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MARCH 2014 . VOL 88

AMA Queensland Membership Magazine

$6 CO-PAYMENT: GOOD OR BAD?

“BUT I NEED TO SEE A DOCTOR TODAY!”

- PATIENT ACCESS TO GENERAL PRACTICE

WEEKEND PENALTY RATES UNDER FIRE

TUG OF WAR

DOCTORS FIGHT UNFAIR EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS

FREE TO AMA QUEENSLAND MEMBERS

DoctorQ MARCH 2014

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CONTENTS

THIS ISSUE TUG OF WAR FOR DOCTORS’ RIGHTS THE STRUGGLE CONTINUES AGAINST THE QUEENSLAND GOVERNMENT’S UNFAIR EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS

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I really enjoy learning how to make efficient diagnoses from seemingly complex cases – I guess it comes with many years of experience!

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REGULARS 4

FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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PRESIDENT’S REPORT

10 CEO’S REPORT 34 FOUNDATION NEWS 46 MEMBER NEWS 48 UNSUNG HEROES: DR BERNARD QUIN

people & events

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14 MINISTER’S BREAKFAST 14 MEMBER MILESTONE

Current issues

16 BANCROFT ORATION

20 PATIENT ACCESS TO GENERAL PRACTICE – IS THERE A PROBLEM?

features

12 A DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN INTERN: DR HANNAH BELLWOOD

24 CO-PAYMENTS AND BULK-BILLING 26 ROPP REPORT SHOWS SYSTEM WIDE FAILURE

44 AMA QUEENSLAND

HEALTH VISION: END OF LIFE CARE

28 ETHICAL AGONY AUNT: WORKING WITH REFUGEES 32 PLAN TO SCRAP PENALTY RATES

business tools 52 DOUBLE DIGIT PERFORMANCE IN 2014

42 AGM + ELECTION NOTICE

53 EQUIPMENT FINANCING 54 PROPERTY INVESTMENT

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56 CHANGES TO THE PRIVACY ACT 58 UNAUTHORISED USE OF THE RED CROSS EMBLEM

Life

60 TRAVEL 61 WINE 62 ALL ABOUT YOU

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64 MOVIES 65 ON STAGE 66 IN PRINT

DoctorQ MARCH 2014

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editor’s desk

FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK MICHELLE FORD RUSS Doctor Q Editor More than 700 new doctors hooked up a pager and began their internship at Queensland hospitals this year. Did they hit the ground running? Are you helping them learn the ropes? We had a look at an average day for a new intern in our new series, A Day in the Life. Dr Hannah Bellwood, our 2013 Student of the Year, gave us a window into her new life at the Princess Alexandra Hospital. Check it out on p12. Have you come across a doctor who goes above and beyond their call of duty to carry out extraordinary

work? We plan to track down these individuals in our new Unsung Heroes addition, where we look at members who embody the values captured by our Health Vision. If you would like to tell an unsung hero’s story, living or deceased, email me at editor@amaq. com.au. If you have ever thought of running for AMA Queensland’s Council, now is the time. Turn to p42 for information about the 2014-16 Election and nomination papers. We’ve also included the dates of the Annual General Meeting and the Presidential Inauguration, so mark them in your diaries. Q

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Dr Christian Rowan President

Dr David Alcorn Honorary Secretary

Dr Shaun Rudd President-Elect

Dr Alex Markwell Elected Member

Dr Sharon Kelly Chairperson

Dr John Hall Elected Member

Dr Chris Zappala Treasurer

Dr Richard Kidd Elected Member

COUNCIL Dr Tom Arthur Gold Coast Area

Dr Kelly Macgroarty Specialist Craft Group

Dr Sharmila Biswas Far North Area

Dr Bav Manoharan Greater Brisbane Area

Dr Kimberley Bondeson Greater Brisbane Area

Dr Dilip Dhupelia Part-Time Medical Practitioner Craft Group

Dr Bill Boyd Capricorn Area Dr Ben Duke Greater Brisbane Area

OBITUARIES

The following AMA Queensland members have recently passed away, our condolences to their families. Dr Alan Crighton HELME General Practitioner Late of Alderley Member for 14 years

Dr David LINDSAY Respiratory Specialist Late of Southport Members for 25 years

Dr John Grant DICKSON OAM Otolaryngologist Late of Toowoomba Member for 69 years

Dr John BREINL General Practitioner Late of Rowes Bay Member for 70 years

Dr Graham ENTSCH Physician - Internal Medicine Late of Palm Beach Member for 52 years Dr Darryl ELLEMOR General Practitioner Late of Toowoomba South Member for 46 years Dr Louis Vivian CHURCH General Practitioner Late of Mango Hill Member for 70 years

Dr Larry Gahan General Practitioner Craft Group Dr Noel Hayman Greater Brisbane Area Dr Sharon Kelly Specialist Craft Group Mr Nicholas Gattas Medical Student Group Dr Vanessa Grayson Residents and Registrars Craft Group Dr Wayne Herdy North Coast Area

Dr John F. Murray Full -Time Salaried Medical Practitioner Craft Group Dr Carl O’Kane North Area Mr Callum Potts Medical Student Observer Dr Shaun Rudd General Practitioner Craft Group Dr Jonathon Shirley Greater Brisbane Area Dr Mason Stevenson General Practitioner Craft Group

AMA QUEENSLAND SECRETARIAT Jane Schmitt Chief Executive Officer Filomena Ferlan General Manager Corporate Services Colleen Harper Manager - AMA Queensland Foundation

Holly Bretherton General Manager Member Relations and Communications Andrew Turner Manager - Member Services

Editor: Michelle Ford Russ Graphic Designer: Erin Sticklen Disclaimer – All material in Doctor Q remains the copyright of AMA Queensland and may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form without permission. While every care is taken to provide accurate information in this publication, the material within Doctor Q is for general information and guidance only and is not intended as advice. Readers are advised to make their own enquiries and/or seek professional advice as to the accuracy of the content of such articles and/or their applicability to any particular circumstances. AMA Queensland, its servants and agents exclude, to the maximum extent permitted by law, any liability which may arise as a result of the use of the material in Doctor Q.

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MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

Journalist: Barbara Ferres Advertising: Louise Glynn Doctor Q is published by AMA Queensland Contact Phone: (07) 3872 2222 Postal Address: PO Box 123, Red Hill QLD 4059 Print Post Approved PP490927/00049 Email: amaq@amaq.com.au


letters to the editor

PROMOTING CLIMATE CHANGE PROPAGANDA I wish to register my concern regarding the ‘environmentally sustainable’ edition of Doctor Q recently. I am amazed that an AMA publication should feature stories uncritically promoting ‘climate change’ propaganda. Any cursory review of the current literature would confirm that there is no ‘scientific consensus’ and that consensus is not a scientific discipline. As there has been no discernable warming for several years despite increasing levels of Co2, it is difficult to see how this is a ‘real and pressing public health issue’. Biblical-like prognositications of plague, famine and pestilence will not make it so. The quoted scenario of cyclones (which are decreasing in frequency) wiping out banana plantations, leading to obesity epidemics, is simply laughable and like the rest of the article unworthy of a publication representing a scientific profession. The concern for poor people’s bananas evidently does not extend to their electricity costs. No mention is made in the article of the opportunity cost of misguided low Co2 (not carbon) policies, which have wasted billions which could have been more productively used in health, infrastructure, education and aid. Direct investment such as the building of dams and levies would have prevented deaths and reduced misery in recent years. If we are truly worried about dengue, let’s put the money into developing a vaccine. Similarly, investment in newer technologies to reduce pollution are likely to be more effective than chasing the Co2 phantom. The harebrained pink batts debacle not only killed four young men, but burned down scores of homes, terrorised countless families and burned billions of dollars which could have been more effectively spent. Alarmists do not acknowledge the enormous contribution cheap energy has made to lifting countless millions of people throughout the world out of poverty and pestilence. The resultant development of a middle class in China, India and elsewhere will result in political and economic changes reflected in a better environment both socially and physically. Interestingly the alarmists are usually the same people who vehemently reject large scale replacement of fossil fuel energy sources with advanced nuclear energy or building dams for hydro. Hypocrisy 101. Dr Deborah Mills’ contribution from the Carbon Footprint Working Group made naïve and non-evidenced predictable generalisations about the parlous state of the world. Once again, no mention of support for nuclear energy, advancing technology in food production, health or global affluence. I am accustomed to this secular moral vanity, but what is ethically disturbing is her suggestion that she should indoctrinate and proselytize her world view to her patients. I don’t think Hippocrates mentioned that in his oath. Ironically Hippocrates was the first person to separate the discipline of scientific medicine from religion (of Al Gore?) and superstition (of Co2?). “Men believe only that it is a divine disease because of their ignorance and amazement”. It is hard to take seriously the condescending paternalism of people who wish to damage the economic future of the country (and world) on the basis of an unproven precautionary principle. (This is reminiscent of the millennium computer bug scare, end-of-the-world cults, and mini ice ages).

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MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

I was furthermore intrigued by the ‘Queensland Hospitals Go Green’article by Barbara Ferres. Considering the substantial cost and time blow-outs involved in QCH, one wonders if a proper cost-benefit analysis of the ‘sustainability’ features of the building was done and what compromises were made to secure them? If Co2 ends up being as benign as many suspect, we will have once again wasted substantial funds which would have been better directed toward better patient care and outcomes. I was also seriously concerned by the political overtones of the main article. Praising M.Turnbull and quoting SMH articles critical of Abbott is immature and counterproductive to a good working relationship with the Government.

One could be forgiven for thinking that our organisation has been outsourced to the ABC and the Greens. Finally, the Editor’s statement regarding sustainability in her office makes a virtue of necessity. Why wouldn’t one turn off lights and appliances and air-conditioning at night and at weekends to minimize cost. I would have hoped that this had been common practice for a long time. Likewise, expanding the use of electronic media and other systems in the office are efficiencies the membership would have expected. Her revelations about recycling paper, composting, riding bicycles (500 million Chinese ride bikes every day without dramatically changing the climate) and showering at work are very cute, but make me wish the staff had better things to think about. In seeking to embrace populist opinion, the AMA is disenfranchising the silent majority of members who expect it to uphold the skeptical traditions of the traditional scientific community. Worse, the institutionalisation of so many crafts and special interest groups in the organisation have turned it into a dog with a dozen wagging tails, making it hostage to political correctness. The pre-Christmas issue of the MJA is another egregious example of extremely poor judgment with its one-sided and critical view of the illegal immigrant debate. One could be forgiven for thinking that our organisation has been outsourced to the ABC and the Greens. Recent political history is littered with examples of discredited populist policies which rapidly lose mainstream support. The AMA risks losing its credibility and the support and membership of its previously loyal majority unless it takes a hard look at itself. Dr Michael J Pitney


letters to the editor

K E E S O T E T T P A M M E I ATT H ON CL TRUT

has , as it anging h s c ’t n fu on se te is rticle c a e clima e h t h t t t n a h rre ly ver, claim t . Howe re is cu ld e d u e h o T m r w ’. article et fo ming yone e plan al war ts. The hat an h t b t is t x lo e b e c ‘g u h in f rs s this eo I do suc sly link ery yea he issu hether u v t o w e h u o it n in t e w zine nd t t, as done nge ence, a r maga he leas us cha u t id o io v y v e a in b s g o d tin ial , to such t to rea presen trovers idence t expec ithout sh con o ting ev w li n , ic b t fl o ts u is n d p x o I c m. h to oes e tific fac proble you wis hat it d e scien y t f h it I s t s . g t e im c b in t fa cla nity o presen dled as commu da ped e article n id a s g to the y a b p o e tive pr ’. ve a sid ment’ specula arming ould ha e state h w iv s l t a e a b it w r they hen of ‘glo utho e that views t t an ‘a osition u im p t o o r t t s p u p fir be t the cil had n’t the should agains A Coun t they d. It is a e M , h is A r w ie p e r h p wit d th era s t su realise new th am no g to do ’t I o in t n h r, s d t A e s a o v e M n c A Ih Howe tice, ac at have ederal issue. to prac ause F sues th c is m e ’ o b AMA on the ft d t o e s in up ‘s we w, ju as fre n n ie h e a v c k e u a y s t m m s n’t In oted sue have should s, etc. n viz is uth. I n e r e o t c m g k n o e a c in t e s s s in to s PCC focus opulist itioner tempt n the I up a p l pract and at en eve a e h s ic k e t e d a e t e lv c e m over th ours 8. Sin es to armed ce 200 ink for w il decid h in c t s s n a n ’t d u h e e n o C vis ans , uld orld nd sho been re ames H e the w J la ’t c s y n n n b d e e a d id e h e ev Qu ing to rat ent as is no l warm m gene Statem w a is b e A r m lo r e M g h A la om h the the he a the t on wit admit sis of t biage fr r s a o e b t ie v r e d r t h a a t c ay mis as has h a hot d uestion This w he alar le in q years. at if it is ge in t ic h t n t r a a e h c e m last 17 l th eded ceptica e that the ne s to a s lso not m a e hence I e hange’. s c . t e e I limat logy. chang o ‘c e in t ’s t a m a r m cli y th n in te cold da onfusio g ’; if a in usual c m r a w ‘global that’s Dr Ken

Fry

The uncertainty around climate change, is akin to the uncertainty o f whether tobacco harms human health.

Have your say! Email your thoughts to editor@amaq.com.au and join the conversation.

97 PER CENT AGREEMENT IS “ CONFLICT ”?

To “uphold the skep tical traditions of th e traditional scientifi by the esteemed corre c community” as ad spondent is undoub vocated tedly a worthy goal: working in climate sci yet 97 per cent of sci ence say climate ch entists ange is “real, manm the experts… or sh ade and dangerous ould we likewise tak .” Heed e advice on chemot Arguing “the verbi herapy from psychia age”; climate chan tri sts? ge or glo bal warming is a ple perhaps… “Do we asant distraction say breast “cancer” or “a de nocarcinoma?” - th heat waves are beco e problem remains: ming hotter, longer, and more frequent. Did the IPPC really say there was no ev idence the world ha cursory reading of s warmed? No. A mo the report reveals re than the inconvenient tru uncertainty around th... CO2 = pollutio climate change, is ak n. The in to th e uncertainty of wh human health. Is cri ether tobacco harm ticism of cigarettes s me rel y speculative propaga tobacco companies nda against the poor ? Austin Bradford Hi ll said “All scientific work is incomplete – experimental. All scien whether it be observa tific work is liable to tional or be upset or modified does not confer upon by advancing knowled us a freedom to ignore ge. That the kn owledge we already ha action that it appears ve, or to postpone the to demand at a given time.”

DoctorQ MARCH 2014

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PRESIDENT’S REPORT

NEW SYNTHETIC DRUG CAMPAIGN FOR 2014

A NEW YEAR SEES SOME CHALLENGES BUT ALSO SOME GREAT OPPORTUNITIES TO MAKE AN IMPACT ON QUEENSLANDERS’ HEALTH FOR THE BETTER.

DR CHRISTIAN ROWAN President, AMA Queensland PHARMACISTS AND FLU VACCINES Our GP and primary care members are facing their own challenges with the recent approval of a trial allowing pharmacists to provide in-store flu vaccinations from 1 April 2014. The Government claims the convenience of this scheme will encourage a higher rate of immunisation across the community. While we strongly support efforts to boost immunisation, AMA Queensland opposes this scheme as only suitably qualified GPs should be administering vaccines that potentially carry serious health risks for patients. MEDICARE LOCALS Another issue for primary care is the review of Medicare Locals, announced by the Federal Government late in 2013. AMA Queensland contributed to the AMA submission which called for a network of PHCOs that are: GP-led and locally responsive; focused on supporting GPs in caring for patients, working collaboratively with other health care professionals; not overburdened by excessive paperwork and policy prescription; focused on addressing service gaps, not replicating existing services; and better aligned with Local Hospital Networks, with a strong emphasis on improving the primary care/hospital interface.

We will continue to monitor the progress of the review which is being led by Australia’s former Chief Medical Officer Prof John Horvath AO. We welcome any feedback or comments from members on the review of Medicare Locals or AMA’s submission (which can be viewed in full at ama.com.au).

At the campaign launch on 17 February, Queensland Police Commissioner Ian Stewart explained that the introduction of new state laws last year mean Queenslanders caught taking or trafficking new synthetic drugs will face serious legal consequences.

SYNTHETIC DRUGS CAMPAIGN

The Drugs Misuse Act 1986 now includes 35 synthetic drugs classified as ‘dangerous drugs’, meaning the possession, trafficking or sale of new synthetic drugs in Queensland will be treated under the same laws as other illicit drugs.

As an addiction medicine specialist, I was very pleased to take part in a campaign recently with the Queensland Police Service’s Crime Stopper unit highlighting the dangers of new synthetic drugs. The campaign New Synthetic Drugs: Real Damage, aims to inform Queenslanders of the damaging effects new synthetic drugs are having on the community.

The campaign New Synthetic Drugs: Real Damage, aims to inform Queenslanders of the damaging effects new synthetic drugs are having on the community. 8

MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

The campaign features a series of short video messages outlining the key medical and legal consequences of using synthetic drugs can now be downloaded and viewed via YouTube. This collaboration was a great opportunity to raise awareness of a devastating but rarely discussed problem within our community. Q

SYNTHETIC DRUG EFFECTS Violent outbursts Irrational fears Pyschosis Heart damage Blurred vision Stroke Liver damage


ceo’S REPORT

DOCTORS FIGHT UNFAIR CONTRACTS AN INITIAL, SIGNIFICANT STEP HAS BEEN MADE IN OUR FIGHT FOR FAIR CONTRACTS FOR SMOS. HEALTH MINISTER LAWRENCE SPRINGBORG HAS OPENED DIALOG.

JANE SCHMITT Chief Executive Officer, AMA Queensland Last night AMA President Dr Steve Hambleton, President-Elect Dr Shaun Rudd and Dr John Fraser met with the Queensland Minister for Health, Lawrence Springborg, and Assistant Minister for Health, Dr Chris Davis, to discuss the current dispute over unfair Senior Medical Officer (SMO) contracts. Dr Hambleton summed up the meeting: “The meeting was very productive. Our aim was to convince the Government of the overwhelming concerns SMOs have with the current contract and to agree on a pathway to satisfactorily resolve these concerns. We achieved that aim. It is only the first step. But it is a very significant step. “The Minister assured us that he wanted a strong and productive relationship with SMOs and that there should be a fair and just process to resolve our concerns. He committed to a process that will involve the Federal AMA, AMA Queensland, ASMOF, ASMOF Queensland, Together Queensland, and other SMO representatives. “The first meeting to achieve ‘real repair’ and a ‘real solution’ will be early next week in Brisbane, and will be led on the Government side by the Director General of Health. “We will work constructively to get a positive result for SMOs and ensure the

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KEY ISSUES

The Minister assured us that he wanted a strong and productive relationship with SMOs and that there should be a fair and just process to resolve our concerns. public hospital system has an engaged, motivated, and respected medical workforce. “In the interim, you should not feel pressured to immediately sign a contract. You should instead wait to see how this process evolves. We will, of course, keep you informed about developments and any changes in our advice,” he said. More than ever, it’s important to join together and fight for fair work contracts. Ensure your AMA Queensland membership is renewed so we can continue to fight on your behalf. Call (07) 3872 2222 and renew your membership today. JUNIOR DOCTOR CONFERENCE Our team are hard at work organising the first Junior Doctor Conference in June. Jeff Kennett AO, Chairman of beyondblue, is locked in to speak on doctors and medical students and mental health after last year’s national survey.

1. Remuneration – Remuneration payable under the contract is incapable of precise calculation. 2. Termination - SMOs can be arbitrarily dismissed and unfair dismissal provisions will no longer apply. 3. Dispute resolution –SMOs will no longer have recourse to the Queensland Industrial Relations Commission and no other dispute resolution process is provided. 4. Shift work – SMOs may be required to undertake shift work and extended rosters and the State may vary or amend rosters or shifts as required by the service. Penalty rates are absorbed into vague tiered remuneration arrangements. Overtime and recall may only be paid on an exception basis (which is not defined).

MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

I’m also excited to hear from Dr Dimitrios Nikolarakos on the future of 3D printing and surgery. The conference is exceptionally well-priced and an even better deal if you register before 1 May. BREAKFAST WITH THE HEALTH MINISTER Our breakfast with Health Minister Lawrence Springborg in February quickly sold out and 470 attended or watched the webinar. The Minister highlighted the need to continue public and private collaborations to boost the health system. Many guests also had the chance to question the Minister on employment contracts and primary health care initiatives. Thanks to our breakfast partner ACHSM and our generous sponsors for another successful event. Q

5. Directives and Contracts – The contracts are subject to any applicable Directives. It is not known whether any other Directives (apart from the current Directive which requires that SMOs be engaged under the contracts) will be issued at any stage that might affect SMOs who sign the contract. 6. No certainty – SMOs are to a large extent required to take the State on trust in a number of areas. For example, the State has unilateral power to vary the contract in relation to a number of matters including remuneration, hours of work and performance review.

This document is not legal advice and is provided for general information purposes only. For specific legal advice, you should consult a legal practitioner.

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Professor Adele Green AC will no doubt inspire many young doctors when she speaks about her ground breaking work into battling melanoma, where she was part of establishing the need for sunscreen.


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Feature story

A DAY IN THE LIFE

OF AN

INTERN

WHAT DOES ‘A DAY IN THE LIFE OF’ AN AMA QUEENSLAND MEMBER LOOK LIKE? IN OUR NEW SERIES, WE GET THE CHANCE TO SEE THE DAILY CHALLENGES AND TRIUMPHS OF MEMBERS FROM DIFFERENT DISCIPLINES. LET’S START AT THE BEGINNING, WITH NEW INTERN DR HANNAH BELLWOOD, AMA QUEENSLAND’S 2013 MEDICAL STUDENT OF THE YEAR. Day 15 of being a doctor begins with my well-rehearsed hitting the snooze button a few times before finally waking up at 6am. My morning ritual begins with breakfast before packing my lunch, my trusty clipboard and my little black pager. I’m lucky enough to be a five minute drive from my hospital, so by 6.45am I arrive at Princess Alexandra Hospital. This term I am an intern on a General Surgery Team. Before 7.30am ward rounds, my jobs consist of organising a patient list, updating bloods and progress, assembling the charts and getting a handover from the night team and nursing staff. Surgical ward rounds are an experience within themselves – a quick review of the patient by the registrar, whilst the interns madly rechart fluids, prescribe laxatives and wrote down jobs for the day. Our team is lucky to have three interns, so whilst one of us writes in the chart, the other organises the jobs for the day, and the other runs off to assist in theatre. Today our team had a theatre list as well as an outpatients clinic. I found my way down to clinic and began seeing patients, reporting back to my registrar or consultant after each one. I really enjoy clinic, but I have found it challenging familiarising myself with a patients I have only just met. I’m getting more efficient as time goes on, and after a while it becomes pattern recognition! One of the best bits about clinic is seeing how ‘the boss’ (the consultant) sees their patients. I really enjoy learning how to make efficient diagnoses from seemingly complex cases something I guess comes with many years of experience! Mid morning hypoglycaemia 12

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Handy tips for surviving your internship can be found in the AMA Queensland 2014 Intern Guide at amaq.com.au


Feature story

Everyone says the key to internship is not to know everything, but to be organised.

warrants a cup of tea and a muesli bar as I make my way back to the ward. As interns we spend a lot of time liaising with other medical colleagues and allied health professionals. These last few weeks have been filled with friendly faces willing to help me on my steep learning curve. I’m thankful for their patience and understanding as I figure out what form to take where, which drug to write up and where to find a patient/ chart/cannula/clinic/prescription pad. Triumph for the day (as small as it may seem to many of my seniors) was successfully cannulating a patient. Cannulas are well renowned as the bane of an intern’s existence, but after a few nights on ward call I suspect I will become more confident/competent. Today’s patient knows how to make a new intern feel good: “That wasn’t painful at all! Best one I’ve ever had!” One word that comes up a lot when reflecting on a day of internship is organisation. Everyone says the key to internship is not to know

everything, but to be organised. I have a clipboard (affectionately nicknamed ‘nerd box’) with all my pathology slips, imaging request forms and post-its for on the go jobs. I also make sure I write down everything – every pager message, every job someone gives me and every patient’s daily plan/tests. I also try to plan my work/life balance rather than assuming life will automatically strike a balance. I always plan to do something other than washing and groceries on my days off. New years resolutions since moving to Brisbane include climbing some mountains, visiting more beaches and reading more books (that aren’t medical textbooks). Other things I try to squeeze into my down time is a phone-call to my parents and a jog around the neighborhood – I usually manage these once or twice a week.

We finished discharge summaries, booked patients for clinic and multi-disciplinary meetings, chased up imaging from other hospitals, clarified PET scan risk factors over the phone, referred patients for scopes and echos and spirometry, organised anaesthetic reviews… All on top of re-charting medicines, topping up fluid orders, admitting a patient or two and getting organised for afternoon ward rounds. My last job for the day as I left at 5.30pm was to put in blood forms for tomorrow morning, before double checking with the Nursing Team Leader that there was nothing else I needed to do today. With a big smile on her face she said, “Nope, that’s everything – go home now!” Q

Lunch on a good day occurs at 12pm but often it’ll be 2pm by the time I can sit down to eat. Most afternoons consist of another clinic, theatre or ward work. This particular day I had the time to work with my fellow interns ticking off jobs from our ever-growing list.

INTERN ORIENTATION WEEK VISITS The AMA Queensland membership team, in partnership with Investec Medical Finance was out in force recently hosting orientation week lunches and recruiting more than 300 new doctors statewide across 13 hospitals. Presented by future colleagues and industry experts, new interns learned the tips and tricks of the trade. The team was also on hand to provide advice and assistance about interns first year of employment and answered any questions about AMA Queensland membership. DoctorQ MARCH 2013

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People & EVENTS

Guests enjoyed catching up with colleagues over afternoon tea.

CELEBRATING OUR MEMBER MILESTONES In December, we welcomed additional members to our 50 year club at AMA Queensland’s annual Member Milestone event. Again, on behalf of the AMA Queensland President, Board of Directors, Branch Council, Chief Executive Officer and

the secretariat, we offer sincere appreciation for your continued loyalty and support of the association. If you attended the lunch and wish for any photos taken on the day to be sent to you, please email k.latchford@amaq.com.au Q

LIST OF 50 YEAR MEMBERS Dr Anthony Arden Dr Leigh Atkinson Dr Joseph Black Dr Jon Cohen Professor William Coman Dr Elizabeth Creagh Dr John Hains Dr Kenneth Hales Dr Jack Hickey Dr Kevin Hourigan

Dr Donald Leaming Associate Professor Fred Leditschke Dr Vera Lukursky Dr John Lynch Dr Peter Marendy Dr Bruce Martin Dr David McConnel Dr Harry Muir Dr Terrence Mulhearn

Guests were treated to a sumptuous cooked breakfast in the prime city location.

Dr Alan Porter Dr Glenda Powell Dr Ray Que Hee Dr William Renton-Power Dr Edward Ringrose Dr Les Sands Dr John Slaughter Dr Lloyd Toft Dr Peter Ulrich

BREAKFAST WITH THE HEALTH MINISTER AMA Queensland’s recent Breakfast with the Health Minister attracted a full-house in Brisbane with more than 470 attending in person and by webinar. Minister Lawrence Springborg spoke at length about improvements to the state’s health system over the past two years and his intention to introduce further advances gleaned from a recent trip to Denmark, Finland and Sweden. He highlighted the need to continue public-private collaborations

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to boost the health system and remove service duplication. Mr Springborg was questioned by guests on several issues including SMO employment contracts, primary health care initiatives, asthma education, and sharing data to improve health economics. We would like to thank our breakfast partner ACHSM and supporters AMA Queensland Insurance Solutions, Macquarie Private Wealth, and William Buck for another successful event. Q


mutual group

Your Advantage DoctorQ MARCH 2014

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People & EVENTS

BANCROFT ORATION More than 100 members turned out to the biennial Bancroft Oration late last year to hear Professor David Paterson on tackling antibiotic resistance. In his oration, ‘Small bugs; big problems’, Professor Paterson

discussed the origins of antibiotic resistance and the global significance of the problem. Professor Paterson is a Professor of Medicine at The University of Queensland Centre for Clinical Research (UQCCR). Q

FRONT ROW L-R: Josephine Bancroft (Great granddaughter of Dr Joseph Bancroft), Pixie Annat, Dr Humphrey Cramond, Prof Tess Cramond BACK ROW L-R: Dr Jane Mackerras, Jo Brain, Dr Christian Rowan, Prof Paterson

Dr Angie Ry

an and Dr

Michael Fo

rrest

Prof Erol Maguire asking a question

Dr Jessica Pa and Christo ge, Mitchell Kelly, D r Claire McA pher Hanse llister bout

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AMA QUEENSLAND

Business Support Services

Professional, highly experienced,

with excellent written and verbal skills and attention to detail. Ms Sue Tremlett CEO, PCPA (Private Cancer Physicians of Australia)

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DoctorQ MARCH 2014

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news

CONGRATULATIONS

AUSTRALIA DAY AWARDS CONGRATULATIONS TO THE FOLLOWING AMA QUEENSLAND MEMBERS WHO WERE RECOGNISED FOR THEIR SERVICES ON AUSTRALIA DAY.

Tim Fairfax AC AM, Hamilton Tim Fairfax AC, AMA Queensland Foundation Patron

AMA QUEENSLAND FOUNDATION PATRON

Mr Fairfax was named a Companion in the General Division of the Order of Australia for eminent service to business and to the community, as an advocate for philanthropy and as a major supporter of the visual arts, to the promotion of higher education opportunities, and to rural and regional development programs.

Dr Carol Cox AM, Mount Lofty

MEMBER: 31 YRS

Dr Cox was appointed a member in the General Division of the Order of Australia for significant service to medicine in rural and remote areas as a general practitioner, to education, and to professional medical organisations.

Dr Vernon Hill AM, Fig Tree Pocket

MEMBER: 10 YRS

Dr Hill was appointed a member in the General Division of the Order of Australia for significant service to rehabilitation medicine and spinal injuries. x AM, arol Co

Dr C

years

r for 31

membe

Dr Peter Myers AM, Clayfield

MEMBER: 27 YRS

Dr Myers was appointed a member in the General Division of the Order of Australia for significant service to sports medicine and orthopaedic surgery.

Dr Christine Tracey-Patte OAM, Runaway Bay

MEMBER: 31 YRS

Dr Tracey-Patte was awarded a medal of the Order of Australia in the General Division for service to womens’ affairs.

Dr Darryl Gregor OAM, Southport

MEMBER: 34 YRS

Dr Gregor was awarded a medal of the Order of Australia in the General Division for service to ophthalmology, and to education. Dr Robert McG

Dr Robert McGregor, Ipswich

regor, membe

r for 39 years

MEMBER: 39 YRS

Dr McGregor was National Finalist for Senior Australian of the Year for his work in paediatrics and fundraising for children’s charities.

Professor Michael Cleary PSM, Auchenflower

MEMBER: 8 YRS

Professor Michael Cleary was awarded a Public Service Medal for outstanding public service to healthcare innovation improvement and reform in Queensland.

Dr Catherine Yelland PSM, Ashgrove

MEMBER: 9 YRS

Dr Yelland was awarded a Public Service Medal for outstanding public service, excellence and leadership in Older Persons Medical Services.

Dr Darryl Gregor

18

OAM, member for

MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

34 years


Dr Francis Tomlinson NeurosurgeoN & spiNal surgeoN

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NeurosurgeoN & spiNal surgeoN

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paediatric & adult spiNal surgeoN

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HaNd & spiNe surgeoN

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DoctorQ MARCH 2014

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CURRENT ISSUES

PATIENT ACCESS TO GENERAL PRACTICE – IS THERE A PROBLEM? AN AUSTRALIAN STUDY SHOWS 25 PER CENT OF PATIENTS COULD NOT SEE A GP ON THE SAME DAY AND 12 PER CENT COULD NOT SEE A GP FOR TWO OR MORE DAYS. DR RICHARD KIDD IS CONCERNED ACCESS TO A GP IS BECOMING A PROBLEM.

DR RICHARD KIDD General Pracitioner

Garth et al in their study Managing same day appointments – A qualitative study in Australian general practice2 - identified five different types of urgent need: Medical Administrative Therapeutic Logistic Emotion These needs must be addressed in an environment of high demand for GP appointments with limited supply. They cite a 2002 New South Wales Court of Appeal ruling that ‘a doctor’s receptionist has a duty of care to assess a patient’s condition, determine the urgency of the case and make an appointment based on the urgency of the patient’s symptoms’. It also noted the need for policy and training to guide receptionists. This study surveyed 10 practices and found all clinics had broadly similar policies and procedures regarding management of same day appointment requests. Most had basic triage flow charts to guide receptionists. Some clinics offered receptionists training

We may need to develop clearer definitions of what is ‘urgent for today.’

opportunities. Two types of systems were used in clinics: a carve out and a traditional system. Some clinics reported experimenting with different systems (eg. moving from a ‘no appointments needed’ walk-in system to a carve out system). Irrespective of which booking system was used, demand for same day appointments usually exceeded each clinic’s capacity, and all clinics reported having to ‘squeeze in’ patients based on urgent need. The Australian Primary Care Collaboratives helped general practice improve and track access and redesign results: GP Third Available: the number of days at any given time until the third next appointment is available ACR Unmet Demand: the number of people whose appointment demands were not met. The Aggregated Access and Care Redesign Results (May 2008 – Feb 2011) of 280 Health Services3 did not show any improvement in the GP Third Available measure staying at about three days. The ACR Unmet Demand measure did show some improvement with an average reduction in the number of patients whose appointment demands were not met from about 25 to about 19. The demand for General Practice services will increase substantially with the ageing population and increasing need for chronic disease management. The AMA Position Statement: Access to Medical Care for Older Australians 20124 notes “the importance of a robust framework for medical services in aged care is growing as the number of older Australians increases”. We know GPs are dealing with more problems at each consultation and consultations are taking longer. The most recent BEACH data5 shows GPs managed

625,000 PARTICIPANTS

25%

DID NOT GET TO SEE GP ON THE SAME DAY

12%

DID NOT GET TO SEE A GP FOR TWO OR MORE DAYS Australian Bureau of Statistics 1

significantly more problems at encounters in 2012–13 (155 per 100 encounters) than in 2003–04 (146 per 100). This suggests there were 55 million more problems managed at GP–patient encounters in Australia in 2012–13 than in 2003–04. Access for the elderly, house-bound and residents of aged care facilities and others is worsening. This BEACH data shows there was a significant decrease in the proportion of home and institution visits (together) from 1.8 per cent to one per cent between 2003–04 and 2012–13. This equates to 500,000 fewer home and institutional visits carried out by GPs in 2012–13 than in 2003–04. The implications for General Practice are significant. We need to improve access to same day appointments and balance this with the need for chronic care and non-urgent appointments. As Garth et al suggest and the APPC have tried to assist practices to do, we may need to develop clearer definitions of what is ‘urgent for today’, improve patient understanding of this and further develop our triage and appointment systems. In doing so, there is potential for practices to increase efficiency, decrease medico legal risk, and improve patient care. Q

1. Australian Bureau of Statistics: 4839.0.55.001 - Health Services: Patient Experiences in Australia, 2009 - Latest ISSUE Released at 11:30 AM (CANBERRA TIME) 20/10/2011 - TIME BETWEEN MAKING APPOINTMENT AND SEEING A GP FOR URGENT MEDICAL CARE - http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/ECD0FB95AA0D6002CA25792E000D5BAA?opendocument 2. Australian Family Physician Volume 42, No.4, April 2013 Pages 238-243 Managing same day appointments : A qualitative study in Australian general practice 3. Aggregated 280 Health Services APCC Wave Results – Diabetes The GP Third Available measure number of patients Access and Care RedesignResults (May 2008 – Feb 2011) http://www.apcc.org.au/images/uploads/ ACR_Feb2011_combined_.pdf 4. AMA Position Statement: Access to Medical Care for Older Australians 2012 5. A decade of Australian general practice activity 2003–04 to 2012–13: BEACH Bettering the Evaluation and Care of HealthHelena Britt, Graeme C Miller, Joan Henderson, Janice Charles, Lisa Valenti,Christopher Harrison, Clare Bayram, Timothy Chambers, Carmen Zhang,Ying Pan, Julie O’Halloran, Allan J Pollack November 2013

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MARCH 2014 DoctorQ


Featurestory story Feature

TUG OF WAR

FOR DOCTORS’ RIGHTS OUR FIGHT AGAINST THE QUEENSLAND GOVERNMENT’S DRACONIAN EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS HAS GROWN OVER THE PAST COUPLE OF WEEKS. HUNDREDS OF SMOS STATEWIDE HAVE RALLIED TOGETHER IN HOSPITAL MEETINGS IN BRISBANE, IPSWICH, CAIRNS, TOWNSVILLE, MACKAY, NAMBOUR AND GOLD COAST. Over the past eight months since the release of Blueprint for Better Healthcare in 2013, negotiations have been ongoing with Queensland Health regarding the introduction of individual employment contracts for the state’s almost 3,000 SMOs and 1,000 VMOs. Queensland Health proposes to introduce changes which include a direct employment relationship between the doctor and their manager and remuneration linked to key performance indicators. Queensland Health says these arrangements are standard in the private sector and for high income employees in the public sector, but advice from Dan O’Gorman SC, a senior barrister at the independent Queensland bar, suggests the contracts do not reflect contemporary contracts of employment.

The initial Medical Officer’s Certified Agreement (MOCA) was introduced in 2006 and had gone through several versions resulting in the current MOCA3. The nominal expiry date of this agreement is 30 June 2015. This method of collectively negotiating terms and conditions of employment between SMOs, their representatives and Queensland Health has ensured the best outcomes for the medical workforce and Queensland Health. This collective negotiation is standard across Australia for medical officers. A similar arrangement is in place for Visiting Medical Officers although their agreement does not require a vote by the employees affected, but the same principles of collective negotiation ensure the best outcome for the parties.

Senior Counsel’s advice identifies 10 significant areas where change is needed to bring the contracts in line with modern employer/employee relationships. Mr O’Gorman SC identifies the areas of uncertainty to include remuneration, how new employment conditions can be imposed and whether there is any intention to make further changes to employment conditions after the contracts are signed.

Visit www.amaq.com.au to join your nearest protest. RALLIES ARE PLANNED THROUGHOUT THE STATE

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STOP PRESS! Health Minister Lawrence Springborg and Assistant Minister Dr Chris Davis met AMA President Dr Steve Hambleton, AMA Queensland President-Elect Dr Shaun Rudd and Professor John Fraser at Parliament House this week. “The meeting agreed that while negotiations on the contract framework are complete, a dialog on the implementation of six key issues will begin on Monday,” the Minister said. “We will work with relevant parties to examine each of these key issues; to provide robust protocols and to deliver the necessary protections and reassurance that our senior doctors are seeking.

AMA Queensland hotline

1300 356 155 or amaq.com.au


Featurestory story Feature

Support for the campaign Public support for our campaign is growing through media coverage and via the ASMOF website of keepourdoctors.com.au.

of Private Practice (RoPP) (See article on p26) there are serious concerns about the capacity, capability or competence of the department in such a short period of time.

A Fighting Fund has been established to help campaign against the State Government and it can also be found on the above website under ‘Donate’.

Queensland Health has unilaterally determined that decisions regarding the terms of employment of the medical workforce will be made by management without the requirement of engagement or consultation with the employees impacted. They intend that individual contracts should start on 7 July 2014. The Fair Work Harmonisation Bill was passed by the Queensland Parliament on 30 October 2013 with minimal consultation. It was sent to the relevant state government committee (as Queensland has no senate or upper house, bills are sent to committees for review) but the complexity of the law and its implications were not adequately discussed. The legislation was passed without the community or employees being consulted. By the time discussions with industrial representatives of AMA Queensland, ASMOFQ, and the Queensland Public Sector Union/Together Queensland, Queensland Health had already determined that individual contracts were going to be introduced. At no time was a comparison with the MOCA made, there was no analysis of arrangements in other states and no willingness to consider alternatives to the contracts. Significantly, under individual contracts, Queensland Health may issue Health Employment Directives that bind every SMO and VMO in the State.

A health employment directive can either be issued by the Director-General or by a Chief Executive of a Hospital and Health Service (HHS) at any time without notice. This directive may impact upon any aspect of the employment relationship. This means the contract can be overridden and changed to suit the interests of one party without the engagement by the other. Until the legislation was passed, a directive could have been issued by the DirectorGeneral, however, importantly, it could not disadvantage the employee. Now, no such assessment is required. The only protection that an SMO or VMO has is the Queensland Employment Standards. Under the new contract of employment, a directive may be issued compelling you to work anywhere within the service. In this instance, while consultation with the employee is required, the definition of consultation is not provided and does not require the agreement of the employee before a decision is made. The legislative framework, the proposed implications on the workforce and the contract itself require serious analysis. What is evident from the information that has been communicated from the department is the only selective information has been disclosed to SMOs and VMOs. Keeping in mind the recent administrative bungles of Queensland Health, including the payroll systems failure, the Tahitian prince scandal and indeed, the recent Auditor-General’s findings into the administration of Right

With 4,000 medical officers affected, and with contracts of employment expected to be understood, negotiated and signed by 30 April 2014, there is serious alarm at the unnecessary haste with which Queensland Health is moving. It was initially stated that each contract would require four hours per negotiation, per employee. In total, this would require 16,000 clinical hours. While Queensland Health is saying the objective in this process is ensuring flexibility and accountability and simplifying arrangements, there is no evidence for any of these assertions. Throughout the last eight months, only selective information has been disclosed to SMOs and VMOs. Full disclosure was avoided. Information was provided selectively. This includes all resident medical officers, registrars and employees transferring to Queensland. Your industrial representatives from AMA Queensland and ASMOF have been working tirelessly to ensure that you and your colleagues understand the full intent of the contracts as it is evident the department has not provided this information to you. Q

LEGAL ADVICE We urge members not to sign the SMO contract in its current form, after considering your personal situation including individual risks. AMA Queensland has written to the each HHS Board Chair, all Board Members and Chief Executives providing them with a copy of our legal advice and requesting them to support their senior doctors and insist on their strong, stable and equitable workplace.

This document is not legal advice and is provided for general information purposes only. For specific legal advice, you should consult a legal practitioner.

DoctorQ DoctorQ MARCH MARCH2013 2014

23 23


CURRENT memberISSUES view

CO-PAYMENTS AND BULK-BILLING THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT MAY CONSIDER INTRODUCING A $6 FEE FOR BULK-BILLED VISITS TO THE GP. WE ASKED MEMBERS TO OUTLINE THE ARGUMENTS FOR AND AGAINST CO-PAYMENTS.

DR ANNETTE KORTLUCKE ‘FOR’

When this issue was last raised under the Hawke Labor Government, I was President of the Southside Local Medical Association and we fought hard to see the co-payment decision reversed. This was largely because the co-payment would have meant a cut in the rebate at that time. The rebate was to be reduced by $5 and that $5 was to be made up by a patient contribution. On reflection I believe that we made a huge mistake. It was a missed opportunity to change the way we do business in general practice by moving away from bulk billing. The retention of bulk billing has kept Medicare rebates artificially low and we are unlikely to see an increase in rebates to a realistic level anytime soon.

another opportunity for GPs to break away from the shackles of bulk billing which keeps our incomes well below those of our specialist colleagues. If members of the public have to pay for medical services there will be an awareness of what it costs to provide a service. Hopefully pressure will be brought to bear by our patients (the voting public) to increase rebates and or facilitate private health insurance rebates to cover gap payments. It has been argued that private health rebates for general practice would be inflationary but why should we be treated differently to our specialist colleagues? This time we should not let opportunity pass us by.

This time the talk is of a $6 payment over and above the rebate. I see a co-payment as

The $6 co-payment has been suggested as a way to constrain costs in two ways. Firstly, by the concurrent freezing of the Medicare rebate and secondly, by reducing the number of consultations by sending a direct pricesignal to patients who supposedly would reduce ‘unnecessary’ visits to their GPs. The co-payment is also argued to be a way to increase the payments to GPs without increasing government spending. International experience, however, suggests that these outcomes would not be achieved. A recent review concludes that while health service utilisation is decreased, the decrease is disproportionally seen amongst the vulnerable and disadvantaged in society. Any short-term savings were generally offset by the longer term effects of exacerbating the poorer health outcomes of these communities. There has also been little academic study to see if the decrease in utilisation overall is actually in the ‘unnecessary’ visits. In fact some jurisdictions found that health care utilisation went up in wealthy populations. I don’t think any of us want to see increased barriers to accessing medical care by vulnerable and disadvantaged groups when many of our patients are delaying visits, avoiding investigations as requested, and not 24

MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

filling prescriptions due to the cost. Waiving of this co-payment for disadvantaged populations has been suggested as a way to overcome the disproportional effects and undesired outcomes. What doesn’t appear to have been widely examined is the effect that discretionary or systematic waiving of the co-payment would have on the doctors who service these populations. If you work in a practice where the majority of your patients are exempt from the co-payment, your income will comparatively decrease unless less time is spent with each patient so more patients can be seen to make-up the difference. This will be particularly felt if the Medicare rebate is to be frozen. This can have a number of flow-on effects including a possible reduction in the number of doctors willing to serve these communities/populations and a further exacerbation of the disparity of health outcomes due to reduced services. I can only see this proposed initiative as exacerbating the current maldistribution of GPs in Australia and may further entrench a two-tier system for patients who can afford to pay and those who can’t and between the remuneration of the doctors who look after them.

While there is a pressing need to look at the funding models for General Practice and health more generally, a co-payment in my opinion is not the panacea we are looking for. Instead, how can we improve a system that currently preferentially rewards acute care presentations rather than chronic disease management and preventative care? How can we fix a system that unfairly rewards procedural medicine over cognitive medicine? Or fix a system that rewards through-put rather than quality? Q

DR EMILY FARRELL ‘AGAINST’


57th Clinical Update Weekend City GP. Country GP.

The most relevant and up-to-date information for GPs Royal International Convention Centre Brisbane | 3–4 May 2014 Join the RACGP Queensland Faculty and take advantage of the opportunity to update your clinical knowledge and skills on a range of topics, including: • women’s health • dermatology • men’s health • ophthalmology • musculoskeletal health • CPR • GP research and more.

This year we welcome our keynote speaker, Dr Don Bowley from the Royal Flying Doctor Service, who will address the highs and lows of general practice in the outback. The program will also feature internationally acclaimed speaker, Dr Victoria Brazil, who will close the conference with a unique look at the role of the city GP and the country GP. For more information please contact the RACGP Queensland Faculty at qld.events@racgp.org.au or 07 3456 8944.

Early bird offer available. Register now. Visit the RACGP website to register racgp.org.au/racgpevents/qld/. * Early bird offer available until Monday

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CURRENT ISSUES

ROPP REPORT SHOWS MISMANAGEMENT ON 11 FEBRUARY THE AUDITOR-GENERAL TABLED THE SECOND PART OF THE REPORT INTO THE RIGHT OF PRIVATE PRACTICE ARRANGEMENTS (ROPP) REGARDING QUEENSLAND HEALTH’S 2,817 EMPLOYED SMOS. INTERNAL ACCOUNT PROCESSES IN HOSPITAL AND HEALTH SERVICES (HHS) THROUGHOUT QUEENSLAND WERE FOUND TO BE FLAWED.

ANDREW TURNER

Workplace Relations Manager, AMA Queensland

THE AUDITOR-GENERAL MADE A SERIES OF RECOMMENDATIONS, INCLUDING:

The Auditor-General found: Wrongdoing was found for a very small proportion of doctors. Widespread mismanagement of private practice arrangements, rostering and overtime by HHSs was found. ROPP arrangements create conflicts of interest between hospitals and individual SMOs. As acknowledged in the report, the overwhelming majority of SMOs are untainted and ensure their patients get quality attention and care. They are determined to ensure their patients are appropriately managed despite a very complicated and inefficient billing process. The questions raised in the AuditorGeneral’s report involve a small number of targeted doctors and is not representative of SMOs across Queensland. The report identified inadequate processes and reflects poorly on Queensland Health administrators. Only one instance of possible doctor misconduct was identified for referral to the CMC. Allegations of absenteeism could not be substantiated or disproved due to inadequate record keeping and leave processing by HHSs. The present arrangements could not allow for an objective assessment to be made, and greater transparency and more vigilant management is required. The Auditor-General undertook a statistical analysis to identify SMOs whose overtime and private practice income appeared to be out of the ordinary. Of the 88 doctors (three per cent) identified, one third of absences could be explained by unprocessed or unsubmitted leave forms. The other absences were explained by an ad hoc arrangement where SMOs make up hours missed informally. Ultimately, insufficient supervision and guidance was in place for SMOs. Of the 115 SMOs (four per cent) identified as working at levels of ‘significant’ or ‘higher’ 26

MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

Mandatory declaration of outside employment; Strengthening the processes for recognising and assessing conflicts of interest; Reform the rostering process to ensure fatigue is managed and rosters reflect work practices and investigate unexplained absences; Assess SMO performance based on clinical activity; Ensure equitable access to services.

COME ING ALL IN T E K C O P S SPITALS DOCTOR PUBLIC HO DS DODGY IN IN F S T T R N O P IE E T R ATE PA ATING PRIV FROM TRE DOCTORS WORKIN G FOR QUEENSLA ND HEALTH ACCUSE D OF MISCONDUCT REPORT DELIVERS CURE FOR SICK SYSTEM REPORT ON QLD DOCTOR RORTS SENT TO CMC QUEEN SLAND DOCTO HAVE RS MA RORTE Y D SYST EM: RE PORT fatigue risk (as determined by the AMA standard) for periods of between 20 and 91 weeks - no wrongdoing was found and poor fatigue management practices were highlighted. 31 SMOs were permanently on call and paid an allowance for this. Permanent on-call creates a severe fatigue risk. One SMO was paid $300,000 in on call allowance – despite sharing on call duties. This second report will be sent to the Crime and Misconduct Commission for their assessment. It is unclear what recommendations will be adopted by the State Government. However the report is concerning as the HHSs have been revealed to be incapable of ensuring proper management of SMOs. An urgent question is: How can the HHS possibly manage responsibility for SMO employment under proposed individual contracts? Q

How can the HHS possibly manage responsibility for SMO employment under proposed individual contracts?


GP Education EvEnts 2014

CPD Weekends 22-23 March

Innovations in Primary Care

Sheraton Mirage, Gold Coast

Sat 21 June

Mind Matters Symposium & Gala

Versace, Gold Coast

Sat 23 August

Sports Meet 2014

Hilton, Brisbane

15 - 16 November

When General Practice meets Hospital Practice

Sheraton, Noosa

CPD Evenings Wed 19 March

Cardiovascular / Vascular / Cardiac Surgery

United Service Club Queensland

Wed 25 June

Coeliac Disease / GI surgery

United Service Club Queensland

Wed 17 September

Gynaecology / Urology

United Service Club Queensland

Wed 12 November

Orthopaedics / Rehabilitation

United Service Club Queensland

Q&A with Tony Jones Sat 17 May

Q&A ALM 9am - 5pm Q&A Gala 5:30pm - 9:15pm

Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre

Venues, hosts and topics are subject to change.

For more information: 457 Wickham Terrace, Brisbane GPO Box 764 Brisbane Q 4001

Phone Fax Web

(07) 3834 4444 (07) 3832 6006 uchealth.com.au/sawmh

Susan Walsh Project & Events Manager Phone (07) 3834 4371 Email susan.walsh@uchealth.com.au


CURRENT ISSUES

ETHICAL AGONY AUNT

THE EXPERTS FROM OUR ETHICS AND MEDICO-LEGAL COMMITTEE ANSWER YOUR ETHICAL DILEMMAS. SEND YOUR ETHICAL DILEMMA TO POLICY@AMAQ.COM.AU.

Dear Confused,

Dear Committee, I am a GP consider ing providing heal th care to asylum se ekers in detentio n– I’ve always had a strong interest in this area and want to provide as much he lp as I can. Howeve r, I have read repo rts that doctors are unable to ensure that appropriate medical treatmen t is provided to as ylum seekers. I’ m worried and unsu re about what to do – when making this decision, what are my ethical and profes sional obligations ? Confused

This is a very difficult situation. Trying to decide how you can best provide care for vulnerable patients in situations where you may not be able to access the right equipment, refer patients on to appropriate care or, are unsure of the level of organisational support, is certainly a dilemma. Unfortunately, reports in the Guardian and MJA suggest that this is a situation which some doctors have to deal with. In November 2013, 15 doctors working in detention centres claimed asylum seekers weren’t able to access appropriate care; that there was poor access to medications, lack of appropriate antenatal treatment and poor mental health care for asylum seekers in detention centres. The AMA has publicly raised its concerns about these issues. This situation is particularly worrying as asylum seekers are at a greater risk of ill health than the general community – particularly for psychological disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression, in addition to the physical effects of persecution and torture. Many suffer from poor nutrition, and their general health before their arrival in Australia can be poor. When making this decision, your conduct should be guided by the principles set out in the Good Medical Practice Code of Conduct which states that doctors have a duty to make the care of patients their first concern and to practise medicine safely and effectively. Doctors must be ethical and trustworthy. While all patients are arguably vulnerable, asylum seekers are particularly so. As stateless people, their rights of redress and protection under Australian law appear more limited than the general patient

Medical practitioners should at all times insist the rights of their patients be respected and not allow lower standards of care to be provided.

population you are used to treating. In this situation, your patients will be particularly reliant on you to provide good care and impartial advice as they have no option to go elsewhere. This being so, you will have to exercise extra care and compassion. In addition to these individual duties, the Good Medical Practice Code of Conduct states that doctors have a responsibility to protect and promote the health of individuals and the community. The AMA position statement on the health of asylum seekers says that ‘medical practitioners should at all times insist that the rights of their patients be respected and not allow lower standards of care to be provided’. Your role as patient-advocate is an important one in this context. Before starting the role you should investigate what internal processes are available to address concerns you might have about patient access to care. Ask, what clinical services can my patients access? Will my clinical judgement be respected and applied when I make a recommendation about patient care? Will I be required to keep information confidential? What is the process for ensuring appropriate standards are maintained? You should be satisfied that you are able to provide appropriate care to patients before you take on the role. But you must also be prepared to act as an advocate for your patients and speak out if proper care is not being made available. Working in this environment may also take an additional toll on your health and wellbeing. Before accepting the role you should ensure that your employer has pathways in place to recognise burnout and support you and all staff. You should ensure that peer support processes are in place to assist you to debrief, and you should also make sure that you have a good therapeutic relationship with your own GP to look after your health. You can find more detailed guidance in the AMA position statement on ‘Health Care of Asylum Seekers and Refugees – 2011’. Bon Voyage! Q

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MARCH 2014 DoctorQ


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*Drive away price is based on the 2014 ES 300h Luxury (no enhancement pack). Drive away price shown includes 12 months registration, 12 months compulsory third party insurance (CTP), a maximum dealer delivery charge, stamp duty and premium paint (where applicable). ^ Fuel consumption will vary depending on driving conditions / style, vehicle conditions and options / accessories. **Offer applicable to Private and ABN buyers (who are members of AMAQ) on all new vehicles purchased between 1st Feb - 31st December 2014 and delivered by 31st January 2015. Lexus of Brisbane Group reserves the right to extend any offer. Excludes demos and pre-owned vehicles. You must be a member of the Qantas Frequent Flyer program to earn and redeem points. Complimentary membership will be offered to customers who are not already members. Membership and points are subject to the terms and conditions of the Qantas Frequent Flyer Program available at Qantas.com/terms. To earn points, Qantas Frequent Flyers must provide their membership number. Please allow six weeks for the points to be credited to your account. Points can only be awarded on the purchase of an eligible new vehicle between the 1st Feb -31st December 2014. Points paid on total net contract price of vehicles after discount but before trade-in.


People & EVENTS

AMA QUEENSLAND COUNCIL OF DOCTORS IN TRAINING PRESENT

LEARN

FROM

TODAY,

INSPIRATION FOR TOMORROW.

JDC 2014 AMA QUEENSLAND JUNIOR DOCTOR CONFERENCE

SATURDAY 28 - SUNDAY 29 JUNE 2014 PULLMAN HOTEL, KING GEORGE SQUARE BRISBANE

To view the full program and costs and download a registration form, visit www.amaq. com.au

SATURDAY 28 JUNE PLENARY ONE - INSPIRATION 30 years of creating smiles: the story of ‘Operation Smile’ Associate Professor Richard Lewandowski, Plastic Surgeon and Board Member, ‘Operation Smile’ HIV, AIDS and law reform: current challenges and the road ahead The Hon Michael Kirby AC (invited) Battling melanoma in the skin cancer capital of the world Professor Adèle Green AC, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute TASTING PLATE MINI WORKSHOPS Talking, teaching and technology Dr Victoria Brazil Protocol development for clinical trials - the essential takeaways Dr Louise Cullen, Senior Staff Specialist, Department of Emergency Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital Making friends with statistics - the essential lessons Dr Kerenaftali Klein, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute PLENARY TWO - COLLABORATION Lessons learned in public health for tomorrow’s leaders Professor Michael Daube, Director of the Public Health Advocacy Institute and the McCusker Centre for Action on Alcohol and Youth A race against time: the interrelation of public health and the macro economy in developing economies Professor Stephen Leeder AO Navigating the mess of medical information Professor Paul Glasziou THE INAUGURAL JDC COCKTAIL PARTY

30

MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

SUNDAY 29 JUNE Rejuvenation breakfast QRRRF: Learn more about the Queensland Residents and Registrars Research Foundation and how you can apply for a research grant. JDC Inspirational leader lecture Introduction: Dr Steve Hambleton, President, Australian Medical Association JUNIOR DOCTOR HEALTH AND WELLBEING 2013 National mental health survey of doctors and medical students The Hon Jeff Kennett AO, Chairman, beyondblue Personal resilience Dr James Scott, Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital JUNIOR DOCTOR FORUM Then and now: navigating the challenges for junior doctors Facilitator: Dr Steve Hambleton, President, Australian Medical Association Then – where have we come from? TBA Now – current challenges and the road ahead Dr Will Milford Winning strategies for cover letters, resumes and practical interview skills Kathryn Cassidy, Career Advisory Service Australian Medical Association Cutting edge technology - 3D printers and the future of surgery Dr Dimitrios Nikolarakos, Surgeon, Gold Coast Hospital QRRRF SPONSORED ‘BEST MOMENTS IN MEDICINE’


Proudly sponsored by:

Premium sponsor:

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

PROF. ADÉLE GREEN 2013 Queenslander of the Year and melanoma research pioneer Professor Adèle Green will lend her considerable experience to the first AMA Queensland Junior Doctor Conference in June. Barb Ferres caught up with Professor Green up for an interview. Q. You have achieved a great deal, what accomplishment are you most proud of? In terms of scientific findings, our long-term study showing that melanoma is preventable by regular sunscreen application was a major milestone. I’d like to stress it was very much a team effort that led to this finding! Q. At what stage in your medical career did you decide to pursue research as your vocation? As a junior doctor I took some years out to do a PhD and then post-doctoral research in epidemiology in the UK and the USA. I imagined that I’d return to full-time clinical work but back in Australia and working hospital shifts, I realised the more fulfilling career for me was research and I’ve worked in full-time medical research ever since. Q. What advice would you give to a junior doctor interested in pursuing a career in research? Decide what fields really interest you then find a couple of independent senior researchers with similar interests and discuss opportunities to work or train with them. Better still, find a mentor to advise and guide you from the outset. Q. Did you have a mentor or role model that inspired you to enter research? Not really… I entered research as a possible way of better understanding the causes of common chronic diseases. However, along the way I did encounter some inspirational public health researchers like Douglas Gordon, Foundation Professor of the University of Queensland’s then Social and Preventive Medicine Department. Q. Millions each years are spent on making Australians more aware of their risk of skin cancer. How would you like to see these campaigns evolve? It would be good to strengthen campaign messages about the dangers of sunburn, a strong predictor of future skin cancer. Q. Research can be a long process with many set-backs and frustrations, how do you stay focused and motivated? For me taking a walk in the forest is a great counterbalance to stress and set-backs. Q. What was your first thought upon hearing you were 2013 Queenslander of the Year? It was feeling a tremendous thrill that medical research was being recognised in this way by our community.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS Submit an abstract for oral and poster presentations at the JDC 2014. The conference provides a unique opportunity to present your research in the comfortable setting of your peers, have eminent health researchers available to provide guidance and feedback, and a chance to win the Queensland Registrars and Residents Research Fund Medal or Poster Prize. Abstract submission will open on the Monday 24 February and close on Thursday 1 May. Abstracts can be submitted for a research topic of your choice, or alternatively, your best moment in medicine. Please see the requirements below: RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS

Word count of 350 words plus a 100-word biography in sentence format to be emailed in a single word document. BEST MOMENT IN MEDICINE

Word count of 250 words plus a 100-word biography in sentence format to be emailed in a single word document. View the abstract submission guidelines at www.amaq.com.au

I hope that research into prevention of chronic disease in socio-economically disadvantaged groups will take a great leap forward in my lifetime.

Q. What research breakthrough do you hope to see during your lifetime? Most of all I hope that research into prevention of chronic disease in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups will take a great leap forward in my lifetime. I know that will require researchers and policy makers across several sectors to work much more closely together than at present, but I am optimistic. Q. What is a most important trait for a researcher – passion or persistence? Of course a researcher does best with both, but I think persistence finally overcomes most barriers. Most of all I hope that research into prevention of chronic disease in socioeconomically disadvantaged groups will take a great leap forward in my lifetime.

DoctorQ MARCH 2014

31


CURRENT ISSUES

PLAN TO SCRAP PENALTY RATES THE FAIR WORK COMMISSION RECENTLY COMMENCED THE FIRST FOUR-YEARLY REVIEW OF MODERN AWARDS. UNDER THE ACT, THESE REVIEWS ARE MANDATED EXAMINATIONS OF THE MINIMUM TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT IN MODERN AWARDS, AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO MODERN WORKPLACES. THE HEALTH PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORT SERVICES AWARD WERE WITHIN THE AMBIT OF THE REVIEW.

ANDREW TURNER

Workplace Relations Manager, AMA Queensland

The Federal Government has said that the Full Bench should consider the impact of employment costs on employers’ willingness to hire workers over the next four years. The Government’s submission argues the recent insertion of penalty rates into legislation covering awards should not be read in isolation. Instead, it must be balanced against other factors. This ‘balancing’ reflects the Government’s notion of workplaces having to be mindful of the softening economic environment and labour market as employees’ award pay and conditions are reviewed. A controversial aspect of the review is the payment of shift allowances and weekend penalty rates. Workers historically receive higher rates of pay when they work late nights, early mornings, weekends or public holidays. Its payment as an acknowledgement that working unsociable hours can contribute to an unsociable life.

1.5 MILLION

AUSTRALIAN WORKERS RECEIVE PENALTY RATES

4.6

32

4.2

MILLON

MILLON

workers (48.1% of the workforce) are entitled to penalty rates for a public holiday

workers (44.2% of the workforce) for a weekend, if they work at those times.

MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

It is argued that modern awards should support job creation and therefore significant weight should be given to the following legislated objectives: the need to promote social inclusion through increased workforce participation; the need to promote flexible modern work practices and the efficient and productive performance of work; the likely impact of any exercise of modern award powers on business, including on productivity, employment costs and the regulatory burden; the need to ensure a simple, easy to understand, stable and sustainable modern award system for Australia that avoids unnecessary overlap of modern awards; and, the likely impact of any exercise of modern award powers on employment growth, inflation and the sustainability, performance and competitiveness of the national economy.

Given that the model transitional arrangements included in most modern awards (designed to allow employers and employees time to adjust to new minimum wages, loadings, penalty rates and shift allowances in modern awards) operate up until 30 June 2014, it would be appropriate to schedule any review of penalty rates after this date. The potential for significant changes to modern awards to occur as a result of this review. With education being one of its core functions, the Fair Work Ombudsman will play an important role in ensuring that the community is made aware and has access to information about significant changes to modern awards arising from this process. Q

Its payment as an acknowledgement that working unsociable hours can contribute to an unsociable life.


18 - 19 JULY | BRISBANE

FRESH THINKING STARTING & WORKING IN PRIVATE PRACTICE CONFERENCE 2014

EARLY BIRD

SPECIAL REGISTER BY 20 JUNE 2014

EXPRESSION OF INTEREST: NAME: PRACTICE:

22

CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT POINTS

EMAIL: PHONE:

*Subject to approval

For more information contact the Workplace Relations team on (07) 3872 2205 or email j.ovnic@amaq.com.au

RETURN TO: Email: j.ovnic@amaq.com.au Fax: (07) 3872 2280


FOUNDATION

NATIONAL RECOGNITION FOR OUR PATRON

Sincere congratulations to Mr Timothy Vincent Fairfax AC, long term patron and supporter of the AMA Queensland Foundation – who was awarded an AC in the recent Australia Day Honours list. It was in recognition of his eminent service to business and to the community, as an advocate for philanthropy and as a major supporter of the visual arts, to the promotion of higher education opportunities, and to rural and regional development. Q

ABOVE (FROM LEFT): Jane Schmitt - CEO, AMA Queensland, Mr Tim Fairfax AC, Associate Professor Noel Hayman and Nola White, Nurse Unit Manager on a visit to the Inala Indigenous Health Centre.

You can contribute to the Foundation via a regular contribution or corporate giving.

WE GOT THE TROOPIE! THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO GAVE GENEROUSLY IN THE 2013 CHRISTMAS APPEAL, WE RAISED $44,041 AND WERE ABLE TO BUY A USED 11-SEATER TROOPIE FOR DR LARA WIELAND’S OUT THERE KOWANYAMA PROGRAM.

A huge and heartfelt thank you from AMA Queensland Foundation and AMA Queensland member, Dr Lara Wieland to everyone who generously gave to our 2013 Christmas Appeal.

community in Far North Queensland where she volunteers so much of her time, working tirelessly to educate and empower the children of Kowanyama through her volunteer run program.

“I’m so grateful to my fellow AMA Queensland members and professional colleagues for their contributions to the AMA Queensland Foundation. Your generosity and compassion will very soon take the form of a second-hand Troopie, without which we would not have been able to continue our camps. What we’re able to provide for the kids and teach them while they’re with us is truly life changing for them, and you can be proud that you’re now a part of that.”

Many of the 1,000 plus children who have attended the camps come from difficult backgrounds and a community where there are high levels of social dysfunction.

Lara, who is also a member of the AMA Indigenous Health Taskforce, has spent the past 13 years living in a remote Indigenous

“The program is about more than education, health promotion and sports activities,” Lara says. “We strive to instill confidence, resilience and self belief in these kids, giving them their best chance at overcoming the challenges they will inevitably come up against when they leave for boarding school (compulsory because of the remoteness) and throughout the rest of their lives.” Q

LONG TERM FOUNDATION SUPPORTER At the recent AMA Queensland Member Milestone event, long term Foundation supporter and Past President Dr Daniel Hart celebrated 70 years as an AMA Queensland member. In his speech, he highlighted the importance of supporting the Foundation’s mantra of doctors doing good. 34

MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

Dr Hart recounted the story of moving from Wickham Terrace to AMA House: “I was staggered at the amount and wondered if we were wise. Something goes wrong and we’re out on the streets with a begging cup. But, as you know, things did not go wrong. They went spendidly well.” Q


FOUNDATION

THANK YOU DOCTOR How often have you had a well meaning patient give you (yet another) box of chocolates, bottle of wine or home baking to show their gratitude and appreciation for the high level of care and support they have received? As we know, it is unethical to accept gifts; however there are many worthwhile causes you would love your grateful patients to support. For example: desperately needed retinal camera for rural Cunnamulla

The answer is simple - give your patient AMA Queensland Foundation’s Thank YOU Doctor brochure or ask them to make a donation online at www. amaqfoundation.com.au. Posters and brochures are now on display in many surgeries (on the Info-Med display stands) or alternatively contact (07) 3872 2204 or amaqfoundation@amaq.com.au for a poster and brochure pack. Q

urgently needed used four wheel drive vehicle for Dr Lara Wieland’s Out There Kowanyama holiday and leadership camps program replacement of a vaccine fridge for the Charleville Health Centre.

DOCTORS DOING GOOD

Do you have a project which needs financial assistance? Contact Colleen Harper, Foundation Manager: Phone: (07) 3872 2204 Email: c.harper@amaq.com.au Website: www.amaqfoundation.com.au

The Thank You Doctor program, offers patients the opportunity to express their appreciation in a tangible, tax efficient way.

Want to say

thank you to YOUR doctor?

It was a pleasure to donate to the recent AMA Queensland Foundation’s Appeal for Dr Lara Wieland’s – Out There Kowanyama, to help out with the purchase of a four wheel drive. It is fantastic that the AMA Queensland can bring such worthwhile causes to the attention of its members and to bring to life the adage that charity really begins at home.” Dr Eugene Siew Keong Lim, Donor, Radiologist and AMA Queensland Member DoctorQ MARCH 2014

35


AROUND THE REGIONS

LOCAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION ROUND UP

JOIN YOUR LMA

STAY CONNECTED WITH COLLEAGUES AND UP TO DATE WITH THE LATEST HEALTH NEWS AND ISSUES AFFECTING YOUR LOCAL AREA. DON’T STAND ON THE SIDELINES —JOIN YOUR LOCAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION TODAY AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

SUNSHINE COAST

CAIRNS

BRISBANE NORTHSIDE

Monthly dinner meetings are generally held on the fourth Thursday of each month.

Meetings are generally held on the second Tuesday of alternate months.

Venue: Maroochydore Surf Club

For information on meeting dates and membership contact Cairns LMA President Dr Sharmila Biswas.

Convenor: Jo Bourke

Phone: (07) 4036 4333

Phone: (07) 3265 3111

Phone: (07) 5479 3979 Fax: (07) 5479 3995

Convenor: Dr Graham McNally For further information or to join, visit www. northsidelocalmedical.wordpress.com

Email: jobo@squirrel.com.au

TOWNSVILLE

For further information or to join visit www.sclma.com.au

For information on meeting dates and membership contact Townsville LMA President Dr Carl O’Kane.

REDCLIFFE & DISTRICT

Phone: (07) 4433 1111

Venue: Golden Ox Restaurant, Redcliffe

GOLD COAST Monthly meetings are generally held on the third Thursday of each month. For information on meeting dates go to www. gcma.org.au or email info@gcma.org.au A membership form can be downloaded from our site. Phone: (07) 5575 7054

Time: 7pm for 7.30pm

CENTRAL QUEENSLAND For information on meeting dates and membership contact Central Queensland LMA Secretariat Dr Harley Wilson. Phone: 0419 277 611 Email: harleywilson00@gmail.com

Fax: (07) 5575 7551 Email: info@gcma.org.au

FRASER COAST For information on meeting dates and how to join, contact Fraser Coast LMA President, Dr Shaun Rudd. Phone: (07) 4128 3644

Next meeting: 30 April

BUNDABERG For information on meeting dates and how to join, contact Bundaberg LMA President, Dr Daud Yunus.

Convenor: Margaret MacPherson Phone: (07) 3121 4043

TOOWOOMBA & DARLING DOWNS For further information, go to www.tddlma. org.au or email info@tddlma.org.au Membership to the Toowoomba and Darling Downs LMA is just $50. To join, download an application form at www.tddlma.org. au/membership.html

Phone: (07) 4152 2888 Fax: (07) 4153 3245 Email: daud.yunus@gmail.com

Fax: (07) 4124 0660

CAN’T FIND YOUR LOCAL AREA?

36

September 2013 DoctorQ

If your Local Medical Association does not appear above or your details are incorrect, please email amaq@amaq.com.au with corrections, contact details, how to join, web address, dates for upcoming meetings and who to contact for further information.


How would you know if you bought an unsuitable life insurance product? Experien Insurance Services are leading insurance brokers to the medical industry, we tailor our advice to ensure you receive maximum return in the event of a claim. We would like to extend a 15% cash back offer on any new personal insurance policy, simply quote AMA QLD to take advantage of this offer. Contact an Experien Insurance adviser for an obligation free insurance review, 1300 796 577. Life Insurance services are provided by Experien Insurance Services Pty Ltd ABN 99 128 678 937. Experien Insurance Services Pty Ltd is a Corporate Authorised Representative (No. 320626) of ClearView Financial Advice Pty Limited ABN 89 133 593 012 AFS Licence No. 331367. General Insurance services are provided by Experien General Insurance Services Pty Ltd trading as Experien Insurance Services ABN 77 151 269 279 AFS Licence No. 430190. This information is of a general nature only and has been prepared without taking into account your particular financial needs, circumstances and objectives. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information, it is not guaranteed. You should obtain a copy of the product disclosure statement and obtain independent professional advice before acting on the information contained in this publication. * Promotion only applies to new policies from the Experien Insurance Services (EIS) life insurance offering - Trauma Insurance, Total & Permanent Disablement (TPD) Insurance, Needle stick Cover, Life Insurance, Key Person Insurance, Income Protection Insurance, Business Succession (Buy/Sell) Insurance or Business Expenses Insurance - and not to any existing policies that are transferred to EIS as adviser or products offered by Experien General Insurance Services (EGIS). Only one rebate will be issued per client (or related entity/party) and cannot be used in conjunction with any other EIS offer. The rebate only applies to the first year’s premium. Rebates will be issued to eligible clients at the end of the promotion period and only on policies that complete in the promotion period (1 February 2014 - 31 May 2014).

AMAQ_March_ad.indd 1

2/17/2014 2:08:14 PM

How the MBAQ can help you The Association provides financial assistance to help medical practitioners through crises. If you find yourself in a financial crisis, then make contact with the MBAQ to receive the application forms for assistance.

How you can help the MBAQ You may contribute to the Medical Benevolent Association of Queensland in several ways: • By becoming a member of the Association: Subscriptions - Ordinary Annual membership $30 p/a - Life membership $50 one sum • By making a tax-deductible donation to the Association. • By making a bequest in your Will. • By naming the Association as the beneficiary where there is a surplus following functions such as Year Reunions or LMA Dinners.

Tragedy is unpredictable and may strike at any age in the life of a medical practitioner... More Information Further information can be found on the MBAQ website at www.MBAQ.org.au. All donations are tax deductible.

Donate or subscribe today!

Medical Benevolent Association

of Queensland DoctorQ MARCH 2014

37


Cele

s ear

ating 25 Y r b

2014

Rural Doctors Association of Queensland 25th Annual Conference

A Rural Health Renaissance

RDAQ 20I4 – Register today! The Rural Doctors Association of Queensland 25th Annual Conference (RDAQ 2014) will focus on celebrating past achievements in rural medicine, present innovations and address key challenges facing Queensland rural doctors. The conference offers comprehensive clinical and health policy sessions. Come along and share in the expertise of conference speakers and engage with key decision makers for rural medicine in Queensland. The conference will be held at the Sofitel Brisbane Central on the 6th – 8th June 2014.

Sofitel Brisbane Central 6th – 8th June 2014

A note from RDAQ President RDAQ 2014 will be heading south to the city of Brisbane to enable as many members, past, present and future to gather in celebration of our first 25 years. The rural health renaissance theme will allow us to celebrate past achievements and look towards future challenges while learning about present innovations in rural medicine. RDAQ 2014 will offer excellent clinical content with plenty of networking opportunities. I welcome past and new delegates and our student colleagues to consider attending. RDAQ is a unique conference experience, and this year promises to deliver yet again. I hope to see you in Brisbane.

For more information on RDAQ 2014 please go to: conference.rdaq.com.au

Dr Sue Masel President RDAQ


s ear

Cele

ating 25 Y r b

2014

Rural Doctors Association of Queensland 25th Annual Conference

A Rural Health Renaissance

Sofitel Brisbane Central 6th – 8th June 2014

RDAQ 2014 PROGRAM Running from 6th – 8th June with two additional days of pre conference workshops, the program includes the latest updates in clinical practice, topical forums and policy updates. The program will also feature RDAQ’s traditional medico-political forum to discuss issues vital to the survival of rural and remote healthcare. Program topics will revolve around four streams, RDAQ stream, Clinical update stream, Doctors in training stream and a Telehealth stream. Topics include: Cardiology l Anaphylaxis l Neonatal resuscitation l Obstetrics emergencies l

Rural workforce

l

Use of telehealth in rural settings

l

Community advocacy and leadership

l

To view the current RDAQ 2014 program please visit the conference website.

NETWORKING AND FAMILY PROGRAM In 2014 RDAQ will host a networking program featuring four exciting networking events. The program will give delegates the opportunity to take a break from the academic side of the event and enjoy the company of old friends and make new contacts. RDAQ 2014 will also provide a Queensland Rural Medical Family Network (QRMFN) family program. All networking information can be found on the conference website.

Event Management services for RDAQ 2014 provided by Health Workforce Queensland

CONTACT DETAILS Viv Culverwell & Renee Dobbin RDAQ 2013 Conference Managers Health Workforce Queensland GPO Box 2523, Brisbane, Qld 4001 Phone: 07 3105 7800 Fax: 07 3105 7801 Email: conference@rdaq.com.au Web: www.rdaq.com.au/conference

For more information on RDAQ 2014 please go to: conference.rdaq.com.au


events calendar People & EVENTS

COMING

UP

28-29 JUNE

JUNIOR DOCTOR CONFERENCE

WHAT’S ON

8 MAY

AMA Queensland, Hunstanton

Join our Workplace Relations team, along with our corporate partners for coordinated insight into the FREE key elements to consider MEMBER when moving to private SEMINAR practice.

END OF LIFE CARE AMA Queensland, Hunstanton

Come and learn more about your options and legal obligations when caring for patients at the end of their lives – including about advance care directive, care planning and powers of attorney. Free member seminar.

18 - 19 JULY

TO VIEW THE FULL EVENTS CALENDAR

40

MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

PRIVATE PRACTICE CONFERENCE Brisbane Based on delegate feedback, the program now offers two concurrent streams – a fundamentals stream for those looking to move into private practice and an advanced stream, designed for those who wish to grow and improve the efficiency of their current practice.

The conference topic, Learn from Today: Inspiration for Tomorrow, will focus on research, leadership and resilience presentations, delivered by the leading lights in the medical profession, business and political arenas.

13 JUNE

PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURATION Brisbane

Enjoy more than a century of tradition when we celebrate the installation of Dr Shaun Rudd as President and present prestigious awards.

Or to register for an event, visit amaq.com.au or contact the AMA Queensland Membership team on (07) 3872 2222 or email registrations@amaq.com.au

21 -27 SEPTEMBER

27 MARCH

THE MOVE TO PRIVATE PRACTICE

Pullman Hotel, Brisbane

AMA QUEENSLAND ANNUAL CONFERENCE Cape Town, South Africa As a conference delegate you will learn about a range of topics from world renowned Australian and International speakers and develop a better understanding of the medical issues that will affect you and your patients.


AMA Queensland President Dr Christian Rowan along with the AMA Queensland Council invite you to attend the

PRESIDENTIAL

INAUGURATION INCORPORATING:  The 2013 - 2014 President’s Address by Dr Christian Rowan  The Presentation of Awards  The Memorial Roll of AMA Queensland  The installation of Dr Shaun Rudd as President for 2014 - 2015 To be held on Friday 13 June 2014 – 7.30pm for an 8pm start Please RSVP to (07) 3872 2222 or email inauguration@amaq.com.au by Friday 31 May 2014. Black tie or academic dress and decorations. Refreshments will follow the formal ceremony.

Brisbane’s newest

Clinical Haematologist

Dr Raluca Fleser Clinical Haematologist MBBS RACP RCPA Suite 4, Specialist Centre, North West Private Hospital 137a Flockton Street, Everton Park Queensland 4053 p. (07) 3353 9026 f. (07) 3353 6027 admin@ralucafleser.com.au www.ralucafleser.com.au

Accepting referrals now For bookings, call (07) 3353 9026

DoctorQ MARCH 2014

41


QUEENSLAND BRANCH OF AUSTRALIAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION | ACN: 009 660 280 | ABN: 17 009 660 280

Election Notice 2014–2016 Annual General Meeting The Annual General Meeting of the Members of the Queensland Branch of the Australian Medical Association will be held at:

Time: 6.30pm Date: Tuesday 20 May 2014 Venue:  AMA Queensland 88 L’Estrange Terrace Kelvin Grove, Queensland Business

The business of the Meeting will be: 1. To receive and consider the accounts, balance sheets and reports of: (i) The Board of Directors; (ii) Any committees instructed to report to the meeting; and (iii) The Auditors. 2. The declaration of the results from the election of; (i) The President Election and Council members. 3. The appointment of the Auditors and approval of the remuneration (if any) to be paid to the Auditors; 4. The President’s address; and 5. To deal with all business which any statute, the Constitution, or the By-laws requires.

Proxy Notice

A member who is entitled to attend and register one vote at the Annual General Meeting is also entitled to appoint another member as a proxy to attend and vote in his or her place. Proxy forms can be downloaded from the AMA Queensland website (www.amaq.com.au) or by phoning Andrew Turner on (07) 3872 2207 and must be received by 6.30pm 18 May 2014.

Notes

The Presidential Inauguration and presentation of annual AMA Queensland awards will be held on Friday 13 June 2014, where the following business will be conducted: 1. Installation of Dr Shaun Rudd as President 20142015; and 2. Presentation of Awards and Prizes. Annual Report *The 2013 Annual Report will be available online from 25 March 2014 at www.amaq.com.au.

Nomination forms are to be either faxed, emailed or posted to Andrew Turner: Phone: (07) 3872 2207 Fax: (07) 3856 4727 Email: a.turner@amaq.com.au Post: AMA Queensland, PO Box 123, Red Hill Qld 4059

The Returning Officer invites nominations and will hold an election for the positions of President-Elect or Council of the Queensland Branch of the Australian Medical Association.

President-Elect 2014 - 2015 For election as President-Elect of the Queensland Branch of Australian Medical Association. One representative required (Any two (2) ordinary members may nominate another member). Candidates for President-Elect may submit with their Nomination Paper: A short personal statement of no more than 250 words. Any words in excess will be discarded; A passport-sized head and shoulder photograph; A brief CV of no more than 250 words. Any words in excess will be discarded; and A video statement of no more than three minutes. This will be filmed at AMA Queensland.

Councillor of the Queensland Branch of the Australian Medical Association 2014 - 2016 Nominations must be in writing and signed by the nominee, and two (2) nominators. All persons must be financial members of the Queensland Branch of Australian Medical Association. Any two (2) ordinary members may nominate another member provided all members belong to and are registered in the same Geographical Area, Craft Group or other position. Craft Group Representatives required: One (1) General Practitioner Craft Group Representative; One (1) Specialist Craft Group Representative. Other Positions required: One (1) Medical Student Group Representative. Geographical Area Representatives required: Three (3) Greater Brisbane Area Representatives. Postcodes 4000 to 4199, 4300 to 4349, 4500 to 4513, 4514 to 4549 inclusive; One (1) North Area Representative. Postcodes: 4550 - 4601, 4619 - 4675 inclusive; One (1) Gold Coast Area Representative. Postcodes: 4200 - 4299 inclusive; One (1) North Coast Area Representative. Postcodes: 4550 - 4601, 4619 - 4675 inclusive. Candidates for Council may submit with their Nomination Paper: A short personal statement of no more than 250 words. Any words in excess will be discarded; A passport-sized head and shoulder photograph; and A brief CV of no more than 250 words. Any words in excess will be discarded. What is required of a Councillor? Availability to attend Council meetings five times per year, and relevant AMA Queensland events/functions such as the Presidential Inauguration. Actively contribute to setting policy for the Association; Actively support membership retention and growth strategies; Provide a written report (template provided) for council meetings; and Availability to attend and contribute to AMA Queensland Committees. If you need to make changes to your craft group, geographical area or other position in the register of members for the purpose of the election this must be done by 5pm Tuesday 15 April 2014. Return completed nomination forms by 5pm Wednesday 16 April 2014 to the Returning Officer. Further nomination forms can be obtained at www.amaq.com.au. Time Frames 15 April, 5pm: Final changes to register of members 16 April, 5pm: Nominations close 28 April, 5pm: Ballot opens 12 May, 5pm: Ballot closes 20 May, 6.30pm: Annual General Meeting

Nominations close 5pm Wednesday 16 April 2014


You can access this nomination paper online at www.amaq.com.au

Nominations close 5pm Wednesday 16 April 2014

Nomination Form Nomination forms are to be either faxed, emailed or posted to:

Time Frames

Contact: Andrew Turner

16 April, 5pm: Nominations close

Phone: (07) 3872 2207

15 April, 5pm: Final changes to register of members

Fax: (07) 3856 4727

28 April, 5pm: Ballot opens

Email: a.turner@amaq.com.au

12 May, 5pm: Ballot closes

Post: AMA Queensland, PO Box 123, Red Hill Qld 4059.

20 May, 6.30pm: Annual General Meeting

We hereby nominate

(FULL NAME)

as a candidate for the position of PRESIDENT-ELECT OR COUNCILLOR

(PLEASE CIRCLE)

Craft Group/Geographical Area/Other Position

(FOR COUNCILLOR NOMINATION ONLY)

Nominee’s details: I hereby consent to this nomination. Full name:

Member number:

Craft/Area/Other Position: Date of birth:

Telephone number:

Primary practice address: Residential address: Signature:

Nominator’s details x 2: Full name 1:

Full name 2:

Craft/Area/Other Position:

Craft/Area/Other Position:

Telephone number:

Telephone number:

Residential address:

Residential address:

Signature:

Signature:

Candidates can only nominate in either a) Craft Group, b) Geographical Area, or c) Other Position. They cannot nominate for a Craft Group, Geographical Area or Other Position as well as President-Elect. Where nominating representative/s for Craft Group, Geographical Area or Other Position, both nominators must be registered in the same Craft Group, Geographical Area or Other Position (whichever applies) as the person being nominated. Nominations close 5pm, Wednesday 16 April 2014. For more information, please visit the AMA Queensland website or contact Andrew Turner.


Feature story CURRENT ISSUES

AMA QUEENSLAND’S HEALTH VISION

END OF LIFE CARE Compassion. Trust. Knowledge. These values, as nominated by you, will guide AMA Queensland’s advice to government and direct our leadership within the profession. This year we’ll be applying these values to the real world and we’ll be talking about endof-life care. Doctors have been alerting AMA Queensland to the problems which can arise when care is provided to patients at the end of their lives. Doctors have told us about confusion about the law, fears that without direction from patients they might be providing unwanted or futile care, inability to access patients’ advance care plans or contact the right family member or substitute decision-maker. Here we are exploring the issues as they face doctors today with articles from Dr Mark Deuble, a senior specialist in palliative care at the Princess Alexandra Hospital and Dr Peter Saul, Director of Intensive Care at Newcastle Private Hospital.

WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT DYING IN AUSTRALIA DR MARK DEUBLE SHARES HIS EXPERIENCE IN PALLIATIVE CARE WITH US AND ADVOCATES THAT BY RECOGNISING DEATH, DOCTORS CAN GIVE PATIENTS BETTER AND MORE MEANINGFUL END OF LIFE CARE.

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MARCH MARCH 2014 2014 DoctorQ DoctorQ

It is always a tragic event when a loved one dies of illness. Yet this particular subject does not seem to gain as much attention in our medical education system or the general media as it should. Death is never a subject that can be easily discussed: yet it is a normal part of our humanity. Our society tries to deny this inevitability with the constant promotion of youthfulness, cosmetic ideals and illness defiance. Much of the symbolism promoted in the health system and media continues, almost delusionally, to promote the idea that there are regular ‘miracles’ and that ‘fighting illness’ is a war worth supporting; despite the significant human and economic costs. I believe we desperately require a more considered, open, and honest debate within our community about terminal illness and the dying processes. Only when we face death will we truly have a compassionate community that sees death as a natural part of life and creates a more supportive environment for family and friends. The health system currently engages in an overmedicalised approach to terminal illness and dying. As a Palliative Care Specialist working in major hospitals I continue to see most doctors trying very hard to keep patients alive and treating ‘reversible causes’ near the end of life. Sadly this process often causes patients to suffer needlessly and also does not allow patients and families to prepare for their natural death. Research strongly indicates this is one of the major reasons deaths cause significant grief and bereavement difficulties.

There are many reasons why palliative care is neglected in the current health system. Although we cannot change attitudes easily, we certainly can change the way end-of-life care is talked about in the community and in the hospitals. There is an urgent need to start better community and health care education about terminal illnesses, aged care and the options for palliative care during the last months of life. This is a difficult discussion, but it may be one that truly enhances the humanity within our society. The most important component of palliative care is empathetic, well informed communication skills. These communication skills should never be neglected and when caring for terminally ill patient, it is essential for all health professionals to listen carefully and choose words that are appropriate for our patients and families. Such communication usually also relies on the development of trust and compassion. It also empowers patients and families to make real choices regarding their quality of life towards the end of their illness trajectory. These choices may in fact be outside of the medical domain – such as going on one last holiday or tidying up one’s financial affairs. Sometimes it is difficult for medical staff to understand these choices but we must relinquish control back into the hands of our patients. Often at the end-of-life our presence and compassion is more important than one last medical procedure or intervention. Q


Feature ISSUES story CURRENT

CHOOSING FOR OTHERS

DR PETER SAUL SHARES WITH US SOME OF THE DIFFICULTIES FRIENDS AND FAMILIES ENCOUNTER WHEN THEY MUST MAKE DECISIONS ABOUT HEALTH CARE ON BEHALF OF THEIR LOVED ONE. Imagine you are in a restaurant with a few friends. Your partner rings on his/ her mobile and says “I’m going to be 10 minutes late – can you order for me?” Now, what you know about your partner is: 1. (S)he is a bit overweight and has a raised cholesterol 2. (S)he has a passion for double bacon cheeseburgers. Do you: a) order a green salad (because this would be good for him/her) b) order a double bacon cheeseburger (or nearest equivalent)? The green salad choice is a ‘best interests’ judgment, which we are encouraged to make when there is no guidance. The cheeseburger choice is a ‘substituted judgment’, where we are meant to stand in the person’s shoes and make the choice they would have made. It is however, likely that neither choice would match exactly what your partner would have chosen. Making decisions for other people is fraught with practical and ethical difficulties, but has become the norm at the end of life. Through frailty or acute illness, up to four out of five people need a decision maker at the end. The accuracy with which surrogates reflect our own choices is generally poor and perhaps we

need to re-envisage their role. Maybe our substitute decision makers need to make trustworthy, authentic choices, based on love and respect for the journey of our lives so far, rather than try to preserve our lost autonomy. But hang on – there are some more options here, for instance, we could have looked at the menu together beforehand and made a choice in case one of us arrived late – like an advance care directive. Perhaps we could ask our partner to nominate somebody else at the table to make a choice – a best friend who might know better what to choose - like an appointed guardian. Or, best of all, why don’t we get him/her to pull over, read out the menu options and get the closest thing to a real choice – like supported decision making. The capacity to decide is supported by a selected group of others, and there is no rush to make a surrogate decision. This simple exercise reveals serious complexities in deciding for others. Exactly what we, as surrogates, should do is not philosophically straightforward. In my experience, the worst thing to do is to order a compromise – sadly, a common outcome. The best is to read out the menu and make it possible for him/her to make a choice.

The UK Mental Capacity Act demands this, and both Victoria and South Australia are exploring supported decision making for those with reduced capacity. It is important that we look at this as part of the future of making valid end-of-life decisions. Q

Maybe our substitute decision makers need to make trustworthy, authentic choices, based on love and respect...

GET INVOLVED Visit amaqhealthvision.com Send us an email at healthvision@ amaq.com.au Follow us on facebook and twitter at amaqueensland using the hashtag #amaqhealthvision Come to one of our events DoctorQ Call us on (07) 3872 2222

MARCH 2014

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MEMBER NEWS

CONGRATULATIONS to the following doctors who are now elected members of AMA Queensland. OCTOBER 2013

NOVEMBER 2013

DOCTORS IN TRAINING

DOCTORS IN TRAINING

Dr Leyla Beck Dr Indika Leelasena Dr Jose Jiao Dr Julia Groves Dr Kristy Appadoo Dr Luisa Orellana Dr Peter Moore Dr Emily Hay Dr Christina Thirmeyer Dr Dana Pakrou Dr Muhammad Ali

Dr Ferney Bernal Buitrago Dr Sarah James Dr Tristan Howie Dr Omer Ashraf Dr Thomas Toro Dr Alistair Kan Dr Nigel C Mott Dr Emily Vagg Dr Sarah Davidson Dr Michelle Snape Dr Brett Drury Dr Nihal Kumta Dr Sayananta Mukherjee Dr Manish Khanna Dr Lynda Allchurch

Dr Hanh Pham Dr Srinivas Rachakonda Dr Premala Nadarajah Dr Anna Hallett Dr Angela Lin Dr Jason Fletcher Dr Andrew Shaw Dr Michael Burke

SALARIED PRACTITIONERS

Dr Aman Ahuja Dr Paul Butel Dr Andrew Hallahan Dr Michelle Grogan Dr Nicola Ward Dr Anthony R GENERAL Herbert PRACTITIONERS Dr Peta Lorraway Dr Mandana Arshi Dr Jamie Beit Dr Ioselani Pouesi Dr Michael Heytman Dr Reza Madah Dr Jeffrey Goh GENERAL Dr Lasintonb PRACTITIONERS Dr Chris Turnbull Ratnayake Mudiyanselage Dr Sandhir Prasad Dr Raya Mayo Dr Michelle Murphy Dr Mohsen Amoli Dr Alex Tan Dr Gordon Laurie Dr Owen Bourne Dr Pran Lal D Praveen Dr Suntharam Dr Muhammad Sukumaran Sabesan Arshad Dr Sree Venugopal Dr James Macdonald Dr Wendy Findlay Dr Susan Sherlock Dr Louise Munro PRIVATE Dr Ian Smith Dr Joanne TE Shaw SPECIALISTS Dr Mark Michalski Dr Barbara A Dr Philippa Hall Leggett Dr Nelle Van Buuren Dr Trevor Schramm Dr David B Cross Dr James A Douglas Dr Archna Saraswat Dr Michelle T Daly Dr Luke Wheatley Dr Karl Rodins Dr Laura Wee Dr Kieron J Bigby Dr Janusz Bonkowski Dr Steven Yang Dr Jason Brown Dr Susan Ireland Dr Maneesha Tol Dr Luke McDermott Dr Daniel Clarke PART-TIME PRIVATE Dr Thomas Gleeson PRACTITIONERS SPECIALISTS Dr Jason Chan Dr Daniel Smith Dr Stephen Vincent Dr Kenneth Ng Dr Imran Faridi Dr John C McGuire Dr Geoffrey Withers Dr Owen Gillies Dr Shane A Dr David Roberts Thompson Dr Vanessa Rich Dr Richard Stone Dr Leanne L Du Dr Megan Castner Dr Anthony Fisher Dr Tim Shannon Dr Lawrence Nandam Dr Danella Favot SALARIED Dr Clement H-K Dr Stephen Fahy PRACTITIONERS Wong Dr James Reeves Dr Stuart Butterly Dr Nutan Kumta Dr Daniel Chambers Dr Fiona Kermeen Dr Peter Parry Dr John Richards Dr David M Levitt Dr Milos Kolarik Dr Diane Payton Dr Brigid Hickey Dr Edward Pink Dr Sara Lucas Dr Vikas Srivastava Dr Rishendran Dr Daniel Bodnar Dr Lucas Stradwick Naidoo Dr Lambros Halkidis Dr Anthony Crombie Dr Piotr Konopka Dr Anne-Louise Dr Rajeev Jarugula Dr Justin Booyse Swain Dr Ross Francis Dr Hamish Gray Dr Bevan Lowe Dr Kellie Wren Dr Golam Khadem Dr Michael Guandalini Dr Susie Mathew Dr Pankaj Relan PART-TIME Dr Tavey Dorofaeff Dr Deborah Dunstan PRACTITIONERS Dr Martin Heck Dr Rahul Deshpande Dr Deanne Curtin Dr Robert Bonnin Dr Miriam Tohill Dr Asim Shah Dr Ivan Rapchuk Dr Melissa Ramsden Dr Nicole Pfeffer Dr Kiron Chakrabarti Dr Andreas Fiene Dr Annie Fonda Dr Fraser Imrie Dr Morag Whyte Dr Roslyn Shaw Dr Sandra Hayes Dr Werner Dr Monique Wells Dr David Kramer Fleitmann Dr David S Dolan Dr Ruth Hodgson Dr Emmeline Finn Dr Robert Scott Dr Jane Phillips Dr Jeremy Fernando Dr Vanessa Johnson Dr Timothy Hodgson Dr David Symmons

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MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

2014 MEMBERSHIP RENEWALS Thank you to all our members who have renewed for 2014. Keep a look out for your membership pack in early April which includes your new membership card and 2014/2015 Member Benefits Guide. Members eligible for the Directory of Members will also receive their 2014/2015 directory at this time. Scan the QR code on your card to access the extensive range of member benefits on offer.

$500 COLES MYER VOUCHERS Dr Yvette Tan Dr Colin Campey Dr Glyn Lackie Dr Brian Biggs Dr Jennifer Green

For those members yet to renew, note 31 March 2014 is the cut-off for payment as all financial member benefits cease after this time. To renew conveniently over the phone, call (07) 3872 2222 and have your credit card details handy. Congratulations to our renewals prize winners for 2014:

SKI NEW ZEALAND PRIZE, COURTESY OF AMA TRAVEL

SPICERS GAP GOURMET GETAWAY PRIZE, COURTESY OF LEXUS

Dr Peta Cornwall was the winner of the exciting early-bird renewals prize of a trip to Queenstown, New Zealand including return direct economy flights from Brisbane to Queenstown for two adults along with accommodation at Crowne Plaza Queenstown and ski passes.

Dr Andrew Winter was the winner of this fantastic early-bird prize of one night’s luxury accommodation with all beverages during his stay, a gourmet picnic lunch, seven course degustation dinner and two course gourmet breakfast. Spicers Peak Lodge is just two hours’ drive from Brisbane, so Dr Winter will also be provided a Lexus SUV to take him on the journey.

CALL FOR MENTORS AMA Queensland runs an annual mentor program for first year medical student members. The program matches students and senior doctors throughout Queensland and is designed to foster great relationships and valuable learning experiences for both students and their more experienced peers. This is an opportunity for senior doctors to share their skills and knowledge with students during the formative stages of their career development. A face-to-face networking event is a feature of the program, allowing students and doctors

to meet, share experiences and connect with one another. Designed to provide additional skills and support for student doctors, the mutually-beneficial provides the opportunity for mentors to give back and inspire the future generation of doctors. The Membership team is now calling for volunteers for the 2014 mentor scheme and to express your interest, please email our Membership Manager, Leigh Holohan l.holohan@amaq.com.au or call (07) 3872 2222 for a chat about the program. Q


MEMBER NEWS MEMBER NEWS

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR NEW INTERNS Dr Kimberley Abussi Dr Aniket Adhikari Dr Nicholas Aitcheson Dr John Alcorn Dr Christian Allen Dr James Allin Dr Kate Anderson Dr Thomas Anderson Dr Xian Wei Ang Dr Rodney Archie Dr Tess Asgill Dr Steven Ashburn Dr Greta Askin Dr Benjamin Aston Dr Welwyn Aw-Yong Dr Alice Ayres Dr Amitoj Baath Dr Alexandra Bagley Dr Kristina Balaba Dr Rashmi Balaram Dr Dylan Barnes Dr Andrew Basaglia Dr Ajita Basu Dr Timothy Beckman Dr Catherine Bella Dr Hannah Bellwood Dr Kate Berry Dr Tania Billing Dr Margaret Blanco Dr Katie Boles Dr Thomas Boosey Dr Alexander Bowden Dr Melinda Boyd Dr Christopher Bradhurst Dr Rebecca Brady Dr Danielle Bray Dr Emily Brooks Dr Lauren Brownhalls Dr Scott Burdon Dr Fiona Burnell Dr Lauren Burrage Dr Timothy Butson Dr Peter Byrnes Dr Thomas Campbell Dr Amanda Carson Dr Daniel Caruana Dr Amit Chacko Dr Thomas Chalk Dr Abhinay Challa Dr Sze Yan Chan Dr Laurel Chan Dr Rowena Charles Dr Jillian Chau Dr Anthony Chellappah Dr Matthew Cheng Dr Hon Cheng Dr Flora Cheong Dr Kangho Cho Dr Joleen Choy Dr Amanda Clarke Dr David Coe Dr Rory Compton Dr Jason Conn Dr Monique Cook Dr Larissa Cowley Dr Gemma Daley Dr Vineet Das Dr Gareth Davies Dr Jonathan Davies Dr Elizabeth Dawson Dr Aloechka Delamaine Dr George Denby Dr Mila Dimitrijevic Dr Chau Do Dr Garth Douglas Dr Michael Du Plessis Dr Natasha Duncan Dr Kelly Dungey

Dr Jovita Dwivedi Dr Alasdair Dyne Dr Philippa Edwards Dr Emily Edwards Dr Anna-Marie Erian Dr Daniel Faux Dr Jillian Ferrell Dr Mikayla Finocchiaro Dr David Fisher Dr Anna Fleming Dr Jennifer Fleming Dr Jason Fletcher Dr Anthony Foat Dr William Foot Dr Thomas Francis Dr Carley-Marie Francis Dr Kathryn Franks Dr Sara Fraser Dr Lauren Furnas Dr Gillian Gallagher Dr Peta Gardam Dr Colin Giorcelli Dr Marika Goodman Dr Halima Goss Dr Katherine Gridley Dr Trent Grundy Dr Stephen Guy Dr Tegan Hamilton Dr Alison Hanks Dr Mark Hanna Dr Hassan Haque Dr Jessica Harvey Dr Alice Hawes Dr Ashleigh Heron Dr Sanjay Hettige Dr Andrew Hewett Dr Christopher Hickey Dr Jessica Hill Dr David Hill Dr Kellie Hillsley Dr Darcy Hinde Dr Pey Wen Ho Dr Laura Hopkirk Dr Emma Horrocks Dr Richardy Hostiadi Dr Amy Hsiao Dr Stewart Hunt Dr Joshua Hurwitz Dr Ebonney Jackson Dr Mohit Jain Dr John Jasinski Dr Natasha Jeenah Dr Aaron Jeffreys Dr Courtney Jennings Dr Peter Jenvey Dr Tamara Johansen Dr Jody-Lee Johnson Dr Avril Johnston Dr Karlie Jones Dr Sophie Joseph Dr Andre Joshi Dr Kristel Kemmerling Dr Ian Kennedy Dr Grace Kirkby-Strachan Dr Christopher Kleimeyer Dr Nathan Klose Dr Brenda Lai Dr Yan Lai Dr Xinning Lan Dr Benjamin Lazarus Dr Ashleigh Lazzarini Dr Sandy Lee Dr  Ying Ngo Melissa  Lee Dr Kevin Leong Dr Joyce Leung Dr Andrew Lewandowski Dr Dionee Liefman Dr Aaron Lim

Dr Angela Lin Dr Jack Lockett Dr Emma Low Dr Matthew Lumchee Dr Hemming Luu Dr Miles Ma Dr Jessica Madsen Dr Max Maffey Dr Hayley Maher Dr Anthony Makridakis Dr Tara Malcolm Dr Patrick Manley Dr Margaret Mansbridge Dr  Luke  Mansfield Dr Sonya Manwaring Dr Mary Marfori Dr Guido Marks Dr Pahge Marriott Dr Ann Mathews Dr Claire McAllister Dr Jennifer McAuliffe Dr Claire McDonald Dr Steve McElroy Dr Nicholas McGrigor Dr Fiona McKinnon Dr Laurie McLaughlin Dr Rachelle McNamara Dr John McNicholl Dr Natasha Mealey Dr Matthew Mickenbecker Dr Claire Mohr Dr Mridula Mokoonlall Dr Rachael Moore Dr Ashley Morgan Dr Amy Morrison Dr Fauzia Muhammed Dr Hannah Mullins Dr Anna Mullins Dr Millie Nakatsuka Dr Peter Neeskens Dr Chuong Nguyen Dr Linh Nguyen Dr Lyndon Nofz Dr Jamie Nuttall Dr John O’Bryen Dr Jessica O’Connor Dr Ona Okon Dr Gemma O’Leary Dr Timothy O’Sullivan Dr Jessica Page Dr Thomas Pagliaro Dr Angeline Papajcsik Dr Jonathon Parker Dr Tegan Pascoe Dr Nilu Perera Dr Johanna Petterson Dr Thienan Phamnguyen Dr Andrew Ping Dr Daniel Pitt Dr Jessemine Pitt Dr Grace-Linel Polong Dr Jemma Porrett Dr Skye Poulton Dr Benjamin Powell Dr Jacinta Power Dr Corina Preda Dr Rebekah Price Dr Vinod Rajasingam Dr Ravi Ram Dr Mayank Raniga Dr Anthony Rawlinson Dr Jazlyn Read Dr Sascha Reimann Dr James Rigano Dr Brooke Riley Dr James Robinson Dr Claire Robinson Dr Sarah Robinson-Wolrath

Dr Danielle Robson Dr Timothy Rogers Dr Bobby Rolison Dr Erin Rowley Dr Heshani Rupasinghe Dr Eliza Ryan Dr Komal Saini Dr Sammani Samarasuriya Dr James Sax Dr Adrian Scherma Dr  Rebekah  Schofield Dr Susan Scott Dr Katherine Scott Dr Jacqueline Seebold Dr Sahan Semasinghe Bandaralage Dr Emma Sganzerla Dr Jai Sharma Dr Wesley Sharock Dr Nicholas Shoung Dr Aakriti Shrestha Dr Jia-Woei Shyong Dr Navih Singh Dr Talbir Singh Dr Ross Smith Dr Hooi Peng Soon Dr David Sparks Dr Aaron Sparshott Dr Paul Stack Dr Belinda Stallard Dr Jordan Staunton Dr Jessica Stewart Dr Meredith Stronach Dr Gabriella Sue Yek Dr Katie Sunderland Dr Leon Tang Dr Nicholas Tellam Dr James Teng Dr Yuzhen Teo Dr Winston Thai Dr Elangovan Thaya Needi Dr Melissa Thomas Dr Myo Thu Dr Benita Thurairajah Dr Jackie Tran Dr Stefanie Tran Dr  Amy  Tuffin Dr Patrick Tunney Dr Cassie Turner Dr Thaddeus Tuttle Dr Juliette Tyson Dr Stewart Ure Dr Divya Viswanathan Dr  Benjamin  Wakefield Dr  Brittany  Wakefield Dr Scott Walker Dr Stephanie Wallace Dr Mudiyanselage Weerakoon Dr Moira West Dr Stephanie Whelan Dr Sally Wilkinson Dr Sarah Willard Dr James Willard-Jones Dr Natalee Williamson Dr Lauren Wilson Dr Jeanette Wimbus Dr Matthew Winkel Dr Mimi Wong Dr Jadon Wong Dr Penelope Wyche Dr Hnin Wynn Dr Scott Wyvill Dr Edward Yeoh Dr Jordan Young Dr Rhys Youngberg Dr Yin Yuan

CONGRATULATIONS to the following doctors who are now elected members of AMA Queensland. DECEMBER 2013

Dr Olivier Ramuz Dr Geraldine Dyer Dr Matthew Pincus Dr Lalitha Rameshbabu Dr Greet Hoet Dr Ipeson Korah

SALARIED PRACTITIONERS

Dr Megan W France Dr Geoffrey Messer Dr Dan Siskind Dr Christopher Dr Jeremy Wellwood Garland Dr Carrie Y-Y Wang Dr Deanne Hummelstad Dr Cleonie N Perera-Jayasekera Dr Riley Savage Dr Benjamin Sly JANUARY Dr Roger Bain Dr Philip Storey Dr Jason Coventry 2014 Dr Joseph Williams Dr Tinashe DOCTORS IN Vengesayi Dr Charles Lin TRAINING Dr Kristopher Dr Gillian Adsett Rallah-Baker Dr Avril Johnston Dr Christopher Dr Alyia Rahemtula Johnstone Dr Madeleine Cameron Dr Priscilla Martin GENERAL Dr John McNicholl Dr Stuart PRACTITIONERS Polkinghorne Dr Mina Kaddis Dr Ian Cripwell Dr Margaret M Tait Dr Jennie Gu Dr Dimitrios Dr Grace Malcolm Dr Amit Patel Nikolarakos Dr Vicki Naumann Dr Renae Vardi Dr Stephen Dr James Innes Dr Kathleen Jackson Weinstein Dr Sajeeva Dr Jed Mangano Dr Mahendra Singh Abeysundera Dr Manfred Dr David Green Dr Chanchala Penzhorn Dr Scott Campbell Athulathmudali Dr Alison Kirby Dr Colin Myers Dr Phoebe Chidley PRIVATE Dr Richard Scolaro Dr Tuan Tran SPECIALISTS Dr Anand Parameswaran Dr Justine McCarthy GENERAL Dr Michaela Cartner Dr Clinton Gibbs PRACTITIONERS Dr Meenakshi Dr David W Johnson Shanmugam Dr Izak J Bakker Dr Gregory Starmer Dr James Winearls Dr Nicholas Dr Aled Hapgood Bashir-Elahi Dr Damian Abbott Dr Umeshchandra Dr Uchenna Nweze Dr Michelle Roets Dhanjee Dr Sivaprakash Dr Daniel Dr Laxmi Camadoo Appanna Dallimore Dr Sakib TaggartDr Priyani PART-TIME Jeewa Senanayake PRACTITIONERS Dr Chung-Kwun Won Dr Johanna Laporte Dr Michael Von Dr Laurent Layani Dr Christine Welch Papen Dr Kirsty Bennett Dr Ranjith Dr Rebecca Won Ralapanawa Dr Irene Tjhung Dr Richard Wong Dr Neale Thornton Dr Gillian Eastgate Dr Ravikumar Dr Taryn Reddy PRIVATE Krishnaiah Dr Charlene Dymond SPECIALISTS Dr Neil Archer Dr Catriona Slater Dr Peter Rizzo Dr T Quen-Shaw Chong Dr Craig McBride SALARIED Dr Bhaveshkumar PRACTITIONERS Dr Anna Miedecke Patel Dr Shailesh Dass PART-TIME Dr Neil Grant PRACTITIONERS Dr Robyn Cheuk Dr Savio Godinho Dr Michelle Davison Dr Matt Dwyer Dr Kevin Plumpton Dr Michael J Muller Dr Kimberly Oman Dr Caleb Vossen Dr David Godbolt Dr Janice E Stafford Dr Harish Iswariah Dr Geoffrey Eather Dr Natalie Deuble Dr Samuel Marment Dr Jayne Berryman Dr Jennifer Taggart Dr Suresh Varma Dr Nigel Roberts Dr Susan Roberts Dr Sneha John Dr Peter Donovan Dr Nicola Previtera Dr Pieter Le Roux Dr Melita Trout Dr Andrew Hughes Dr Gerben Keijzers Dr Tariq Masood Dr Lauren Dr Heather Russell Dr Akram WM Khalil Stephenson Dr Lakshmy Dr Leah Goodwin Nandakumar Dr James Walsham Dr Joann Rotherham Dr David Pearson Dr Danielle Howe Dr Fiona Hutchinson Dr James Reidy Dr Zulfiquer Otty Dr Natalya Von Dr Tarragon Papen Chisholm Dr Kathleen Dr Indranil Houston Chatterjee Dr Katharine Gallop Dr Kurundeniya Prematunga Dr Francoise Butel Dr Mauritius Du Toit Dr Sarah Earnshaw Dr Annabel Dr Karen Liddle Somerville Dr John Moore

DOCTORS IN TRAINING

DoctorQ MARCH 2014

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UNSUNG HEROES THIS YEAR, WE PAY TRIBUTE TO MEMBERS PAST AND PRESENT WHO HAVE EXEMPLIFIED OUR GUIDING PRINCIPLES: COMPASSION, TRUST AND KNOWLEDGE. HERE, DR ANGIE RYAN SHARES THE STORY OF DR BERNARD QUIN. Seventy years ago a courageous doctor was murdered on Nauru. This is his story.

was an Australian protectorate at the time. He worked tirelessly for the large leper community on the island, as well as the local community. He was loved by his patients, and had many babies named after him, including one with the impressive moniker Quinny Diddy Bitty.

Australian military, Dr Quin chose to remain to look after his patients. Japanese troops occupied Nauru in August 1942. On the 25 March 1943, Americans bombed the island. In retaliation the following day, Dr Quin and four other Australians were beheaded by the Japanese. A few months later, the 50 members of the leper colony including women and children that Dr Quin had tended so well for so many years were rounded up onto a boat, taken out to sea and reports vary as to what happened then but they never returned.

After this he moved back to Victoria and commenced general practice in Echuca and married his second wife Mary and five children soon followed.

In 1940 the island was shelled by the Germans. After this Dr Quin returned to Melbourne with his family for their safety. He then returned to Nauru in 1941 alone as the Government Medical officer. After the shelling, Australian troops were sent to defend the island, and in 1941 Dr Quin was asked by the army at the request of the Prime Minister to perform part-time medical service to the Australian troops there. He was paid a salary by the Defence Force for his extra duties as well as his government salary, and according to his family he wore army uniform, and held the title of Captain.

He first went to Nauru in 1935, taking along his young family. He commenced work as the Government Medical Officer. Nauru

Australian troops were withdrawn from Nauru on 28 February 1942. After a request for him to remain on the island by the

Dr Quin was only 49 at the time of his murder and he left behind a young widow and children. His children are all alive, in their 80s and have lived lives of forgiveness and charity. He has 19 grandchildren, 42 great grandchildren and one great great grandchild.

Dr Bernard Quin was born in Victoria in 1894, and graduated from the University of Melbourne MBBS in 1920. He enlisted in the AIF on 14 June 1918, and was subsequently transferred to the Australian Army medical Corp Reserve in May 1925 as honorary Captain. After graduation he moved to Queensland and worked as a rural doctor in Mareeba. He had a great interest in tropical medicine. Whilst in Mareeba he met and married his first wife Norah. The following year she tragically died in childbirth along with their daughter Mary at the very hospital where Dr Quin worked.

He was an extraordinary doctor whose outstanding commitment to his patients resulted in his death.

According to an eyewitness, Dr Quin faced his brutal death with grace and dignity. He placed his rosary beads around his neck and then was led into a room to be beheaded. He was an extraordinary doctor whose outstanding commitment to his patients resulted in his death.

We need to cherish and acknowledge those within our profession who exemplify commitment and compassion, who inspire us to do more, and who make us reflect on what a noble profession we belong to. RIP Dr Bernard Quin. Q

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MAIN IMAGE SOURCE: United States Army in World War II - The War in the Pacific - Seizure of the Gilberts and Marshalls. OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF MILITARY HISTORY DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY WASHINGTON, D.C., 1955. Library of Congress Catalog Number: 55-60002

DR BERNARD QUIN

MEMBER NEWS


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DoctorQ MARCH 2014

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Conference

AMA QUEENSLAND ANNUAL CONFERENCE

south africa

cape town

South Africa boasts world-class infrastructure, accommodation and meeting facilities combined with the excitement, passion and cultural variety of Africa. Offering cosmopolitan city life alongside the African bush, relaxing beach resorts, opportunities for adventure enthusiasts, breathtaking scenery and world class shopping. South Africa is an exhilarating destination. Whether it’s spotting the big five on a private safari, golfing at world-class golf estates, dining in award winning restaurants, wine tasting in the famous Cape Winelands, visiting Robben Island, or admiring magnificent Cape Town from the top of Table Mountain, there is an abundance of extraordinary experiences.

Accommodation

TABLE BAY HOTEL Location is everything and the Table Bay Hotel has it all! Sitting on the buzzing Victoria and Alfred Waterfront, perfectly located to take full advantage of Cape Town’s incredible sights and settings. The Hotel offers views of Table Mountain, the harbour and notorious Robben Island prison. It was, in fact, the prison’s most famous former inmate who opened the hotel in 1997: then-President Nelson Mandela.

CONFERENCE THEME

Health has a Postcode (Social Determinants of Health)

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MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

Cape Town is the quintessential melting pot: it is a city alive with creativity, colour, sounds and mouth-watering tastes. While walking through the city’s streets and meeting its people, you will fall in love with its natural beauty, creative freedom and incredible spirit. Cape Town is a city where the unexpected is always just around the corner and the beautiful province of the Western Cape lies ready to be explored across the city border. Stock up on Pan African Folk Art at Greenmarket Square, one of the most beautiful and architecturally interesting city squares in the southern hemisphere. Catch a cable car to Table Mountain, visit Mandela’s former cell at Robben Island, taste some wonderful wines and explore the continent’s unique tastes and flavours.

The AMA Queensland Annual Conference is tailored for medical practitioners, practice managers, registered nurses and industry professionals. As a conference delegate you will learn from world renowned Australian and International speakers and develop a better understanding of the medical issues that will affect you and your patients. Plus business sessions on:

Topics for discussion include:

Health has a Postcode (Social Determinants of Health) The First Three Years Child & Adolescent Health Obesity

Nutrition and Exercise Body Image Mental Health & Depression Drugs/Alcohol/Sex Access to Services

Risk management Business development Financial security Practice management skills


Conference

CONFERENCE

itinerary SUNDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 2014

TUESDAY 23 SEPTEMBER 2014

On arrival into Cape Town International Airport, group transfers have been arranged to take you to our conference hotel. Due to the late arrival of flights into Cape Town the remainder of your evening is at leisure.

Buffet breakfast is included at the hotel.

MONDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2014 Buffet breakfast is included at the hotel. 8am - 1pm: CONFERENCE SESSIONS 1pm - 2pm: LUNCH Today lunch will be included as part of the conference package. After lunch we will depart the hotel for a half day tour. 2pm - 6pm: TABLE MOUNTAIN AND HALF DAY CITY TOUR Table Mountain provides Cape Town with a uniquely beautiful setting. Visible at times from 200 kilometres out at sea, the mountain made the anchorage of Table Bay easy to find and attracted early seafarers to the “Tavern of the Seas” for shelter, drinking water and fresh produce. The level but rocky summit provides breathtaking views - the City and Table Bay are spread out below. To the south is the Cape of Good Hope, where the peninsula thrusts between two great currents, and to the north lie the Hottentots-Holland Mountains. Table Mountain is remarkable for more than its aesthetic appeal, it is home to one of the smallest of the six floral kingdoms, and is host to approximately 2620 species of indigenous flora, some of which are endemic. After a visit to Table Mountain the group will commence the city tour. Drive through the city along Adderley Street past the statues of Jan van Riebeeck and his wife, past the Cultural History Museum and statue of Jan Smuts, onto St George’s Cathedral, up Queen Victoria Street and continue to the Houses of Parliament, here you will be able to take a stroll through the Company gardens, originally laid out in 1652 by Jan Van Riebeeck as a vegetable garden to provide fresh produce for the Dutch East India Company ships. The coach then travels down Strand Street, and up to the Malay Quarter and past to the Bo-Kaap Malay Museum. Guests will be taken along Dorp Street, the oldest street in the Bo-Kaap, here the history and culture of the people will be explained. 7pm – 9pm: WELCOME FUNCTION Enjoy an African style cocktail reception within the conference hotel.

8am - 1pm: CONFERENCE SESSIONS Lunch, afternoon and evening at leisure. Optional tours are on offer and can be booked at the hospitality desk located outside the conference room.

WEDNESDAY 24 SEPTEMBER 2014 Buffet breakfast is included at the hotel before our day excursion. 8am - 5pm: FULL DAY TOUR – CAPE POINT & PENINSULA This is a full-day tour with time spent in the Cape Point Nature Reserve. Travel along magnificent Marine Drive beyond Lion’s Head, past the Twelve Apostles, which stretches to Hout Bay, a quaint fishing village on the Atlantic seaboard. As you continue towards the Cape Point Nature Reserve, you will have the opportunity to experience the incredible scenic route along Chapmans Peak drive. After spending time in the reserve and taking a ride up the Funicular, you will head to Boulders beach where you can see the Penguin colony up close. Lunch can be enjoyed en route before heading back to the hotel.

THURSDAY 25 SEPTEMBER 2014 Buffet breakfast is included at the hotel. 8am - 1pm: CONFERENCE SESSIONS Lunch, afternoon and evening at leisure. Optional tours are on offer and can be booked at the hospitality desk located outside the conference room.

FRIDAY 26 SEPTEMBER 2014 Buffet breakfast is included at the hotel. 8am - 1pm: CONFERENCE SESSIONS Lunch and afternoon at leisure. Optional tours are on offer. 7pm - 11pm: FAREWELL GALA DINNER - MolenVliet Wine and Guest Estate MolenVliet is nestled in the heart of the Stellenbosch Winelands between historical Stellenbosch and gourmet Franschhoek. MolenVliet Wine Estate where Heaven and Earth meet is one of the hidden gems of the Stellenbosch Winelands. MolenVliet is only 45 minutes from Cape Town.

SATURDAY 27 SEPTEMBER 2014 Buffet breakfast is included at the hotel. After breakfast checkout and group departure transfers are available. AMA Travel Queensland staff will be on hand to assist with your departure.

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professional services

AUSTRALIAN EQUITY RETURNS IN A HISTORICAL CONTEXT TWO CONSECUTIVE YEARS OF STRONG AUSTRALIAN EQUITY RETURNS PROMPT THE QUESTION: IS ANOTHER POSITIVE YEAR POSSIBLE? MACQUARIE’S ROSS NOYE EXPLAINS WHY THE FORECAST, BASED ON FUNDAMENTAL DRIVERS, IS FOR THE SHARE MARKET TO CONTINUE ITS POSITIVE MOMENTUM. Ross Noye Macquarie Private Wealth (07) 3233 5805 0438 779 955 ross.noye@macquarie.com Ross Noye is a stockbroker and financial advisor at Macquarie who specialises in investment and retirement planning.

Two consecutive years of strong Australian equity returns prompt the question: is another positive year possible? Our forecast, based on fundamental drivers, is for the share market to continue its positive momentum. The Australian share market, as measured by the S&P/ASX 200 Accumulation Index, returned 20.2 per cent in 2013, following a return of 20.3 per cent in 2012. Consecutive years of 20 per cent returns are not as unusual as recent memory may suggest, nor are they particularly common. The chart below shows that over the past 114 years, 28 years (or a quarter of the total) produced returns above 20 per cent, including the last two years. Consecutive years of 20 per cent plus returns have occurred six times over this period. Note that in some cases, the run of strong returns occurred over more than two consecutive years. More generally, Australian equities returns are concentrated in the 10 per cent to 20 per cent range. In the past 114 years, 38 years (or about a third of the years) have had returns in this range. From this perspective, the past two years are slightly unusual. However, as the chart shows, returns in the 20 to 25 per cent range have occurred a dozen times over this period. Sharemarket performance is driven by the complex interaction of earnings growth, valuations, risk

We believe Australian equities will provide another year of double digit returns. tolerance and other behavioural or psychological factors. Some of these factors are dependent on economic growth or financial conditions, both domestic and international. Others are determined by ‘animal spirits’ – human emotion that drives consumer confidence, according to John Keynes’ The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money. Every economic cycle is different and the year ahead will bring with it new challenges, the resolution of some previous headwinds and, assuredly, some past issues will again rear their ugly heads. We believe that Australian equities will provide another year of double digit returns – an expectation based on a combination of improving economic conditions, valuations that are not overly stretched and lower global risk. That is, it is a fundamentally based forecast. Q

FREQUENCY OF ANNUAL RETURNS 1900 - 2013

> 55%

50% to 55%

45% to 50%

40% to 45%

35% to 40%

30% to 35%

0% to 5%

25% to 30%

-20% to -15%

-25% to -20%

-30% to -25%

2

-35% to -30%

4

< - 40%

6

-40% to -35%

8

-15% to -10%

10

-10% to -5%

12

-5% to 0%

14

20% to 25%

5% to 10%

16

15% to 20%

18

10% to 15%

20 DISCLAIMER: This information has been prepared by Macquarie Equities Limited ABN 41 002 574 923 (“MEL”) participant of Australian Securities Exchange Group, Australian financial services licence No. 237504, No 1, Shelley St, Sydney NSW 2000, and does not take into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Before acting on this information, you should consider whether it is appropriate to your situation. We recommend that you obtain financial, legal and taxation advice before making any financial investment decision. Members of the Macquarie Group or their associates, officers or employees (“Macquarie”) may have interests in the financial products referred to in this advice by acting in various roles including as investment banker, underwriter or dealer, holder of principal positions, broker, lender or adviser. MEL is not an authorised deposit-taking institution for the purposes of the Banking Act 1959 (Cth), and MEL’s obligations do not represent deposits or other liabilities of Macquarie Bank Limited ABN 46 008 583 542. Macquarie Bank Limited does not guarantee or otherwise provide assurance in respect of the obligations of MEL.

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Source: IRESS and MPW Research


professional services

EQUIPMENT FINANCING UNDER THE MICROSCOPE IF THE NEW YEAR FINDS YOU NEEDING NEW EQUIPMENT FOR YOUR PRACTICE, INVESTEC’S JEFF MILLER EXPLAINS HOW INVESTEC CAN HELP MAKE THE PROCESS LESS PAINFUL.

Affording patients the best possible care and attention goes hand-in-hand with the need to assess medical equipment and the most appropriate means of financing – but it needn’t be an arduous process. Medical practitioners across Australia should routinely re-evaluate whether existing equipment serves their changing demands and requirements. According to Investec Brisbane’s Jeff Miller, equipment should be viewed from a needs perspective, as well as the medical discipline. “The scope of equipment financing varies greatly depending on the area of expertise or specialisation - an orthopaedic surgeon, for example, will have very different needs to that of a dentist. Some disciplines won’t require many assets at all as the nature of their work means they can arrive at the hospital and it’s all there, whereas areas such as dentistry, ophthalmology, cardiology and radiology are equipment-heavy and will require testing-based assets and fit-outs,” he said.

TECH CHANGES DRIVING PRACTICE UPGRADES Additionally, he said there will be technological changes which have to be factored into any financing arrangements – not only will there be the physical asset (such as a chair and stand) to account for, but also upgrades to any software that operates the equipment. Miller believes it’s important for practitioners to distinguish between a long-term asset and one that will change often with software or technological advances. “These improvements can really drive quality and clinical outcomes and therefore the practice needs

to be kept up to date so the funding of that is critically important,” he said.

A PROFESSIONAL PARTNERSHIP Investec Australia is a long-time partner and supporter of the medical fraternity, and while there have been changes to the profession overtime, some aspects have remained constant. Part of Investec’s initial attraction to medical disciplines was the stability and professionalism of its members and this continues.

Jeff Miller Investec 1300 131 141 www.investec.com.au/medical Investec offer a range of financial products and services specifically tailored to the medical sector.

Miller believes the stability of the profession has assisted Investec with being able to specialise in a unique financing environment. “What underpins our ability to be specialists in the medical field is the dedication of its people and the certainty that brings – practitioners who decide to be a surgeon will typically be a surgeon for the rest of their life. As a lending institution, we fully support the profession and the qualifications that underpin it. We also back the profession as a whole and we don’t cherry pick disciplines within medicine – the role of the doctors is to look after their patients and we see our role as looking after the doctors from a financing point of view,” he said. As specialists, Investec is better positioned to process financing applications in a more streamlined, efficient manner than generalist lending institutions, removing any red tape that could impede the timeliness of securing financing approval. The ability to recognise the specific asset that’s being financed allows Investec to put in place an appropriate structure which gives the practitioner immediate flexibility and efficient cost. The most common types of financing options when purchasing medical equipment are cash, chattel mortgage or asset purchase agreement, and financial lease, whereby the finance company is the legal owner of the asset throughout the duration of the lease. To understand options and enable practitioners to make an informed decision, they should speak to a professional in the industry with experience in financing for healthcare professionals. Investec Specialist Bank has over 20 years experience working with medical professionals and understands their specific needs. For further information on funding fit-out and equipment, contact Jeff Miller on 0416 103 004 or visit our website at www.investec.com.au/medical Q

Medical practitioners should routinely re-evaluate whether existing equipment serves their changing demands and requirements.

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this article (“Information”) is general in nature and has been provided in good faith, without taking into account your personal circumstances. While all reasonable care has been taken to ensure that the information is accurate and opinions fair and reasonable, no warranties in this regard are provided. We recommend that you obtain independent financial and tax advice before making any decisions.

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professional services

PROPERTY INVESTMENT - DO YOU HAVE THE RIGHT FOUDATION? AS SPECULATION GROWS REGARDING THE STATE OF THE PROPERTY MARKET IN 2014, THERE IS RENEWED INTEREST IN PROPERTY INVESTMENT. IF YOU ARE THINKING ABOUT EXPANDING YOUR PROPERTY INVESTMENTS THIS YEAR, WILLIAM BUCK’S JULIE SMITH LAYS OUT THE KEY ISSUES YOU NEED TO UNDERSTAND TO MAXIMISE YOUR CHANCE OF SUCCESS. Julie Smith William Buck (07) 3229 5100 julie.smith@williambuckqld.com.au

Julie Smith is Tax Services Director at William Buck Chartered Accountants and Advisors.

STRUCTURE, STRUCTURE, STRUCTURE With all investment assets, the important thing to remember when it comes to tax is - if you own the asset, you pay the tax. For this reason, how you structure a property purchase is critical. Some of the factors to consider when choosing a structure include: Will you hold the property for a short or long time? Who will benefit from any tax deductions available from holding the property? Do you have available family to share any future capital gain? Do you plan to use the property for personal use? Based on your particular circumstances, the common structures that may be recommended to you for property ownership include: Owning in an individual name Owning in a family trust Owning in a self managed super fund Ultimately, the choice of structure is a strategic decision that should be tailored to your current and expected future circumstances. Make sure you seek the right advice to ensure you get the most out of your investment. TAXES TO BE AWARE OF There are some hidden costs in purchasing and holding a property that need to be considered when determining the amount of money you have available for investment.

NEGATIVE GEARING AND THE VALUE OF YOUR PROPERTY We often see some confusion about how tax applies to property ownership, so let’s revisit gearing and how it will impact on your return on investment. Gearing is where you use a level of debt to assist with purchasing the property. The level of gearing determines whether the property is positively or negatively geared. Positive gearing is where the income from the property does not exceed the expenses. Therefore, the ownership of the property delivers a cash surplus to the investor. Negative gearing occurs where the income from the property, being the rent, is not sufficient to cover the costs of owning the property. Often, people are attracted to negative gearing as this will create a loss for tax purposes and will therefore help to reduce your yearly tax bills. It is critical to remember, however, that a paper loss is a real loss. In other words, when you are negatively gearing a property you are actually losing money. If the property is not increasing in value by more than the net loss, you will end up worse off. Whilst the tax savings in the short term are attractive, if you are to increase your overall wealth, these must be offset by the future capital gain on a well chosen property. In summary, property investment is a well used tool to assist with wealth creation. By getting the right advice before you sign, you will ensure that you maximise your chances of success. Q

Some of the key taxes to consider include: Stamp Duty on purchase – your solicitor is the best place to start regarding the level of stamp duty payable and any concessions that may apply. Land Tax – Depending on who owns the property, its location and your other property investment holdings, land tax may be payable. This is a yearly tax levied on the unimproved value of your land. Getting the right advice about structure and the applicable land tax will help to ensure you manage this cost. DISCLAIMER: This article has been prepared by Julie Smith of William Buck. The article is intended to be general in nature and should not be relied upon by any person without seeking advice concerning their own circumstances.

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If you own the asset, you pay the tax.


We won’t take control of your finances, we’ll make them easier to understand. William Buck (Qld) GPO Box 563, Brisbane QLD 4001 Telephone:+61 7 3229 5100 Facsimile: +61 7 3221 6027 williambuck.com

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS & ADVISORS


professional services

CHANGES TO THE PRIVACY ACT - ARE YOU PROTECTED? THERE ARE A RAFT OF NEW PRIVACY OBLIGATIONS AND RISKS ABOUT TO LAND ON THE DOORSTEP OF MEDICAL AND HEALTHCARE PRACTITIONERS AND ESTABLISHMENTS. CHRIS MARIANI FROM AMA QUEENSLAND INSURANCE SOLUTIONS EXPLAINS.

Chris Mariani AMA Queensland Insurance Solutions 1300 883 059 chris.mariani@amaqis.com.au Chris Mariani is a medical indemnity specialist at AMA Queensland Insurance Solutions.

DISCLAIMER: AMA Queensland Insurance Solutions is a trading name of KSLR Pty Ltd, a Corporate Authorised Representative of Insurance Advisernet Australia Pty Limited, AFSL 240549. Corporate Authorised Representative No: 366807. The information provided in this article is of a general nature and does not take into account your objectives, financial situation or needs. Please refer to the relevant Product Disclosure Statement before purchasing any insurance product.

WHAT’S CHANGED?

WHERE TO FIND MORE INFORMATION:

Changes to the privacy laws will commence on 12 March 2014, when the Privacy Amendment (Enhancing Privacy Protection) Act 2012 will amend the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth). The changes will likely require you to update your privacy policy and procedures. For example, a patient will need to give their informed consent where you intent to hold their information offshore (eg. cloud computing using an overseas system).

1. We recommend practice owners and managers attend the AMA Queensland Private Practice Series – Privacy, Confidentiality and Electronic Record Management, which are being run in various locations through Queensland mid-Feb to mid-March 2014.

The changes also provide additional powers to the Office of Information Commissioner (OIC) such as to conduct assessments of privacy performance for businesses.

3. Speak with your Medical Defence Organisation. Some are running sessions on this topic.

WHAT ARE THE NEW RISKS?

5. Contact us to discuss how to protect yourself with the right insurances. Q

One of new risks is the OIC’s ability seek a ‘civil penalty’ for serious or repeated offenses of up to $340,000 for individuals and $1.7 million for entities. It’s important to note that ‘civil penalties’ are generally not covered by medical indemnity policies - unless there is specific cover usually referred to as ‘Statutory Fines and Penalties’. This cover is however available outside of medical indemnity policies, so please contact us if you require advice or have any queries. Note: A medical indemnity policy should be designed to cover a patient seeking compensation/damages for a breach of privacy (it is only the ‘civil penalty’ that is a new risk and may not be covered by your medical indemnity). Please review your individual circumstances and policy coverage.

Check the Events Calendar at www.amaq.com. au to find a Privacy, Confidentiality and Electronic Record Management session near you.

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2. There is a wealth of information at Office of the Australian information commissioner website under Privacy Law Reform: www.oaic.gov.au

4. Speak with your IT consultants and have them review and provide advice on how to prevent or minimise the risks of data breaches.

The changes will likely require you to update your privacy policy and procedures..


www.amaqis.com.au

Insurance renewal time getting you down? Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face it insurance is boring. But necessary. We know doctors have a busy schedule, and while it may be easy to renew your insurance each year without proper revision, changes may have occurred for which you may not be fully covered and premiums need competitive comparison. For peace of mind and taking the yawn out of renewal time, contact AMA Queensland Insurance Solutions.

All insurance needs covered for all members through AMA Queensland Insurance Solutions.

AMA Qu eenslan d Insuran ce Solution Your Ins s urance Speciali sts

For more information phone: 1300 883 059


professional services

UNAUTHORISED USE OF THE RED CROSS EMBLEM - A REFRESHER Katharine Philp Partner

THINK TWICE BEFORE YOU USE A CROSS ON YOUR PRACTICE BRANDING – YOU COULD END UP ON THE WRONG SIDE OF THE GENEVA CONVENTIONS. AS THE AUSTRALIAN RED CROSS CELEBRATES ITS CENTENARY IN 2014 TRESSCOX PARTNER KATHARINE PHILP PROVIDES A REFRESHER COURSE ON WHAT’S OKAY AND WHAT MEANS ‘DON’T SHOOT!’

(07) 3004 3536 Katharine_Philp@tresscox.com.au Katharine Philp is a Health Law Partner at TressCox Lawyers and is a member of the Australian Red Cross (Qld) International Humanitarian Law Committee.

Unauthorised misuse of the red cross emblem occurs frequently in the health, medical, pharmaceutical and retail arenas. It appears that the broader community is not aware of the existence of the Commonwealth legislation which protects the use of this emblem – the Geneva Conventions Act 1957 (Cth) (“the Act”). Section 15(1) of the Act provides that it is an offence to use any of the recognised emblems of the Red Cross Movement (the red cross, the red crescent and the red crystal) as well as a white cross on a red background without the permission of the Minister for Defence. An offence against s15(1) is one of strict liability. Therefore, a doctor will be responsible for a breach of s15(1) irrespective of the absence of any fault or intention on his or her part. In Australia the emblem used is the red cross on a white background and unfortunately, many of us incorrectly associate that emblem of the Red Cross with the provision of medical aid and services. However, the red cross is first and foremost an emblem of protection. The protective nature of the red cross emblem is enshrined in the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and three Additional Protocols of 1977 and 2005. Australia is a signatory to the Geneva Conventions and Protocols, and therefore obliged to protect the emblem. The emblems are used in times of armed conflict to say ‘Don’t shoot’. They indicate that people, materials, structures and transport displaying the emblem are not part of the fighting, but are responsible for providing neutral humanitarian assistance.

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The red cross is first and foremost an emblem of protection. Given the significant nature of the symbol of the red cross, its misuse, even in peacetime Australia, dilutes the protective authority of the emblem in armed conflict. It also undermines the authorised use in armed conflict by Red Cross humanitarian workers, Australian Defence Force medical services and religious personnel (the only bodies in Australia authorised to use this emblem). Despite the common misconception that a red cross simply denotes ‘health’ or ‘first-aid’, any advertising, signage or product which uses a red cross on a white background, or any other symbol that closely resembles this emblem, will be in breach of the law, specifically the Act. Consequently, if a doctor wants to avoid breaching this legislation, and to protect the integrity of this internationally recognised emblem, they should not use the emblem of the Red Cross or anything resembling it, nor a white cross on a red background, in any livery, signage, brochures, or advertising material in the absence of appropriate approval. A white cross on a green background is the standard Australian symbol for First Aid. That may be suitable in many cases. Q


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• • • • • • Business structuring and contracts

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lifestyle

Africa

WILD

WITH AMA QUEENSLAND’S ANNUAL CONFERENCE IN CAPE TOWN, IT’S TIME TO CHECK OUT THE SMORGASBOARD OF DELIGHTS THIS CONTINENT HAS TO OFFER. ROS BULAT FROM AMA TRAVEL TELLS US MORE. Most people associate Africa with game viewing and Southern Africa has animals and birds in abundance. South Africa makes it easy to discover the African bush with direct daily flights to the Kruger National park area from either Cape Town or Johannesburg. The Kruger region is approximately two million hectares and the private lodges makes the game viewing experience exciting and up close and personal. The chance to see lions, elephants, leopards, zebras and giraffes only meters away is a memorable one. The trained rangers add a depth of knowledge that make the African bush come alive. The game lodges are an experience in themselves due to their luxurious décor,

design and level of service. Lodges in the Sabi Sands Game Reserve like Savanna, Sabi Sabi and Leopard Hills ensure guests are treated to a host of different experiences such as candle lit dinners under the stars and drinks whilst watching the African sun set.

The falls need to be experienced both from the ground and air to appreciate their magnitude. A guided tour of the falls (on the Zimbabwean side) visits David Livingstone’s statue and walks along the edge of the gorge. Due to the mist created from the falls, be prepared to get wet! From the air visitors can either enjoy a light plane, helicopter or a microlite flight. The view is spectacular and puts the vast landscape into perspective.

VICTORIA FALLS

CHOBE NATIONAL PARK

Victoria Falls, one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, is only a short flight north of Johannesburg. The falls form part of the border between Zimbabwe and Zambia, with the majority of the falls located on the Zimbabwe side.

Chobe National Park is located in neighbouring Botswana, and is an easy day tour from Victoria Falls, however, a two night stay is recommended. Most lodges are situated on the Chobe River and provide game cruises.

The mist created by the thundering falls rises high into the air and from a distance looks like the smoke of a bushfire. This is why the locals call the Falls Mosi-ao-Tunya - “the smoke that thunders”.

The river is teeming with pods of hippos, crocodiles, elephants, antelopes and a vast array of bird life. 4WD game drives are also offered in the national park. For any keen angler, tiger fishing is a must due to their fighting spirit and razor sharp teeth. Q

Photo courtesy

of African Travel

Specialists

For more in AMA Tra formation call o r email R vel Quee os at nsland.

PHONE : 1800 26 2 885 FAX: (0 7) 5556 72 00 EMAIL: travel@ amaq.co m.au WEB: www.am aq.world travel.co m.au

A GROWN UP TREE HOUSE Many of the game lodges offer a special night in an open air treehouse. Set amid the pure and untouched wild, you will be surrounded by African bush and uninhibited wildlife at its best. Check into the ultimate bush bedroom and toast the African sunset. WiFi not included. 60

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Leopard photo courtesy of Richard Ruskin

Photo courtesy of

cialists

African Travel Spe


lifestyle

DURIF:

A WARM CLIMATE WITH LEGS WANT TO TRY A WINE WITH AN INKY CORE OF BRIGHT FRUITS AND A STRONG SPINE OF ACIDITY? PHIL MANSER FROM WINE DIRECT INTRODUCES US TO THE HIGH-ALCOHOL, GENEROUS TASTING DURIF.

Andrew Seppelt from Murray Street likens it to Shiraz on steroids and says it is… ‘akin to eating fountain pen ink.’ Troy Kalleske, winemaker, had firsthand experience of Durif from a hot climate. Doing vintage at Miranda’s Barossa facilities in 2003 he handled a parcel from the Riverland which he felt was amongst the best fruit of the vintage. He says ‘If Riverland fruit can produce such stunning wine from the variety – then I thought, “what can we do with it in the Barossa?” Kalleske have already released their first Durif, called Buckboard. It’s a little less brooding than a Rutherglen edition, awash with masses of bright, cuddly fruits. It’s big and ripe, yet balanced and delicious. It’s hard to imagine a more charismatic and enjoyable red wine. Kalleske trialled a number of alternative varieties so as to offer something apart from the Barossan

Phil Manser Wine Direct 1800 649 463 phil.manser@winedirect.com.au

mainstays of Shiraz and Grenache. They chose Durif, Tempranillo, Petit Verdot and Zinfandel. Tony Kalleske says “Durif was our first alternative variety to market and has been one of our most successful wines overall”.

It’s Shiraz plus in terms of what the wine has to offer - more oomph, flavour and tannin… a very good mouthful of wine. He has been amazed by the feedback from mailing list customers with many placing standing orders. Only small quantities of their alternatives have been planted but it looks like Durif is the most likely to be planted again. Troy believes “Durif really needs to be 1516 per cent alcohol to work as a table wine. Lower than that and the tannins aren’t ripe and the fruit flavours just aren’t there. Also it’s not too big a stretch for lovers of big Shiraz to jump on board. It’s Shiraz plus in terms of what the wine has to offer - more oomph, flavour and tannin… a very good mouthful of wine. Shiraz at 15 per cent plus is often too jammy with dead fruit and alcohol that shows hot. Durif in the Barossa seems to have boofy, generous fruit on the mid pallet, which along with ripe tannins and good natural acidity helps with balance and avoids showing hot or alcoholic”. Just as well, given that this bad boy hits the showers at a temperance union drowning 16 per cent alcohol.

In the Riverland, 919 wines are also bottling Durif. The current edition, from 2009 is magnificent. Satsuma plum, morello cherries and dark chocolate wrapped up in an abundance of gloriously soft, fine tannins. Like most Durif wines, it is massive, so let it breathe or pair it with a nice woolly mammoth steak. Here’s hoping Durif gets even more of a leg up and is joined by yet more cross-country cohorts. Q

Treat yourself to durif at special member prices at winedirect.com.au

Durif is particularly well suited to warm climates as it is drought tolerant and seems to avoid shrivel, even in extreme conditions. It retains acidity and bright fruit even when very ripe, minimising the chance of dead or indistinct fruit finding its way into the glass. Handled well it makes massive, tannic wines with an inky core of bright fruits and a strong spine of acidity. Fruit tends to plum and blackberries. You might also find liquorice, blood plum, cinnamon and cloves.

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all about you APP SNAP Find My Car Parked in some labyrinth car parks in your time? Come out from work or shopping and not quite sure where you parked that pesky transportation? Jump onto the Find My Car app when you park it and you’ll never wander car parks listlessly ever again. Using a simple navigation to walk you to your car, you’ll just need to remember your keys now! Q Geek meditation session.

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Entries close 31 March

Tallulah is bewitched: by Annabelle, by her family, and their sprawling, crumbling house tumbling down to the river. Their unlikely friendship intensifies through a secret language where they share confidences about their unusual mothers, first loves, and growing up in the small coastal town of Juniper Bay. But the euphoria of youth rarely lasts, and the implosion that destroys their friendship leaves lasting scars.

AUSTRALIAN WAR DIARIES OF A JAPANESE POW FRED LASSLETT Fred Lasslett went down with the HMAS Perth off Indonesia, and was captured by the Japanese. He spent the remainder of the wzar in POW camps in Indonesia and Japan, but through it all maintained a diary in the form of letters home to his “elusive girl”, written on cigarette paper and preserved to this day.

Name: Postal address: Phone: Member no:

COUSCOUS TABBOULEH SALAD INGREDIENTS 1 cup whole wheat couscous 1 cup vegetable stock 1 large cucumber, peeled and small diced 2 green onions, thinly sliced 1 large bunch italian parsley 1 handful fresh mint Serve 2 tbsp olive oil alongsid chicken e juice of 1 large lemon or fish! sea salt to taste ½ cup crumbled feta cheese

METHOD 1. Bring the stock to boil and once boiling, add the dry couscous and ¼ teaspoon sea salt. Stir, then immediately turn off the heat and cover the pot. Let sit for 12 minutes covered like this then fluff with a fork. 2. Meanwhile, place the minced parsley, minced mint, diced cucumber and thinly sliced green onions in a large mixing bowl. Add cooked couscous to the bowl, followed by the lemon juice, olive oil, feta cheese and additional sea salt to taste. Toss well and serve. Q © Recipe and image kindly provided by Jenna Weber at www.eatliverun.com


r


lifestyle

PRINCE IGOR Met Opera

23 March 1pm, 27 March 10am Borodin’s defining Russian epic, famous for its Polovtsian Dances, comes to the Met for the first time in nearly 100 years. Dmitri Tcherniakov’s new production is a brilliant psychological journey through the mind of its conflicted hero, with the founding of the Russian nation as the backdrop.

RUSALKA

ORE FOR M ISIT INFO VOM.AU

Met Opera

2 March 1pm, 6 March 10am

.C DENDY

The great Renée Fleming returns to one of her signature roles, singing the enchanting “Song to the Moon” in Dvorák’s soulful fairy-tale opera. Tenor Piotr Beczala co-stars as the Prince, Dolora Zajick is Ježibaba, and dynamic young maestro Yannick Nézet-Séguin is on the podium.

WAR HORSE

National Theatre Live 8 - 9 March 1pm, 12 March 6pm, 13 March 10am Based on Michael Morpurgo’s novel and adapted for the stage by Nick Stafford, War Horse takes audiences on an extraordinary journey from the fields of rural Devon to the trenches of First World War France.

LOST ILLUSIONS Bolshoi Ballet

30 March at 1pm, 3 April at 10am

Filled with stirring music and songs, this powerfully moving and imaginative drama is a show of phenomenal inventiveness. At its heart are astonishing life-size puppets by South Africa’s Handspring Puppet Company, who bring breathing, galloping, charging horses to thrilling life on stage.

Lucien, a young provincial composer, sets to conquer the Parisian scene in search of glory. Quickly, his success blinds him and he betrays his friends and his love. This stylised adaptation of the novel (Lost Illusions) for the stage, blends thwarted love, ambition and disillusionment with 19th century Paris as a backdrop.

HOLD YOUR FUNCTION OR BIRTHDAY PARTY AT DENDY!

COMING FILMS 6 March Mr Morgan’s Last Love Tracks

We love hosting corporate film nights and group bookings at Dendy. It is a great way to thank clients or staff – or perhaps you have a favourite charity that you would like to raise some money for? We have a functions pack and cinema package to suit all requirements – plus a specially tailored functions menu. Please contact Events & Publicity Manager Jenny Sonter on jennys@dendy.com.au for a free quote.

13 March

Monuments of Men Vampire Academy

20 March I, Frankenstein Cuban Fury Pompeii 27 March

Noah

WIN MOVIE TICKETS FOR TWO Name:

Member No:

Postal address: Portside Wharf, Remora Road, Hamilton Ph: (07) 3137 6000 www.dendy.com.au 64

MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

Phone:

FAX BACK TO (07) 3856 4727 or email amaq@amaq.com.au by 31 March


lifestyle

E MOR FOR ATION RM INFO COM.AU . QPAC 36 246 OR 1

QUEENSLAND THEATRE COMPANY PRESENTS

MACBETH

22 March - 13 April William Shakespeare’s Macbeth is the original game of thrones a dark epic of ambition, betrayal and murder set in the wilds of the Scottish highlands. Wending his way back from war, famed General Macbeth is seduced by three witches who prophesy he will be king. Spurred on by his adoring and ambitious wife, he schemes and sets about the massive sin of regicide - the violent murder of a king - leaving the blood stained couple to wrestle with its monumental consequences.

SOUTHERN CROSS SOLOISTS’

KISS ME, KATHARINA

ADMISSION: ONE SHILLING

30 March

9-10 May

Southern Cross Soloists entice you to Kiss Me, Katharina with works influenced by William Shakespeare’s comedies that explore the art of seduction. An alluring program, this concert references the famously witty love-hate relationship between the sharp tongued and quick tempered Katharina and the boisterous scoundrel Petruchio from The Taming of the Shrew. Enjoy the sublime voice of Australian tenor Alexander Lewis as he joins the Soloists alongside actors from the Queensland Shakespeare Ensemble.

Olivier and Tony Award winning actress Patricia Routledge - best known as Hyacinth in Keeping up Appearances - stars alongside renowned classical pianist Piers Lane to tell the inspiring story of one of Britain’s best loved pianists Dame Myra Hess. This humorous, passionate and highly entertaining account of one the most remarkable musical achievements of the 20th century will transport audiences back to the morale-boosting recitals at London’s National Gallery which Dame Myra produced during World War II.

Name:

WIN DOUBLE PASSES TO KISS ME KATHARINA

Member No:

Postal address:

Phone:

FAX BACK TO (07) 3856 4727 or email amaq@amaq.com.au by 31 March DoctorQ MARCH 2014

65


IN lifestyle PRINT

A MEDICAL CENTRE ON THE MOON

THE STORY OF THE FIRST TEN YEARS OF THE OCHRE HEALTH GROUP This is the story of how Hamish and Ross, two somewhat eccentric young doctors brought energy and enthusiasm into the area of rural medicine and almost by accident created what was to become an astonishing business. Breaking every rule in the textbook of business development, they showed a surprising disregard for the bottom line and instead delivered quality medical outcomes for their patients and unrivalled conditions for their staff.

Doctor Q has a copy of A Medical Centre on the Moon to give away. Simply fill out your details in block letters on the form and fax it to (07) 3856 4727 or email amaq@amaq.com.au.

CHECK FOR YOUR NAME!

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MARCH 2014 DoctorQ

COMPETITION WINNERS

Entries close 31 March

It’s all here - the big things that no one will ever forget and the little things that everyone prayed would never be mentioned again - the mad walk to Hungerford - the Tasmanian who kick-started medical recruitment in her garage - the ‘to infinity

and beyond’ bus - the bush poet - the lifethreatening emergencies - and the team of dedicated professionals who made it happen - those who nudged this enterprise into being - and those who pushed it down the road to the big smoke. If you ever want to know how to create a successful medical services company from nothing, this is where you start. If you ever felt unappreciated by your patients, or want to do things differently, this is where you start. And if you are part of Ochre, this will remind you what has happened in the first ten years of this incredible journey. A Medical Centre on the Moon is published by AKA Publishing and retails for $24.95. Q

WIN THIS BOOK! Name: Postal Address: Telephone: Member No:

DENDY WINNERS

QPAC WINNERS

BOOK WINNER

DOUBLE PASS WINNERS

Dr Anne Kynaston won a family pass to Chitty Chitty Bang Bang in December.

Dr Jan Hanson won a copy of An Introduction to Community and Primary Health Care

1. Dr Cecilie Lander 2. Dr Su Mien Yeoh 3. Dr Seedat 4. Dr Anne Kynaston 5. Dr Tim Briggs 6. Dr Ken Bowes 7. Dr Janice Marshall 8. Dr Marjorie Busby 9. Dr Nigel Dore 10. Dr Photene Weber


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• Leading Skin Cancer Clinic in Canberra • $200,000 (part-time) to $400,000 (full-time) • Part of new, fully accredited private hospital facility

• Not a bulk-billing practice • Surgical upskilling provided • Complete administration support

GP REQUIRED FOR SKIN CANCER UNIT 360UV Skin Cancer Clinic is looking for a dedicated general practicioner qualified, or willing to undertake further training, in skin cancer diagnostics and treatment.

The successful applicant will work with Dr Taylor & the CEO to oversee the unit & coordinate a professional team to ensure best practices are maintained and developed.

For more information call Cheryl Taylor (02) 6282 1177

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Unique services for adolescents to adults in a premier facility. St Vincent’s Private Hospital Brisbane specialises in pain management (adolescents & adults), neurosciences, rehabilitation, general medicine, palliative and geriatric care. Our new purpose-built pain management centre includes a dedicated operating theatre where complex pain management procedures take place using the latest technologies. Compassion

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FIRST FLOOR OFFICE – P.A. CENTRAL – FOR LEASE • Attractive incentives on offer • Major carpark adjoining • Opposite Centro Buranda and the PA Hospital with direct overpass access • 125 to 200m2 available • Adjoining Southern X Radiology

• Ideal for medical suites and other related services • Disabled access and amenities

CONTACT: George Koukides: 0412 872 786

Unique Medical Rooms “On the Terrace” in Brisbane CBD are now available LOCATION: 79 Wickham Terrace, Brisbane QLD 4000

PLEASE CONTACT:

AVAILABILITY: A range of Heritage Rooms in various combinations are available to suit the needs of a modern medical practice. Varying in size and up to two or three rooms that adjoin if you require.

BRISBANE CLINIC

WEBSITE: www.brisbaneclinic.com.au/rooms-for-lease

E: administrator@brisbaneclinic.com.au

Leanne Winter P: (07) 3270 4551 or 0402 822 924

DoctorQ MARCH 2014

67


We’ll give credit where credit’s due We recognise your true worth

Traditional banks look at numbers alone – they’ll only lend you money if you can prove that you don’t need it. At Investec, we know better – your professional qualifications are considered when granting credit. Investec is a leading Australian specialist bank offering a full range of financial services to the medical sector. Our team understands both your industry and the property market inside out, so we can lend you up to 100% of the purchase price of your home, with no Lenders Mortgage Insurance. We offer competitive fixed and variable interest rate options, plus you can save with our offset accounts for specific home loan products… We know you deserve it.

Experience our unconventional approach to banking, call your local finance specialist on 07 3018 8100 or visit investec.com.au

Specialist Banking Equipment and fit-out finance | Goodwill funding | Credit cards | Home loans | Commercial and property finance | Car finance | SMSF lending and deposits | Transactional banking and overdrafts | Savings and deposits | Foreign exchange Investec Bank (Australia) Limited ABN 55 071 292 594, AFSL and, Australian Credit Licence 234975 (Investec Bank). All finance is subject to our credit assessment criteria. Terms and conditions, fees and charges may apply. We reserve the right to cease offering these products at any time without notice.

Dr Q March 2014  

The March 2014 edition of AMA Queensland's flagship publication.

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