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ISSUE

(DPS) CALVIN KLEIN 1

Home

NO.

12


THE JELLYFISH BLOOM 1 MARCH – 1 APRIL Did you know a group of jellyfish is called a bloom? And did you know Canberra Centre has created jellyfish sculptures that flash when they sense human interaction? See them up close in centre.

FIND OUT MORE AT CANBERRACENTRE.COM.AU


Tell us you spotted this in HerCanberra and we will sweeten your staycation with a bottle of local red wine and an antipasto platter!* Book your homestay direct with us on 02 6295 6925 or stay@easthotel.com.au *Valid for Autumn bookings in March, April & May 2018


ISSUE

NO.

12

–– EVERY I S S U E

02 04 06

Editor's Letter Contributors

C ontents

HC Online

CITY

08 14 59 91 109

Save The Date The Hot List Home Away From Home Still Calling Canberra Home The Changing Face of Canberra

PEOPLE

18 71

Corner Of The World Chefs At Home

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

10 12 12

Movies Books Netflix: Global Window

LIFE

51 Storage 101 64 Home And Hope 150 Sweet Dreams FOOD

98

Apple Of My Eye

STYLE

36 125 155

Homeward Bound The Test Of Time Hygge Home

T R AV E L

119

Wherever I Lay My Hat

ACTIVE

145

––

Home Sweat Home


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

We have loved exploring the idea of home— from peeking inside the private spaces of some of Canberra’s most fascinating people to the raw and honest journey of a young mum fighting to keep her child. There’s cosy autumn fashion, recipes and tips to make your home a haven, covetable mini breaks and so much more. It’s the perfect publication to curl up on the couch with.

E D I TO R ' S LETTER

We say it every time we go to print, but this issue really is our favourite yet. When we decided on ‘Home’ as our theme, our Production Manager Belinda Neame and Associate Editor Emma Macdonald nearly had to be hosed down. Let’s just say we could have easily produced a 300-page edition.

I can’t sign off without acknowledging the tremendous talent of two members of the HerCanberra family—Belinda and her photographer husband Tim Bean, whose images adorn many of the following pages. Together, these two are a creative powerhouse and have poured their hearts and soul into this issue. Turn the page and step inside our world.

Amanda Whitley Magazine Editor-in-chief HerCanberra Founder + Director

TEAM HC

Emma Macdonald Associate Editor

Belinda Neame Production Manager

Beatrice Smith Online Editor

W E ' D L OV E TO H E A R YO U R T H O U G H T S Please drop us a line at hello@hercanberra.com.au with your feedback. @HERCANBERRA HERCANBERR A .COM. AU

Katie Radojkovic Graphic Designer

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Ashleigh Went ACTIVE Editor


BOUTIQUE SPACIOUS APARTMENTS DESIGNER INCLUSIONS FROM $469K AND EXCHANGE ON $1000 NOW SELLING // LONSDALE STREET BRADDON

TO REGISTER YOUR INTEREST GO TO BRANX.COM.AU OR CALL NIK BULUM ON 0407 283 218


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M agazine cont ributors

WORDS Emma Macdonald Belinda Neame Laura Peppas Beatrice Smith Ashleigh Went Amanda Whitley Rebecca Worth GRAPHIC DESIGN Katie Radojkovic

AMANDA THORSON

H AY L E Y O ’ N E I L L

Amanda photographs people. She's not fancy. She like simple things, spending time with her family, small living, striped t shirts, and brown leather shoes.

Hayley O’Neill is a Sydney-based fashion stylist (but a Canberra girl at heart). She has worked alongside the likes of Alex Perry, Samantha Harris and Margaret Zhang.

PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT Belinda Neame PHOTOGR APHY Tim Bean Lauren Campbell Amanda Thorson HAIR Sarah Wright, Saloon MAKEUP Sarah Wright, Saloon STYLING

TIM BEAN

L AUREN CAMPBELL

A fire fighter by day (and night), Tim also loves being behind the lens to capture all things food, people and places. You can often find Tim drinking coffee at his local or capturing a time lapse on Anzac Parade!

Lauren Campbell is a Canberrabased Wedding, Portrait and Fashion Photographer, approaching all three with unflappable flair. She loves nature, animals, filter coffee and skiing. In the Winter months, Lauren spends as much time as she can in the Snowy Mountains to combine as many of her loves as she can!

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Belinda Neame Hayley O'Neill MODELS Sarah Kennewell Calum Stenning PRINTING CanPrint Communications


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HC ONLINE Visit hercanberra.com.au for your daily dose of all things Canberra.

@christopherpaultoth

@fabsoc_anua

@letsgomum

@liveinliving

@pollencafe

@poultrystories

@rainbownourishments

@theplannerwit_

@thesnowflakepinup

#HERCANBERRA FOR THE CHANCE TO SEE YOUR IMAGES IN PRINT

C onnect @HERCANBERRA #HERCANBERRA

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–– STYLE FOOD & DRINK CITY BUSINESS EVENTS AND MORE ––


Ten days of glorious music with performers from Australia and around the globe 27 APRIL – 6 MAY 2018 Book online at cimf.org.au

Supported by


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S A V

E

D A T

E

t he

M A R C H

A P R I L

M A Y

ENLIGHTEN

NATIONAL FOLK FESTIVAL

2–18 MARCH Locations across Canberra enlightencanberra.com.au

29 MARCH–2 APRIL Exhibition Park in Canberra

2018 CANBERRA INTERNATIONAL MUSIC FESTIVAL

CANBERRA COMEDY FESTIVAL

THE FORAGE

19–25 MARCH Canberra Theatre Centre canberracomedyfestival.com.au

7 APRIL Little National Hotel Carpark theforage.com.au

ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL

CANBERRA DISTRICT WINE WEEK

1–29 MARCH Palace Electric Cinema affrenchfilmfestival.org

ART NOT APART 17 MARCH New Acton Precinct artnotapart.com

folkfestival.org.au

5–6 MAY Exhibition Park in Canberra handmadecanberra.com.au

OLD BUS DEPOT MARKETS A CELEBRATION OF WOOL

AUSTRALIAN RUNNING FESTIVAL

19–20 MAY Kingston Former Transport Depot obdm.com.au

14–15 APRIL West Lawns (Parkes Place West) runningfestival.com.au

SPIEGELTENT: BLANC DE BLANC

25 APRIL Australian War Memorial awm.gov.au

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HANDMADE CANBERRA – MOTHER’S DAY

7–15 APRIL Locations across Canberra canberrawines.com.au

ANZAC DAY AT THE AUSTRALIAN WAR MEMORIAL

M O R E E V E N T S AT HERCA ANBERR A .COM. AU/EVENT S

26 APRIL–6 MAY Locations across Canberra cimf.org.au

26 APRIL–20 MAY Civic Square canberratheatrecentre.com.au


LOOKING TO MAKE YOUR PUBLIC EVENT MORE SUSTAINABLE? WE’LL SHOW YOU HOW. Events that participate in this program have access to free equipment, including delivery, and support to: • reduce energy and water usage • reduce waste and increase recycling • reduce greenhouse gas emissions • educate and raise awareness of sustainability issues to event patrons Events can range from small to large, such as school fetes, festivals, shows or sporting events. Contact Actsmart today to find out how we can help your public event.

13 22 81 (Access Canberra) actsmartbusiness@act.gov.au actsmart.act.gov.au


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

MOVIES

There's no place like home W O R D S

B E AT R I C E S M I T H

Whether it’s the slick executive returning to their small hometown, two people struggling to create a home or the sudden loss of everything that makes you feel safe, the film industry is intrigued with what home really means.

MAD MAX FURY ROAD

THE GREAT GATSBY

In a post-apocalyptic wasteland where the only liveable areas are ruled by merciless warlords, everyone is searching for a better home. Except for Max. He doesn’t care for the world, or the search for something better. Or does he?

Jay Gatsby’s palatial mansion is known for its wild parties attended by the who’s who of jazz-era New York City. But why did the mysterious host buy the house in the first place? And who lives across the harbour?

One of the coolest, most brutal films to come out of Australia, send the kids to bed before you pop this one on.

As visually stunning as it is heart-wrenching, Australian director Baz Luhrmann perfectly captures the roaring ‘20s in this epic adaptation.

MOANA

When reluctant Chief-to-be Moana’s island is threatened she must venture across the waves to seek demigod Maui’s help. Moana has always wanted to see what’s beyond her home’s familiar shores, but will this be the adventure she’s always dreamed of? With a strong female lead and some of the best music from a Disney film, handsdown, Moana will have your household singing along (if it hasn’t already).

THE WIZARD OF OZ

MIDNIGHT IN PARIS

Twisters, yellow brick roads and new friends, oh my! The ultimate story of the search for home, The Wizard of Oz tells us that we don’t have to go further than our back door to find adventure, love and family.

Film writer Gil has never felt at home in the present day. But when he stumbles into the past (1930s Paris, to be exact) he begins to question whether he should just disappear into time. But should he be seeking a life in the past? Or questioning his present instead?

With gorgeously remastered technicolour sets and wonderful musical numbers, this film never goes out of style.

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With set design to die for, this modern classic is a (moveable) feast for the eyes.


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Fiction

Interior Design

THE TOYMAKERS

REMODALISTA: THE ORGANISED HOME

Robert Dinsdale

Books REBECCA WORTH, PAPERCHAIN BOOKSTORE

All titles available for purchase instore, paperchainbookstore.com.au

Julie Carlson and Margot Guralnick

Entering the welcoming wings of a magical toy emporium in central London, a pregnant teenage runaway with no plans for the future finds a place of shelter among the aisles of enchanted Christmas toys. The creation of an enigmatic Prussian Toymaker, the emporium is a mysterious world that opens on the first midnight frost and closes when the first snowdrop flower blooms. It is here, in the enchanted building, that Cathy tries to hide her pregnancy and inadvertently catches the eye of the two Toymaker’s sons, the charismatic Kaspar and the reserved Emil. After her first winter in the Emporium Cathy begins to feel a sense of belonging; however, in the face of the store’s impending closure, she hides away in the depths of the building to give birth to her child and begins to create a new home.

NETFLIX: GLOBAL WINDOW BY ASHLEIGH WENT

Explore some of the world’s most culturally and geographically isolated communities without leaving the lounge. These documentaries each expose different corners of the world that are otherwise inaccessible, showing what ‘home’ looks like for different people around the globe.

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The word ‘home’ conjures up a variety of contradictory ideas: cosy, cluttered, open and light, minimal and restful. All of them resonate differently in each of us, however, they all involve a sense of belonging, safety and rest.

Remodalista is an inspiration guide that taps into the recent decluttering and downsizing trend which seeks to promote simpler living spaces. It encourages readers to take part in an ecofriendly approach to decluttering by engaging in a ‘Sharing Economy’ by borrowing items they would rarely use. Although Remodalista is based around changing the physical space in your home, at the core it is a means to improving one’s mental health by creating solutions for the inevitable cluttering that begins even as you unpack boxes in a new home. Not only does it inspire you to reduce your clutter, it is also darn pretty to flick through.

HUMAN PLANET This BBC documentary series examines the lives of communities around the globe, through the lens of their relationship with the environment. From fishing for sharks off the coast of Papua New Guinea, to racing against elephants in the search for water in the arid Sahara Desert, to embarking on expeditions across thousands of kilometres of sea ice in the arctic. Human Planet is worth watching not only for its insights into the lives of people across the world, but also for the incredible landscapes and wildlife.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

Fiction

Non-fiction

Classic

THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU

SAGALAND

THE ODYSSEY

Richard Fidler and Kari Gislason

Homer

Jonathan Tropper

After the death of their father, the four adult Foxman children make their way back home to sit ‘Shiva’, the Jewish period of mourning with their mother. Begrudgingly coming together for first time in many years, they must spend seven days together under the same roof in order to fulfil their father’s dying wish. Bringing with them their various marital debacles and old sibling feuds, painful wounds are reopened as people from their past re-emerge and the riotous family dynamic from their childhood returns. Though the roots of this story are steeped in the misfortunes of life, the failures of relationships and sobering nature of death, there is a likeability and humour in the flaws of each character as they search their own lives for meaning and ponder their regrets.

Iceland is a place of meadows and mountains, a vast windswept interior and plunging waterfalls. A place where Viking feuds played out, and whose true stories have been passed down through the years from generation to generation. Part biography, part travel-writing, this collaboration between Fidler and Gislason is an exploration of the landscape of epic folklore, but for Kari it is also a search for home in the land of his father. The son of an Australian woman and an Icelandic father, Kari’s early life was spent in Iceland before his mother returned to Australia leaving behind the first home he’d ever known. The book finds its rhythm through alternating chapters from each author: in Richard’s there is a playfulness to the phrasing and humorous observations, and in Kari’s there is a poetry of longing as he seeks to uncover his father’s family history and find his own place amongst the Sagas of Iceland.

Odysseus, King of Ithaca, remains missing, 20 years after sacking the City of Troy. In his efforts to return he finds himself driven to the ends of the earth, facing temptations and trials from foes, both foul and fair, in a bid to return home to his family. Back home his household is in disarray; his wife Penelope fights against the rising number of suitors that are seeking to marry her, while his son Telemachus tries in vain to stand up to them. In Odysseus’ quest to return home Homer explores the themes of wandering, temptations and homecoming—the absence of home, the fight to return to what is loved and the embrace of the familiar. Though it has stories of war and isolation, these narrative elements distil the essence of ‘home’—the place that you call your own, and in an emotional sense, the ones who you love.

CITY 40

UNDER THE SUN

PYGMIES: CHILDREN OF THE JUNGLE

One of Russia’s closed cities, Ozersk is home to the Mayak nuclear facility and one of the most contaminated places in the world. Historically, residents were given the very best of food, education and healthcare in return for their secrecy. Generations later, its residents face human rights violations and serious repercussions of long-term radiation exposure.

Told through the eyes of Zin-Mi, a young girl joining the Children’s Union, this documentary peels back the curtain of propaganda to expose the reality of life in North Korea. Producers deliberately deceived the Korean government’s attempt to control the film, leaving cameras rolling to expose the artificial way North Korea’s residents and their lives are portrayed to the rest of the world.

Deep in the Central African Republic lives a tribe of Pygmies. Ivan Bulik makes the dangerous journey through Africa to find the tribe and discover their way of living. Learn the fascinating customs of the tribe, as well as the ever-growing threats to their existence—from the logging industry to militia from the neighbouring Republic of Congo. PAGE 13


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T H E

W O R D S

Hot

A M A N DA W H I T L E Y + B E AT R I C E S M I T H

Inspo for your autumn.

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L I S T


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

Drink THE HOWLING MOON

The Rex Hotel is a Canberra institution. Built in 1959 as “the Luxury Hotel”, the Rex was looking a little tired for a few years, but a recent makeover has seen it restored to its former glory—and then some.

Eat

The icing on the cake, so to speak? The hotel’s new rooftop bar, The Howling Moon. If you like 180-degree panoramic views of Canberra with your chardonnay and cheese board, this is the place to be.

BRICK & BASIL

Level 6, 150 Northbourne Avenue, Braddon

Pizza topped with spicy salami and oozing mozzarella, a bountiful antipasto board with creamy cheeses and pickled artichoke, luscious nests of pasta covered with slow-cooked ragu and rich carbonara. Hungry yet?

canberrarexhotel.com.au

This new addition to Erindale Vikings is raising the bar for club dining. A stunning fitout channels the vibe of an authentic Italian trattoria, while the food could be straight from Nonna’s kitchen. Mangia! Mangia!

Erindale Vikings, 6 Ricardo Street, Wanniassa vikings.com.au

Make KIN GALLERY JEWELLERY WORKSHOPS

There’s something special about crafting something by hand, and even better when you can wear the fruits of your labour. From beginners to those keen to refine their skills, Kin Gallery’s jewellery-making workshops offer intimate tutorials that teach participants basic fabrication methods including saw piercing, soldering, riveting and finishing techniques. The best part? You’ll leave with a unique piece of jewellery that you crafted yourself!

G06 - 27 Lonsdale Street Braddon kingallery.bigcartel.com PAGE 15


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Watch THE SPIEGELTENT CANBERRA

A full program of world-class music, comedy and cabaret will hit the stage of The Spiegeltent Canberra during April and May— we’re talking Dan Sultan, Sam Simmons, The Black Sorrows, Rove McManus, Trevor Ashley, Gretel Killeen and more. These artists will join the adultsonly headline act Blanc de Blanc—a blend of vintage glamour, high-end spectacle and titillating acts which will bring the finest cabaret and acrobatic talent from around the world into a wild, shimmering night.

26 April to 20 May 2018 Canberra Theatre Centre Forecourt, Civic Square, Canberra City canberratheatrecentre.com.au

" Pop out to the orchard to discover when your favourites are ripe and ready for picking.

"

Harvest PICK YOUR OWN PRODUCE

It’s a sad fact of life that the apples and stonefruit that languish in the supermarkets are a pale imitation of the fruit picked fresh from the tree. So why not do exactly that? Tanbella Orchard in Pialligo is Canberra's only self-pick orchard, boasting more than 52 varieties of apples, nashis, pears and peaches (not to mention fresh apple juice). Pop out to the orchard to discover when your favourites are ripe and ready for picking, and experience the taste of a changing range of fruit each week.

Open 11am to 4pm until May. 20A Beltana Road, Pialligo tanbellaorchard.com

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Party HOT DUB WINE MACHINE

DJ extraordinaire Hot Dub Time Machine‘s touring music event Wine Machine is coming to Pialligo Estate on 31 March, and it's going to be big. Hosted by Triple J’s Tom Tilley, Wine Machine will boast sets from the likes of Sneaky Sound System, The Kite String Tangle, Touch Sensitive, Luke Million and Hot Dub Time Machine himself. There’ll also be gourmet food, wine, craft beer, dancing and apparently the “Best. Chardy. Ever.” Enough said.

31 March 2018 Pialligo Estate, 18 Kallaroo Road, Pialligo thepialligoestate.com.au/whats-on

the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

Cartier London Halo tiara 1934 on display at

MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

See " Cartier: The Exhibition showcases more than 300 spectacular items.

"

CARTIER: THE EXHIBITION

Never before have so many incredible diamonds, emeralds and other precious stones been seen in Australia. Cartier: The Exhibition showcases more than 300 spectacular items, with loans from royal families, celebrities and the astonishing Cartier Collection itself, in exquisite settings such as royal tiaras, necklaces, brooches and earrings. Highlights include: Dame Nellie Melba’s diamond stomacher brooch; the Queen’s “Halo” tiara, worn by Kate Middleton at her wedding to Prince William; Princess Grace of Monaco’s 10.48-carat diamond engagement ring; and Dame Elizabeth Taylor’s diamond and ruby necklace.

30 March to 22 July National Gallery of Australia, Parkes Place, Parkes nga.gov.au/cartier

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

C O R N E R O F

T H E

World W O R D S

E M M A M AC D O N A L D

P H O T O G R A P H Y

A M A N DA T H O R S O N

There is a voyeur in all of us. Come inside the private spaces and places of some of Canberra’s most interesting people.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Daryl Karp D IR E C TO R O F T HE M US EUM O F AUST R A LI A N DEMO CR AC Y, M ED I A A N D C ULT UR A L IN D UST RY V ET ER A N. SY D N EYS IDER L I V ING A N D WO R K I NG I N C A NBER R A F O R T HE PA ST F I V E Y E A R S .

SINCE HER APPOINTMENT to heading the museum, Daryl Karp has taken up residence in a quiet corner of Turner in an apartment that also allows her access to a shady garden and a favourite tree, under which she assumes the thinking position with the dog at her feet.

takes pride of place, along with a handcrafted glass vase and a buffalo horn Indigenous sculpture (farewell gifts from staff) that travel with her. Special works of art hang in the living space, including John Olsen’s “Sticking Your Neck Out” and pieces from her artist friends and family.

“I say I live in Canberra but my husband (executive coach Brendan Higgins) says he lives in Sydney. It is quite clear we view our circumstances very differently as we live together here in Canberra but travel to Sydney frequently.”

“I will admit I miss the beach, which is perhaps the greatest stress reliever of all when you stand at the edge of the water and sink your toes into the sand.”

Daryl feels very much at home in Canberra thanks to some important curated possessions she has relocated from Sydney. An old dresser from her grandfather

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But she has become a staunch convert to Canberra, loving its intellectual citizens, cosmopolitan pursuits, and abundance of galleries and national institutions. “Canberra, you know, it just gets to you.”


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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Anne Masters C ER A M IC IST A N D M A K ER OF A M P M CER A MI C S , GA L L ERY O F S M A LL T H I NG S OPER ATOR .

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" Anne never tires of walking through her French doors to the studio "

ANNE MASTERS thinks about ceramics all day and all night—hence the name of her practice, AM PM Ceramics. It's also her potters mark (Anne Masters Potters Mark) which goes onto every piece she designs and makes from her studio in Watson. For Anne, running her own gallery is about “community, access and connecting my neighbours (whether they are in my street or in the next suburb) with each other. I also wanted visitors to experience art in a comfortable environment so that they can build their confidence to buy affordable art.” Anne never tires of walking through her French doors to the studio to see the artwork living there. The public reaction to the space is similarly pleasing. Gallery of small things operates Thursday to Sunday 11am to 4pm. For 10 months of the year it showcases a stable of artists from the visual arts: ceramics, glass, jewellery, textiles, objects, painting, photography, and printmedia before an annual group show in September. “Then for one month over Christmas to the end of January I close the doors to have a lie-down. Don’t we all!”

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

Teresa Zarlenga CO U T UR IER , GAR DENER , CH A R I T Y S UPP O RT ER , OPER A BU F F.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

" When I am in my garden time seems to disappear. "

WHEN TERESA ZARLENGA bought her home in Red Hill in 1995, it was a small and rather uninspiring ex-govvie. She set about orchestrating a massive renovation— tripling its size, setting aside room for a home studio where she makes bespoke clothing for clients, and even including an “Opera Wing”. By this, Teresa means a 7.5 metre by 7.5 metre room in which she brings together notable singers with appreciative audiences. The room has superior acoustics and a large bank of windows overlooking the back garden, which is an equal passion. Teresa’s Italian heritage comes to the fore in the layout of the garden with its 27 fruit trees, sturdy grape vine which this year produced 200 kilos of grapes, vegetable garden, rose garden, water feature and six happy chooks. “When I am in my garden time seems to disappear, I never feel tired going from one job to another. Gardening also gives me an opportunity to share produce and plants. During a very difficult time in my life I think my garden saved me. I am so proud of what I have created on my own,” she said. Teresa’s obsession for opera has seen her host 17 musical events in her home. “I love opera and my dream has always been to encourage people who had not had the opportunity to experience opera to actually try it. I can be very persuasive!”

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Phillip A.Jones M A RT IN I W H IS PER ER , S P IR I T CO N S ULTA N T, NAT IO NA L TO UR IS M JUD GE .

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

PHILLIP KICKED OFF his career as the official “martini whisperer” one night with a tipsy tweet. He responded to a call from the ACT Government in the lead up to Canberra’s Centenary celebrations in 2013 to create an official martini to celebrate. The debonair business consultant suggested a Centini (providing recipes for both a north and south-side version) and began sharing his superior spirit knowledge with a fascinated crowd. His ongoing experiments in cocktail alchemy take place each afternoon when his ritual evening cocktail preparations begin. “I keep the key ingredients and equipment in the fridge (it’s very reassuring at 3pm to know they’re there waiting for me) so they’re perfectly

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chilled. I’ll choose the gin for the occasion—I’m fortunate to have about 100 in my collection, so it’s a question of the mood I’m aiming for—and have a few different mixing sets including vintage glasses and a lovely Georg Jensen silver set. The right music makes a difference and some nibbles to go with the drinks.” “I’ll mix my Martini, pour my wife Edwina her drink, and bring a water cracker for Harry (the dog). We talk about the day, and avoid going online— it’s a chance to connect and reflect. We generally don’t talk about work though, that’s rarely been our way. “Then, with some perspective gained, I’ll compose my Instagram— featuring a new craft spirit or some cocktail inspiration—and it’s time to organise dinner.”


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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Nathan Harradine-Hale IN F LUENC ER , CO N T E N T CR E ATOR , PHOTO GR A PHER , PA RT-T IME BROA D C A ST ER .

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"

Home feels like family and love, home-cooked baked meals and our Sunday dinner routines. "

HIS NAME IS ACTUALLY Nathan Harradine‑Hale, but if you listen to FM radio, or peruse Instagram, Nathanxgaga is the tag you’ll recognise for this creative chap. Although you'll soon see a change to @collectionsofhim. With an ear for a beat, an eye for a perfect capture, and an ambition to create compelling online content, Nathan is slowly but surely making a name for himself in Canberra—next stop, the world. The 22-year-old is proudly Canberra born-and-bred and works a day job before spending his after-hours energy on his creative and radio work where he does live broadcasts and about-town reports for both FM 104.7 and Mix 106.3. He is often on the road to and from Sydney, where the allure of a new band is often too much to resist, but when he gets back it is into the family fold he goes. Still living at home with his mum and dad in Bonner, Nathan describes his surroundings as a safe and warm haven.

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“Home feels like family and love, homecooked baked meals and our Sunday dinner routines.” He is particular about his surroundings, describing his room as “minimalisticmale-trying-to-be-white-girl-butis-also-just-another-gay-boy chic." He loves a fresh clean room, with nice new sheets and a doona cover. “Home is also—for me—the smell of candles burning and incense in my room, as it seeps through the house.” ¡


THE FIRST EVER BMW X2. The first ever BMW X2 is unmistakable, unrestrained and unprecedented. A Sports Activity Coupé with the latest tech and the boldest style. Test drive at Rolfe Classic BMW today. Rolfe Classic BMW 2 Botany Street, Phillip. Ph (02) 6208 4111. rolfeclassic.bmw.com.au

LMD 17000534


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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

Homeward B O U N D

C R E A T I V E

D I R E C T I O N

P H O T O G R A P H Y

S T Y L I N G

A M A N DA W H I T L E Y

L AU R E N C A M P B E L L

H AY L E Y O ’ N E I L L

A happy home doesn't need to be tethered to land. We grab our coats, ceramic mugs and cosiest knits and hit the road.

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Calum wears knit ($59.99) by H&M, Canberra Centre. Pants ($179.98) Kathmandu, Canberra Centre. Socks, model’s own.

Pants ($179.98) and boots ($249.98), all at Kathmandu, Canberra Centre. Vintage jacket and beanie, model’s own. At right: Sarah wears knit ($139) and Ponte pant ($89.95) by Country Road, Canberra Centre. Socks, model’s own.

At left: Sarah wears knit ($290) by Viktoria & Woods, and dress ($495) by Zimmermann, both at David Jones, Canberra Centre. Boots and socks, model’s own. Calum wears cotton-blend jumper ($59.99) by H&M, Canberra Centre.

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Socks, model’s own. Calum wears top ($139.98), merino shirt ($159.98) and pants ($139.98), all at Kathmandu, Canberra Centre.

model’s own. At right: Sarah wears sweater ($320) by Jac + Jack, and dress ($450) by Zimmermann, both at David Jones, Canberra Centre. Star sign necklace ($149) by reliquiajewellery.com.

At left: Calum wears knit ($79.99) by H&M, Canberra Centre. Vest ($249.98), pants ($179.98), boots ($249.98) and backpack ($249.98) all by Kathmandu, Canberra Centre. Beanie and sunglasses,

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Vintage shearling jacket and beanie, model’s own. At right: Sarah wears knit ($290) by Viktoria & Woods from David Jones, Canberra Centre.

At left: Calum wears Long sleeve tee ($149) by Wynn Hamlyn shop.wynnhamlyn.com. Pants ($179.98) and boots ($249.98), all at Kathmandu, Canberra Centre.

HERCANBERRA.COM.AU


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

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($179.98) Kathmandu, Canberra Centre. Socks, model’s own.

Socks, model’s own. Calum wears knit ($59.99) by H&M, Canberra Centre. Pants

Sarah wears knit ($139) and Ponte pant ($89.95) by Country Road, Canberra Centre.

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Calum wears Long sleeve tee ($149) by Wynn Hamlyn shop.wynnhamlyn.com. Pants ($179.98) and boots ($249.98), all at Kathmandu, Canberra Centre. Vintage shearling jacket and beanie, model’s own.

At right: Sarah wears dress ($545) by Aje and jacket ($449) by Ena Pelly, both at David Jones, Canberra Centre. Star sign necklace ($149) by reliquiajewellery.com. Boots and socks, model’s own.

At left: Calum wears flannel shirt ($29.99) by H&M, Canberra Centre. Vest ($299.98), pants ($179.98) and boots ($249.98), all at Kathmandu, Canberra Centre. Beanie, model’s own.

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Sarah wears knit ($139) and jeans ($119) both by Country Road. Boots and socks model’s own.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

B E H I N D

T H E

Scenes

PHOTOGRAPHY LAUREN CAMPBELL CONCEPT AMANDA WHITLEY CO O R D I NATI O N B E L I N DA N E AM E S T Y L I N G H AY L E Y O’ N E I L L M A K E U P + H A I R S A R A H W R I G H T, S A L O O N MODELS SARAH KENNEWELL AND CALUM STENNING L O C AT I O N P I A L L I G O E S TAT E S P E C I A L T H A N KS TO B R E T T A N D J OA N N C O R C O R A N F R O M S I LV E R B U L L E T A I R S T R E A M HIRE FOR VIVIEN THE CARAVAN AND FOR HELPING U S WITH LOG I STICS ON S ITE

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l a u r e n c a m p b e l l . c o m . a u l a u r e n @ l a u r e n c a m p b e l l . c o m . a u


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

Storage

101

W O R D S

+

S T Y L I N G

P H O T O G R A P H Y

B E L I N DA N E A M E T I M BE A N

On a scale of one to 10, how much of a clean freak are you? Neat and tidy doesn’t need to equal boring—we step outside the box, so to speak, showcasing clever small storage ideas for your kitchen, bathroom and office.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Salt&Pepper Madeira Fruit Bowl RRP $79.95 David Jones, Westfield Woden

Rema Glass Canister in Medium and Small RRP $29.95 Small, $34.95 Medium Country Road, Canberra Centre

Kitchen Resin Bowl 7cm in Black with Spoon RRP $9.95 Gewurzhaus, Canberra Centre

Gewurzhaus Spices – Chinese Five Spice, Paprika Sweet & Mixed Herbs RRP Varying Gewurzhaus, Canberra Centre

Filt String Bag in Black RRP $19.95 Gewurzhaus, Canberra Centre

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

T2 Jug-a-lot 1.2L RRP $34.00 T2, Westfield Woden

T2 Square Tins in Black RRP $6.00 Small, $7.00 Medium, $9.00 Tall T2, Westfield Woden

Le Creuset Condiment Pot with Spoon in Satin Black RRP $49.00 Le Creuset, Canberra Centre

French Butter Dish in Glass RRP $19.95 Gewurzhaus, Canberra Centre

Superbee Wax Wraps RRP $24.95 Gewurzhaus, Canberra Centre

Le Creuset Utensil Jar in Cotton RRP $35.00 Le Creuset, Canberra Centre

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Kimi Small Paper Basket in Black RRP $29.95 Country Road, Canberra Centre

Jakk Face Washer in Charcoal and Pale Grey RRP $12.95 each Country Road, Canberra Centre

Bathroom Salus Lemon Myrtle Milk Soap RRP $11.90 Harry Hartog, Westfield Woden

Bade Timber Tray in Black RRP $24.95 Country Road, Canberra Centre

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

Talo Carafe RRP $39.95 Country Road, Canberra Centre

Salus Lemon Bliss Buff & Bath Salts RRP $12.00 Harry Hartog, Westfield Woden Studio. W Text Resin Tumbler in Grey RRP $24.95 David Jones, Westfield Woden Lennox Bowl in Natural RRP $29.95 Country Road, Canberra Centre

Christy Hygro Surpreme Face Washer in black , white and silver RRP $18.95 each David Jones, Westfield Woden Studio. W Text Resin Dispenser in Grey RRP $29.95 David Jones, Westfield Woden

Woven Artists Basket in Black RRP $12.00 Harry Hartog, Westfield Woden

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Round Paper Clips – 100PK Jar in Gold RRP $9.95 Kikki K, Canberra Centre

Slim Memobottle RRP $44.95 Harry Hartog, Westfield Woden

Bulldog Clip Large in Gold RRP $2.50 each Kikki K, Canberra Centre

Sali Dip Bowl Set in White RRP $29.95 Country Road, Canberra Centre

Office Phone Box in Natural RRP $19.95 Kikki K, Canberra Centre

Half A4 storage box cloth grey RRP $16.95 Kikki K, Canberra Centre

Tassel Black Pebble Keyring RRP $24.95 Harry Hartog, Westfield Woden

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

Baxta Holder in Dark Grey RRP $79.95 Country Road, Canberra Centre

Important Document Organiser in Blue RRP $39.95 Kikki K, Canberra Centre

Metal Rollerball Pen Essential in Black RRP $19.95 each Kikki K, Canberra Centre

Metal Scissors Essential in Gold RRP $12.95 Kikki K, Canberra Centre

Tape Dispenser in White RRP $12.95 Kikki K, Canberra Centre

Metal Paper Clip in Gold RRP $19.95 Kikki K, Canberra Centre

Magnetic Gel Pen in White/Gold RRP $19.95 Kikki K, Canberra Centre

Goals Journal Life Essentials in Black/Gold RRP $34.95 Kikki K, Canberra Centre

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Cartier Paris Hindu necklace 1936, special order, altered 1963 (detail). Cartier Collection, NE 28 A36


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

H O M E

Away from H O M E

W O R D S

E M M A M AC D O N A L D

Sometimes, the whole idea of getting dressed up and venturing out to the newest place on Eat Street leaves you feeling a little overwhelmed. What you really want to do is stay casual and hang somewhere where everybody knows your name. Here are four favourite locals we’ll always go back to.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Tilley's Devine C afé Gallery FOR ALMOST 35 YEARS, generations of Canberrans have been retreating into the womb-like comfort of Tilley’s. Dark wood and glossy maroon paint turns this rather cavernous space—it used to be the place to go for live music before it turned its focus to café operations—into something warm and intimate. Behind a long bar, a bustling all-female staff wear crisp white shirts and ties as they juggle orders ranging from quick coffees to gourmet food for long wine and jazz-soaked dinners.

The female staff is a link to the establishment’s ground-breaking history as Canberra’s first women’s space when it opened its large brass-handled doors in 1984. Men were originally allowed entry only when they were accompanied by a female companion—leading to all sorts of opprobrium. Having felt she made her point, trailblazing owner Paulie Higgisson loosened the policy and welcomed all respectful patrons to her establishment.

Tilley’s has subsequently established itself as part of the fabric of the city. Always open, always bustling, accepting of students through to pensioners— some of whom have standing table reservations every Saturday night when the stage lights up for live jazz—Tilley’s is a calming place for a long chat and a wind-down. It presents consistently good food on the fancier side of gastro-pub fare, in portions that are always value for money. There’s a specials board every day where seasonal dishes feature and a good selection of local beers and wines. There is, honestly, nothing quite like it. TILLEY’S DEVINE CAFÉ GALLERY

Open seven days, from 7.30am Monday-Saturday and 8am Sunday Corner of Brigalow and Wattle Streets Lyneham 02 6247 7753 tilleys.com.au PAGE 60


Edgar's Inn ESTABLISHED BACK IN 2001 to become a “local” for the People’s Republic of Ainslie, Edgar’s now pulls loyal crowds from right across the city—particularly when a big game of footy hits its large screens. Owner Frank Condi has helped spawn a raft of pubs and clubs around Canberra—Public and Academy among them—but he reckons Edgar’s has that right mix of community and connection. Some may call it something of a distraction—particularly when they are dispatched to grab bread and milk from the Ainslie IGA only to walk past a table of mates enjoying a chilled glass of something-or-other. It would be churlish not to pull up a stool and check in to see that everyone is OK, wouldn’t it?

With a capacity of 100 outdoors, and a more intimate inside space of 75 within a mainly woodthemed interior, Edgar’s buzzes on the weekend with brunchgoers, and late-afternoon drinkers soaking up the ambience of the live musicians who play there. With a view of Mount Ainslie, and pizza flowing freely from the nextdoor pizza oven at Mama Dough, it’s hard to resist some nights. Food is simple and hearty, and the beer selection is broad. Coffees are queue-worthy of a weekday morning and there’s no judgement if you linger for hours over one drink. It’s a corner where the pace slows down a little. Frank loves that it’s a meeting place where often the temptation to order dinner rather than cook at home overcomes people as they walk past. So a spontaneous meal—such as a burger, or slowcooked lamb and cous cous— it is. It’s likely to be speckled with lots of conversations and your neighbours sitting nearby. Ainslie has never had it better.

EDGAR’S INN

Open Monday-Friday 7am till late, Saturday-Sunday and public holidays from 8am till late 1 Edgar Street Ainslie 02 6257 5488 edgarsinn.com.au


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To A ll My Friends HERE’S A NEWBIE that feels like it’s always been there. Recently opening its doors at the Cook shops, To All My Friends is all about craft beer, happy hour, and gourmet pizza washed down with, ah, more beer. The brainchild of Shayne Taylor and Natalie Legg, who run Little Oink next door, To All My Friends is a gorgeous space—long and narrow with crazy floral wallpaper up one side, dark grey panelling and dark wooden recycled floors. Think Kinfolk Magazine with a touch of English pub and you’re there. While the café next door has been running for more than four years, it was something of a snap decision to take over the next door space at the start of the year. But the couple fancied themselves as publicans, and already Natalie reports a strong contingent of locals are making it their hangs.

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The vibe is ultra-casual and community-based with a “community keg” raising money for charity each week. And even though it’s a pub, the place is kid-friendly and allows Little Oink patrons to literally carry on eating and drinking all weekend. Natalie says it is the sort of place that embeds itself in the Belconnen region but also further across the city. “It’s comfy but pretty—the sort of place where you could think of holding a thirtieth or fortieth or fiftieth birthday—but also a really easy place to pop into after work rather than going home to start cooking dinner.” It’s early days, but the appreciative crowds keep coming back and the pizza oven and beer selections are winning new fans.

TO ALL MY FRIENDS

Open Wednesday to Sunday 12pm-11pm 24 Cook Place, Cook 02 6251 1699 facebook.com/toallmyfriendsbar


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

A Bite to E at WHERE ELSE but Mum’s kitchen would you find yourself eating off mismatched plates and Formica tables? Indeed, the retro atmospherics of A Bite to Eat in Chifley are so homely it feels like you could put your feet on the table, or stretch out and have a nap on one of the sofas, without any other patrons raising an eyebrow. But would Mum serve up a Banoffee Pie Milkshake? With its salted caramel, banana, pretzel and an optional shot of Kahlua, the answer is probably no. Nor is she likely to have the barista skills that earn this Campos Coffeeserving institution a dedicated coffee crowd.

A Bite To Eat is under new and enthusiastic management after earning a rusted-on clientele for its bohemian mish-mash of furniture, crockery, living room feels and hearty meals. Think all the homely classics that are actually too much effort to cook at home—brekkie burgers and fritters, chicken schnitzel, fish and chips, and steak sandwiches. A decent wine and beer list and a decision to serve dinner now allows patrons to move from early morning coffees and bircher mueslis through to late night snack of spicy chicken wings washed down with a Tumut Brewing Pilsner. There’s live music, and a gorgeous and sun-drenched courtyard in which to catch up with friends, or simply slip into a book or daydream. Just like you did as a child. A BITE TO EAT

Open Tuesday-Friday 7am-9pm, Saturday-Sunday 8am-9pm Chifley Place, Chifley 02 6260 3703 abitetoeat.net.au

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H O M E and H O P E W O R D S

E M M A M AC D O N A L D

P H O T O G R A P H Y

T I M BE A N

For 20 years, Karinya House has been taking young and vulnerable mothers and babies under its roof and teaching them skills for life.

WHEN JAZZ first met Catherine Cooney, client services manager with Canberra’s Karinya House, she was so deeply distraught she was almost catatonic. The trauma Jazz had experienced was every mother’s worst nightmare. Family breakdown and poverty meant she and her partner were homeless and her four-month-old-son had been removed from her arms by authorities. At just 23 years old, she fell pregnant again, and as the birth of her second son approached, Jazz realised she was at almost certain risk of losing custody of him, too. Family and Community Services told her the only way she could keep her baby with her was to move into supported accommodation—enter the 21 dedicated

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maternal health, caseworkers and support staff of Karinya House. For 20 years, the service has provided a home, and 24-hour assistance, for mothers and babies in crisis, as well as outreach programs to support these vulnerable women as they move towards independent living. When Jazz arrived she was at rock bottom. She felt utterly hopeless and was fast disconnecting from those around her as a coping mechanism. “I couldn’t stop crying. I didn’t have my partner with me. I’d just had a baby. I was really emotional and felt really alone even though there were a lot of people around me.”


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

Catherine spoke to Jazz several times on the phone while her pregnancy progressed and her placement at Karinya was organised. The pair met face-to-face at Calvary Hospital shortly after baby Justice was born. Catherine remembers just how vulnerable Jazz was. “She could barely communicate or make eye contact. My heart really went out to her.” “She was so traumatised she had almost shut down emotionally”. But Catherine could see something in Jazz, despite her detachment from the world. As with all the new mothers she supports, Catherine set about bringing Jazz back— helping her to care for her newborn son and piecing her life and family together. Jazz agreed to move into the Melba facility with Justice, but it was not simple, nor easy.

After years of instability, periods of homelessness and the loss of her first son, Jazz initially found it hard to engage. As she underwent intensive support and met with her caseworkers each day, the adjustment became a little easier. She loved her little boy and cared for him with dedication. She started to learn how to cook some basic meals, and was supported to breastfeed her baby. As Justice thrived, Jazz became a more competent and confident mother. More than a year on, Jazz’s life is almost unrecognisable. She has a lease on a modern townhouse, and is a doting and dependable parent. With Karinya’s support, she successfully contested a court order to remove Justice from her, and has regular contact with her first son—and hopes to regain custody.

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" Hardship does not even come close to describing the emotional turmoil I plunged into... the shame.

" Jazz passed a clinical parenting capacity assessment and she and Justice’s father are both engaged with support services and have worked to stay together despite their traumatic past, forging a loving and healthy relationship.

“Hardship does not even come close to describing the emotional turmoil I plunged into... the shame. I was already technically a single mother—if I had this baby I would not only be a single mother, but my children would have different fathers.”

As she returns to Karinya for the HerCanberra interview, Jazz is embraced by staff members as they pass her in the corridor. Her eyes are bright and her smile is wide. Catherine, in particular, is almost overwhelmed with pride.

In the eyes of society, Catherine believed, “that was bad on so many levels.”

“Jazz is really a perfect example of why I do this job,” says the former school psychology and counselling support worker.

“I am a Catholic and with that comes particular sensibilities regarding unborn children. And yet I did consider termination of the pregnancy. I did not do this not for me, this was so that I did not have to upset the lives of all the people who care about me.

For Catherine, the job she has dedicated herself to at Karinya House has deeply personal resonance. She knows from experience the myriad pressures that pregnancy can bring—particularly for those unprepared. Catherine was herself a young mum after “an early and somewhat disastrous marriage” to her teenaged boyfriend. She had a three-year-old daughter and was putting her life back on track in her early twenties—enrolling at university. “I had survived my ‘wild years’ and I was settling down, employing my gifts, talents and privileges to focus on building a productive, stable life. Everyone, including me, was supremely confident that despite an impulsive and somewhat rocky start to my adult life, I was going to be fine. And then something unexpected happened. I had an affair with a young man in my Literature class and I became pregnant.”

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Describing herself as a person of faith, Catherine admits that she was forced to explore all her options.

“I have discovered the research since then, that this is indeed the most common reason women seek abortion. To take the pressure off other people. It’s another service women provide, they keep things tidy.” But a moment of certainty came as unexpectedly as the pregnancy. Catherine was waiting for someone to get off a bus at the Jolimont Centre in Civic when she ran into an old friend. “I don’t know why but I told her I was pregnant and that I was probably going to terminate. Her response was so important. She simply asked me ‘Is that what you want?’ I said, ‘Of course not, I want the baby, I already love the baby, it’s just so messy.” As I said it, I knew I would have the baby. And I did.”


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" The home offered by Karinya is crucial in allowing vulnerable mothers the space and support to move forward.

" She would go on to marry Michael, that young man from her Literature class, and give birth to a beautiful daughter, Mary, and another three children. Catherine would also complete her degree, go on to complete postgraduate studies in Psychology and Counselling and is currently completing her Masters. By anyone’s standards, Catherine has led a productive and successful life, joyously welcoming Mary’s first child—a granddaughter—into the world just after Christmas. But she remains innately sensitive to the plight of young mothers who move into Karinya. She understands their fears and the sense of isolation that envelops them when their friendship group is moving on, studying, going to parties and doing normal teenage stuff. The home offered by Karinya is also crucial in allowing vulnerable mothers the space and support to move forward. They bond with the other mothers, they are supported by caring staff, they are given the skills and confidence to raise their babies. The future benefits to mother and child are enormous. “So much research has been done in this area. Attachment theory and developmental milestones are well known to us and we know that if this is done well in the early parenting period then the benefits are huge and can significantly change life outcomes for individuals which inevitably flow on to broader society,” says Catherine. This is particularly true for women who have not had a happy and healthy family life and have had limited opportunities to learn this by osmosis.

“Most of the women, most of the time, receive advice and education willingly if they know it will make their relationship with their child better. All the mothers I have ever met have the desire to be good at it.” Each year, Karinya takes in around 200 mothers and babies as well as offering outreach to around 25 women at any one time. Running a large shared accommodation facility that is staffed day and night does not come cheaply. And as Karinya runs on a 50 per cent Government funding agreement in order to maintain autonomy, it means each year a dedicated committee has to raise $750,000 to ensure the service continues. For Jazz, however, there is no price to be put on her Karinya experience. It provided so much more than a temporary home. It pulled her back from the brink and allowed her to change the course of spiralling disadvantage and misery. “I know that if it wasn’t for Catherine and Karinya, I would not have my son. She is my guardian angel, and to be honest, I didn’t want to leave at first because these people had become my family and Karinya was my home.” But as she considers returning to her bright and clean townhouse to play with her beautiful son, Jazz is filled with a new level of independence and confidence. She now has a home of her own and hope for a bright future. ¡ ––– Donations can be made to support Karinya House at

karinyahouse.asn.au/donate-now

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

C H E F S

at Home

W O R D S

A M A N DA W H I T L E Y

P H O T O G R A P H Y

T I M BE A N

It’s an oft-used cliché. On every reality television cooking show there’s a moment—perhaps even several—where contestants will tear up as they recount childhood memories in the kitchen with a loved one, and how those early days shaped their “food journey”. It’s hard to resist an eye roll when the accompanying violin soundtrack reaches its quavering crescendo, but there’s no denying that the home environment can have a powerful influence on our relationship with food. We go into the kitchens (and one garden) of three Canberra chefs to discover the influence of family and home on the food they love to cook.

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Louis Couttoupes B A R

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R O C H F O R D


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WHAT’S YOUR EARLIEST FOOD MEMORY?

I remember sitting with my grandad and watching the Swans play when I was young. My favourite snack back then was a bowl of cut apple and cheddar cheese. To this day, it's what I reach for when I raid the fridge at 3am. I also remember making fresh pasta with my dad. We didn't really know what we were doing but there was nothing more thrilling for five-year-old me than making a huge, parent-approved floury mess in the kitchen. WHAT WAS FOOD LIKE IN YOUR HOUSE GROWING UP?

My family is food-obsessed. I definitely inherited that from both my parents. They are quite academic though, with a strong sense of social justice—mealtimes at our place seemed to be the anchor for discussions about politics or social issues or foreign affairs—so I don't think they ever thought I'd end up cooking for a career. I studied international relations at uni, have a Masters in International Security and spent nine years in the public service before I started cooking, so I guess the sudden change might have come as a bit of a surprise to them. WHAT DID YOU LOVE TO EAT WITH YOUR FAMILY?

I always looked forward to weekend lunches at home. I grew up close to Haberfield in Sydney, so someone would

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always go to the Italian deli and load up on fresh cheeses, salumi and bread. Either that or a big pasta lunch. WHEN YOU PREPARE MEALS FOR FRIENDS AT HOME, WHAT IS YOUR GO-TO MEAL?

I don't get a lot of time off so when I have people around I prefer to spend it with them than in the kitchen. Whole grilled fish is as simple as it gets, and I love cooking over coal. The smoke and char flavour is just the best. I like to mix the resting juices from the fish with a bit of oil and lemon juice, and some wild fennel blossoms. At the moment it’s hard to go past tomatoes when they look and taste so great too. Olive oil, fetta, picked herbs. That’s it. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR FOOD PHILOSOPHY?

Someone once asked me to describe my cooking style, and that one stumped me for quite a while. I was like "kind of French-Japanese-Mediterranean with a South American influence?" which is sort of true but it makes me sound like a crazy person. I know it sounds trite and overdone, but I'm a huge believer in seasonality, simplicity and locally-grown produce. So many places say that and then you see tomatoes on the menu in winter, so you know they've travelled from miles away.


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Or they say simple, but serve vegetables that have taken hours or days to prep with all sorts of special chefs’ gadgets and tricks. Don’t get me wrong—that kind of cuisine definitely has its place, and people are doing amazing things—but it's definitely not the low key or casual approach that many claim. I try not to interfere too much with the food I make—it's all about enhancing it—like pairing it with an awesome or unusual companion ingredient to bring out the taste and texture. I put a lot of emphasis on building relationships with growers and producers. I like to be guided by their advice because they know best—if my supplier brings me something unexpected because it looked great that particular day, I'll chuck it on the menu that night.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

L O U I S ’

Grat in Dauphinois These potatoes—or variations of them—are a pretty traditional accompaniment to a lot of stuff in rural France. This dish will go with pretty much any grilled fish, meat or vegetarian meal, and I have never, ever seen leftovers.

INGREDIENTS

6 medium waxy potatoes (like Desiree) 300ml pure cream sea salt flakes I’m also a bit of a sucker for an unusual ingredient—algaes, fungi, foraged plants, ferments, inks, glands, rare honeys, you name it. One of the best things I’ve eaten in the last 12 months was fermented fish guts in Japan. Ten years ago I would have baulked and now I spend hours trying to incorporate those things into the everyday. DO YOU HAVE ANY TIPS AND TRICKS

rosemary -–Serves 6

METHOD

Preheat oven to 200˚C.

FOR MAKING ENTERTAINING AT HOME LESS STRESSFUL?

More booze never hurt! But seriously, I think people tend to get anxious and overreach when they entertain and end up spending the whole time in the kitchen rather than hanging out with friends. Make it simple, and make something you know well, so you can chat your way through it and sit down with everyone at the table.

Slice or mandolin potatoes to about 1 mm thick and lay them in overlapping layers in a lightly oiled baking tray. Pour cream over the potatoes and season with salt. Sprinkle a few generous sprigs’ worth of rosemary leaves over the top and bake for 30-40 minutes, or until the cream has caramelised.

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Trent Harvey P O P - U P

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C H E F


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WHAT ROLE DID FOOD PLAY IN YOUR CHILDHOOD?

I grew up on an apple orchard. We always had a lot of homegrown fruit and veggies and had cows that we milked. Milking the cows and drinking the fresh milk straight from the bucket in the fridge has got to be one of the earliest food memories that I have. WHO HAS BEEN THE BIGGEST INFLUENCE ON YOUR APPROACH TO COOKING?

My brother and I stayed with our grandparents a lot growing up—Grandma and Grandpop lived in another house on the same property as us. I didn't realise it until later in life, but I think the time I spent with Grandma in the kitchen influenced my attitude towards food a lot. My grandparents lived a very selfsufficient lifestyle. I remember picking homegrown fruit and vegetables and making things like jams, chutneys and pickles. It’s a lifestyle that I’ve really grown to value and desire now. My Nan was also a very proficient cook and I have fond memories of my cousins and I "helping out" in the kitchen regularly.

its thing in the oven all day makes for an easy plate-up and very little time in the kitchen when friends arrive. It's also easy for slow-cooked dishes to pack a lot of flavour and impress with little effort. TELL US ABOUT YOUR FOOD PHILOSOPHY.

Keep it simple. I always try to cook/eat healthy whilst enjoying all foods in a balanced and considered way. I try to buy local and the best quality ingredients I can. For cooking at home, I tend to buy whatever is fresh and in season (which usually also means cheap) and just decide what I'm going to cook on the day depending on how I feel. I'm not one to follow recipes. I try to keep a stocked pantry of staples which makes it much easier—sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't! ANY TIPS AND TRICKS FOR MAKING ENTERTAINING AT HOME LESS STRESSFUL?

MEALS AS YOU WERE GROWING UP?

Choose a menu where you can prepare most of it ahead of time. You don't want to be in the kitchen too long when people arrive. It's a lot easier to do all the legwork when your family and/or friends aren’t looking over your shoulder.

I can remember my Nan’s Sunday roasts being top notch. Roast beef with Yorkshire puddings covered in gravy and golden syrup (English heritage). I still love a good roast!

Choose a few good-quality ingredients and try to treat them the best way you possibly can. Choose dishes and flavours that complement each other or stick with one style of cuisine.

WHEN YOU PREPARE MEALS FOR

It's probably also best to cook something you have cooked before as you'll know quantities, cooking times and whether or not it even tastes good! Just keep things simple and enjoy your cooking and the food you're eating!

ANY FAVOURITE HOME-COOKED

FRIENDS AT HOME, WHAT IS YOUR GO-TO MEAL?

I guess it depends on the weather, but I tend to cook a lot of dishes based around some kind of slow-cooked meat. Being able to start it in the morning and let it do

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T R E N T ’ S

Cauliflower + Coc onut Soup INGREDIENTS

METHOD

½ head of cauliflower

Slice the onion and cauliflower into small pieces.

½ brown onion

Place onion and cauliflower in large saucepan over high heat with coconut milk and vegetable stock and bring to the boil.

400ml can coconut milk 200ml vegetable stock 30g butter 2 Pialligo Estate Pork, Fennel and Chilli Sausages 1-2 spring onions Coconut yoghurt, toasted coconut flakes, toasted fennel seeds—to garnish __ Serves 2 to 4

Reduce heat and simmer for around 20 minutes or until the onion and cauliflower are very soft. Slice spring onions into small pieces, separating the green and white parts. Remove skins from sausages, chop into small chunks and brown with the white parts of the spring onions over medium-high heat in a splash of olive or coconut oil. Try to break up sausages into smaller chunks with a wooden spoon while cooking. When cauliflower is soft, blend well with the butter using a stick blender. Season with flaked sea salt to taste. Serve blended soup in a large bowl with a couple of big spoons of the sausage and cooked spring onions. Garnish with a large dollop of coconut yoghurt, green parts of spring onions and toasted coconut and fennel seeds sprinkled liberally on top!

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Travis Cu ler W O O D B R O O K

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WHAT’S YOUR EARLIEST

ANY FAVOURITE HOME-

FOOD MEMORY?

COOKED MEALS?

My grandparents had an old, unused wooden butter churn on the farm. We have had the family farm for generations but I never saw it in action, but I was amazed how such a simple instrument could take a liquid from the fridge door and turn it to a solid on the shelf. It might have well been a story of transubstantiation—all the more magical than simply turning water into wine.

Leftover roast lamb fritters with green tomato pickle.

IS COOKING IN YOUR BLOOD?

I come from a family of cooks. My Nan would cook all day. I remember it wasn’t so much the aroma from the stove, but the evidence in the cupboard. Jams, cakes, biscuits, chutneys—all things that preserved the seasons and were shared amongst the family. I could see the joy it provided people. Farmers and neighbours would stop for morning or afternoon tea just to share in Nan’s cooking. I was attracted to that. WHAT WAS FOOD LIKE IN YOUR HOUSE GROWING UP?

Our food was simple, frugal and budgeted. We enjoyed dinners together but it often felt like a study in the uses of beef mince. My career choice came as a surprise to my family only because I was in the middle of my PhD in history. Yet on reflection they could see that it was the right choice and were very supportive. Perhaps it had something to do with when I was living in Melbourne, dragging them across town to small and obscure restaurants in search of great meals.

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WHEN YOU PREPARE MEALS FOR FRIENDS AT HOME, HOW DO YOU LIKE TO EAT?

I like food that encourages conversation. Not in a television kind of way, but in a way that enables friends to share stories. It is something that informs my cooking for Woodbrook. A few plates of simple food between friends, not something that takes until midnight to get to the table unless you’ve had a few too many sneaky gins. ANY TIPS FOR HOME CHEFS?

Do your preparation and be realistic. I’m not sure if watching someone cook all night is how I’d enjoy spending my evening. If you keep things simple and work out what you can have ready in the fridge then you should be able to take the stress out of cooking. SIMPLICITY OR SHOWMANSHIP?

I’d take a thoughtfully cooked vegetable over some kitchen trickery any day. I challenge anyone to derive more pleasure from charring a freshly picked zucchini from the garden than transforming it into pearls through spherification. The first takes skill, timing, and a feel for the heat in the pan; the latter is a repetition, the enacting of a codified formula.


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T R A V I S '

Pecorino + Mint Ravioli, C hicory, Zucchini, Salsa Verde INGREDIENTS

METHOD

PA STA

Make the pasta dough and let it rest in the fridge overnight.

Bring a pot of seasoned water to the boil.

Mix together the filling and place in a piping bag.

Cook the chicory and zucchini in a pan.

Chop the ingredients for the salsa verde together. Add vinegar, oil, mustard. Season.

Add the ravioli to the water.

10 eggs 500gm ‘00’ flour 110gm water SALSA VERDE

parsley mint capers anchovies garlic dijon mustard red wine vinegar olive oil salt pepper PECORINO + MINT FILLING

200gm buffalo ricotta 50gm pecorino chopped mint lemon zest salt pepper T O SE RV E

chicory heirloom zucchini __ Serves 4 to 6

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Roll out the pasta and make the ravioli. Store them in semolina in the fridge while you get everything together.

Plate up the zucchini and chicory as suits your style. Add the ravioli. Dress with some salsa verde. Finish with some small bitter herbs.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

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Where your front yard is the Arboretum Display Village Open Sat to Wed 10am - 4pm Located so close to Canberra’s natural attractions, Denman Prospect is situated between the National Arboretum and Stromlo Forest Park and only 15 minutes from the city centre. Denman Prospect, perfectly placed.

Sales suite located at 37 Kondelea Way, Denman Prospect. Patricia Hepburn 0412 782 343 Steve Morrissey 0438 996 555.

denmanprospect.com.au


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

S T I L L

C A L L I N G

Home C A N B E R R A

W O R D S

E M M A M AC D O N A L D

They’ve travelled, lived and worked around the globe. But somehow, these three women find Canberra’s siren song impossible to resist.

Photo Vlado Korenic

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Anneliese Seubert THE WOMAN WHO can claim one of the most successful careers of any Australian model— working during the 1990s for the likes of Dior, Gucci, Versace, Yves Saint Laurent, Givenchy and Hermès and appearing in Vogue magazines from one end of the globe to the other—has been happily settled in Canberra for the past few years.

BORN IN BAVARIA, RAISED IN COOMA, EDUCATED IN CANBERRA THEN WHISKED UP IN A WHIRLWIND CAREER AS A BONA FIDE SUPERMODEL, ANNELIESE SEUBERT HAS COME FULL CIRCLE.

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You’d think that having lived in Paris for six years, New York for another six and travelling to 45 different countries to shoot in all manner of exotic locations, Canberra may not have been on the final destination manifesto for the statuesque brunette. But love lured her back. Anneliese agreed to a blind date almost 10 years ago, orchestrated by her cousin. Robbie was a public servant with no interest in high fashion. He’d never heard of her. She loved that about him.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

Together they share a home in the Inner South and are contentedly raising two beautiful daughters, Camille, 5, and Avery, 3. “Canberra really suits us. It is close to the beach, close to the snow, close to my mum, and at this stage of our lives we are really happy here.” Anneliese still travels regularly for bookings interstate. But otherwise you will find her with the girls, in the park, or catching a quick minute to herself to sip a peppermint tea. The latter is an ironic choice of beverage given Australia’s superior coffee culture was one of the things which brought her home after more than a decade in front of the camera for the likes of Mario Testino and Patrick Demarchelier. “After six years in New York, I was really homesick. Everything about America was starting to annoy me. I found myself complaining a lot. About everything—including the coffee—and I decided to move back to Australia.” For their first year living together Anneliese and Robbie were based in Gundaroo—providing an almost comical counterpoint to life with the jet-set. “Yeah, it was pretty quiet. The dog got walked a lot,” she laughs. Yet Anneliese seems genuinely content. She now focuses on the minutiae of organising two little people through each day.

" Canberra is a really easy city to live in. Especially once you have children.

"

Part of Canberra’s appeal is its winter—and proximity to the snowfields. Raised in Cooma, Anneliese has always been a keen skier, and the girls are following in her tracks. “Canberra is a really easy city to live in. Especially once you have children. I am really settled and happy here. I think it allows me to raise the girls with more freedom and responsibility as it is a safe place for them and I don’t need to hover over them every minute of the day.” She may have been in the public eye since she was picked as a finalist in the Dolly Covergirl competition while a 15-yearold boarder at Canberra Girls Grammar School, but Anneliese is just as happy leading a fairly anonymous Canberra existence. There is comfort in the steady rhythms of being a mum and partner. “It is fun to work, but it is always pretty busy at home too. I love spending time with the girls, reading, yoga, cooking, you know, just average stuff. “I feel really blessed to be here.” PAGE 93


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Jane O'Dwyer BUT IN BETWEEN those two monumental institutions is a love for ordinary Canberra—the golden afternoon hour on Mount Ainslie, snow on the Brindabellas, kangaroos in the driveway—that make Jane believe she will always return. No matter what.

IT WAS OUR FEDERAL PARLIAMENT THAT LURED JANE O’DWYER FROM ONE SIDE OF AUSTRALIA TO THE OTHER AND OUR AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY THAT HAS KEPT HER HERE.

The newly announced Vice-President of Engagement and Corporate Affairs at the Australian National University (ANU) has come a considerable distance since she first alighted the plane from Perth in 1997, bound for the office of a Labor frontbencher. But a life of international postings and relentless relocations was pretty much assured when she met Marco Salvio, a graduate bound for a career within the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). Within a few short years of falling in love at an Australian Republican Movement fundraiser at Tilley’s, Marco was posted to Tokyo and Jane took a leap of faith to quit her job and follow him. He proposed en route at Singapore’s Raffles Hotel. Not content to be simply a diplomatic spouse, Jane launched herself into a Masters in Journalism, studying Japanese at Sophia University, and then joining the English edition of Japan’s largest newspaper as a staff writer. When the couple returned in 2005, Jane accepted a position at the ANU and began rising through the ranks. But within a few years, an overseas adventure called again, this time a dual posting to Washington—where Jane established an ANU office at the Australian Embassy. Then it was back to Australia before Marco was posted to Rome as Deputy Head of Mission. “I took long service leave and lost myself in the eternal city, while hosting a non-stop parade of friends who came to stay.”

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Now her tribe is even smarter. “Every day I arrive on campus feels like such an enormous treat. ANU is a really special place—it’s incredibly open and stimulating to be part of the community here. I don’t know any other place where you work alongside 75-year-old professors who have changed our nation and 17-years-olds who will change our nation.”

They’ve been back two years now, and Jane’s new appointment will make it harder to uproot in the future. But that’s not the only reason. Despite her West Australian blood, Jane pretty much fell in love with the national capital the minute she laid eyes on it. “There is no city in the world like this. It’s crammed full of smart people with a large proportion dedicated to contribution to our nation, to research and to education. We are surrounded by a stunning natural environment and have our pick of all the wonderful things a capital city offers but in a setting like no other.”

Not that Jane isn’t thankful for the extraordinary privilege of diplomatic life. “The moment you get to the airport on your way to posting is the most amazing feeling. I always feel a strange mixture of peace and excitement. The lead up is exhausting—packing, working through the long DFAT posting manual and filling out all appropriate forms, saying too many farewells, wondering what life will be like in another place, trying to learn a new language.

“The first three months are always fabulous, then reality kicks in and you go through the usual culture shock and adjustment that comes with making a new home and settling into a routine. You then go through exactly the same thing in reverse coming home.” But juggling two careers is increasingly a challenge. “I think it is getting more difficult for DFAT as women rise up the ranks and have to ask their partners to sacrifice careers or job security, and more DFAT officers have spouses who equally value their own careers.” When asked where she sees herself in five years Jane says “as an even more rusted-on Canberran! Hopefully still at ANU but likely getting ready for our next overseas adventure…” And further down the track? She hopes to find herself “Back in Ainslie, probably wondering where the last decade went.”

She also describes connecting with the community—recalling an epiphany one night at a political staffer’s group house when she was surrounded by “young political staffers, academics and newly-minted public servants. Everyone there was smart, engaged in the world around them, interested in understanding and wanting to be a part of it all. I felt like I had found my tribe.”

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Anthea Roberts THERE WAS A QUICK return home to complete her degree and graduate, after which she spent a year working for Chief Justice Gleeson at the High Court of Australia where she met her future husband, Jesse Clarke, who was working for Justice Kirby.

THE PURSUIT OF A CAREER IN LAW TOOK ANTHEA ROBERTS FROM HER HOME TOWN BEFORE SHE HAD EVEN COMPLETED HER DEGREE—SHE WAS ONE OF ANU’S FIRST EXCHANGE STUDENTS TO OXFORD UNIVERSITY IN HER THIRD YEAR.

They were then off again. This time Anthea headed to New York University’s School of Law for her Masters with a specialty in international law. Jesse, also an international lawyer, headed to Cambridge University to do his Masters before joining Anthea in New York. Anthea spent a summer working at the International Court of Justice in The Hague before joining one of the big international law firms Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, spending five years working for them in New York and then in London. From there, she took up a lectureship in international law at the London School of Economics before she received an invitation from Harvard Law School to be a Visiting Professor for a year. “That sounded exciting and I said ‘yes’…but then I fell pregnant with our first child, so we decided to spend my maternity leave back in Canberra. I was homesick.” After being away from Canberra for eight years, Jesse and Anthea relished returning to the city in which they had met. “I remember how incredibly sad I was leaving Canberra at the end of my maternity leave. My family is definitely the number one thing I miss when I am away. My parents still live in the same house that I grew up in in Cook which backs onto the reserve. Every time I visit them and see the mountain view, I feel happy and at peace.” But Harvard was waiting and the family of three set off—including nine-month-old Ashley Roberts-Clarke.

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“It is a much less stressful city to live in than New York and London. The commutes are really good and the public schools are great.”

" People tease me about how much I love Canberra.

" At the end of the year at Harvard, Jesse (who is a dual Australian/UK national) was selected as one of the UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office lawyers to be posted to the UK’s Mission to the United Nations. “So, we picked up again and headed back to New York and I was given a Visiting Professorship at Columbia Law School. We stayed in the US for almost five years this time.” By the time they returned in January last year, they were also bringing their newest addition— Freya—who was six months old at the time. Their return was just in time for Ashley to start Kindergarten, Freya to start daycare, Anthea to take up a research position at RegNet at ANU and Jesse to start work at the Office of International Law in the Attorney General’s Department.

Now happily settled in Narrabundah, the family has many favourite Canberra things to do. “We love getting breakfast and tarts from Silo in Kingston and our girls like getting milkshakes from Bittersweet in Kingston or white hot chocolates from Urban Pantry in Manuka. When we come back from the US, we are always really pleased to have good Australian coffee again! When we come back from Europe, we always really appreciate the great Asian food that we have here.” And having traded in the Big Apple and Big Ben for something decidedly more sedate, Anthea is happily soaking up the Bush Capital.

But Anthea admits her fervor for the city sometimes elicits disbelief. “People tease me about how much I love Canberra. When I was in New York and London, people would always say ‘oh, you are so lucky to live there!’. And that was true. No one says the equivalent to me about Canberra, yet I just adore it. “Part of it is surely that it is home. But another part of it is Canberra’s unique ability to mix some of the advantages of a big city—government work, a good university, great restaurants and cafes—with the feeling of a small town.” ¡

“I love walking up and over Red Hill at sunrise or sunset and seeing all the kangaroos. At certain points, you can see bushland and kangaroos in the foreground and Parliament House in the background. I can’t imagine that being true of many capitals, even leaving aside the kangaroos. I think it is just lovely.” She also notices Canberra’s ease and quality of life. PAGE 97


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Apple O F

R E C I P E S

P H O T O G R A P H Y

+

M Y

S T Y L I N G

TIM BEAN

E Y E

B E L I N DA N E A M E

L O C A T I O N

TA N B E L L A O RC H A R D

There are few dishes more homestyle than fresh apple pie warm from the oven. But there’s more to this versatile fruit than meets the eye.

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Apple + almond B I R C H E R

M U E S L I

SERVES 4

1.5 cups rolled oats 1 cup natural yoghurt 1 cup milk 1/3 cup slivered almonds ½ cup currants 1 small Granny Smith apple, grated ½ tsp cinnamon 1 small apple, to serve

METHOD

Combine the oats, cinnamon, currants, apple, almonds, milk and yoghurt in a large bowl and mix well. Cover and refrigerate overnight. To serve, divide the mixture between bowls and serve with extra yoghurt, a dash of milk, extra almonds (lightly toasted), extra grated or sliced apple and a drizzle of honey.

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A P P L E

Tea Cake

SERVES 8

METHOD

180g unsalted butter, softened

Pre-heat oven to 180ËšC. In an electric mixer, beat the butter, lemon rind, vanilla and caster sugar until light and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time until well combined. Sift in both flour and milk and beat gently until smooth. Put mixture in a greased and lined, 20cm springform cake tin and level the top.

2 tsp grated lemon rind 1 tsp vanilla extract 2/3 caster sugar 3 eggs 1 cup self-raising flour ½ cup plain flour 1/3 cup milk 2 medium apples 2 tbsp water 1 tsp gelatine 2 tbsp apricot jam, strained

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Peel, quarter and core the apples. Make cuts lengthways in to the round sides of the apple quarters, cutting about three quarters of the way through. Place the quarters evenly around the edge of the cake, rounded side up. Bake in the preheated oven for 50 minutes to 1 hour or until browned and cooked through. Heat water in a small pan, add the gelatin and stir until dissolved. Remove from the heat and add the jam. Using a pastry brush, brush the jam mixture over the top of the hot cake. Cool the cake before cutting.


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A P P L E

Spri tzer SERVES 4

Âź cup apple brandy Âź caster sugar 1 vanilla bean or 1 tsp vanilla bean paste 1 cinnamon stick 1 red apple, thinly sliced 3 cups soda water

METHOD

In a small saucepan, place the apple brandy, caster sugar, vanilla and cinnamon stick stirring over a low heat until the sugar is dissolved. Simmer for 10 minutes and then remove from the heat. Allow the syrup to steep for 1 hour and then place the sliced apple in a jug and add the soda. Spoon the syrup into 4 glasses and pour over the apple soda and serve.

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A U N T Y

G L E N ’ S

Apple C rumble SERVES 6

120g unsalted softened butter ½ cup self-raising flour ½ cup caster sugar ½ cup desiccated coconut ½ cup powdered milk 1 kg Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, quartered and thinly sliced 1 tsp cinnamon

METHOD

Pre-heat the oven to 180˚C. In a large bowl add the sliced apple and cinnamon. Mix through until the apples are coated in the cinnamon. Place in a greased baking dish and place in the oven for 10 minutes to warm while you are making the crumble. Place all dry ingredients in a bowl and add the softened butter. Rub the butter in until you have a fine crumb. Take the apples from the oven and cover evenly with the crumb. Return to the oven and bake for 45 minutes or until lightly golden. Remove from the oven and allow to stand for 10 minutes before serving. Serve with a big dollop of double thick cream or ice cream or both!

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thepialligoestate.com.au


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

T H E F A C E

C H A N G I N G O F

C anberra W O R D S

L AU R A P E P PA S

Image courtesy of National Archives of Australia.

In our push to become the cool little capital, are we losing the very qualities that have made us what we are?

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WHEN photographer Martin Ollman posted a photo to his social media account of Canberra's light rail deep in construction mode—a chaotic blur of bulldozers, freshly gutted trees and traffic—it struck a nerve. In the many shares of the image that followed, some locals were excited to see Canberra finally stepping into the much larger shoes of busier cities such as Melbourne or Sydney; others were shocked ("where is this?!"); while many longterm residents lamented the loss of trees and green space for "an eyesore." Either way, the image thrust into the spotlight what many have known for a long time: Canberra is growing up, and fast.

"No longer did a weekend in Canberra mean some serviced apartment with vast, dull interiors set in acres of asphalt,” she writes. “Now, you could sleep tucked between the lake and the Shine Dome; stroll out for breakfast; explore on foot without terminal boredom.

"It caught on. Next, Kingston Foreshore—its aesthetic a little King-Street-Wharf tacky but inevitably popular. This was low-rise " but extensive, canal-side apartments If any year solidified and restaurants bunched around the our move from small produce market, Megalo Print Studio and the choral hall conversion of town to cool capital, J. S. Murdoch's Fitters' Workshop. The it was 2017. place hums every night of the week.

If any year solidified our move from small town to cool capital, it was 2017. From taking out third spot on Lonely Planet’s list of the world’s must-see " cities, to Gourmet Traveller naming our own Bar Rochford as the best in the country, to our booming restaurant scene, it was official: Canberra was having a moment. Suddenly, the nation's collective sniggers about us being a boring city full of pollies and public servants felt utterly unimaginative, and one by one, members of the Twitterati were forced to reluctantly admit Canberra's appeal. “Have we been wrong about Canberra all these years?,”asked ABC online while the Sydney Morning Herald half-jokingly touted the Instagram success of “The Freakshake” as the moment Canberra officially shrugged off its famously daggy reputation. Word spread quickly: in the past year alone Canberra has attracted record numbers of domestic and international visitors, and the most recent census recorded the ACT as having the nation’s largest population growth. So when exactly did Canberra move from muchderided capital to international city?

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In a column published in the Sydney Morning Herald, author and architecture critic Elizabeth Farrelly credits cultural precinct NewActon with “inverting the diagram.”

"Next up; Fyshwick, Red Hill, Dickson and the famously daggy inner north, driven by the ANU's rising status, endless student demand and the new Canberra light rail that opens in 2018—likely well ahead of Sydney's.” Beyond Farrell's assertions, there is also Gungahlin—the fastest growing suburb in Australia—and our CBD, once upon a time a ghost town on weekends, largely thriving thanks to the revitalisation of Bunda Street and a push towards high density living. Twenty years ago, apartment living in Canberra—particularly in the city—was rare. Now you can't look sideways without stumbling across construction site after construction site of new developments, with everyone from families to retirees capitalising on the benefits of high-density living. Yet some critics believe Canberra is caught in a precarious spot —no longer content to be simply a "bush town," but not quite ready to grow into its new identity of thriving capital.


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Photo Lux & Us

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Photo VisitCanberra

IF we are going to own the tag of “international city” there is still some work to do, according to consultant and property leader Catherine Carter.

“When key workers such as nurses, teachers and police officers can no longer afford to live in a city, then we have a problem.”

“The fact that Garema Place is still such a wasteland after all these years is incredibly disappointing,” she says.

To allow for better housing affordability, Catherine believes there is a case for dual occupancy developments and densification in established areas—but she acknowledges it’s a contentious issue.

“City Walk is still largely devoid of life, while the Sydney and Melbourne buildings remain tired and tatty. In spite of the rhetoric, I think the fact of the matter is that urban renewal in our city centre hasn’t—until recently—been a genuine government priority. “For the first time though there is genuine light on the horizon—the new City Renewal Authority established by the government in 2017 has a remit to lead the transformation of the city centre, including Civic, Northbourne Avenue and Haig Park.” Housing affordability is another pressing issue as our city expands—a problem Canberra can’t afford to have, warns Catherine. “Already, in cities such as Sydney, even workers on above average wages fear they’ll never get a foot on the property ladder,” she says.

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“It’s difficult when trying to balance a situation when existing communities would like to see things maintained just as they are, while others would like the opportunity to be able to move into established suburbs and take advantage of the lifestyle options available to people living in inner suburbs, such as easy access to local shops,” she says. “I think there is certainly a case for more densification on brownfield sites, but it needs to be managed in a way that’s responsive to community needs and which is respectful of community opinion." But will our push for densification mean we could be at risk of losing the very qualities that make Canberra unique, such as our wide open spaces, bushlands and strong sense of community?


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

" Not all of Canberra’s 'unique qualities' should, or can, be preserved "

“Increased density and continuing the garden city character are not mutually exclusive,” asserts Catherine.

CBD and town and group centres, which also makes these areas better through more services and entertainment options.

“Increased urban density offers people housing choice as well as greater access to amenities such as local shops and public transport options, which I think is worth considering in the density debate.”

"We know our population is increasing by around 7000 people each year, and this settlement approach is part of ensuring we can house them all without excessive sprawl or losing what makes our suburbs such nice places to live."

Then comes the other side of the question— will some of those defining qualities become irrelevant, as Canberra grows into bigger shoes? Indeed, University of Canberra urban planning expert Richard Hu believes the current features that make Canberra unique from other cities— driving, low density, suburbanisation—are not actually sustainable in today’s challenges of climate change and energy use. "Densification creates better sense of community with good planning and urban design, compared to our existing urban sprawl structure," Richard says. "Canberra, as a sprawling city, has many legacies from the 1960s and ‘70s when Modernist urban development and planning dominated, which require urban renewal to regenerate, such as Woden. “The city centre, meanwhile, has transformed significantly in recent decades—for example Braddon, New Acton—with more amenities, residents, residentials, and quality urban design." ACT Chief Minister Andrew Barr agrees. "Not all of Canberra’s 'unique qualities' should, or can, be preserved," he says. "The best way to protect the character of our garden suburbs and the farm and bushland that surround us is by ending needless urban sprawl through more concentrated development in the

Yet there is concern, in our rush to develop, that there are too many “quick-fix” construction standards. While Mr Barr says the ACT Government is undertaking a comprehensive set of reforms to the way building work is regulated in the Territory, former ABC radio host and longtime Canberra resident Alex Sloan says she has noticed a “big rush to the bottom.” "We have seen old buildings of character demolished, cheaper rents disappear, small quirky businesses forced out," she says. “Urban planners talk about assets of ‘grittiness and fine grain.’ The old buildings that made some of our streets interesting have been replaced with monolithic structures with very high rents. “When it comes to our buildings, there is too much bland design and in some cases, crap standards." Standards are something the National Capital Authority (NCA)—the body tasked with ensuring that the city “and the Territory are planned and developed in accordance with their national significance”—take very seriously. The organisation is responsible for the preservation of some of the city’s iconic buildings—Parliament House, Old Parliament House, the High Court and the National Gallery of Australia. It’s not often in the headlines.

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Controversy was stirred earlier this year, however, after the West Block buildings—some of the earliest erected in the area—were sold by the federal government to ubiquitous developer GEOCON, who will look to turn the historic building into a "luxury hotel."

Former ACT Chief Minister Kate Carnell agrees densification surrounding our most iconic sites will be a good thing, but if we're going to grow positively, there is work to be done. "We need a state-of-the-art convention centre. We need an efficient public transport system, with urban infill along the light rail lines. We need to see ourselves as a meeting hub for the Asia Pacific region, and we need to be less reliant on the public sector," she says.

The sale marked the first private land ownership inside the Parliamentary Triangle. Once home to the National Library, the Crown Solicitor's office and the Australian Electoral Commission, the site was also a World War II bomb shelter, which was used to decode messages between Australian prime minister John Curtin and British prime minister Winston Churchill. Other buildings in the area, including the Anzac Park East, Anzac Park West and East Block buildings, are currently up for sale. The ACT Greens had previously opposed the West Block sale, saying it was "deeply concerning" and a blow to our national heritage.

" We just need to make sure we make the next 20 years as good as the last 20.

Last month, the NCA also opened expressions of interest for the sale of Canberra landmark The Lobby, to make way for a new restaurant, bar, café, place of assembly or tourist facility. NCA Chief Planner and Deputy Chief Executive Andrew Smith believes the new developments will be a positive for Canberra's future, while still honouring our early history. “The National Capital Authority is responsible for ensuring the Parliamentary Zone is a vibrant and active place within Canberra,” he says. “A new restaurant, bar, café, place of assembly or tourist facility will no doubt reinvigorate the iconic Lobby site, supporting a vibrant Parliamentary Zone.”

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"There's a lot of things we can do that we haven't done yet. It's a damn better city than when I was Chief Minister 20 years ago. We just need to make sure we make the next 20 years as good as the last 20."

"

PERHAPS the people best placed to reflect on Canberra’s changing face are the ones who have been here so long they are practically etched into our city's fabric.

One resident who has seen Canberra change before his eyes is Manuel Xyrakis. When his parents, Nick and Alice Xyrakis, moved here back in 1960, the population was around 50,000. The couple purchased the then Ainslie supermarket/milk bar in 1963 and it’s been in the family ever since. "Back then there was a butcher, baker and fruit shop at most of the local shops, because that’s where everyone did their shopping,” says Manuel. “Tthere weren’t any big malls or anything at that stage. It was very different.” Then came the late-1980s, where the introduction of larger supermarkets gobbled up most of the market, sending those smaller businesses into decline. Luckily, the Xyrakis’ business survived— and in more recent years, Manuel says new life is being breathed into once decrepit shops as more people appreciate the personal aspect of their ‘local’.


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" It’s a good thing we are still growing because we’re always striving to be better. " Despite this, Manuel is concerned Canberra’s growth could be bad news for many smaller businesses.

And while he is enjoying watching our city bloom, Emilio is concerned about protecting what makes it special.

“It’s very hard sometimes, when the big shopping malls are air-conditioned, and areas like Kingston Foreshore are by the lake. People always flock to the ‘new’ things, which can make it hard for the older, smaller businesses.”

“I do believe we have to be careful, as we grow, to protect these green spaces. You look at New York City, and they’ve got Central Park which is famous for being such a beautiful green space amongst all the concrete.

However big it grows, Manuel is certain Canberra will always retain one of its most defining qualities: its sense of community.

“We need to allow increased density in certain areas and re-think the limits of our building heights. Our city could really benefit from increased high-rise buildings which will promote creative architecture and a more appealing, international cityscape.”

“It’s one of the reasons I will never leave, no matter what,” he says. That small town sense of togetherness allowed Emilio Cataldo's parents to easily transition from a small village in the South of Italy to the then unfamiliar Canberra community in 1960. Emilio’s father Giuseppe set up his first hair salon on Marcus Clarke Street then on the outskirts of the city in 1965. Cataldo's, now in Ainslie Place and with a second salon in Woden, has become Canberra's best-known hairdressing empire. According to Emilio, Canberra got its “momentum” when Lake Burley Griffin was completed in 1963. “It was the confidence booster Canberra needed,” he says. “From then on, we just grew and grew. Now we have a lot of technical/IT companies here which is helping our business sector. We’ve got a highly-educated workforce that has helped Canberra grow. We’re also getting young people leaving Canberra but then returning to make it their home, which wasn’t always the case. “I think it’s because Canberra is becoming an international city without losing any of its positive features like ease of transportation, great universities and proximity to nature.”

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As a smaller city, Emilio believes we currently have the advantage over the larger cities thanks to our ability to redesign more effectively. "It’s a good thing we are still growing because we’re always striving to be better.” IF ANYONE should have the last word on our city, it's Alex Sloan. The former-ABC radio presenter spent a good slice of her career championing all things Canberra, after moving here in the mid-1990s. "There is a liveliness that wasn’t here 23 years ago," Alex reflects. "Apartment living, people walking on the street, cyclists, walkers, light rail is coming. There are delicious additions and changes to food, restaurant and café culture." Alex believes some of the biggest risks to our city are bad planning, poor quality quickfix construction, climate change, an ageing population and health services. The other challenge is properly preparing to be a "big city". "Part of Canberra’s challenge will be managing transport planning, from cars to public transport,” she says.


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“We can do things really well. Look at our commitment to leadership in renewable energy, right under the noses of the appalling decisions made in the house on the hill. The ACT was a leader on Same Sex Marriage and returned a wonderful 74 per cent in the postal vote. “So why don’t we get ahead of the game on transport planning, autonomous vehicles or telecommunications?” As for our future, Alex emphasises the need to be mindful of the economic base of the city. "If people are moving here to retire we need younger innovative, creative people to be able to live and work here too,” she says.

"What this generation, of which I’m a member, needs to remember is we bought housing at much more affordable price. We need to let the next generation in. We need creative people, artists, actors, musicians, writers. Think about the great cities around the world and why you want to visit them–usually it’s to do with the arts, great design and a cultural throb. If our artists can’t afford to live here they will leave. "One of more memorable tongue-in-cheek suggestions during Canberra’s Centenary was a “Whingeing Wall” down by the Lake, (trademark Ian Warden). While I think that’s a brilliant idea the flip-side is big-hearted, broad minded generosity. If you can be generous with your time or resources, give what you can to ensure Canberra remains a fantastic place to live in the future." ¡

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As Bridget Jones said so well, there’s nothing better than a full-blown mini break. With cooling temperatures and beautiful foliage, autumn is a great time to escape to the country for a weekend getaway. Here are four Airbnbs within three hours drive of Canberra.

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DUNGOWAN

airbnb.com.au/ rooms/12811913

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Built in a luxe French provincial style, Dungowan Estate is a next‑level getaway. A sprawling yet manicured property just an hour from Braidwood, highlights include a lake house, tennis court, games room, swimming pool, sweeping lawns and utter peace and quiet. This is the ultimate destination for large groups wanting a country escape that doesn’t skimp on style.


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VA L L E Y VINTAGE A spacious, rustic retreat built from mostly reclaimed and recycled materials, The Shed at Broger’s End brings the country indoors. But don’t let the tin roof walls fool you. Inside you’ll find luxe touches like velvet lounges, a claw foot tub, pizza oven, espresso machine, rain shower and even a wood fireplace. Perfect for a cosy escape with friends, it’s also just 10 minutes to the town of Kangaroo Valley.

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airbnb.com.au/ rooms/2479538

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airbnb.com.au/ rooms/5113065

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A guest house with a 180-degree panoramic view of rolling hills thanks to an entire wall of glass louvres, this luxe studio is situated perfectly between the pristine coastal towns of Kiama and Gerroa and the epicurean delights of the Kangaroo Valley with Berry just a 20-minute drive away. Did we mention the infinity pool right next to the room and the complimentary bottle of wine on arrival?


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BABY IT’S COLD OUTSIDE Nestled in the heart of the Snowy Mountains at Crackenback, Pender Lea is just a stone's throw from Thredbo, Perisher and Jindabyne. Containing a range of accommodation options from their adorable Post Office that sleeps five to the Chalet that sleeps 10, there’s something for every winter wonderland getaway. Add-on options include horse riding and bushwalking. The Post Office is available on Airbnb. ¡

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airbnb.com.au/ rooms/21530434

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Three homes from three different periods in Canberra’s development history. We bring you a rich montage of (almost) 100 years of architecture and design—proving the adage that good style never dates.

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Reid IT’S A CLASSIC 1930s Reid cottage— white render, gentle arches, set well back from the road.

lower-ranking government workers had to be content in the cheaper wooden houses going up over in Ainslie.

But this Coranderrk Street example stands out from the suburban row with its vibrant red chairs and bold mix of red, green and black Kate Spade upholstery adorning its deep and wide front verandah.

Mind you, when Nadine and her husband, Antolin Feria, purchased the property in 2011 it appeared more tethered to its 1970s double-brick extension than its rather lofty history as one of Canberra’s original—and now securely heritage-listed—homes.

And that’s just the way interior designer Nadine Neilson wants it. The frontage of the stately original home—which was among the first erected by the Federal Capital Commission in the suburb—is a virtual business card. And the bold pops of colour differentiate it from the other similarly classic homes dotted throughout the suburb. They all share the distinction of being built for the middle to upper-ranking bureaucrats moving to the new capital, while the

But she saw beyond the lime green kitchen benches and highly patterned carpets. “I have to admit like most home owners we purchased with emotion, we just fell in love with it. Though, sensibly speaking, Reid is the most convenient suburb in Canberra— not to mention beautiful.” Now Nadine has brought it into a new era—as a platform for her interior design business, Journey Home, which consults to clients across the city, and often, interstate.

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Nadine’s style is authentic Hamptons/ Ralph Lauren with a twist of Canberra Heritage thrown in for good measure. She has decorated the front half of the home in a carefully curated and high-end style—adding wall paneling, an impressive Austrian Swarovski crystal-encrusted chandelier and restoring the fireplace to its rightful place as the focal point for the room. She and Antolin have whiled away many a weekend winter afternoon, soaking up its glow and crackle. It’s a multi-layered approach that illustrates Nadine’s mastery at mixing pattern, palette and texture. Don’t try this at (your) home without expert advice! Nadine took about six months to renovate the front half of the house after designing it—calling on her secret trade sources for just the right fixtures and scouring her favourite haunts such as a Sydney salvage yard for the external front door light.

While the back half of the house still presents in all of its ‘70s makeover glory, Nadine has similarly drawn up its soon-tobegin metamorphosis. And with a beautiful stretch of back yard shaded by a massive Japanese Pagoda tree, there is plenty of room to move. The journey has been a joy. “Sometimes I will look at one of my rooms from a hallway, and if the light is coming through the window just right it is a picture-perfect vision. It makes me feel really good.” Nadine also transformed the front yard— creating a formal garden complete with fountain—which hides a long garden bench just right for stretching out in the dappled sunlight. “We love our front garden so much that we spend more time there than in the enormous back yard.” Always competing for her attention are Nadine’s commissioned jobs, including a number of heritage homes around the city, the installation of her signature Hamptons style kitchens, and more recently a very modern Kingston apartment. PAGE 129


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There’s no rush to complete the second half of the renovations, however, as the Reid home—which faces onto Glebe Park—is the couple’s forever home and will continue to be a gallery to showcase Nadine’s work to potential clients. Some tips for those taking on restorations and renovations of stately and heritagestyle homes include, first and foremost, “run with the character”. “Resist putting a contemporary box extension on the back—it is already dated before you start and the neighbors who thought they were buying into a tranquil heritage suburb will hate you! Trust me I’ve seen this,” says Nadine. She also warns that double brick walls can be expensive to take out if you are looking to create modern and open-plan living with more light, while plot ratios can be restrictive for extensions, and renovations

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will cost more per square metre than building new. One of the home’s most stunning rooms is a guest bedroom which shows Nadine’s flair with a British Colonial look. It combines masculine and feminine features in a dark and luxe mix of navy wall paint, natural cloth wall covering, rattan fans, velvet upholstery, custom soft furnishings and decadent upholstery material forming thick curtains. But then there is the joy of a summer’s eve on the front verandah in a distinctly Canberra style— sipping a wine and watching their Golden Retriever, Bailey, sneak through a hole in the hedge to visit his friend Lily—the terrier next-door. Reid continues to be a genteel suburb where the bold stylings of this Coranderrk Street home attract many a friendly comment from passers-by.


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CREATING A FAMILY HOME is, for any architect, a labour of both love and professional pride. But for Steven Cetrtek, there was an added layer of complexity as he restored and remade an original Ken Oliphant-designed home—adding a modern wing to a classic and significant piece of the city’s heritage. Oliphant (1896-1975) was a prodigious and influential architect conscripted from Melbourne in Canberra’s infancy. He also designed Calthorpe’s House on Mugga Way and some of the southside’s most distinctive abodes. By 1953, Oliphant had set his sights on creating a modest but light-filled family home on Captain Cook Crescent, and it was kept in meticulous condition until it was put on the market in 2016.

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Enter childhood sweethearts Steven and Lisa. Having recently sold their renovated Narrabundah duplex, they were literally itching to make over a substantial home to create a family oasis in which to raise Allessandra, 7, and Olivia, 4. Of course, design principles have evolved somewhat since the '50s. Steven recalls that while the house was in great condition, it contained some “unusual design features”. By that he means the bathroom was right opposite the front door, there was a clunky mission brown pergola, original ‘50s laundry, kitchen and bathrooms and the rather awkward bedroom extension done in the ‘60s.

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But then there were the features that made it all worth it—high ceilings, generous rooms, a fireplace, wide hallways and that subtle 'Mad Men' vibe. Most of all there were the windows— original steel-framed corner windows— which both Steven and Lisa fell completely in love with and which have subsequently informed other design elements in the home. The couple secured the property after a few nervous days of negotiation and set about transforming it as owner-builders and project managers. Creating the Instagram account @salohouse to chronicle the renovation journey along the way, the project took around nine months— including three months of bone-shaking, dust-creating internal demolition of double-brick and load-bearing walls. Not for the faint-hearted.

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While Steven was ready to put his nextgeneration architect’s stamp on the home, he also shared the process with Lisa, whose eye for interior design has provided some of the home’s most beautiful atmospheres. The existing layout of the front rooms and entry was kept as original as possible to maintain the house’s street character. But beyond those rooms a huge transformation took place. All bedrooms were moved to the rear to take advantage of the private and verdant backyard and to minimise street noise. Working to emphasise the beauty of the original windows, Steven’s design response was to complement them with similar grey-boxed frames in the living room and children’s bedrooms for relaxing and reading.


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Lisa loves it when the family congregates to eat outdoors under a huge covered terrace that includes a neat outdoor kitchen directly connected with the main kitchen. Together, they oversaw the selection of the home’s palette of white, greys and oak. The herringbone floor is carried through in a marble herringbone tile in bathrooms, while v-groove panelling is used in the kitchen joinery, on all the internal doors and dark grey externals. Steven came up with the garden design which is enhanced by the massive elm tree, around which a deck is built, with a fish pond to one side. The girls swing on their British Oak and Rope Company swing (Prince William has one too) while light filters through enormous rattan light fittings Lisa insisted on.

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"

It will probably never feel completely finished, and that’s the beauty of it. "

For Lisa, there is the thrill of adding layers of art and signature furniture pieces. “It will probably never feel completely finished, and that’s the beauty of it,” she says. For Steven, the compromises he had to make working within existing parameters of an old home were worth it.

She said investing in high quality window treatments custom-made by Chadwick Designs was a wise decision. Deciding on a paint colour for the front room, however, was far less straight-forward. Armada by Dulux was the winning shade—neither too green, nor too blue— after six hair-pulling attempts. It’s Steven’s favourite room and takes on a cozy feel in winter when the fire goes on and the drinks trolley comes to the fore. There is no television in this room, just artworks and the vista of the street to focus on—just as the couple want it. Meanwhile, Lisa says she still pinches herself when she wakes in the morning and looks out onto the backyard. There are still a few things left to tick off, including doubling the garage, and adding a sauna—which Steven says is a necessary luxury given the city’s long winters.

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He is delighted with the finished result, which takes cues from the old and transforms a modern addition into a beautiful and eye-catching homage to one of Canberra’s architectural forefathers.


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Greenleigh WHEN YOU WALK IN THE DOOR of Tess Godkin’s home, it’s almost like a light and slightly opaque Instagram filter drops down over your eyes. There’s a soft whiteness to all that you see: clean lines, high ceilings, and an enormous square window into the bluest of pools. Everything looks slightly bleached— brighter and larger than it ought to be. It is clear that the home has been created by someone with a strong aesthetic. That would be Tess, a professional photographer, whose Instagram account @you.me.and.the.sea demonstrates the very same lightness as her home—no filter required. Tess, and her project-manager-by-dayand-DJ-by-night husband Sean Luca, have designed every aspect of the new build. They turned only to expert advice when it came to drafting the plans for Council approval. Their bravery was certainly tested at the start of the project—when their chosen builder went bust, taking a sizeable deposit with him. “It did set us back a bit, but we couldn’t change the outcome, so we moved on with things,” says Tess with trademark calmness.

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Securing the services of Neeta Homes on the recommendation of a friend, Tess and Sean moved in with Tess’ parents and awaited the impending birth of their daughter, Siena, now 18 months. Second time lucky, the build was smooth-sailing. “We had really good communication with the builder and it all went exactly to plan. Honestly, there were just no dramas at all. Luckily!” The result is a bespoke design, encompassing everything Tess and Sean wanted from a forever home, with no compromise. That is due, in part, to their decision to buy an affordable five-acre plot at Greenleigh, just beyond Queanbeyan. The couple purchased land more than two years ago after a city-wide search. The alternative was to buy a small fixer-upper in an established suburb. “We looked at all options and could actually have gone either way, but in the end, we wanted to do it from scratch the way we wanted, rather than try and patch over someone else’s mistakes.” Now the couple feel they have the best of both worlds—a house they dreamed of, in a location they absolutely adore. Indeed, the views of gently rolling bushland that stretch beyond the pool suggest you could be in the Blue Mountains or a nearly-hidden retreat far from the city. “It’s just a beautiful location and we feel like we are living in a resort, permanently on holiday.” In fact, Tess works from home, with an enormous room down one end of the house acting as a beautifully-styled studio. In a separate room, Sean has his DJ equipment laid out, and one can only imagine how this sprawling home could accommodate fabulous parties. PAGE 140


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The couple feel they have the best of both worlds—a house they dreamed of, in a location they absolutely adore. "

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Warmth is added in artistic touches, everywhere—woven baskets, sheepskin throws, flowers and weather-beaten wood. The kitchen, meanwhile, is pure Hamptons chic—all marble and shaker-style cabinetry in white.

The style of the home could be described as Scandi/coastal, with a Hamptons‑esque touch. “What we wanted was to create a home that was not stock-standard. We didn’t want that generic new build feel.” Tess said she chose a fit-out that, while contemporary, edged towards classic rather than being “completely on trend”. “For instance, I did spend some time asking myself whether the black taps would date, but I think they will stay timely.” A massive double-doored entry way with a vaulted ceiling and rustic chandelier sets the tone for the home. The oak floorboards surpass all expectations while the white wall panelling and recessed television help create even more clean space and light. The feature window includes a bench seat where Siena can watch the world go by, while linen sofas, a rustic wooden coffee table and Tess’ grandfather’s old armchair all provide places to relax.

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Down one wing are the children’s bedrooms—yes, Siena is about to become a big sister—while an enormous parents’ retreat forms the other wing. Storage and space abound, and clear light floods the home. Having only moved in in January, all is not complete, of course. Landscaping is in its infancy, and the couple have big plans for the entertainment area and back garden. But at least the pizza oven and pool are fully functional. “In the end we want a home to reflect our personalities and we are both really relaxed. We love family and we love entertaining, and it is so exciting to have people come around. We want to live casually, and we want a home that reflects this and is easy to maintain.” And, in this case, there’s the added bonus of capturing endless Instagramable moments. ¡ Sources – 100 Canberra Houses, A Century of Capital Architecture by Tim Reeves and Alan Roberts, Reid Residents Association, Canberrahouse.com.au


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Sometimes, getting to the gym is just not doable. Whether you’re trying to save money or simply feeling a bit self-conscious, there’s a whole lot to love about working out in the comfort of your living room.

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STRENGTH

Think you have to get yourself under a barbell to get that booty? Think again! While a gym will always be the frontrunner option when it comes to heavy lifting, you can get some quality resistance workouts using your body weight or minimal equipment.

WE’VE COME A LONG WAY since Jane Fonda VHS tapes and yoga DVDs. Fitness trainers and personalities have been flocking to YouTube in droves, producing guided workout videos that are increasing in production quality. And with virtual reality pegged as a significant wellness trend, this is an industry that will no doubt continue to grow. Here are some of the best free online fitness workouts on offer.

DANCE

At-home dance workouts are perfect for anyone who loves the idea of dance, but not the thought of performing in front of others. You can take these workouts at your own pace, pausing and replaying to learn the choreography where necessary. There’s also an enormous variety of videos—great for newbies and experienced hoofers alike. Amanda Kloots is the creator of The Rope, an interval class with cardio and toning using just a jump rope. Her Cardio Dance classes, however, are high energy, cardio-based dance workouts suitable for all levels and genuinely fun to do.

youtube.com/popsugartvfit Speaking of fun, The Fitness Marshall is one of the most hilarious, energetic workouts on the internet. His sassy attitude and easy to follow choreography make his videos both a solid sweat session and a whole lot of fun. This is a great one to do solo or with your girlfriends—post workout vino optional.

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Whitney Simmons has some fantastic at-home workouts on her channel. Her Grow a Booty at Home video uses body weight and resistance bands for a tough but effective lower body strength workout. Other goodies include videos on everything from how to activate your glutes before a gym session through to active wear and beauty products.

Search YouTube for Whitney Simmons Carly Rowena is a British YouTuber with a library jam-packed with workout videos —including ones designed for home-based exercisers. Her 7 Day at Home Workout Challenge even comes with a free workout plan, so if you want a challenge to kickstart your fitness regime, this is a good place to start. If that’s not your thing, however, there are plenty of individual workouts for you to try.

youtube.com/Carlyrowena


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" We’ve come a long way since Jane Fonda VHS tapes and yoga DVDs. "

CARDIO/HIIT

YO GA

Cardio queens rejoice—there are workouts for you too! And you don’t even need a stationary bike, elliptical trainer or treadmill.

Every style of yoga under the sun is available for you to practice in the comfort of your lounge room, for free.

Pop Sugar Fitness is a great channel for a multitude of different workouts, and a lot of their cardio workouts are modifications of dance styles like Latin or Hip Hop, with a focus on burning serious energy.

Yoga with Adriene is easily the most well-known YouTube yogi, and for good reason. With more than three million subscribers and nearly 400 videos, she’s cultivated a community that caters for every level, and serves her yoga with a side of quirkiness, taking the ‘serious’ edge off yoga and making it accessible to everyone.

Try the 30-Minute Hip-Hop Tabata to Torch Calories or 30-Minute No-Equipment Cardio Workout to Burn Calories. Alternatively, the Low-Impact Cardio Workout, which doesn’t have any jumps or hops, is not only gentle on your joints but also on your floors— perfect for apartment dwellers!

youtube.com/popsugartvfit Katrina and Karena, the Tone It Up girls, are personal trainers who specialise in getting women fit. While they primarily offer paid fitness and nutrition programs, their YouTube channel offers a number of free workouts, including a few from their latest body positive ‘Love Your Body’ series.

Adriene offers a number of 30-day series or challenges—if you’re a beginner, start with her 30 Days of Yoga and move on to Yoga Camp when you’re finished. She even offers yoga for anxiety, depression and heartbreak, perfect for self care when you’re feeling less than wonderful.

Alo Yoga make the most beautiful activewear, and their free yoga videos certainly do not disappoint. While they do offer yoga for beginners, most of their content is aimed towards seasoned yogis, with a lot of power Vinyasa flows and workshops in poses like backbends and inversions. They also offer specialty yoga for runners, or excellent pre-natal flows for mums-to-be. Their recent 30 Days of Mindful Movement series is especially great, with not only yoga sessions but lessons in setting intentions and goals, as well as mindfulness.

Search YouTube for Alo Yoga Other notable mentions include Yoga with Tim, Cat Meffan and lululemon.

youtube.com/yogawithadriene

The Cardio Kickboxing Workout, Tabata Workout and Beginner Dance Cardio Workout are all fun, novice-friendly workouts that can be easily slotted into even the busiest of schedules.

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P I L AT E S

" Working out at home gives you the freedom to be yourself without fear or judgement. "

Pilates is a fantastic workout for anyone, but especially those who spend a lot of time working at a desk, and there’s a big focus on posture and core strength, as well as muscle balance. The good news? There are plenty of free mat-based Pilates videos on offer. Lottie Murphy has a stellar YouTube channel, with lots of vlogs, recipes, meal ideas and, of course, Pilates workouts. Her charming British accent will guide you through alignment, balance and fundamental Pilates positions. Many of Lottie’s videos focus on sculpting specific areas—like the Wonderful Waist Workout or Sculpted Ballerina Shoulders Workout—but she also has routines for working your whole body.

youtube.com/lifestylewithlottie Cassey Ho and her Blogilates channel have amassed over four million subscribers who tune in to

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join her high-energy, fun workouts. The majority are set to pop music and focus on booty, thighs, abs and arms and require little to no equipment, save for a yoga mat. Cassie even coined her own workout style—PIIT (Pilates Intense Interval Training)—which combines her two favourite workout styles: Pilates and HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training). Many of her workouts are also scalable—either by making adjustments to movements or by repeating the routines for a longer, more challenging workout.

youtube.com/blogilates Whether you like to work out out in your underwear or baggy sweats, a full face of makeup or bare faced, working out at home gives you the freedom to be yourself without fear or judgement. Stretch, shake, sweat or Savasana—do what makes you feel good! ¡


Canberra’s most luxurious day spa Hale Spa provides a full complement of day spa treatments. Immerse yourself in the cave-like spa pool, or dissolve away your stress in the steam rooms and infrared saunas. Take a seat in the Scandi-style lounge in front of the fireplace with views onto a landscaped courtyard and water feature while you prepare for your facial or body treatment in one of the nine private treatment rooms.

H A L E H E A LT H .C O M . A U

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Sweet D R E A M S

W O R D S

B E AT R I C E S M I T H

Until recently, sex and money have existed in black and white, the lines clearly drawn.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

YOU’RE CHEATING or you’re faithful. You’re engaging in sex work or you’re not. But with the rise of the Sugar Baby/ Daddy dynamic, the lines are becoming blurred. For the uninitiated, a Sugar Baby is someone of any gender identity who engages in a platonic, romantic or sexual relationship with a wealthy—usually older—Sugar Daddy or “Mommy” in exchange for favour, money or gifts. This will usually be a contractual agreement, with terms and amounts set before anything takes place. For Regina*, a 22-year-old Canberrabased university student who was introduced to the lifestyle by a friend, becoming a Sugar Baby was first and foremost a pragmatic financial decision. “It is the fastest way to make money in a short period of time. Though I have no intentions of this being my sole income, it alleviates financial struggles and permits more time to focus on my studies. Contemplating past questionable one night stands, I figured a lucrative one was more beneficial for all involved.”

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Reading the experiences of Sugar Babies, this is a common logic. If you’re single and prepared to go on dates, send selfies and have one-night stands and receive nothing in return, why not create an agreement where you will? “After learning of a friend’s double life I became intrigued,” explains Regina. “Another friend and I combed through copious movies on the topic, debating the pros and cons of jumping on the band wagon. We imagined all the possibilities that came with such vast sums of money.” For many Sugar Babies, engaging in conversation with their Daddies is truly a lowest effort to highest reward equation. In a first-person account called ‘Confessions of a Sugar Baby’1 published in Australian National University student publication Woroni, student Phoebe* explained that she saw the arrangement as “an enticing solution” to fund her preferred lifestyle. While the concept may seem foreign (and distinctly unenticing) to some, Regina says Sugar arrangements are far more common than you might think.

woroni.com.au/words/confessions-of-a-sugar-baby

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

SeekingArrangement.com, the foremost website for ‘Sugar arrangements’ estimates five Canberra Sugar Babies for every Canberra Sugar Daddy, with both parties receiving an average of 13 messages per day. It also states that the average ‘allowance’ offered to Sugar Babies sits at just over $5,000 per month. Regina has now been on SeekingArrangement.com for three years but says that she spent the first year only emailing her first ‘Daddy’ before they finally met in person. She describes him as “fascinating” and says they shared many similar interests. “In comparison to sites like Tinder, those whom I have affiliated with are smart, accomplished men leading perfectly normal lives, engaging in occasional escapism. “Above all else, the networking opportunities looked promising,” says Regina, adding that the men she spoke to were “very different from what I anticipated.

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[They] were respectful and interesting. We spent the majority of the time talking about anything from current affairs to personal interests.” That being said, Regina currently only has one Daddy and has only engaged with two in total, describing her relationship with them as “friendly” as opposed to platonic, romantic or sexual. “I have reservations and am rather selective with my choices”, she explains. “Whilst I haven’t had a bad experience, I also haven’t had many. I have been on the website for maybe three years now but use it sporadically and usually stick to the same person.” As for what sort of ‘arrangements’ one could expect by becoming a Sugar Baby, gifts range from cash to designer clothes and accessories to cars and in Regina’s case, a fully funded overseas holiday. “He kindly paid for a friend’s flights as well as I did not feel comfortable going alone,” says Regina.


MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

"

For many Sugar Babies, engaging in conversation with their Daddies is truly a lowest effort to highest reward equation. "

“We met for approximately five minutes when he greeted me at the airport, only to hand over the agreed upon sum of money and say that he wasn’t feeling well. He sincerely apologised for the inconvenience and said he hoped to meet again another time. I never saw him again, but my friend and I thoroughly enjoyed the vacation.”

Daddies “feeling degraded”. Instead, she says it’s “somewhat empowering” and says she’ll most likely continue to be a Sugar Baby until she’s finished her studies.

While there are obvious differences between being an escort—whose clients are determined by a brothel or other employer—and a ‘Sugar’ arrangement where the stakes are agreed by both parties, there are also undeniable shades of grey.

“I think people foreign to the concept have an image of Sugar Babies not dissimilar to that seen in Pretty Woman,” she explains. “In reality, they are often intelligent women that see a market worthy of exploitation.”

If the act of engaging an escort is paying for sex, then what is paying someone for a naked photo? Is it cheating if you’ve never met in person? Is it sex work if you’re simply going on a date with someone where sex is out of the question? The Terms of Use section of SeekingArrangement.com explicitly forbids escorts or prostitutes using the website to solicit clients, but it is certainly the view held by many that Sugar Daddies are seeking a round‑about way of paying for sex. However, Regina would disagree with that stereotype. “Most men are not seeking sexual interactions,” she asserts. “They simply want company; someone to go to the theatre with, to eat out with. Those that do use this as a full-time job enjoy the best money can buy. They live lavish lives whilst achieving what they desire academically.” Regina explains that she doesn’t walk away from her interactions with her

So are Sugar Babies essentially escorts with long contracts? Not according to Regina.

However, Regina cautions that while the industry may be misunderstood, it’s neither perfect nor infallible. “This industry can be easily glorified but it is one that should be entered with great caution. While I have not had an unpleasant experience, I am certain ones exist.” She explains that she protects herself from these kinds of experiences by being open with friends about her activities and making sure they’re aware when she’s out with one of her Daddies. “I am fortunate enough to have friends I can trust,” she says. “I tell them precise details of the person I am meeting, location etc. I have them on standby should anything go wrong. “Even when I am meeting someone I have met before, I will ensure someone is aware. I think this is the most important part of these vices.” ¡ * Names have been changed

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Beautiful jewellery F I N D YO U R

CUSTOM MADE

A T. . .

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

[noun]

{hygge} home W O R D S

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S T Y L I N G

P H O T O G R A P H Y

B E L I N DA N E A M E T I M BE A N

/pronounce/ hue-guh a feeling of cosiness and comfort creating a sense of wellbeing, contentment, celebrating the everyday, belonging to the moment.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Hygge is the Scandinavian word for a mood of cosiness and comfort, with feelings of wellness and contentment. Although there are many ways to describe Hygge, essentially it is a ritual of enjoying life’s simple pleasures with friends and family. As we slide into the cooler months in Canberra and get our hibernation on, here are 25 ways to bring a touch of Hygge into your home.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

H YG G E T H E

A ROU N D

HOU S E

Surround yourself only with things you love. Use layers on your furniture and walls. Use natural textures—linen, wool, ceramic, cotton. Candles, candles, candles. Hang lots of fairy lights. Hang artwork that evokes feelings of contentment.

Lavender Wreath courtesy of Moxom&Whitney

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

H YG G E

C R E AT E

E S S E N T I A L S

E X P E R I E NC E S

Friends and family.

Create a table setting and gather with friends around a home cooked meal.

Cozy blankets and throw rugs. A beautiful ceramic mug. Comfy knit socks. Woollen jumpers. Books, books, books. Yoga pants. Ugg boots (of course).

H YG G E

Spend time in front of a roaring fire. Curl up on the couch with a good book and blanket. Create a cozy evening by turning out the lights and lighting lots of candles. Get out your board games and have a night in with friends. Listen to your favourite music soundtracks. Binge on Netflix with takeaway on the couch. Fill the bath, light some candles and soak away.

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MAGA ZINE I S S U E NO.12

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H YG G E

F O OD

Warm drinks like coffee, hot tea, mulled wine, and hot cocoa. Baked goods like sourdough bread and cake. Homemade soup and slow cooked meals. ยก

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SOMETHING NEW IS COMING SOUTH. NEW PLACES TO

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