

973

Concrete & Glass (GLAC)

950

953

943

Stones & Concrete (STOC)

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WEIGHT DIFFERENCE (g) DECAY RATE (%)

WEEKS TO DECAY

DECAY TIME

25

2.9

34.48

< 8 Months

3

0.49

205

< 4 Years

95

23.57

4.24

< 30 days

1

0.18

547

< 10 Years, 6 Months

46

8.36

11.98

< 2 Months, 3 Weeks

<1

0.36

280+

< 5 Years, 3 Months

1

0.4

252

< 4 Years, 9 Months

45

8.06

12.4

< 2 Months, 3 Weeks

1

0.15

672

< 12 Years, 10 Months

13

3.68

27.15

< 6 Months, 1 Week

12

1.94

51.67

< 1 Year

7

0.83

120.57

< 2 Years, 4 Months

4

0.38

260.25

< 5 Years

7

0.71

140

< 2 Years, 9 Months

7

0.73

135.7

< 2 Years, 8 Months

To conclude, the most successful outcomes have been the tests that use a heavier ratio to concrete with particular aggregate that aid the binding mixture. From these results, in particular, I will be taking forward, Concrete, Brickcrete, Clay and Concrete, Jesmonite and Jesmonite and Concrete, with a control material of Timber, a material that I know will be used in the main structural construction of the proposal. Their decay rate presented an interesting hybridisation that I want to test further in a 1:5 Scale model of my proposal in the form of a Tidal Pool. During the construction process it would be beneficial for me to record the making and outcome to see and understand whether these materials on a larger scale would work as well as they have on a smaller scale. 111


Material Totem Drawing A series of material experiments using alternatives to concrete in order to provide a greener build. These tests will examine the consistency of materials against the exposure to water. They will replicate mini Tidal Pool slices, analysing an element of my Design Proposal.

The test model will have a cast tidal pool, with elements from the alternatives to concrete, as labelled. The Base will be cast in mud, as per the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conditions, replicating a site model and examining how to attach to the existing. The test will be wrapped in a sealed acrylic case and placed onto a wooden base. These tests will help define parts of my proposal and technical thesis. 112


Material Totem Proposal Drawings for Size and Measurements, highlighting experimental function of Totem through sectional studies.

225mm

700mm

700

m

225m

Small Drainage Holes [Drilled]

Tidal Pool Slice Thickness 36mm

m

150

113


Material Totem Choices After consideration from tutorials and materials tests, I have chosen a select 6 materials to use in the totem that will enforce my experimentation further. These materials have a higher rate of water resistance compared to other tested materials and have a higher casting success rate, making a more suitable exploration into these said materials.

Concrete

Clay (&) Concrete

Timber

Jesmonite and Concrete

Jesmonite

Brick-Crete

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Material Totem Construction A series of images showing the construction and casting methods used to create the Material Tidal Totem. Using moulds and negative forms to create the tidal pool sections and mixing and collating materials to use to make recipes for concrete and alternative materials as binding and sustainably increased casts.

Petroleum Jelly was layered on the inside of the mould to allow the cast to be easily released upon solidifying. Problems arose at right angles where cracks and breakage began to occur. Ground materials such as brick were broken down by hand in order to be included in the alternative mixtures.

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116


Hot glue and Silicone sealant were lined on the inside of the water tank to form a sealed container to prevent the escape of water. The tidal pool section pieces with attached together using grip adhesives, the real test is the impact on water upon the SURFACES of the material.

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118


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Material Totem Outcome The Totem, now a representational element of my proposal, fits into my scheme at a scale of 1:5. Knowing that this structural feature will be a main part of my proposal, provides me with the knowledge that the materials used can be cast and withstand environmental issues that impact on the site. In particular, salt water exposure.

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Further Study - Tidal Pool Foundations An exploration in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Attaching to the existingâ&#x20AC;? leading on from the results of my material totem tests, my next goal will be to analyse particular of attaching new structures to an already shifting existing environment. These diagrams below show initial intentions in attachment through foundations that I will be exploring further.

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Precedent Study - Dania Park ARCHITECT: SWECO FFNS Architects LOCATION: Malmo, Sweden PROJECT YEAR: 2015

This Precedent focus is mainly upon the construction and placement of foundations with the tidal. Riparian Zone of the site. In particular Dania Park boasts a series of varied foundations that I wish to explore further in my design, from stilts, to rafts, to piles. The mixture presented here allows that landscaping of the design to flow directly into the water, creating a harmonised relationship through material construction. A relationship that I also wish to translate into my own proposal.

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VIII. CHOSEN SITE: THE POINT Site Photos Site Drawings

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Site Location and Photos

From researching and exploring the greater site of the Creek and Marina, I have decided to narrow down my focus to a specific to design my proposal on. In particular, I will be focusing on the commonly known area known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Pointâ&#x20AC;?, an area of land at the tip of the Island that looks out onto the mud-lands, estuary and beyond. Its perimeter is that of the Riparian Zone, bordering the Marina and Mudflats.

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Marina Boat Workshop

+

N Island Yacht Club

+

127


Site Section and Analysis through Models and Urban Plan

Site Map Engrave Model

Highlighting Roads and Waterways as Circulation

Analysing Tide Levels through Physical Mapping

Locating Permanent Sea Wall Defences

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Figure Ground Plan and Site

Riparian Space

Traversal Systems

Public V Private Gradient

Relationship with Nature

129


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IX. MARINA-VILLE Users & Programme Programme Strategy & Scheme Spatial Diagrams and Urban Plan Proposal Development Precedents Landscape Channels & Tides Circulation and Topography Construction Details Structural Analysis Proposal Drawings Proposal Visuals Big Drawings

131


User + Programme Collages

USERS: Children [6+]

USERS: Youths [16+]

USERS: Seniors [50+] 132


PROPOSAL INTENTION

133


Programme Strategy

Lighthouse Archive - Potential Spaces

Tidal Pool Classroom - Potential Space

Boat & Mechanical Workshop - Potential Space 134


Education - Tidal Pool Classroom

YOUTHS

+

SENIORS TEENAGERS

Tradition - Lighthouse Archive +

=

Marina-Ville

Ambition - Boat & Mechanic Workshops

Potential Proposal Spatial Arrangement

135


Urban Plan

A key understanding of the site now comes form my Urban Plan of the area, narrowing down areas of interest that relate to my programme and agenda. Highlighting the Riparian Zone and focusing on Private and Public spaces dominates these plans whilst trying to understand the sites relationship between the land and the sea.

136


137


Proposed Spaces My proposed spaces of Boat Workshops, Lighthouse Complex and Tidal Pool Classrooms are broken down here into degrees of activity, interaction and furnitures. This way it will be easier to arrange and design spaces around the technical requirements especially for safety and privacy aspects of the programmes, in particular when dealing with child-friendly spaces.

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B

Worksho t a p o

Li g

Ti

Pool Classro l a

om

d

ex

use Comp o h l ht

139


Iteration 1 The Proposalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first iteration. An educational complex/facility that aims to bring a new life back to The Point. The cross-pollination of generations is the ultimate aim here. Perhaps the next stage here is to experiment and explore material connections to link spaces and structures together. Who Builds the Spaces? Who are the Spaces really for?

140


141


Sketch Development

142


143


Sketch Development

144


145


Iteration 2 Urban Plan and Strategy Development

146


147


Iteration 2 Iteration 2 presents a massive departure from the previous designâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mass development. This variation is more considerate of the evolving landscape due to its shared borders with the ever changing sea levels. The design itself has now decreases in land coverage of built structures and is split into 3 standing buildings. One a cultural centre linked to a series of boat workshops. A building purely for the education and free form social interaction for children and a social house for the connecting of the community featuring a public house, restaurant and multi-purpose function room.

Key Sketch Diagrams (Refining Iteration through defining specific spaces) Programme Diagram (Particular Spaces highlighted in relevant colours)

CULTURE SPACES (Gallery/Library/ Function Room/ Restaurant/Pub/Viewing Platform)

GREEN SPACES

Circulation Diagram (Pathways highighted in Red)

148

EDUCATIONAL SPACES (Classrooms/Tidal Pools/Playground/Build Spaces/Amphitheatre)

CIRCULATION

MAKING SPACES (Workshops/Lecture Hall/Fabrication Bureau/Studios/ Computer Room)


Thatch Roof Construction (incl. Skylight)

Metallic Sheet Pitched Roof

Thatched Cladded Structure on stilt support

Raised Circulation Platform (Timber)

Viewing Platform (Facing South-East)

Dock/Pier

Exterior Landscape Spaces (incl. Build Area/Pond/Playground/Social Spaces) Public Leisure Tidal Pool Sloped Incline towards Marshland/Sea Educational Tidal Pools

Site Area (Excavated Areas highlighted in Red)

149


150


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Precedent Study - Swansea Bay Visitor Centre ARCHITECT: Juice Architects LOCATION: Swansea, Wales PROJECT YEAR: 2014

Sketch Highlighting the Views seen from the interior of the curved spaces out to the sea and open view. Circulation flows directly into the center.

Man made pathway made out from hardcore stone and gravel provide the ultimate breakwater and stable platform for circulation to traverse over. Heavy material in the centre, lighter on the outside.

The building provides a curved defence system against prevailing wind allowing the wind to flow around the curve facade, reducing impact on the structure itself.

The building itself being powered through the man made break water using hydro powered fans to power the proposal. Water movement through isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just ornamental after all. 152


Sketch highlighting the hydro powering element of the design through the man-made breakwater.

Circulation of the spaces flow around the curved façades that also aid with environmental impact on the proposal. Its curved facade are fed through direct circulation towards it.

The buildings curved roof angles rainwater inside to be collected in order to be re-pumped around the building for cooling and heating. Heat rises through the side of the building and out the top, whereas cool air filters inbetween.

Glare from the sun is reduced with the curvature of the building on itsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; west side. Angling out provides ample opportunity fro natural light to filter through to the building interiors.

153


Precedent Study - Piscina Das Mares ARCHITECT: Alvaro Siza LOCATION: Porto, Portugal PROJECT YEAR: 1966

154

Sizaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural blending into the landscape with his architecture presents a seamless transition between the relationship of man-made and natural construction. A language I wish to translate into my own proposal, using the landscape as a form of construction.


In particular, this plan of the proposal highlights how the structures use the contours of the landscape to blend their structures into a more natural form.

Siza uses harsh corners and angles to create framed views and experiences, above, Siza uses a sharp turn at the end of a long threshold to open up out to the sea. The creation of an experience and framed view through the turn of a body.

Sketch highlighting how concrete would be cast (in plan view) onto the natural landscape without interfering with it much.

Fitting a pool to the contours of the landscape, a more natural aesthetic.

Slicing away at the landscape in order to fit cast elements on site to fulfil programmatic and circulatory needs. From public view the proposal is blocked by its roof and frames a view of the sea. You will have to traverse into the proposal to experience it before the sea being revealed to you THROUGH the navigation of the proposal.

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Precedent Study - Youth Centre ARCHITECT: Cornelius + Vรถge LOCATION: Roskilde, Denmark PROJECT YEAR: 2012

Views are littered out from the building, leading away from circulation points. Each direction targeting a different view away from the central point of the building. 156


Sketch highlighting the existing structure and it’s extensions to accommodate for the Youth Centre Programme.

Force Diagram highlighting the distribution of weight throughout the structures with forces acting upon it. Gravity pushing the weight down through the sides and into the foundation but the structure itself is pushing back against that, allowing the structure stand and retain itself upright.

Light enters the central space through a skylight and also through the “nook”. The open panels allow for the maximum amount of natural light into the space, particularly important for children interacting and spending time in the space.

The plan of the building here highlights the numerous exit and entry point of the building, creating a flow of back and forth, in and out of the building. The nooks create a framed view, a space solely for the children.

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Precedent Study - Facts Takern Visitor Centre ARCHITECT: WingĂĽrdh Arkitektkontor AB LOCATION: Glanas, Sweden PROJECT YEAR: 2008

Similar to Wadden Sea Centre, this particular Precedent also uses thatch as a primary material. The placement of this proposal on a marshland too highlights the natural properties of thatch, through hardening in the presence of salt moisture in the air. Thus creating a harder exterior that could double up as insulation.

158


159


Iteration 3 Sketch Development

160


161


Borrowing from the Land for Iteration 3 The Point needs to welcome the water in for this Proposal to work. My next move is to “Break the Land”. Doing this creates many opportunities and constraints for me, making designing easier but also by having the help of borrowing the language of the site. By borrowing the forms of the natural channels, I intend to make my own set of channels that run through the site and create the spaces I need for my overall masterplan to begin to start taking shape. near Canvey Island — Essex

0

25

50

75 yards 1 of 1

(Above) The Site (Right) The process of breaking the land using the immediate site language of the marshland channels. (Below) The Two Phase Masterplan once the Land has been broken (Opposite Page Top) Phase 1 - The intertwining pathways and waterways create a fluid sense of flow throughout the site and harmonise the relationship between the land and the sea. (Opposite Page Bottom) Phase 2 The extension of the proposal over time with the continuation of walkways and waterways.

162


163


Forming the Channels through Site Language

164


165


Creating a new Topography via Tidal Influence

166


167


Landscape Channels and Tides

CONTOURED SITE MODEL (CNC)

168

Low Tide (Above) | High Tide (Below) | Tidal Shifts occur every 6 hours on site


Tidal Levels based on new Landscape

169


Further Development Research Precedents

Santa Marta Lighthouse Museum Caiscais, Portugal 2007 Aires Mateus The Santa Marta Museum manages to maintain a traditional set of themes whilst keeping a fresh and contemporary aesthetic at the same time. The Lighthouse is traditional, in itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s structure and design, yet is contrasted by the open, minimal plaza that surrounds it. The open spaces and directed channels guide users through the proposal yet always being in the presence of the lighthouse through angled gaps in wall to maintain the presence. Traditional V Contemporary is the scheme that is at play here, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in harmony.

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Rolex Learning Center EPFL, Switzerland 2007-2009 110 Million CHF Architect: SANAA The Rolex Learning Center is constructed above ground level and contains its own form of rolling landscape that provides an internal experience that is highly experimental and innovative upon its flat ground surface. The slopes and undulating scape of its interiors contribute toward the barrier-free delineations of space, that contain their own enclosures to encourage group work inside.


LA Waterways Los Angeles, California The channelization of the LA River in Downtown Los Angeles began purely as a way to combat the area’s main problem of constant flooding due to the cities lying in the river’s flood plain. These areas experienced high levels of flooding and these concrete channels were built to combat these rise in levels. Their sheer size are iconic and see people circulate through these regularly. These open space provides that break down of the barrier between water and land and harmonises the two in situe. This is what I wish to impose when my new proposal of forming channels.

Pargas Maritime Landscape Pargas, Finland 2017Schauman Arkkitehdit Pargas Maritime Landscape began development with an analysis of the city, its history, structure, character, potentials and challenges. It introduces an urban loop that connects the public spaces of the harbour front to the surrounding public spaces and the pedestrian street, which today ends by the harbour area. The idea is to strategically position the new functions along the promenade and thereby making the harbour a “string of pearls” destination for inhabitants and visitors alike. The harbour becomes a natural, recreational, extension to the city centre.

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Creating Typologies in Harmony with the Landscape

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Connecting Typologies and Further Harmonisation Studies

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Iteration 4 Masterplan and Sketch Sections

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4

2

2 4 1

4

4 4

3 5

3

MASTERPLAN - KEY

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1

Workshop - Build

2

Workshop - Repair

3

Viewing Platform

4

Classroom

5

Social House


Workshop

Clasroom

Social House

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Iteration 5 Development Sketch - Slice and Timber Grid Focus

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Masterplan Slice I will be designing a part of the Masterplan Scheme that will be proposed for the Point. The proposal contains buidling that retain exactly similar architectural language. The buildings and slice I will be examining are:

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Marina-Ville Slice

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Further Development Research Precedents

Maritime Youth House Copenhagen 2004 BIG Two very different users had to share the structure, a sailing club and a youth centre. Both with conflicting requirements, the youth centre wanted outdoor space for the kids, the sailing club required the site to moor their boats. The building is the result of two contradictory demands. The deck is elevated high enough to allow for boat storage underneath while providing an undulating landscape for the kids to run and play above. The Maritime Youth House has gained an additional â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, the wooden deck, it supports all the centreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs, indoor and outdoor.

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Yokohama Ferry Terminal Japan 1995 Foreign Office Architects (FOA) This International Passenger terminal is organized in three vertical levels, its contours, occasionally betray an element of randomness, they are in fact generated by a single circulation scheme that dictates spatial organization. The circulation operates as a continuous looped diagram, directly rejecting any notion of linearity and directionality. Visitors are taken through paths that meander vertically and horizontally before arriving at any destination, and their sight lines through space are comparably tortuous and indirect.


Parque del Este Caracas, Venezuela 1961 Roberto Burle Marx

Piscina Das Mares Porto, Portugal 1966 Alvaro Siza

The park combines three differently designed areas, the first being an open field with a gentle undulating topography, the second a densely forested landscape with meandering pathways. The third, a series of paved gardens with tiled murals and water works. This combination of the three schemes allows the landscape to be more than just a ground you walk on. The curvature allows the natural aspect of the design to be more than just a journey from A to B.

Sizaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural blending into the landscape with his architecture presents a seamless transition between the relationship of manmade and natural construction. Siza uses harsh corners and angles to create framed views and experiences. Siza uses a sharp turn at the end of a long threshold to open up out to the sea. The creation of an experience and framed view through the turn of a body. From public view the proposal is blocked by its roof and frames a view of the sea. You will have to traverse into the proposal to experience it before the sea being revealed to you THROUGH the navigation of the proposal.

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Integrating Schemes into a single Structure for Development

Key Development Sketches - how to seamlessly connect the spaces in harmony

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MARINA-VILLE MANIFESTO 1/ Provide a SEAMLESS connection between the Land & the Building Volume - building inside and outside and ontop -

2/ Material LAYERING. Concrete, Timber, and Thatch create Spatial Layering through Water, Land and Air

AIR LAND WATER 3/ Walkway Access and Social Spaces are linked to activity both in and out of the building.

S

O

CIA

L

4/ FLUX and CHANGE. Shifting Environment conditions create Expansion and Contraction of Space & Activity 187


Spatial Arrangement and Sequence in Scheme

SOCIAL | EDUCATION | MAKING

CAFE

CLASSROOM

WORKSHOP SOCIAL

CLASSROOM

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CLASSROOM

VIEWING PLATFORM

OUTDOOR GREEN SPACE

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Circulation Plan Diagrams

WALKWAY CIRCULATION 190

CLASSROOM CIRCULATION


SOCIAL SPACES CIRCULATION

WORKSHOP & MAKING CIRCULATION 191


Material Rationale and Layering Selection

CONCRETE

BRICKCRETE

JESMONITE

The main material in the construction of this slice and the channels in general. Concrete rafts and piles will help support the proposal in its place on the mudflats. The channels themselves acting as a rolling piece of pre-cast land that can be built off. In particular, the Tidal Pool Steps will be the most interesting piece of cast concrete due to the steps being carved into the surface with its custom Latex addition for circulatory aid.

My proposal contains material layers, the first is Concrete, the second is Brickcrete. This is directly built off the concrete foundations and act as my buildings walls, anything below 2 meters off the ground. This is because at the height, this is the furthest the water level could rise in the case of a drastic flood, so the structure can remain intact without rot setting in and much degradation at all, as seen in my material testing.

Jesmonite cladding for the interior walls above the Brickcrete walls and inbetween the timber frame. The material decision for this was due to the minimal amount of the cladding would be used, thus reducing cost and also, its resistant to water provides ample protection from any exterior forces if it decidedly managed to get through.

SAND GRAVEL GROUND - Mud, Dirt, Earth

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This section highlights the placement and ordering of particular materials to use as structural and ornamental elements of my design proposal. The majority of these materials will be taken from my earlier materials tests and totem, bringing their potential through experimentation forward. Also, this selection highlights the MATERIAL LAYERING of the proposal, changing as your vertically move through the building.

TIMBER

THATCH

STEEL

Timber frames are the main secondary structure after the concrete foundations. The timber meets the concrete and Brickcrete forming a solid based of the frame on top of a sole plate. The timber is then framed in an apex manner that accommodates the social platforms that sit on-top of the structures themselves. Inside the building the timber is protected by the roof thatch and is bracketed with steel reinforcement due to the sheer size and amount of it.

Thatch is solely used for the roof and exterior wall cladding. Similar to my precedents, the use of the thatch is to act as a natural barrier and harden in the presence of salt moisture in the air, creating a stronger wall and potential insulation. The thatch decision itself is helped by the Canvey Island heritage use of it through their iconic Dutch Cottages on the Island. An aesthetic I wish to come through via my proposal.

Steel re-bar reinforcement in the concrete provides a stable series of pre-casted elements that can slide together with a dowelled joint. The only other aspect of steel being used is via the walkway bracing for sway and movement frames aswell as bracketing for the timber frame structure. The addition of steel is minimal but used to great, effective use.

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Wind Impact This section highlights the impact of the prevailing wind not only on the proposal but on the newly formed site as a whole. Due to their Apex forms, the buildings allow for the wind to glide over the tops of the strcutures reducing impact in total.

Impact of the Prevailing wind on the new site.

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Light Impact This section highlights the impact of noon natural light from the sun. Due to the skylights on the proposal, the maximum amount of intake of natural light will be at noon. The section here is North facing (to the left) so the seasonal change will directly affect the angle of the light entering the skylights.

AVE

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ERAGE SUMMER SOLSTICE

JULY 15th

APRIL 15th

OCTOBER 15th

JANUARY 15th

AVERAGE WINTER SOLSTICE

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Views Diagram Due to the central focus of the social space being the rooftops of the buildings connected via raised walkways there will be open space for views for a far. This diagram here helps illustrate the angle and direction of those particular views.

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Ventilation Diagram The majority of the ventilation of the proposal comes from heat being generated through the making spaces in the form of body heat and machinery and underfloor heating. The heat will rise and escape through the skylights above. Cold air will be ushered through side windows to help push the hot air out of the window and provide that circulation. The viewing platform is open to the elements s so always exposed to cold air.

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Force Diagram Forces acting upon the main proposal structure.

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Construction and Exploded Structural Elements This section highlights the construction of the proposal slice. In particular, this section will breakdown the proposal through the layered elements of the design through its layered materials.

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TIMBER WALKWAY STEEL BRACING

THATCH ROOFING

WOODEN WINDOW FRAMES

JESMONITE BOARD CLADDING FIREPROOF DOORS

TIMBER FRAME STRUCTURE SOLE PLATE CONCRETE LAYER (BRICKCRETE)

CONCRETE CHANNEL

GROUND (SAND, GRAVEL, MUD, DIRT)

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Walkway Construction Detailing

TIMBER

STEEL

CONCRETE

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Sketches above illustrate the concrete clad bracing using panels that slot onto the steel cladding for the walkways. The design decision was to hid the bracing to create block structures for the walkways to sit on, allowing their arches to create framed moments that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t broken by the open bracing. (Left) Drawing exploring how the viewing platform could use stilts, rafts and piles to secure its foundations amongst the shifting marshland.

(Below) Straight bolted connection for the concrete to timber transfer for the walkway structure.

(Above) Attachment to building with steel bracketing. (Below) Cladding Frame in Bracing

(Above and Below) The concrete to timber transfer for the viewing platforms foundations that are reinforced with rebar. Piles go down 10m+.

(Above) Sway Frame

(Above) Walkway column section (Left) Walkway suspended bracing 207


Thatch Roof Construction Detailing

THATCH

TIMBER

208


(Left) Thatch roof detail, thatch material is the same thickness as well in order to achieve material outcome and finish.

(Left) Thatch roof detail with embedded skylights. Due to the proposal being littered with skylights on a thatch roof, this detial highlights the threshold between in, out and window frame.

(Right) Thatch roof detail, detailing that composition of the roof structure in order for thatch to be placed onto frame using membrane across a crossbeam, integrated with a fire-proof ceiling. Perfect for the workshop space.

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Timber Frame Construction Detailing

TIMBER

210


(Above) How the timber will be connected together using bracketing and bolting. (Left) Steel Bracketing Example (Below) Scale 1:5 FLOOR DETAIL 1. Flooring 2mm 2. Timber Joists 4. 15mm Sterling Board 7. 25x50mm Suspension Batons

Where the Timber meets the concrete, using a joint that is embedded in the concrete and bolts into the wooden beam.

3. 25mm Cement/Dry Sand Mix 5. Heating Pipes 6. Insulation 8. Structural Timer

1 3

5

4

2 7

6

8

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Typical Wall Construction Detail (Scale 1:5)

The Sole Plate Sill, preventing backtracking of rain water back against the material that could lead to rot.

WALL DETAIL KEY: 1. TIMBER 2. CONCRETE w/rebar 3. INSULATION/VAPOUR MEMBRANE

Timber to Concrete connection with a steel plate slotted into the timber that is bolted in place.

4. AIR GAP 5. TIMBER STRIP FOR THATCH MOUNTING 6. SOLE PLATE

How the Sole Plate and the Timber/ Concrete connection could combine for my own wall detail.

7. THATCH 8. STEEL PLATE 9. STEEL BOLTS

This detail includes the previous incarnation but with insulation and thatch, to highlight the wall panels that will go inbetween the timber frame posts.

10. TERMITE BARRIER

Where the Timber meets the concrete, using a joint that is known as a SOLE PLATE. This allows the timber to rest on a frame that connects to the concrete. This also acts as a vapour barrier against any run off rain.

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RAIN 1

3 4 5

9

6

RUN-OFF onto sill.

10

Sole Plate preventing backtracking of rain water.

8

2

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Concrete Channel Construction Detail

BRICKCRETE

CONCRETE

GROUND: Mud Dirt Earth

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How the pre-cast concrete elements come together to form a channel.

In between each of the concrete elements there will be an expansion joint to allow movement of the cast pieces due to expansion and contraction in water. This will allow some give and prevent damage to the core structure. Each elementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foundation will be primarily a 1.5m raft that spans that depth into the marshland and earth below, but the elements will also have piles that will span a 10m+ depth into the ground for extra stability. (Above) Installing Piles on site.

Aswell as moving joints, the channel pieces can also be carved into, giving spaces for green areas amongst the concrete flooring and composition. This allows for a more natural environment instead of a completely imposed concrete one.

Due to the curved nature of the site, some of the elements that follow the contours of the islands will need to be curved, this means that some of the pre-cast elements will need to be pre-cast in that specific curved measurement.

Brickcrete cast elements will be able to slot into the cast concrete channel base, allowing for pre-planning before construction to ensure the pieces fit in the right places. Or perhaps elements are carved out in a general formation to allow for free building on islands over time.

Sketches exploring the curved concrete cast elements that will be going into shaping the islands. 215


Concrete Channel + Tidal Pool Construction Detail (1:20)

1

9 7

2

5

4

3

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DETAIL KEY: 1. Brickcrete

6. Polyurethane

2. Concrete

7. Rebar

3. Ground/Earth

8. Dowelled Joint

4. Gravel

9. Latex

5. Sand

10. Pile

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6

10

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Sectional Model + Tidal Pool Connection Conclusion

1:100 Sectional Model

Foundations

Circulation

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Detailing the Layers of penetration for the piling of the foundations.

Slot system for construction on the channel, these will be a mix of purposefully placed slots for permanent fixtures, and some so temporary structures.

Option 1: Cantilever connection between channels, highly undesirable due to lack of movement of which could cause great breakage and friction.

From my material tests, Latex will be placed in strips in the concrete tidal steps to allow for safer navigation for children due to the friction caused by the rubberised texture. The Latex will be housed in a Polyurethane strip that will house the material and over time can be taken out and recast in situ. 20mm wide compressible filler board 20mm wide joint sealer

Option 2: Mastic Joint, the most desirable, allowing for contraction and expansion of the channels in lue with the presence of water.

Connecting the channel pieces together using a dowelled joint. This removes the risk of vertical movement and solely allows horizontal movement in tandem with the expansion joint.

Dowel Cap, end filled with compressible material

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Masterplan Proposal (1:1000)

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10 Year Masterplan Extension (1:500)

WORKSHOP: BUILD HUB

SOCIAL HOUSE

222


WORKSHOP: REPAIR HUB CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

SOCIAL HOUSE Extension

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Marina-Ville Typologies (1:200)

LARGE UNIT: Workshops Classrooms Cafe Office Storage Utilities

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MEDIUM UNIT: Classrooms Function Room Active Space

SMALL UNIT: Viewing Platform

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Ground Floor Plan (1:100)

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Mezzanine Floor Plan (1:100)

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Low Tide Impact (1:200 - 0.15m Tide level)

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High Tide Impact (1:200 - 3.1m Tide level)

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The Open Workspace - Proposal Interior Visual

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Raised Walkway - Proposal Visual at High Tide

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Channel Framing - Proposal Visual at Low Tide

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The Rolling Landscape - Long Section (Scale 1:100)

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X. BIBLIOGRAPHY

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WEBSITES www.maps.google.co.uk (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) http://canveyisland.org/page_id__191_path__0p2p30p.aspx http://www.mycetes. co.uk/a/page43.html (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) http://canveyisland.org/category/old (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) https://www.streetcheck.co.uk http://www.echo-news.co.uk (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) http://laurenbriodyarchitectureblog.blogspot.co.uk/2014/06/dab510-2014-week-1014-project_281.html 2.3 https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather/forecast/modelclimate/canvey-island_united-kingdom_7911271 2.4 (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) http://www.canveyweather.org.uk/wxtides.php (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) http://slco.org/watershed/streams-101/the-riparian-zone/ (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) http://canveyisland.org/page_id__191_path__0p2p30p.aspx (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Mitchell_(engineer) https://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/Screw-pile_lighthouse#/media/File:Maplin_Sands_Lighthouse_founded_on_Mitchells_screw_piles.jpg http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/373/2035/20140081 (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) http://www.canveyisland.org/page_id__1290.aspx https://www.pinterest.co.uk/ptmengin/landscape-detail/ (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) http://designlifenetwork.com/interior-alchemy-carlo-scarpas-palazzo-querini-stampalia/ https://www.metalocus.es/en/news/architecture-details-palazzo-querini-stampalia-carlo-scarpa (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) https://www.archdaily.com/868361/wade-sea-centre-dorte-mandrup-a-s http:// timberframehq.com/timber-frame-deck-post-construction-detail/ (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/426293920958265473/ http://www.acumendesign. co.uk/our-blog/view/glass-waves (Last Accessed 21.05.2018) 244


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Profile for Amar Sall

MARINA-VILLE Design Journal  

Design Journal for Project: Marina-Ville

MARINA-VILLE Design Journal  

Design Journal for Project: Marina-Ville

Profile for amar_sall
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