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ISSUE

NO.

9


ONE GENERATION O N E FA M I LY ONE WESTFIELD


BELCONNEN/WODEN


UNCOVER /STYLE /WELLBEING /TECH

Canberra is a destination that beckons you to scratch the surface. Rich in hidden gems of culture, sophistication and style, we invite you to uncover your full potential this season.

canberracentre.com.au


ISSUE

NO.

9

–– EVERY I S S U E

02 04 06 08 10

Editor's Letter Contributors HC Online Save The Date Entertainment

CITY

48 84

Pumping Blood To The City’s Heart What Goes Up

LIFE

30 60

New Generation Plan B

FOOD

12 96

Food in Fashion Campfire Tales

STYLE

18 70 90

Metallics 101 A Life Less Ordinary An Ashby State of Mind

T R AV E L

52

Head for The Hill(tops)

WELLNESS

104 109

––

Future Fitness Go Go Gadget


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Today we delight in receiving ‘snail mail’ and hand-written communication because it’s the antithesis of today’s blink-and-you’ll-miss-itculture. And that’s why Magazine has become so popular.

E D I TO R ' S LETTER

Each issue takes us three months to put together. We imagine, we plan, we write, we reach out to local creatives to work with us on a free publication that we do for love, and we give it to you in the hope that you can see our hearts and souls in its pages.

I’m often asked why, in a world which is largely controlled by a device that fits in the palm of our hand, I choose to publish a print magazine. My answer? Because the more time we spend interacting with a device or in front of a screen, the more we crave the tangible. When emails first roared into common usage, the ‘ding’ that signalled a new message was cause for excitement—these days it’s groan-inducing.

That’s our future. No matter how much success is measured by clicks and shares, we’ll always produce something that has a far deeper purpose.

Amanda Whitley Magazine Editor-in-chief HerCanberra Founder + Director

TEAM HC

Emma Macdonald Associate Editor

Belinda Neame Events Coordinator

Ashleigh Went Feature Writer

Emily Simpson Editorial Coordinator

W E ' D L OV E TO H E A R YO U R T H O U G H T S Please drop us a line at hello@hercanberra.com.au with your feedback.

Beatrice Smith Online Editor

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Katie Radojkovic Graphic Designer

Calum Stenning Editorial Coordinator

@HERCANBERRA HERCANBERR A .COM. AU


SALES GALLERY NOW OPEN

A NEW CHAPTER FOR elevated DESIGN IN BELCONNEN Now Selling. North-facing 1, 2 & 3 bedroom residences and penthouses with uninterrupted views to Lake Ginninderra. Priced from $330,000. MIN EER 5.5

Visit the Sales Gallery located on 167 Emu Bank, Belconnen Sales Enquiries 1300 120 454 / cirrusbelconnen.com

ABOVE LEFT: Artist Impression, Typical Living

Developer

Architect


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Magazi ne

WORDS

TIFFANY BONASER A

TIM BEAN

Tiffany Bonasera is a Canberrabased journalist, copywriter, and interior design student. When stuck for creative ideas and story inspiration, the former elite distance runner hits the capital’s magical bush tracks—a trick that works, every time.

A fire fighter by day (and night), Tim also loves being behind the lens to capture all things food, people and places. You can often find Tim drinking coffee at his local or capturing a time lapse on Anzac Parade!

Tiffany Bonsaera Catherine Carter Roslyn Hull Emma MacDonald Belinda Neame Emily Simpson Beatrice Smith Ashleigh Went Amanda Whitley Rebecca Worth

PHOTOGR APHY Tim Bean Lauren Campbell Brenton Colley Tina Nikolovski Martin Ollman

HAIR Lexi Bannister Peter Magro, Pony and Pins

MAKEUP Lesley Johnston Jacqui Scott

H AY L E Y O ’ N E I L L

T I N A N I KO L O V S K I

Hayley O’Neill is a Sydney-based fashion stylist (but a Canberra girl at heart) who currently works as a fashion office coordinator for marie claire Australia. She has worked alongside the likes of Alex Perry, Samantha Harris and Margaret Zhang.

Tina Nikolovski is an internationally published fashion photographer, based in the heart of Canberra. She is also the founder and director of boutique modelling agency Devojka Models. She believes in doing everything with a strong intention, from a soul level.

STYLING Belinda Neame Hayley O'Neill

GRAPHIC DESIGN Katie Radojkovic

PRINTING CanPrint Communications

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THE NEW MINI COUNTRYMAN. NOW AVAILABLE AT ROLFE CLASSIC MINI GARAGE. ROLFE CLASSIC MINI GARAGE 3-5 Botany Street, Phillip. Ph (02) 6208 4222. rolfeclassic.minigarage.com.au


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HC ONLINE Visit hercanberra.com.au for your daily dose of all things Canberra.

@38espresso

@drommeren

@emmamacdonaldinsta

@lucykingyoga

@miraniparker

@paris.does.art

@tracy_lee_photography

@allgrownupweddings

@number10restaurantandbar

#HERCANBERRA FOR THE CHANCE TO SEE YOUR IMAGES IN PRINT

@HERCANBERRA #HERCANBERRA

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–– STYLE FOOD & DRINK CITY BUSINESS EVENTS AND MORE ––


Pizza & RosĂŠ ...in leopard print

02 6178 0048


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JUNE HANDMADE CANBERRA 10-11 JUNE Exhibition Park in Canberra handmadecanberra.com.au

BETH ORTON 16 JUNE Canberra Theatre Centre canberratheatrecentre.com.au

WINTER GLASS MARKET 17 JUNE Canberra Glassworks canberraglassworks.com

FAREWELLCOME – THE IDEA OF NORTH

OLD BUS DEPOT MARKETS: CREATIVE FIBRE 9 JULY Kingston Former Transport Depot obdm.com.au

1984 25-29 JULY Canberra Theatre Centre canberratheatrecentre.com.au

HANNAH QUINLIVAN: ANATOMY OF A DRAWING UNTIL 30 JULY Canberra Museum and Gallery cmag.com.au

24 JUNE The Street Theatre thestreet.org.au

AU G U ST

ROCKWIZ LIVE! TWENTYSEVENTEEN

CANBERRA WRITERS FESTIVAL

22 JUNE Canberra Theatre Centre canberratheatrecentre.com.au

25 – 27 AUGUST Various venues canberrawritersfestival.com.au

J U LY THE FORAGE 1 JULY Little National Hotel theforage.com.au

CANBERRA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA'S OPERA GALA 8 JULY Llewellyn Hall cso.org.au

M O R E E V E N T S AT HERCANBERR A .COM. AU/EVENT S

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SAV E T H E DAT E

MELODRAMA IN MEIJI JAPAN UNTIL 27 AUGUST National Library of Australia nla.gov.au

THE TRUFFLE FESTIVAL – CANBERRA REGION UNTIL 31 AUGUST Various venues trufflefestival.com.au


melodrama in meiji japan


HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

ENTERTAINMENT

of

In Metropolis (1927) the divide between classes has become a yawning chasm and Henry Ford’s assembly line is a living purgatory for workers. The uncaring elite cruise between skyscrapers in bi‑planes and a mad scientist manufactures a pop idol to rally the masses.

p as t

Forbidden Planet (1956) is Shakespeare’s Tempest in outer space, complete with Robbie the Robot as the home help. Anne Francis struts around her alien world in bare feet, brief skirts and the obligatory push-up bra whilst all the men wear neck-to-toe overalls.

BY ROSLYN HULL

What the ‘future’ is is a matter of perspective. 1984 was the distant future to H.G. Wells but 2001 is in the past for us. Film is an excellent medium for depicting a fabulous or frightening future.

BOOK TO THE FUTURE

Soylent Green (1973) takes recycling resources and devaluing human beings to a bitter extreme. Food only comes as Soylent Green—a protein bar supposedly made from plankton until it is revealed it is made from people. Women are ‘furniture’ that come as a package with your company apartment and big business is untouchable. Chilling, or an accurate prediction?

BY REBECCA WORTH, PAPERCHAIN BOOKSTORE

All titles available for purchase instore, paperchainbookstore.com.au

NEW YORK 2140

THE HANDMAID’S TALE

DEAR IJEAWELE

Kim Stanley Robinson

Margaret Atwood

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

2140 NYC—the city is submerged by rising sea levels. This book follows the lives of the occupants of a single apartment—a market trader, a detective, an internet celebrity, a lawyer, the building manager, two boys with nowhere else to go, and the temporary residents on the roof—the coders. In a gripping, multi-layered novel, the disappearance of the coders creates drastic consequences for all the occupants as all their futures become threatened. PAGE 10

Atwood’s modern classic invites us to imagine a dystopian future in order to reflect on our present. It is the story of Offred, a woman forced to bear children for an elite couple unable to conceive in a violent world in which women are prohibited from reading, working or owning property. As we recognise parallels with our own world, this challenging tale reminds us of our privilege and encourages us to fight for a fairer future.

Poignant, witty and deeply insightful, Dear Ijeawele is written in the form of a letter to Ngozi Adichie’s dear childhood friend Ijeawele, in response to her request for advice to raise a feminist daughter. Adichie gives 15 suggestions to her friend, ranging from warning her against ‘Feminism Lite,’ to debunking traditional gender roles. Don’t be deceived by the slimness of this book; it is replete with intimate, honest and astute insights.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

BLACK MIRROR

FUTURE FLIX BY ASHLEIGH WENT

A look into the future provides a brief yet captivating escape from the present. Here are our favourite futuristic Netflix and podcasts picks.

Back to the Future II (1989) is famously set in 2015, and looking back a couple of years, from our perspective, it is hard not to be disappointed. No hoverboards, no cold fusion-powered flying cars, no self-inflating hi top boots. Sadly, they got the obsession with plastic surgery right. The Fifth Element (1997), shows the future as a colourful, many-specied crowd scene. Gaultier models manning the McDonalds drive-thru, blue skinned divas singing ALL the octaves, luxurious space liners, instant roast dinners and the ubiquitous flying cars. Sadly, the most accurate elements are the violence, pollution, obsession with celebrity and tiny city apartments.

CLOUD ATLAS

ABANDONED PLACES

David Mitchell

Henk Von Rensbergen

Through six intertwining stories spanning the colonial past to the post-apocalyptic future, this exquisite novel explores humanity’s desire for power and its far-reaching consequences. Each story captures the essence of a new style, and the beauty of this piece is not only its lyricism, but Mitchell’s ability to tie each story together.

From burnt libraries in Italy to a forgotten love-themed hotel in Japan, Henk’s photographs take us across the world to the places that have been long-abandoned. Insightful and melancholic, these places are not dominated by despair, rather they are an archive compiled in the search for beauty in desolation, and the curiosity for their literally crumbling future. This pocket-sized photo book is beautifully presented, and perfect for urban explorers.

Occasionally uplifting, but mostly depressing, Black Mirror takes an often-dim peek into the future of modern society. Each episode features a new story with a satirical, dark and commonly confronting take on the consequences of social media and technology. Despite its pessimistic outlook, it makes for addictive watching.

TRAVELLERS This is essentially a show about time travel, but not how you know it. Citizens from the future discover a way to implant their consciousness into modern day ‘hosts’ moments before their death—with the intention of saving the human race from disaster. These citizens carry out missions while attempting to maintain the pre-existing life of their host, creating a juxtaposition of individual tribulations with societal collapse.

FUTURE THINKERS PODCAST Mike Gilliland and Euvie Ivanova host this Podcast which examines the trajectory of technology and issues that impact the future including spirituality, philosophy, future societies and artificial intelligence. Each episode features a guest expert as they discuss and speculate on what our collective future holds.

FUTURE TENSE This podcast comes courtesy of ABC Radio National and discusses trends and technology and how they affect our society. The show attempts, through sharing various perspectives and discussions, to answer questions like ‘could a 24-hour economy improve your quality of life?’, ‘Could you be sued for your tattoo?’ and ‘is happiness vastly overrated?’.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

IN

WORDS AMANDA WHITLEY STYLING BELINDA NEAME PHOTOS TIM BEAN FROM POKÉ BOWLS TO MOONSHINE, WE’VE ROUNDED U P C A N B E R R A’ S H OT T E S T F O O D A N D D R I N K T R E N D S .

DOUGHNUTS

Doughnuts are hardly a new food—they’ve been a favourite sweet snack for more than a century. But as coffee has gone upscale, doughnuts have followed…and while you can find some fine locally-crafted morsels at cafés around town, Canberra has lacked a dedicated artisan outlet. Until now. The Doughnut Department, just opened in the city’s No Name Lane Precinct, shuns the typical doughnut style (small, mass produced and full of pre-bought tinned fillings and toppings). Instead, their larger handmade doughnuts are made by Chef Nathan Frost with yeast-raised dough, table-cut by hand and filled with fine sweet—and savoury—ingredients. The Doughnut Department will also offer a unique champagne and doughnut experience Thursday and Friday nights. All our favourite things in one place. ___

The Doughnut Department, No Name Lane Precinct, 40 Marcus Clarke Street, Canberra City | thedoughnutdept.com

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

N O S TA LG I A

Perhaps it’s a knee-jerk reaction to the recent molecular gastronomy frenzy, but these days diners are flocking to restaurants serving up nostalgic dishes. It’s classics like Pepper Steak—once decried as ‘old fashioned’— that are proving a winner at Kingston’s OTIS Dining Hall. But banish that image of an RSL counter meal from your head, OTIS’ pepper steak is a 200g melt‑in‑the-mouth beef fillet, topped with a silk‑wood pepper crust and served with a velvety brandy jus. As OTIS’ Chef and Owner Damian Brabender reflects, “throughout the recent years of forever-changing Australian food trends, steak au poivre has always been a strong reminder of what good food is really about, and the processes that make great chefs what they are. “It is a dish that you can't hide behind— it is either right or it is not”.

"IT I S A DI SH THAT YOU CAN'T HIDE BEHIND—IT IS EITHER RIGHT OR IT IS NOT."

___

OTIS Dining Hall, 29 Jardine Street, Kingston. thisisotis.com.au

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MOONSHINE

In a throw back to prohibition days, moonshine is gaining a new generation of admirers. Though it's been distilled in backwoods Appalachia since the 1800s and mostly produced in secret, today’s Moonshine is leaving behind its “illegal” and “illicit” past and emerging as a serious alternative to Vodka as a mixer. A unique Whiskey, being un-aged, the liquor has a very distinctive taste and can be enjoyed straight or combined with a variety of mixers. The latest craze? Moonshine mixed with Mountain Dew—affectionately known as “Moondew”.

MOONSHINE IS LEAVING B E H I N D I T S “ I L L E G A L” AND “ILLICIT” PAST

Baldwin Distilling Company’s Moonshine is handcrafted right here in Canberra from 100% Australian Corn and is available in Original, Apple Pie, Honey and Peach flavours. ___

Baldwin Distilling Company, 1a/70 Dacre Street, Mitchell. baldwindistilling.com.au

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

POKÉ BOWLS

If you’ve just discovered acai bowls, bad luck, you’re already too late. Poké bowls (pronounced POH-kay), have become the newest darling of the Instagram set. A traditional Hawaiian dish with Japanese influences, Poké bowls typically feature bite‑size pieces of raw fish like tuna and salmon, marinated and tossed through a bowl of edamame beans, cucumber, pickles, shiitake and rice. Think of it as a big sashimi-style salad—the perfect healthy fast food. ___

Lazy Su, 1/9 Lonsdale Street, Braddon. lazy-su.com.au.

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N O S E TO TA I L

In a world where an estimated 50 per cent of food is thrown out before it would reach a plate, the Nose to Tail movement is an important step towards sustainable eating. Based around the philosophy of not wasting any part of the animal, Nose to Tail cooking is being championed locally by Blood n Bones—a Canberra collective hosting pop-up dinners around the city to showcase the movement to locals. While many consumers baulk at the thought of eating offal or

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offcuts, Blood n Bones’ dishes— such as this starter of smoked and roasted bone marrow with herb and caper salad and toast—prove they can be downright delicious. THE NOSE TO TAIL

But it’s not just about the taste. Blood n Bones hopes that their innovative approach to Nose to Tail food will encourage consumers to be more mindful about the food that they prepare and eat. ___

Blood n Bones. Various locations. facebook.com/eatbnb

MOVEMENT IS AN IMPORTANT STEP IN SUSTAINABLE E ATING.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

S H A R E P L AT E S

They’re the antithesis to the formal three-course format that’s long been de rigueur, and a reflection of the casualisation of dining as a whole. Share plates have fewer constraints, more variety, and offer diners the chance to enjoy multiple flavours and tastes within each meal. Food envy, begone! Share plates are a key feature of Pialligo Estate’s paddock-to-plate menu and underpin its welcoming farmhouse atmosphere—think family and friends gathering to share a meal.

The fare itself is homestyle food taken to fine-dining levels: a platter of Chicken liver parfait, Chicken galantine, Veal tongue and oxtail terrine and Pork and prune terrine is served alongside slow-roasted Flinders Island lamb shoulder—designed to be pulled apart and distributed among plates—and moreish sides. Share plates are about more than just the food—they’re about a shared experience. The chance to taste, to talk and to come together. ___

Pialligo Estate, 18a Kallaroo Road, Pialligo. thepialligoestate.com.au

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

THINK ‘FUTURE’ AND YOU THINK SLEEK, SHINY M E TAL S . W E S H OW YO U H OW TO I N C O R P O R AT E O N E OF THE HOTTEST TRENDS FOR AW17 INTO YOUR

101

WA R D R O B E A N D M A K E U P.

WORDS AMANDA WHITLEY P H OTO G R AP HY TI NA N I KO LOVS KI

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FAS HION

Metallics are everywhere this season, and it’s never been easier to incorporate a bit of sparkle or shimmer into your wardrobe. Stylist Hayley O’Neill advises introducing the trend to an outfit through a key piece—a sequinned top or metallic boots—and pairing it with staples you already own. It’ll reinvent your ‘go to’ pieces whilst elevating your entire look. Witchery sequin top $139.95, Dotti jeans $59.95, Olga Berg crocodile skin clutch from David Jones $99.95 and Peter Lang ring from Devine Goddess. All from Westfield Belconnen and Woden. Right: Silver Ankle Boots $119 from Zara at Canberra Centre.

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

Don’t be afraid of metallics or feel you need to reserve them for night time—a sequinned pencil skirt teamed with a feminine knit is the perfect daytime combo. For night, go full metal with a sequinned dress or dip your toe in the metallic pond with a sculptural clutch. Witchery sequin pencil skirt $299.95, Dotti sweater $49.95, Peter Lang Brooch $189 from Devine Goddess. All from Westfield Belconnen and Woden. Right: Rose Gold Clutch $109 from Devine Goddess at Westfield Belconnen.

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

BEAUT Y

I T’S AL L AB O U T T HAT BAS E

Use a liquid illuminiser as your primer to give your skin that sun‑kissed glow. Makeup artist Jacqui Scott used Benefit sun beam ($45.00) from Myer, Canberra Centre on Alana.

Y O U G L O W, G I R L !

Make your cheekbones light and lifted by applying a powder highlight after your foundation—Jacqui loves theBalm Mary-Lou Manizer ($29.95) from David Jones at Canberra Centre. This versatile product can also be used on the Cupid's bow to make your lips appear fuller, or as an eyeshadow.

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

DAY T I M E S H I M M E R

A fun and flirty version of a classic black winged liner, this metallic olive is perfect for a day-into-night time look. Jacqui used the NYX Glam Liner Aqua Luxe Collection in Glam Golden ($9.95) from Priceline. Custom Unicorn Hair Extensions ($75+) from Pony and Pins add a playful touch. Emma wears londunn + missguided pink hammered satin duster jacket, model’s own. Custom Unicorn Hair Extensions made to order from Pony and Pins.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

H E AV Y M E TA L

When the sun goes down, metallics really shine. Add some glitter to your smoky eye with a liquid eye shadow— Jacqui used Stila’s Magnificent Metals Glitter & Glow Liquid Eye Shadow in Rose Gold Retro ($35.00) from Mecca Cosmetica at Canberra Centre.

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To really up the glam factor, add metallic pop to your pout—a lightreflective touch will also make your lips look fuller. Alana wears Hourglass Extreme Sheen Gloss in Siren ($40.00) from Mecca Cosmetica at Canberra Centre.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

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BEHIND TH E

VIDEO TUTURIALS

Want more expert tips for incorporating this season's hottest trend into your wardrobe and makeup routine? Visit hercanberra.com.au/metallics

C R EATIVE D I R EC TO R AMAN DA WH I T L E Y S T Y L I S T H AY L E Y O ’ N E I L L , A S S I S T E D BY E M I LY C R A B B H A I R P E T E R M AG R O, P O N Y A N D P I N S M A K E U P J A C Q U I S C O T T, A S S I S T E D B Y G E N N A K O U M A L AT S O S P H OTO G R A P H E R T I N A N I KO LOV S KI, AS S I ST E D BY B E K DAY VIDEOGRAPHER MARTIN OLLMAN M O D E L S A L A N A J A N S S E N A N D E M M A YAT E S, D E VO J K A M O D E L S

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PROUDLY AUSTRALIAN SINCE 1981

PERRICUTTEN.COM. AU


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GENERATION SEVENTEEN CANBERRA WOMEN WHO ARE MAKI NG WAVES L O C A L LY, N AT I O N A L LY A N D I N T E R N AT I O N A L LY; HERE ARE THE FACES TO W AT C H I N 2 0 17

W O R D S Emma Macdonald P H O T O G R A P H Y Martin Ollman L O C A T I O N Canberra Glassworks

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

THE

M OVERS

ALISON PLEVEY

Why get bogged down in words when you can express yourself through movement? Alison Plevey is pushing the boundaries of modern dance, and has founded the Australian Dance Party. A graduate of the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts with a First Class Honours Degree in Arts and Dance, Alison is a choreographer, teacher and improviser in Canberra and regional New South Wales. In the wake of last year’s Federal Election, she founded her dance company inspired by Canberra’s political culture and identity. Alison strives to communicate contemporary issues, human stories and bring dance performance into non-traditional theatre spaces and environments. ELLIE BRUSH

As a sporting role model, Ellie Brush provides double the motivation and aspiration. Not only is she an Australian and international women’s soccer star, but this year Ellie moved into representative Australian rules football in the AFL Women’s. Some weekends she plays both codes.

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The qualified physiotherapist, who studied at Charles Sturt University, joined Canberra United for their inaugural season in 2008 and has captained the team ever since. She’s been called up to the Matildas in 2009 and 2012 and has notched more than 100 W-League appearances. She signed with the Houston Dash in 2015. BIANCA ELMIR

Bianca “Bam Bam” Elmir is a boxer striving for a place in the 2018 Commonwealth Games. She has been ranked number three in the world as a bantamweight, and has won three Australian titles and one Oceania title. A former political advisor for the ACT Greens, Bianca holds a degree in International Studies and Development and will follow her passion for international aid work once she has fulfilled her boxing ambitions. Using her profile as a mentor to provide self-defence training for women and support victims of domestic violence, she is currently preparing her autobiography and involved in the production of a documentary film of her boxing career, titled “Bam Bam”.


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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

THE

INFLUENCERS

GINA CIANCIO

It is just shy of three years since Gina Ciancio decided to follow her heart—looking beyond the Australian Public Service and into the world of interior design. Building a new home and giving birth to Patrick as she nurtured her Style Curator blog, Gina quickly engaged a social media following with her minimalist—but always inviting– aesthetic. Style Curator has now cemented itself as an interiors inspo site nationally. Gina has amassed over 25,000 social media followers and the blog receives 50,000 clicks a month. Meanwhile, she’s just been selected as Foxtel’s Lifestyle Home Influencer— signing up to deliver content to a twomillion-plus audience.

TA N YA H E N N ES SY

There is a little bit of all of us in Tanya Hennessy only she is much, much funnier. A radio announcer by day, she presents breakfast for Hit 104.7 in Canberra during the week and 2DayFM in Sydney on a Saturday. The last year has seen Tanya’s profile skyrocket through her series of videos tackling “what people say” to professionals such as hairdressers, nurses and personal trainers. She has one of the most engaged pages on Facebook with 680,000 followers, and her videos have amassed 130 million views. And until you have seen her present a makeup tutorial–along with the other 70 million of us–well, you haven’t really laughed.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

THE

RESE ARCHERS TAR A B O U L D I N G

Tara Boulding is part of the groundbreaking University of Canberra research team developing new treatments for breast cancer. Led and mentored by Professor Sudha Rao, Tara devotes her waking hours to research focused on understanding proteins that promote breast cancer stem cells and the formation of tumours. The aim is to halt the recurrence of breast and other aggressive cancers as well as come up with innovative therapies to improve cancer patients’ quality of life. The 25-year-old early-career researcher was recently awarded the inaugural Melanie Swan Cancer Research Fellowship to support her vital work.

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

H AY L E Y TE AS DA L E

Not much stops Hayley Teasdale. At just 25, she is a rising star in the science field and about to complete her PhD in Parkinson’s disease research where she is pioneering a type of noninvasive brain stimulation to help suffers regain their balance. She is also teaching herself how to design, build and market a “Buzz Balance Ball” to assist sufferers. But sometimes, each month, Hayley is forced to stop. She spends four hours hooked up to a blood plasma transfusion to treat a debilitating disease Common Variable Immune Deficiency. Even then, the finalist of the 2017 Young ACT Citizen of the Year and finalist of the 2017 ACT Young Woman of the Year uses her experience to propel further good works—as a volunteer for the Red Cross Blood Service. PAGE 37


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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

THE

T H I N KERS

LUCY POOLE

JESSA ROGERS

Tackling reform of the Australian Public Service (APS) is not for the faint-hearted. But Lucy Poole is one of a new generation of creative thinkers considering how the APS can benefit from business opportunities and be more responsive to change.

An Indigenous woman from a low‑income family who fell pregnant in Year 12, Jessa has overcome enormous challenges to become an accomplished 32-year-old Associate Professor of Education, mother of two, and a 2017 Fulbright Scholar.

Born in the United Kingdom, Lucy has worked in London both within the British Civil Service and a large private recruitment firm.

Despite the demands of new motherhood, Jessa enrolled at university, graduating with First Class Honours, and trailblazing an academic career focusing on Indigenous education and the creative arts. Along the way she has also set up a girls’ school in Far North Queensland.

Having recently moved to Prime Minister and Cabinet as part of the APS Talent Council program, Lucy was the former Group Manager of APS Reform at the Australian Public Service Commission and a Future of Work Champion. She’s led a number of firsts, including a Hackathon using 500 graduates to consider real policy challenges, a new talent attraction and branding strategy “Brandit”, and the first APS-wide smartphone app “Ripple”.

Having completed her PhD, Jessa was National NAIDOC Youth of the Year 2010, and last year was ANU Postgraduate Student of the Year and runner-up ACT Young Woman of the Year.

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THE

DESIGNERS

CHARNE ESTERHUIZEN

Charne Esternuizen wants to change the way we create and consume fashion. The 23-year-old Canberra Institute of Technology (CIT) graduate is using 3D printing technology to “build” garments in a way that has never been done before. Emigrating from South Africa at the age of 16, Charne established her own label MAAK (which means “to make” in Afrikaans) in 2016 and has shown at two Fashfests (also modelling her own designs) using 3D printing to manufacture them. This year an intricate black dress made of hundreds of 3D rubber butterflies debuted on the catwalk at Vancouver Fashion Week with her work featuring internationally, in German fashion magazines and Vogue China.

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CHELSEA LEMON

When is a table a piece of art? When it is a meticulously hand-crafted plateau of geometric splices of wood that almost creates an optical illusion. Chelsea Lemon’s “Granger Table” is indicative of the artist’s style. Her award-winning furniture and woodwork often includes foliage and plant themes, mixed with the technique of parquetry. Graduating in 2015 from the ANU with Honours in a Bachelor of Visual Arts, majoring in Furniture Design, Chelsea received the 2014 Designcraft: Craft + Design People’s Choice Award for her Triangulation Chair as well as the Craft ACT Exhibition Award to showcase her chair in the 2015 ‘Emerging Contemporaries’ exhibition.


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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

THE

CREAT I V E S

UTE PIKLER

LEXI BANNISTER

She’s known in the hair industry as “Queen of the Blondes” and had a hand in creating some of New York Fashion Week’s runway hair for designers such as Sandy Liang and Ji Oh. Closer to home Lexi Bannister assisted Renya Xydis on the Toni Maticevski show at the last Mercedes Benz Fashion Week and last year made the leap to freelancing. Lexi has tended the tresses of some of the country’s most notable heads – supermodel-in-the-making Zoe Barnard, and TV presenter Erin Molan among them. She’s also a favourite stylist of The Bachelor set, having coloured both Keira Maguire and Rachael Gouvignon’s glossy locks.

She’s only 28 but Ute Pikler has spent four of the last 10 years in one of the toughest and most male-dominated roles in the food industry—head chef. Now she has taken the leap into co-owning and running her own restaurant, the much-lauded Vincent in Barton. Earning her chef’s whites as an apprentice at The Boat House, Ute cemented her French-inspired technique at some of Melbourne’s most elite restaurants. She was commis chef at Vue de monde before moving to Circa, The Prince. By 2015 Ute felt ready to make the leap to create her own restaurant, which she did with friend Ollie Ryrie.

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THE

LEGISL ATO R S

ELIZABETH LEE

TAR A C H EY N E

Touted by psephologist Malcolm Mackerras as the ACT’s next Liberal Chief Minister, Elizabeth Lee has entered the Legislative Assembly with high expectations. But the former lawyer is circumspect about her future, saying she just wants to get her head around the inner workings of ACT politics as the newly-minted member for Kurrajong.

Few people can lay claim to embracing Canberra with as much gusto as Tara Cheyne. Having left her home city of Queensland in 2008 for the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Department and later the Finance Department, Tara settled in Belconnen and promptly fell in love.

Putting her people skills down to a passion for aerobics instruction— she knows how to enter a room and get people doing what she wants—Elizabeth may also need to take lessons from her comprehensive Taekwondo study into the combative political chamber. The eldest daughter of a Korean migrant family, Elizabeth gained her Law Degree from the ANU and has worked in both the public and private sector.

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She moved quickly to cement her links to the city, starting up the popular blog In The Taratory and becoming president of the Belconnen Community Council. She won a Labor seat in Ginninderra at last year’s ACT Election—making her the youngest woman in the Assembly at just 30. That has not impeded her promotion to Government whip, nor future leadership speculation.


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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

THE

CHANGEMAKERS

CAITLIN FIGUEIREDO

HANNAH WANDEL

Caitlin Figueiredo was just six years old when she felt an acute awareness that the world was not a just place. Now, at 21, she has discussed her passion for equality with former first lady Michelle Obama in Washington after last year being named United State of Women's Gender Equality Global Champion.

Hannah Wandel understands Canberra’s unique role as the national capital, and how complex its corridors of power can be.

She ranks alongside Chelsea Clinton and Gloria Steinem as an International Influencer and Mogul Ambassador to an online platform of 18.5 million women from 196 countries. Closer to home Caitlin won the Westpac/AFR “100 Women of Influence” Young Leader category in 2016 - the youngest recipient in the award’s history. She also works to end violence against children and the bullying epidemic as an Ambassador of the Alannah and Madeline Foundation.

A social entrepreneur and gender equality advocate, Hannah founded Country to Canberra in 2014, which brings young rural women to Canberra to connect them with female role models and mentors. She’s been named in the Westpac/AFR “100 Women of Influence” in 2015, is a World Economic Forum Global Shaper, a United Nations Youth and Gender Equality Taskforce member and the youngest ever Director of the National Rural Women’s Coalition at just 27.

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PUMPING

BLOOD TH E C IT Y ' S HEART TO

WO R D S C AT H E R I N E C A R T E R PHOTOGRAPHY MARTIN OLLMAN

Image courtesy of National Archives of Australia.

TA K E N I N T H E E A R LY 19 6 0 S , A HAPPY SNAP IN BLACK AND WHITE CAPTURES A B A R E LY R E C O G N I S A B L E GAREMA PLACE.

In the foreground, a group of women with children gathered at their skirts stop to chat. Passers-by gaze into sparkling shop windows. Men in three piece suits walk briskly along the bustling sidewalk. There’s not a faded ‘for lease’ sign in sight. I’ve lived in Canberra for a long time, and no other topic on the urban planning agenda musters as much ire and irritation as the question of what can be done with Civic. It’s been called a concrete jungle, a tumbleweed farm and a wasteland. Attempts to kick-start our failing heart—from Christmas lights to camel rides, ice skating rinks to dachshund races—have mostly fallen flat. Revitalising our city centre is essential for Canberra’s growth as an attractive, competitive city in the 21st Century economy. Canberra’s

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citizens also need a great city centre that they can be proud of. Undoubtedly, the bright lights of the Canberra Centre have lured people away from Garema Place. But the Canberra Centre is not going anywhere—and nor should we want it to. A trip to any other capital city in Australia will confirm that we have a first-class mall in our city centre—one which is a pleasant experience in all weather. Removing the road that ran down the middle of the city also made it harder for people to swing by Garema Place. While pedestrians can walk almost the entire length of the city without having to cross any roads with cars, sadly they often choose not to. Why? Because City Walk is largely devoid of life. But the real problem is far greater than a road or a large shopping mall. We currently have no real


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

"OUR CITY CENTRE IS BROKEN AND DIRTY"

vision and no master plan for our city centre. Petty rules and a range of obstacles have made redevelopment difficult—from waste management policies that make it impossible for new cafes and restaurants to enliven empty corners to a tax regime that makes it expensive to redevelop. So, what is the solution? In March, the ACT Government announced its intention to establish a City Renewal Authority to drive development of the Northbourne Avenue, Civic and West Basin precinct. This could be our biggest chance to revive our failing heart. The new authority will commence on 1 July, and Chief Minister Andrew Barr says “planning for the precinct’s future will be a priority”.

Canberrans can expect a greater emphasis on “design-led, people focused urban renewal of Canberra’s city centre”, Barr says, “basically filling the precinct with places people want to spend time in”. “More residents, more businesses, new buildings and better public spaces” throughout the city centre will bring more life to Garema Place, he says. This seems like a good start. But we need some ‘quick wins’ to re-build people’s confidence in our city centre. Jane Easthope, chief executive officer of In the City Canberra—the organisation tasked with administering the Canberra City Centre Marketing and Improvements Grant—says the quickest win is to look after our existing infrastructure. She says that currently much of our city centre is broken and dirty and “not worthy of a selfie at any time of the day or night”. Improving existing infrastructure will be a priority for the new authority according to Barr. “The City Renewal Authority will work to improve public spaces within the whole precinct, including the city centre. This will mean improvements to streets, footpaths, parks and buildings,” he promises. PAGE 49


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railroaded by the Territory’s policies regarding waste management,” she says. The activation of several sites with huge potential as sun-filled cafes or gorgeous boutiques has been blocked, Morris says, because of the need to provide “voluminous and over-sized waste rooms and collection areas”.

Other city builders have suggested that a quick win may be a trial shareway in City Walk, in a similar style to that found in Bunda Street.

"THERE ARE A GRE AT MANY OPPORTUNITIES FOR RE DE VE LOPMENT"

This would simply reinstate the original design. City Walk was only created in the 1970s as part of a growing trend around the world that has since been rethought. Rebecca Gallacher, a director with Knight Frank Town Planning, says the controlled reintroduction of cars “would increase both activity and surveillance throughout the day”, while Kristi Jorgensen, chief executive officer of Purdon Planning, is also in favour of a “bold trial” opening up Garema Place as a shared way. She says we need to embark on this as a “city experiment”. Another quick win is to embrace a flexible approach to planning. Louise Morris, a director of property and construction with Chamberlains Law Firm, a long-time property professional and self-described Canberra tragic, says policy barriers prevent the renewal of existing sites, but the biggest barrier is the ACT Government’s lack of flexibility. “There are a great many opportunities for redevelopment which have been

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The question of how to better manage waste is currently being reviewed by the ACT Government. But in the meantime, this is just one of a range of unexpectedly tricky problems that confront both government and developers, and which stymies renewal of Civic. “This is a tragedy for the city,” Morris says, and adds that we need to work together to be thought leaders that craft and shape a “dynamic city that our children will simply take for granted”. Meanwhile, Easthope would like to see building owners given discounts “like a temporary tax discount to spruce-up or renew”. She says this would create more opportunities for our “foodie and nightlife entrepreneurs” and that “slowly City Walk will convert to Lygon or Church Street”. Other radical ideas for Civic continue to emerge. A field of flowers as a reinvented Floriade breathing new life into our city centre each spring. An urban playground with water games, climbing ropes, swings, slides and a flying fox. A large-scale program to reposition ageing offices as apartments or incubators for budding entrepreneurs. A quality year-round events program, pop-up galleries, pocket parks and more urban greenery. The ideas are endless. Meanwhile, another cold, grey winter is approaching and with it, another season where our city’s heart lies dormant. ¡


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

“with my crossbow, I shot the Albatross”

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this poisoned Sea

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FOR

TH E WORDS BELINDA NEAME PHOTOGRAPHY TIM BEAN

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

I T ’ S V I N TAG E C H A R M M E E T S T H E B E S T O F MODERN LIFE. LESS THAN A TWO-HOUR DRIVE FROM CANBERRA, THE ROLLING COUNTRYSIDE O F T H E H I L LTO P S R E G I O N I S B U R S T I N G W I T H R I C H R E D S O I L S, S TO N E F R U I T S (C H E R R I E S A R E T H E LO C A L H E R O E S), V I N E YA R D S , L I V E S TO C K AND LOCALS WHO WELCOME YOU WITH GOOD O L D - FA S H I O N E D C O U N T RY H O S P I TA L I T Y.

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THE BEAUTY OF THE MILKY WAY WILL KEEP YOU SPELLBOUND FOR HOURS.

Stay

COLENSO FARM

If you’re looking for urban buzz, this isn’t the place for you; but if you want to unplug and soak in the beauty of the rural lifestyle, Colenso Farm is the perfect retreat. Located on an isolated stretch between Harden and Boorowa, this working farm will bring you instant calm as soon as you arrive—and on a clear night, the beauty of The Milky Way will keep you spellbound for hours.

Choose from Colenso Country Retreat (sleeps eight) or Walker’s Cottage (sleeps four). All beds are adorned with cloud-like mattresses and covered in the whitest of linen. Although both cottages are self-catered, you can order hearty homemade meals ahead of time and Rosie will deliver them straight to your door. It's truly relaxing farm stay where you can bring your pets, walk the paddocks or just sit and relax on the verandah as you breathe in the country air.

Colenso Farm | 219 Colenso Road, Galong | colensocountryretreat.com.au

OTHER PLACES TO LAY YOUR HAT

St Clements Retreat & Conference Centre Kalangan Road, Galong stclement.com.au Wantana Cottage Farmstay 854 Rugby Road, Boorowa facebook.com/wantanafarmstay1 Federation Motor Inn 109-119 Main Street, Young young federation.com.au

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

THE MUDDY DUCK

E AT +

A café, giftwares, florist and deli, The Muddy Duck has it all. Nestled inside the historic Murrumburrah Post Office, this gorgeous café is impossible to resist. Open for breakfast and lunch from Wednesday to Sunday, The Muddy Duck specialises (as the name suggests) in duck offerings and you shouldn’t leave without trying their handmade duck chorizo. With fresh, flavour-packed menu options, homemade cakes and good coffee, The Muddy Duck is one of the region’s little gems.

Muddy Duck | 344 Albury Street, Murrumburrah | Facebook @ TheMuddyDuckCafe

KETTLE & GRAIN

Set in the former Young School, Kettle & Grain Café has old-world charm but is a modern culinary delight dishing up a fresh, seasonal menu: think tasty bruschetta on moreish rye bread or a “Big Bird” chicken burger made with the tenderest chicken breast. Room for more? Tantalise your taste buds with a homemade cake and slice, or a creamy ONA coffee. Sit inside one of the former classrooms, or maybe let the kids roam in the sun-filled courtyard—and don’t leave without a taste of the region in the form of local Hilltops Honey and homemade pantry items. When you’re sated, work off that lunch with a walk through the old school yards and the Lambing Flat Museum.

Kettle & Grain Café | 2 Campbell St, Young | kettleandgrain.com Lambing Flat Museum | Campbell Street, Young | Young lambingflatmuseum.webs.com

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GROVE ESTATE WINERY

TAS T E-T E S T, INDULGE AND SOAK UP THE VIEW

It’s just four kilometres from Young, but Grove Estate Winery’s sweeping vineyards wouldn’t be out of place in Tuscany or the Loire Valley. Having taken out Gourmet Traveller Wine’s ‘Best Small Cellar Door’ award for the Hilltops region five years in a row, the winery is also quietly building its international following with its French and Italian varietals.

OF THIS STUNNING 35 -HEC TARE PROPE RT Y.

Tim Kirk from Clonakilla Wines is one of Grove Estate’s head wine makers—and you can taste it. With a large range of reds and whites (and now a Moscato) and a local winery dog called Stubby, be prepared to taste-test, indulge and soak up the view of this stunning 35-hectare property.

Grove Estate | 4100 Murringo Road, Young | groveestate.com.au

THE SIR GEORGE

When you turn off the Hume Highway towards Jugiong, you do wonder what could possibly lie at the end of this long, quiet country road. But don’t let first impressions deceive you. Built in 1852 and grandly positioned on the corner of Riverside Drive, the historic The Sir George has recently undergone a stunning refurbishment. A good old-fashioned pub with a simple eat, drink and bake philosophy, you’ll love the family aspect—the indoor restaurant overlooks the beautiful grounds that provide plenty of space for the kids to play, explore, pat the resident goats and calves and climb in and out of the cubby house. Finish off your time in Jugiong by exploring the town on foot: visiting the Long Track Pantry for locally made jams, chutneys and sauces, Jugiong Wine Cellar for a local wine or two, and the Curators Collective boutique for a little retail therapy. Jugiong really is the Hume Highway's little gem.

The Sir George | Riverside Drive, Jugiong | sirgeorge.com.au The Long Track Pantry | 1 Riverside Drive, Jugiong | longtrackpantry.com.au Curators Collective | Studio 3, 4 Doors Up, Harden Road, Jugiong | curatorscollective.com.au PAGE 56


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

KEVIN AND VICKI SOLD OVER ONE TONNE OF FUDGE IN THEIR FIRST WEEK OF TRADING…

LAMBING FLAT CHINESE TRIBUTE GARDEN

Play

POPPA’S FUDGE & JAM FACTORY

Don’t plan on having a quick visit to Poppa’s Fudge and Jam Factory. Kevin and Vicki sold over one tonne of fudge in their first week of trading and once you taste it, you’ll understand why. Freshly-made by Poppa without any preservatives or additives, it will send your taste buds into overdrive! Not only is Poppa’s a fudge factory; it also offers a huge range of gift and homewares, chocolates and lollies. The shelves are also full to the brim with an extensive range of jams and chutneys, all of which are made on the premises, using locally-grown produce.

Poppa’s Fudge Factory | 21 Lovell St, Young | poppasfudgeandjamfactory.com

Want to stop for a moment and digest all that food? A visit to The Lambing Flat Chinese Tribute Garden at Chinaman's Dam reserve is a must. Just four kilometres from the Young town centre, the development of the gardens began in 1992 and was established to recognise the contribution of the Chinese community to the settlement of Young in the 1860s. The gardens and surrounds will take your breath away—it’s quiet, peaceful and the perfect spot for a morning or afternoon picnic (barbecue facilities are also available). In the mood for some introspection? Find the viewing platform across the bridge and simply sit and relax overlooking the Pool of Tranquility.

Lambing Flat Chinese Tribute Garden | Pitstone Road, Young

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BOTANICA ROMANTICA

What’s a trip without some retail therapy? On the long, wide main street of Harden you’ll find garden and giftware boutique Botanica Romantica. Stocking a lovely range of local and Australian-made and designed products, there is something for everyone: local honey, men’s giftware, the sweetest smelling candles and, as its Latin moniker would imply, a beautiful display of indoor and outdoor plants.

Botanica Romantica | 46 Neill Street, Harden | botanicaromantica.com.au

YOU MIGHT WANT TO ADD A LIT TLE MORE ESTIMATED T I M E TO YO U R R OA D T R I P.

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PANTRY ON PUDMAN

A favourite stop for locals and travellers alike, Pantry on Pudman is not just a café—it’s also antique heaven! Located in the farming town of Boorowa, it boasts a simple and delicious menu full of locally made sweets, regional and national produce, fresh flowers and an extensive range of antiques and collectibles. You might want to add a little more estimated time to your road trip.

The Pantry on Pudman | 107 Pudman Street, Boorowa


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

THE PERFECTIONIST. THE ALL NEW BMW 5 SERIES NOW AVAILABLE AT ROLFE CLASSIC BMW. Rolfe Classic BMW 2 Botany Street, Phillip. Ph (02) 6208 4111. rolfeclassic.bmw.com.au LMD 17000534

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B PLAN

WO R D S B E AT R I C E S M I T H PHOTOGRAPHY MARTIN OLLMAN

N O M AT T E R H O W P E R F E C T LY YO U R D U C KS A R E I N A R O W, L I F E C A N A LWAYS T H R OW YO U A C U RV E B A L L . S O W H AT D O YO U D O W H E N YO U R C A R E F U L LY- P L A N N E D FUTURE GOES TO PIECES?

THE STRUGGLE of an athlete’s journey to stay in peak physical condition is as exhaustive as is mentally taxing. But add in a debilitating injury at the beginning of a professional career and you have Jess Bibby, who at 20-years-old suffered a catastrophic back injury just before she was due to start her professional career in the Women’s National Basketball League. “As a 20-year-old playing my first WNBL team in Melbourne I was still learning about how to lift weights properly,” she explains. For Jess, it was a costly mistake. “I deadlifted incorrectly and ruptured multiple discs in my back.” As Jess is quick to point out, back injuries are common and some settle quickly while others tend to hang around. “Initially it settled and I got drafted to the WNBA to New York City but it flared up on me over there.”

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

For the next 12 months Jess battled with severe problems but her desire to keep her professional career was too strong to let her stop playing and give her back to rest it needed. “When you’re that age you’re invincible and nothing is ‘long term’,” she says drily. “In 2002 I went back to the States for preseason number two and in literally the first session I dove on a loose ball, fell on it and couldn’t get up.” “That was it. I knew straight away I wasn’t going to be able to play for a while.” After four years of different types of physical treatments and surgical consults, Jess’ back had deteriorated so badly that she couldn’t cough or sneeze without holding onto something to keep her upright. “It got to the point where it was too severe for conventional surgery and then we found a surgeon from the States who was doing some experimental surgery in Australia,” says Jess. However, Jess had reached her limit mentally and had been looking forward to using the last of her earnings from playing in the United States to fund a trip around Europe, travelling and indulging her other passion—watching tennis. “But at the same time, this surgical option came up,” she says. “Because it was experimental it was going to cost me everything I had and there was no guarantee that it was going to work. So I had to choose.”

"I DOVE ON A LOOSE BALL, FELL ON IT AND C O U L D N ' T G E T U P."

Jess’ surgeon was optimistic about her chances of what seemed like a full recovery and said he could have her back playing sport in 12 months. Jess decided that her quality of life (and the potential to pursue her career again) was worth the money and risk. A year on, she was back playing basketball, but the challenges didn’t stop. An injury 18 months later saw her back in surgery with another year of rehabilitation. The road to recovery is never easy but the road back to pro sport from four years out and minimal physical activity in that time could be described as sadistic. But not to Jess. “I had a contract to go back to my team in Melbourne but when Graffy [Carrie Graf, then coach of the Canberra Capitals] came calling… for her to have faith in me, wanting me to play for her after playing a year and a half in six…” The happiness is still present in Jess’ voice as she recalls the conversation. “If you’re ever going to have an opportunity to go outside your comfort zone this was it—so that’s what led me to Canberra.” Jess knew that she couldn’t bear another injury and another 12 months of rehabilitation, so she made herself a promise. “I made a vow that I was going to be the most conditioned athlete in the WNBL to make sure I never had any major flare up ever again,” she explains. But Jess was more than that. Her time with the Capitals saw her rise to the ranks of Captain, playing a total of 394 WNBL games before her retirement in early 2016. When she tells me that she played 10 years without missing a game because of her back, the pride in her voice is inescapable.

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But Jess’ basketball retirement didn’t signify the end. Late last year, it was announced that Jess would swap her baby blue for flame orange as a new recruit for the GWS Giants as part of the new Women’s AFL League to begin playing in early 2017. "EVERY PERSON EXPERIENCES

“I would be lying if I said I wasn’t concerned when I signed with the Giants,” Jess says. “There was a little voice in my head saying ‘if you survived Basketball, can your back survive footy?’

SOME FORM OF SETBACK IN THEIR LIFE, BUT IT’S HAVING THE AT TITUDE TO NE VER SAY DIE"

So did it? Well, sort of. “The start of the third week of preseason – we were just getting stuck into it. I was really excited to learn as many skills and drills and terminology as I can before the season starts,” she says. “Week three of the pre-season one of the girls stood on my hand wearing football boots.” Jess suffered four fractures and two ruptured tendons from the accident and was only cleared to play full contact two days before the first game of the season. “The doctor that cleared me said ‘you’re going to have a sore hand for six months’,” she says ruefully. To add insult to grievous injury, a hand specialist then confirmed that the hand had not been set properly and therefore Jess would likely need surgery. “After all my back battles – to keep it in such good condition – to then have this happen…this was one of the main reasons I’m pulling the pin,” she explains. Although this year’s much-loved competition will be her last, Jess can see the bright side to retirement. “I’m 38 in August and the idea of having to spend another Canberra winter flogging myself running around ovals to get myself footy-conditioned—I couldn’t imagine anything worse!” she says, laughing.

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“I loved every second of it, it was an amazing experience. [If I were] five years younger I would be wanting to see how much I could evolve and learn as a footballer.” So what now for Jess? Teaching and coaching come naturally to her—her infectious enthusiasm for both sports is obvious—so her future will likely be teaching others to pursue their goals with the same dogged determination. That, and supporting the exciting future of women’s sport, of course. “My somewhat creaky body is ready to put its feet up and cheer on as much women’s sport as I can,” she laughs. And her advice to others who suffer physical setbacks? “My attitude to everything is that anything is possible. I’ve had the opportunity to live through being told ‘no’. I’m a five-foot-seven basketballer who suffered severe back injury— there should have been no chance for me to have been in the positions I played in.” “Every person experiences some form of setback in their life, but it’s having the attitude to never say die. If you love something enough you’ll leave no stone unturned. Regardless of setbacks, if you live and breathe it, you give yourself every chance to succeed.”


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

TIM GAVEL and wife Dr Jenny Andrew were at highpoints in their respective careers—she was as a consultant and him a well-known ABC Radio sports reporter—when they found themselves having to rethink their future plans. The family they had envisioned themselves eventually starting was just not going to happen. “I had my own business at that stage and had just finished studying my PhD in 1997 and Tim as always coming and going with the ABC,” explains Jenny.

“Time was running out in terms of age—we were both heading towards 40,” says Tim. With this in mind, Tim and Jenny began to look at broader options for becoming parents, looking into adoption on the recommendation of a friend. “It didn’t bother me either way if our parenting was with biological children or people that we adopted, because it’s the same,” explains Jenny.

Kids hadn’t factored in their busy, globetrotting lifestyles until they realised in their late 30s that perhaps they may have missed their window.

But the road to adoption is well known for being difficult to navigate and paved with long waiting times, so they knew they had to revaluate their careers and opportunities if they were to take this path.

When I meet Tim and Jenny, we sit in their sunny lounge room as two dogs snuffle around my feet. Family pictures are scattered between copious amounts of books on the shelves because the couple did eventually have the family they desired, just not in the way they might have imagined.

“Towards 2002 there were opportunities to move and we had to make a decision on what we wanted to do—was it really staying in Canberra and pursuing the adoption process?” Tim explains. The answer was 'yes'. The couple began the adoption process in 2002 by contacting the ACT Government who would then deem them suitable as adoptees. The overall process took two-and-a-half years and Jenny and Tim say that while it was far longer than the conventional process of parenthood, it was a positive in hindsight.

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“At the time it seemed like an insurmountable hurdle, it seemed like ‘is it ever going to happen?” says Tim. “We’d become quite anxious towards the end of it. As the years roll on you wonder if it’ll happen.” But Tim says that something they didn’t expect was that the wait would make them more sure than ever that this was something they wanted to do. The adoption came through while Tim was covering and commentating the 2004 Athens Olympics, and six weeks after the closing ceremony they headed to Addis Ababa in Ethiopia where they were seeking to adopt siblings. “We pushed to adopt siblings because it was highly unlikely we’d be able to adopt a second because of our age,” explains Tim. “For us, it was important for them to have each other.” The couple first met their children, Skinny and Eskie, on that trip when the children were two and four respectively. Their grandparents were their primary carers after the death of their parents and felt there was a better future for the pair than in their one-room, 12-person house. But one thing Jenny and Tim didn’t expect to find in Addis Ababa was that Skinny and Eskie had a 12-year-old sister, Meron. “It got complicated when we were over there… all the information we had been given hadn’t mentioned Meron at all. So we felt that was inappropriate that we adopted her only brother and sister,” says Jenny. Because of Meron’s age, Tim and Jenny couldn’t adopt her, so they settled for the next best thing in order to keep the siblings as close as possible. “When we had enough money again we started the process of getting her to Australia on an International Student Visa,” explains Tim.

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But that wasn’t an easy process and Jenny and Tim relied heavily on friends living in Ethiopia for support while they navigated the tricky waters of financing Meron’s schooling and her eventual journey to Australia, five years later at age 17. But it was worth the wait. “The sense that they’re all together again is good,” says Tim with a smile. Eskie and Skinny, now in Year 12 and Year 10 respectively, are thriving. Skinny is a keen swimmer and trains eight times a week, competing in both pool and ocean open water swimming while Eskie’s time is taken up preparing for the end of her formal schooling and what lies beyond. “Adoptive families present unique challenges,” says Tim pensively. “Like all parents you want to be a positive influence on them and instil your values in them but it all works out in the end.” “Sometimes people will say ‘is that your son?’ and people do question whether or not you’re the real father,” he adds. “But the kids will often stick up and say ‘He’s my dad’ or ‘She’s my mum’—we don’t even think about it.” While non-nuclear families have always found it more difficult to be accepted, the definition of family is becoming more elastic all the time, and the couple says that if there was every any place for them to be not just accepted but welcomed, the Inner North of Canberra was it.

"THE DEFINITION OF FAM I LY I S B E CO M I N G M O R E EL ASTIC ALL THE TIME."


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JUNE

J U LY

TRUFFLE FESTIVAL MARKET DAY 2017 LOCAL FOOD LOCAL WINE COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS MARKET STALLS

Westfield Belconnen Saturday 24 June

Westfield Woden Saturday 22 July


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

I MEET MARK, Michael and Jenny McReynolds in a bustling suburban café just a few minutes’ walk from their busy office—but the corporate life wasn’t always the plan for them. Seventeen years ago, their outlook was far more bucolic on their 550-acre property in Galong, between Cootamunda and Yass. The family had purchased the property with the intention of dad Michael (who had cut his teeth in shearing for 17 years) becoming a full-time farmer with wife Jenny commuting the 1.5 hours to her job at the Australian Tax Office. “We loved the community, loved the people,” said Jenny. However, Jenny’s hereditary kidney condition meant that they knew their farming dream would have to end at some point. It had to end, explains Jenny, because as her disease worsened, she couldn’t make the trip alone. “We thought we had better get closer to the hospital,” explains Michael.

The family moved to Canberra in 1999 with three less-than-impressed kids in tow and Michael began work as a real estate agent with Jenny eventually travelling to Woden three times a week for dialysis. The city change from their idyllic country lifestyle morphed into the ‘more than 9 to 5’ that is typical of the real estate industry, even more so when Jenny eventually joined Michael at Luton’s Dickson office a year after the move. “We’ve now sold over 700 houses between us. We work very well as a team.” But while the family flourished despite the drastic change, Jenny’s condition worsened. In 2006 she was told she would need to seek a kidney replacement. Donors, Jenny explains, are hard to come by because not only do they have to be the same blood type but they also need to be quite fit and healthy.

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That Christmas, at the annual Richard Luton Christmas Party, the eponymous real estate mogul stood up and announced, half‑jokingly, that if anyone wanted to donate a kidney to Jenny, they should go and see her. The suggestion was met with gentle laughter, but some time later a man pushed through the crowd to Michael and Jenny. It was their colleague Cory McPherson. “I’m your man,” he announced. “I really mean it. I’m going to ring you tomorrow.” Jenny and Michael remember the moment with fondness, joking that they said “Okay Cory, that’s lovely but have a think about it tomorrow.”

"IF I COULD NAME A SAINT IT WOU LD BE SAINT CORY."

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They never imagined he would go through with the pledge. But Cory stuck to his promise, getting multiple medical and blood tests and even enlisting the help of a personal trainer to lose 11 kilos, making him fit to donate. “Twelve months after that I had a new kidney.” Almost 10 years later, Jenny is thriving and still works seven days a week with her husband and son Mark, who also joined the Luton team. They’ve won Agents of the Year for Luton two times running and they’re even flying over to Thailand for Cory’s wedding later this year. “If I could name a saint it would be Saint Cory,” says Jenny. “He changed my life. It’s better than winning the lottery.”


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

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A

LIFE LESS

TH E F U T U RE I S N OW. DARE TO GO BOLD IN HE AD -TO -TOE COLO U R BLOCKING IN TIMELESS SILHOUETTES

C R E AT I V E D I R EC T I O N H AY L E Y O' N E I L L PHOTOGRAPHY LAUREN CAMPBELL

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Left: ByMalene Birger shirt $649 and coat $1269 and Rosie earrings $109, all available at Pink Ink. By Malene Birger skirt $549 at Baby Pink 02 6282 3543. Boots by Beau Coops x Romance Was Born. Dress $590 by Livina Conti, vest $390 by Tiina Laakkonen, and earrings $190 by Dimitri all at Things Of Desire. Shoes $49.95 from Zara, and Apple Watch from JB Hi-Fi, Canberra Centre.

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Dress $565 and pants $425 both by Macgraw at Rebel Muse. Earrings $139 by Cue at Canberra Centre. Right: By Malene Birger Knit $519 from Pink Ink. Cardigan jacket $620 by Les Filles at Things of Desire. Earrings $60, by ZARICĆ Jewellery.


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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

Top $159 by Maurie & Eve, coat $550 by Bec & Bridge, and pants $149.95 by C/MEO Collective, all from Momento Dezigns. Earrings by ZARIC Jeweller. iPad by Apple at JB Hi-Fi, Canberra Centre. Retro lamp $98, pink teapot $55 and sugar bowl $24, all preloved at Designer Op Shop.

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Dress $590 by Dion Lee at Rebel Muse. Coat $199 by Zara at Canberra Centre. Faux fur stole $199 by Cue at Canberra Centre. Earrings $140 by Russian designer Alex P at Things of Desire. Lenovo keyboard at JB Hi-Fi, Canberra Centre. Right: Dress $590 by Livina Conti, vest $390 by Tiina Laakkonen, and earrings $190 by Dimitri all at Things Of Desire. and Apple Watch from JB Hi-Fi, Canberra Centre.

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

Left: Coat $129.95 and knit $59.95, both by Dotti at Canberra Centre. Skirt $145 by Prada and brooch $24, both preloved from Designer Op Shop. Earrings $220 by Dimitri at Things of Desire. Laptop $298 by HP Stream at JB Hi-Fi, Canberra Centre. Top $159 by Maurie & Eve, coat $550 by Bec & Bridge, and pants $149.95 by C/MEO Collective, all from Momento Dezigns. Earrings by ZARIC Jeweller.

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BEHIND TH E

C R E AT I V E D I R EC TO R H AY L E Y O’ N E I L L PHOTOGRAPHER LAUREN CAMPBELL

VIDEOGRAPHER MARTIN OLLMAN

CO O R D I NATI O N AMAN DA WH I T L E Y AN D E M MA MACD O NAL D MAKE UP LESLE Y JOHNSTON

HAIR LEXI BANNISTER

S T Y L I S T H AY L E Y O ' N E I L L , A S S I S T E D BY E M I LY C R A B B A N D VA L E R I YA L LOY D MODEL GEORGIA RIXON LO CATI O N S F U T U RO H O U S E, U N I VE R S I T Y O F C AN B E R R A A N D N AT I O N A L G A L L E R Y O F A U S T R A L I A M E M B E R S LO U N G E S P E C I A L T H A N K S G E O F F, C L A I R E A N D J A C K B E L L F O R P R O P S ; C L A U D I A D O M A N AT T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F C A N B E R R A ; A N D T E D I B I L L S AT N AT I O N A L G A L L E R Y O F A U S T R A L I A

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

THE

DISPLAY HOME NOW OPEN

TIMELESS STYLE, MEET FUTURE-THINKING Experience this innovative new display home 104 Captain Cook Crescent Narrabundah 02 6299 8467 | classicconstructions.com.au PAGE 83


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W H AT

GOES UP

WORDS TIFFANY BONASERA PHOTOGRAPHY MARTIN OLLMAN

O U R G R OW I N G A P P E T I T E F O R E AT I N G - O U T E XP E R I E N C E S I N C A N B E R R A H AS G I V E N R I S E TO N E W D I N I N G P R E C I N C T S, N E W I N D U S T RY P L AY E R S, AND NEW CONCEPTS IN FOOD AND WINE. A BOON FOR PUNTERS, WITH MORE CHOICE THAN E VER BEFORE, TIFFANY BONASERA SPE AKS W I T H I N D U S T RY I N S I D E R S A B O U T W H E T H E R T H E R E S TAU R A N T B O O M I S S U S TA I N A B L E I N T H E C A P I TA L .

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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

Socrates Kochinos has been in the Canberra restaurant business for 25 years. He believes the city’s dining scene is the “best it’s ever been”.

that 15 years ago, we didn’t have that many places to go out—that mindset is shifting. I think it is unfair for Canberra to still have that stigma.”

The industry stalwart, who owns and runs some of the capital’s most iconic eateries, including Belluci's and Grease Monkey, says increasing competition is testing the imagination of restauranteurs, which is amazing for consumers.

Statistically speaking, we’ve shrugged off the stigma. Research shows we are the nation’s highest spenders on food and beverage. John Hart, chief executive officer, Restaurant and Catering Australia (R&CA), says we are an affluent market, and businesses are capitalising.

“The diversity and quality of dining in Canberra is improving day by day, and the competition is making everyone lift their standards and push the boundaries of what they offer,” he says. Like Socrates, Bria Sydney has been at the forefront of the city’s dining transformation. The Canberra native started Knightsbridge Penthouse and Elk & Pea Eating House, and now director at Parlour, located in the popular NewActon precinct. She is equally complimentary about the high quality of restaurants in the region – a response to our changing attitude to eating out. “Canberrans were not used going out, but that has changed in the last five years,” she says, “It does have a lot to do with the fact

“In the ACT, a larger proportion of earnings is spent on eating out,” he says. “Because disposable incomes are higher, more businesses want to get into it. New businesses should analyse opportunities carefully, and not overestimate the Canberra market.” Pasquale Trimboli, a 20-plus-year industry veteran and owner of Mezzalira Ristorante and Italian and Sons, says while we now have more diversity on the dining scene, there is still only a handful of good restaurants to choose from. “I am referring to the basics that are a common factor to all good restaurants – good food and good service,” he says. “I am predicting more closures than openings in the next three years. We have reached a point of saturation, where we need to look at quality over quantity.”

"NEW BUSINESSES SHOULD NOT OVERESTIMATE THE CANBERRA MARKE T."

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"WE HAVE REACHED A POINT OF SATURATION, WHERE WE NEED TO LOOK AT QUALIT Y OVE R QUANTIT Y."

Unlike their counterparts in Sydney and Melbourne, the nation’s traditional foodie powerhouses, local restauranteurs rely on regular clientele, not tourists, to thrive—and they’re the hardest to please, according to Pasquale. “The strategy we have adopted is to not worry about new restaurants, but rather review our own operations with a true and honest appraisal on where to improve,” he says. “By doing this, you focus on your own efforts, rather than worrying about someone else.” Bria agrees self-reflection is the key to longevity in the hospitality game. “It is like fashion, you have to be able to adapt, while also focusing on what you can do well,” she says. “Places which fail, try to be everything to everyone—and forget to focus on doing one thing really well. At Parlour, we slowly and slightly tweak things to keep up-to-date with what’s going on.” Currently, there is strong demand for local produce from the capital’s culinary crowd —a trend which pleases most chefs, who

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can change up menus with fresh, seasonal ingredients. Given we have award-winning food and wine producers are on our doorstep, it’s a natural fit. “We need to work together more closely with local producers to create our own culinary identity in Canberra. Less quantity and more quality, and the food scene will start to become noticed by other capital cities in a different light,” says Pasquale. While consumers are revelling in a feast of choice across Canberra, restaurateurs are realistic about what it will take to survive. “I would say the biggest dilemma owners face is overheads—the cost of rent and staff is escalating, it is getting harder for some people to open up their doors,” says Socrates. “Owners will have to get creative in terms of how they are going to run their businesses.” The consensus is, generic food businesses are not going to cut it. Bria predicts we will see more casual, high-quality restaurants pop up in the suburbs because “people want to be able to walk to their local”. Socrates concurs intimate eateries in the suburbs will make a comeback.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

BRIA SYDNEY

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“The successful businesses will be owneroperated—smaller, boutique businesses,” he says. According to Bria, Canberra is calling for mixed-business enterprises, along similar lines to The Grounds of Alexandria in Sydney and The Farm in Byron Bay, which serve up much more than a dining experience—bring people and communities together. Nik Bulum, who is credited for leading the rejuvenation of Lonsdale Street, describes the criticism, and ultimate shutdown, of his plans to turn the Canberra City Bowls Club site in Ainslie into a mixeduse commercial precinct as a “lost opportunity” for the community. The Braddon developer’s proposed concept, or “village within a suburb”— featuring a restaurant, a resort-style pool, outdoor cinema, day spa and boutique hotel—aligns with his trademark experimental approach, and underpins the way forward. “We can sustain the growth, if we keep doing things differently—and stop comparing ourselves to Sydney and Melbourne,” he says. “We have highquality restaurants; it’s the standard now.”

“BRADDON HAS TAKEN 10 YEARS TO GET W H E R E I T I S TO DAY, AND IT’S STILL GOING.”

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However, Nik believes the situation could turn sour if plans to relocate our public servants go ahead, and the government continues to force the inclusion of mixeduse retail and commercial spaces in new developments because, “you can’t have a precinct on every corner”. “Braddon has taken 10 years to get where it is today, and it’s still going,” Nik says. “I think we have to cater to what is needed— and let it happen more organically, without being forced.” R&CA’s John Hart is confident the growth is sustainable, noting there has never been a backwards trend in the number of people eating out, and how much they spend. On the other hand, local restauranteurs sense a plateau is on the cards. Time will tell how these predications will play out. What we do know is Canberra’s dining scene will continue to evolve, as competition intensifies—and it’s keeping restaurant owners on their toes, as they battle it out to secure the upper hand in providing authentic eating-out experiences. And it’s Canberra’s dining punters who are on a winner.


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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

AN

S TAT E

OF

MIND WORDS EMMA MACDONALD P H O T O G R A P H Y B R E N T O N C O L L E Y, L I G H T B U L B S T U D I O

A S M AL L S TO N E C OT TAG E I N B U N G E N D O R E HAS SURVIVED 180 YEARS. NOW A YOUNG C A N B E R R A FA M I LY H A S G I V E N A S H BY E S TAT E A N E W L E A S E O N L I F E, H O P E F U L LY ENSURING ANOTHER 180 YEARS FOR T H E G R AC E F U L R U R AL R E T R E AT.

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THE GIGANTIC canopy of elm trees which hides the historic homestead at Ashby Estate was already more than 50 years old by the time Canberra was named in 1913.

Located within a stone’s throw of what is now Bungendore’s main street, the 4000acre estate was marked out for settlement in the mid-1820s—around the same time the neighbouring settlement of “Canberry” was being forged. The land was divided into a smaller plot and a humble stone cottage, Ashby Farmhouse, was built in 1836.

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Successive families have sought to put their stamp on the historic three-room cottage ever since, adding additions and new rooms over the decades. Now the current floor-plan encompasses a sprawling four-bedroom three-bathroom farmhouse with enough living space to host a country dance. Cut to last year and a young Canberra family with a busy weekday routine but a hankering for a slower life saw Ashby for sale. Tara and Christian Taubenschlag run corporate communications company CMAX Advisory from a bustling office within Barton’s Realm Precinct. But while you will find Tara engaged in high-level cross-Atlantic negotiations for her American clients, running in and out of Parliament House, or devoting her “spare” hours to her maternal health charity Send Hope Not Flowers, she is a farm girl at heart. Her parents Suzy and Michael raised three daughters in a succession of properties across northern and coastal NSW, instilling in Tara a passion for horses and an instinctive urge to swap stilettos for gumboots. PAGE 93


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“It’s an incredible opportunity and we feel truly blessed that it has worked out the way it has,” said Tara. Most importantly, Tara and Christian have two little girls, Allegra, 7, and Siri, 6. They fervently believe in the need for children to connect with the land, roam free on the weekends, and eat unhurried meals of homegrown organic produce. In a beautiful confluence of events, Tara’s parents were looking to downsize from their coastal property. As soon as Tara and Christian saw Ashby they saw the opportunity to come together as an extended family in an idyllic patch of pasture and shade. They envisioned reclaiming the original building as a grandparent’s self-contained retreat and felt fortunate that Suzy and Michael can keep the farm running during the week while Tara, Christian and the girls resume their hectic schedules “in town” from Monday to Friday.

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It is, however, fair to say that the pair were a little confounded by Ashby’s aesthetic at the time of sale. Think timber paneling, tiled floors and a pastel colour scheme. This thankfully did not deter them, nor diminish the charm of the original stone cottage or the majesty of that elm canopy. Within days of the sale, Ashby began a massive renovation and restoration—futureproofing it for the Taubenschlag’s tenure, and for generations beyond that. Perhaps the biggest task was ripping up the tiles and sourcing a beautiful 100-year-old hardwood floor from an old Melbourne factory to stay sympatico with the original floorboards which were revealed below carpet. Now the cottage and modern home meld almost seamlessly. The cottage has had a gentle facelift, its nonsquare and gently sloping walls were painted, while the magnificent and massive wooden


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

THE STRESSES OF THE WEEK ALL BUT E VAPORATE

In a long and laborious process, the trees were pruned and checked and all received a clean bill of health. Michael has been quick to establish abundant vegetable patches and Tara’s spiritual retreat has become the old church building which lies to the back of the house. Tiny and made from slats of wood that let the sunlight in, the building was also formerly a school house before becoming the tack room. window frames and doors remain in their natural wood state - showing the patina of almost two centuries. In the new section, which attaches to one of the original stone walls, out went the timber paneling and in came Chilean painter Enrique, who spent weeks creating a crisp white internal canvas to show the external landscape to its best advantage - and in whose honour a new foal has been named.

Tara stands in the shards of light on a Saturday morning as she listens to the girls chase each other between the trees and the stresses of the week all but evaporate. “The drive from the road to the house and through the trees is just long enough to stop thinking about work and Canberra and get into an Ashby frame of relaxation.” ¡

A new kitchen in Tara’s preferred colour palette of black, white and grey went in the main house while a second kitchen was installed in the cottage allowing both families to live separately but join each other on a Saturday night around the massive dining table custom made by Rabbit Trap Timber in Moss Vale. Meanwhile, restoration of the beautiful gardens around the homestead has consumed the family over the past few months, as has tending to the 20 contented Simmental cattle who roam around the eight paddocks. One of the biggest jobs has been hiring an arborist to tend to the 58 160-year-old elms. PAGE 95


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tales

RECIPES + STYLING BELINDA NEAME PHOTOGRAPHY TIM BEAN

E S C A P E A R A R E LY ‘ U N P L U G G E D ’ W O R L D BY G R A B B I N G FA M I LY A N D F R I E N D S, S O M E P I C N I C B L A N KE T S A N D A F E W KI TC H E N S TA P L E S A N D GAT H E R ARO U N D T H E C AM P F I R E . WAR M YO U R BELLIES WITH HEARTY WINTER FOODS WHILE S H A R I N G TA L E S T H E O L D - FA S H I O N E D WAY.

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Beans

HOMEMADE BAKED

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

2 tablespoons olive oil

Place frypan on a grate over the fire pit. Heat up the olive oil. Add the onion and season with a pinch of salt. Cook for about 5 minutes and then add the garlic and cook for another 5 minutes.

1 onion, finely diced Sea salt and freshly ground pepper 2 cloves of garlic, crushed 175g pancetta (optional), cut into small squares 3 sprigs thyme, leaves 2 x 400g tin tomatoes 1 x long red or green chilli, sliced thinly 1 tablespoon HP sauce 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon each of Dijon and English mustard 2 x 400g tins cannellini beans, rinsed and drained Chopped flat-leaf parsley and Parmesan cheese to serve ____ SERVES 4

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Add pancetta, thyme leaves, tomato, chilli, sauces and mustards to the pan. Leave to simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in the cannellini beans and cook for another 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and cook for another 10 minutes. Top with a sprinkle of Parmesan cheese and parsley and serve with the warm damper.

Recipe adapted from ‘What Katie Ate’ by Katie Quinn Davies.


MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

amper INGREDIENTS

450g (3 cups) self-raising flour Pinch of salt TIP

80g butter, chilled, cubed

Prepare the damper dough ahead of the baked beans so when you are ready to start cooking, you can pop the damper in the oven and it will be ready to serve fresh and warm.

185ml (3/4 cup) water ____ SERVES 8

METHOD

Preheat oven to 200°C and line a round baking tray with non-stick baking paper. Combine the flour and salt in a large bowl. Use your fingertips to rub the butter into the flour until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Add the water to the flour mixture and use a round-bladed knife in a cutting motion to mix until the mixture just comes together, adding 1-2 tablespoons extra water if the mixture is a little dry. Use your hands to bring the mixture together. Gently knead the dough for 1-2 minutes or until smooth. Shape the dough into an 18cm disc and place on baking tray. Using a sharp knife, mark 8 wedges on top. Dust with a little extra flour and bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes or until the damper is cooked through. Transfer to a wire rack for 5 minutes to cool slightly. Serve warm with baked beans.

Recipe adapted from Taste.com.au

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Smores '

O AT Y

INGREDIENTS

125g butter, softened 1 cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 egg 1½ cups (225g) plain (all-purpose) flour, sifted ½ teaspoon baking powder, sifted 100g each of dark and milk chocolate chips cups (30g) rolled oats 20 pieces of flat chocolate dark chocolate (we used the Lindt Excellence range) 20 marshmallows ____ MAKES 20

METHOD

Preheat oven to 180°C and line 2 x baking trays with non‑stick baking paper. Place the softened butter, sugar and vanilla in the bowl of an electric mixer and beat until light and creamy. Add the egg and beat until well combined followed by the flour and baking powder and beat until just combined. Fold through the dark and milk chocolate chips and rolled oats. Roll heaped tablespoons of the mixture and place on baking trays, leaving space between them to spread. Flatten slightly and bake for 10–12 minutes, or until golden. Cool on trays until you are ready to assemble. To assemble, toast a marshmallow on the campfire. Once it is warm and starting to ooze, top one biscuit with a piece of chocolate and then another biscuit with the marshmallow and sandwich together. The heat from the marshmallows will melt the chocolate.

Recipe adapted from donnahay.com.au

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TIP

For a relaxing campfire experience, make the biscuits for the S’mores the day before.


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Chocolat e H OT

Nothing screams ‘campfire’ louder than a billycan! This is a thrown-together style hot chocolate that is delicious to wrap your hands around on a chilly night.

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Add 4 cups of milk to a billy can and place over the fire until just before boiling point. Using the left over chocolate pieces from the S’mores, place 1-2 pieces (depending on how chocolatey you want it) into 4 mugs. Add the warm milk and stir to melt. Add some marshmallows (optional) and stir through until melted and gooey.


A T A ST E O F W I N T E R E X P LO R E A S E AS O N O F F L AVO U R S AT O N E D E ST I N AT I O N

C

anberra Centre is the premium destination in the nation’s capital, where locals and visitors can enjoy the best in shopping, entertainment and foodie experiences.

The relaxed dining scene at North Quarter makes it the perfect winter venue. Whether you choose to rug up al fresco or get cosy indoors, the menus will heat things up. Join us for a fiery and garlicky rigatoni arrabbiata at Jamie’s Italian; a warming chicken laksa at Papparich; a scotch fillet with seasonal vegies at Cream Café & Bar. Or sample a world of fresh seasonal flavours at Kinn Thai, CBD Dumpling House, Soi Noodle and Hero Sushi.

D ES S ERTS

They say a little of what you fancy does you good, and this decadent dessert degustation from Koko Black is just the thing for a winter date night. Or sample a marsala tiramisu at Jamie’s Italian.

WINTER OFFERS A GREAT RANGE OF PRODUCE FROM ROOT VEGIES TO CITRUS. IT’S EXCITING TO UPDATE OUR MENU WITH A DISTINCT SEASONAL FLAVOUR.”

D R I N KS

For a pre-cinema treat, turn to the dark side with a chocolate espresso martini from the Dendy Premium Lounge. If you prefer your coffee straight up, Canberra Centre is brimming with beans. Try Xpresso Bar, Dobinsons, Coffee Lab or GreenHouse Coffee & Food Co.

Candice Nertney restaurant manager, Grill’d

D I R E CTO RY

GRILL’D

HERO SUSHI JAMIE’S ITALIAN KINN THAI KOKO BLACK NANDO’S PAPPARICH SAMMY’S KITCHEN SOI NOODLE SOUL ORIGIN THE COFFEE CLUB THR1VE

GUZMAN Y GOMEZ

XPRESSO BAR

AROMA CAFÉ CBD DUMPLING HOUSE

CO M F O RT F O O D

When the temperature drops, it’s time to head out for a warming meal. Savour a signature beef rendang at Sammy’s Kitchen, a spicy burrito at Guzman y Gomez or the famous flame-grilled chicken at Nando’s.

COFFEE GURU COFFEE LAB CREAM CAFÉ & BAR DENDY CINEMAS DOBINSON’S CAFE GOZLEME KING GREENHOUSE COFFEE & FOOD CO.


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F UTU R E

FITNESS OF

WORDS ASHLEIGH WENT

LOOKING TO LE VEL UP YOUR FITNESS? WE LOOK TO GROUNDBREAKING RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY IN PROFESSIONAL SPORTS FOR A S N E A K P E E K O F W H AT T H E FUTURE HOLDS FOR PERSONAL

There’s no denying that the trend in fitness and healthy living has our society in a vicelike grip, with people increasingly taking cues from professional athletes and their sports to gain an edge in their personal recreational fitness. We no longer have ‘personal trainers’ - they’re now ‘coaches’. What once was merely ‘exercise’ is now ‘training’, and you’re just as likely to spot a person in ‘performance wear’ enjoying brunch at a local café as you are at the Australian Institute of Sport.

H E A LT H A N D F I T N E S S .

Like many industries, sport and fitness is a field that’s constantly influenced by developments in research and technology. Given the ever-narrowing gap between professional and recreational fitness, it’s interesting to see how these technologies—once reserved for high level professional athletes—are now available to the wider public.

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WELLNESS MONITORING

Perhaps most notable is the availability of wellness monitoring technology. It’s common for people to wear devices such as Fitbit, or to use apps on their smartphone to track their nutrition, exercise and sleep. Dr Kate Pumpa is an Associate Professor at the University of Canberra, an Accredited Exercise Physiologist and Accredited Practicing Sports Dietician. In her research and in her role as Performance Dietitian for the Australian Rugby Union Wallabies, Dr Pumpa frequently uses this kind of technology. “I use wellness monitoring to look at how energy requirements change from a heavy training day to a light training day to a rest day, and then how to manipulate nutritional intake that impacts on body composition.” While an athlete’s level of fitness was once measured by metrics such as body mass index or simply body weight, developments in technology such as DEXA scans have allowed for a greater focus on particular aspects of body composition, such as lean muscle mass and body fat. These measurements provide a greater reference point for measuring specific changes in training or diet.

WHAT ONCE WAS M E R E LY ‘ E XE RC I S E ’ IS NOW ‘TRAINING’

Similarly, apps such as MyFitnessPal or EasyDietDiary (the latter of which uses an Australian database, allowing greater precision) when used correctly can be reliable methods of tracking nutritional intake and energy requirements. REST AND RECOVERY

It almost seems counterintuitive, but when it comes to athletic performance there is an increasing amount of research and interest in rest, specifically in sleep. Any new mother, university student or shift worker can attest to the serious repercussions of sleep deprivation. Not getting enough sleep can influence cognitive function, memory, immunity, pain perception, inflammation, appetite and protein synthesis, or the ability to repair and grow muscle tissue.

“We can also use our motional sensor technology to more accurately determine their energy requirements, which then can be periodised. Their nutrition can be periodised which then impacts on their body composition, which then hopefully impacts on their performance.”

“When we train we have muscle damage, and we need appropriate protein and carbohydrates around training to stimulate muscle growth. There are strategies we can implement to try and stimulate muscle growth and repair overnight. For example, looking at having larger amounts or either whey or casein protein and how that affects muscle protein synthesis overnight.”

This technology is available to the general population as well. Devices such as the Fitbit or the Apple Watch are constantly being updated and improved to provide greater accuracy and functionality.

Dr Pumpa says there are studies that show that higher doses of protein closer to bedtime can be beneficial, as digestion slows down, meaning that the proteins are broken down in the body at a slower rate.

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HERCANBERRA.COM.AU

“Sleep is important from a muscle recovery point of view, as well as from a psychological point of view. You consolidate a lot of your memories and thoughts when you’re sleeping, so if an athlete has been practicing a particular skill, a lot of those memories or tasks are actually consolidated at night while they’re asleep” says Dr Pumpa. While researchers look to find ways to maximise sleep for athletes, the public benefits from this kind of data as well. A greater quantity and quality of sleep means improved performance from the board room to the gym floor. P E R F O R M A N C E A N A LY S I S

A brief scroll through any fitness focussed Instagram account will confirm that gym goers are increasingly documenting their workouts in video form. More than just millennial self-indulgence, this kind of video footage can provide insights into technical form that can help improve performance and efficiency. For professional athletes and coaches, performance analysis is a field that holds great potential. “What’s becoming really popular is video analysis or performance analytics – capturing training or game footage which is then cut up into smaller segments for individual athletes or for coaches, and that produces a huge amount of data.” This data is what Dr Pumpa is examining in some of her latest research, looking at saliva testing and hormonal responses. “Some of the performance analytics data feeds into the hormonal research I’m doing at the moment. If an athlete watches themselves doing positive things rather than negative things, they’re more likely to get a testosterone boost than if they’re watching images of them doing things that are incorrect.”

PAGE 106

‘How does this type of research translate to performance on the field?’, one might wonder. “Performance staff are looking at ways to almost subconsciously manipulate how an athlete might perform without increasing metabolic load—so instead of doing a training session, using the data they collect through video footage to get a better response out of an athlete or manipulate their hormonal profile without requiring the athlete to run or lift, or create that extra loading.” Dr Pumpa says that despite the high volume of data available through new methods of research, this information isn’t being utilised. This field of research is one that holds huge possibilities for performance development in professional and recreational athletes. In the meantime, however, it’s an exciting time to be a recreational athlete, with plenty of opportunities to take advantage of cutting edge fitness technology. ¡


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MAGAZINE ISSUE NO.9

GO GO

GADGET W O R D S E M I LY S I M P S O N GIVE YOUR FITNESS A FUTURISTIC EDGE – H E R E A R E O U R P I C KS O F T H E L AT E S T A N D G R E AT E S T F I T N E S S G A D G E T S TO HELP YOU RE ACH PE AK PERFORMANCE .

WELLNESS MONITORING

InBody 570 Scan: While the DEXA scans used by athletes are available to the general public, the InBody Scan provides a more affordable, accessible version. It’s a comprehensive scan that reflect levels of muscle mass and fat mass, visceral fat and skeletal mass—leading to an accurate image of your weight loss or gain. There are machines available at locations across Canberra, including The Healthy Eating Hub. Fitbit Flex 2: A reasonably priced fitness

tracker, this revised edition of the classic has the added benefit of being waterproof. Like its predecessors, the Fitbit Flex 2 has all of the basic functions of a tracker compressed into a slim design. Apple Watch Series 2: If you’re an Apple addict,

the Apple Watch may be the kind of technology you won’t want to take off. Made with a built-in GPS, water resistant to 50 metres and completed with an iridescent screen that you’ll be able to see in any light, the Apple Watch is a sound investment. REST AND RECOVERY

Sense with Voice sleep system: designed to give in-depth analysis of sleeping patterns, sense measures and provides recommendations for bedroom temperature, humidity, ambient light, noise and air quality. It also measures sleep time, number of times restless, and time spent in deep, medium and light sleep. Fitbit Charge 2: Rapid developments in

wearable technology have led to the conglomeration of functions into one small

gadget which sits neatly on your wrist. Fitbits tend to be the best among these for people entering the fitness tracker world. The Fitbit Charge 2 is one of the more advanced models, and includes a sleep-tracker feature. It uses auto-detection to track sleep stages, so you don’t even need to remember to switch it on. P E R F O R M A N C E A N A LY S I S

Garmin Vivoactive HR: The prolific brand’s biggest all-rounder, this watch does it all—and not just in fitness tracking, either. Running, swimming, cycling, golf, cross-country skiing and indoor rowing are just a few of the sports it has specialised settings for. Withings Steel HR: Deceptive in its appearance

as an analogue watch, the Withings Steel has a lengthy repertoire. It tracks steps and calories burnt, monitors heart rate throughout the day, and tracks overall distance travelled. Garmin Forerunner 235: Like most in its league

the Forerunner has a swathe of functions, however its standout feature is its sports tracking. It has running, indoor running, bike and general free-tracking settings, with comprehensive metrics available for each. Smartphone apps: If you’re not yet willing to spend big money on a high-tech watch, or you want a transition product before buying one, then a fitness tracking application on your smartphone might be the solution. Apps like Strava, Runtastic PRO and Cyclemeter are either free or very affordable and provide basic performance metrics.

PAGE 109


WINTER 2017

PICTORIAL PREVIEW

W E V O W T O G U I D E + I N S P I R E Y O U F R O M T H I S D AY F O R T H


BY HOTEL R E ALM & BUR BURY HOTEL

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Unveiled pictorial preview W2017

01

Inside UNVEILED

03

A Country Affair

08

Venue spotlight

12

Fast wedding facts

14

The Look of Love

32

Wedding Words

36

Four local sparklings

38

Seven things your guests will love you for

40

A relaxed vintage wedding

H E R C A N B E R R A .C O M . A U/ U N V E I L E D

Unveiled Online

F U L L E D I T I O N AVA I L A B L E AT

Seeking inspiration? Think local Real weddings C'mon, get 'appy! 10 ways to save big Just like clockwork Wedding favours Hair and makeup secrets Dreamy honeymoon destinations


l a u r e n c a m p b e l l . c o m . a u l a u r e n @ l a u r e n c a m p b e l l . c o m . a u


Inside UNVEILED For the last nine months, we’ve been immersed in all things bridal while planning UNVEILED The Event, and we’ve been lucky enough to be surrounded by some of Canberra’s most amazing vendors and suppliers.

From wedding words that will move and inspire from the world’s great poets, to local sparkling wines handmade by our Canberra contemporaries, this preview of UNVEILED is everything that a modern wedding should be—a lush and welcoming blend of the old and the new.

WORDS

HAIR

VIDEOGRAPHY

Kate Hibberson

121 HAIR

COORDINATE

Emma Macdonald

Kath Ilijoski

Mike Raymond

Belinda Neame

Jessica Skokleska

Tobias Ridewood Daniel Unsworth

Laura Peppas Emily Simpson

MAKEUP

Amanda Smith

Jacqui Scott

Beatrice Smith

assisted by

HAUS MODELS

Amanda Whitley

Heather Corrigan

Georgia Mackay

Genna Koumalatsos

Lydia Banda-Mukuka

Hannah Neil

Alexandra Rubio

Daysha O'Hehir Elton

Sarah Parker

Erin Williams

Ploy Patcharida

DESIGN Katie Radojkovic STYLIST Peta Rudd assisted by Hayley O'Neill, Emily Crabb, Sophie Mateer and Annie Caughey

MODELS

George Volis PHOTOGR APHY Michael Conlin, Canberra Small Weddings Kelly Tunney Peta Rudd, assisted by Bek Day

P I C T O R I A L P R E V I E W PA G E 1

From this colourful cloud of Canberra’s best has emerged this pictorial preview of UNVEILED, that is both a sentimental ode to Canberra’s incredible homegrown talent and an exploration of modern bridal trends. You’ll see whimsical country

weddings and retro city celebrations, tips and tricks to make your guests feel more at home, and a luxe bridal shoot that was epic in proportions.


P I C T O R I A L P R E V I E W PA G E 3

A Country Affair W E D D I N G DAT E 24 September 2016 C E R E M O N Y St Joseph’s Church, Gundaroo R E C E P T I O N Grazing Restaurant at Gundaroo

Jose and Marc’s glorious wedding at Gundaroo showed just what you can pull together at short notice, including some seriously well-styled outfits and delicate hand-made styling! Jose shares the details of this fun and love-filled day.


UNVEILED WINTER 2017


G E T T I N G R E A DY

P I C T O R I A L P R E V I E W PA G E 5

My bridesmaids and I stayed at The East Hotel the night before the wedding. We had a fantastic dinner at Joe’s Bar, and I love the photos of my dad and I in the quirky lounge areas.

THE DRESS

We only had a five-month engagement, so getting a dress in a short turnaround was a high priority. I actually bought my dress from a bridesmaid’s store for about $500! I love the low back, full A-line skirt and that my shoes could be a statement. My mum’s wedding sash was turned into an adjustable belt with a premade bow so that it wouldn’t be fussy to tie on the day.


UNVEILED WINTER 2017

THE CEREMONY

I’m still not sure how we packed 104 people into St Joseph’s Church, which is absolutely tiny! At first I was unsure about the horse-shoe layout, but it made for such an intimate and communal experience. Our priest, Father Tony Percy, made a huge effort to get to know us which made the ceremony meaningful but also relaxed. He’s also got a very dry sense of humour! My oldest family friend turned my mum’s fabulously 80’s wedding dress into gorgeous pew ties and an altar cloth, which added an incredibly personal element to the ceremony.

Gundaroo fit the bill perfectly with its rustic charm and beautiful country scenery. Marc and I have always loved the relaxed atmosphere and amazing dining experience at Grazing. I’m also passionate about supporting local businesses and producers.


THE LITTLE DETAILS CERE MO NY St Joseph's Church, Gundaroo RECEPTI O N Grazing Restaurant at Gundaroo P H OTO G R A P H Y Kelly Tunney Photography

Our guests moseyed down to Grazing for canapés and drinks while we had wedding photos. We were lucky to have one of the only sunny days in September, which was perfect as Grazing has a gorgeous outdoor deck and country garden. We opted for a two-course meal (main and dessert), and instead of a cake, we had a mini leg of ham with crusty bread and mustards for guests to munch on later in the evening.

P R I ES T Father Tony Percy

I loved how our florist Fionna completely understood my vision for bold, unstructured flowers. The flower crowns were absolutely spectacular! I wanted to wear mine so badly that I wore it to our recovery brunch the next day. My dear friend Nanette and her family hand-made big paper flowers for the walls, as well as potted succulent clippings into antique silver vessels for the table decoration, which reflected beautifully in the candlelight. She also bought her own vintage furniture to dress the chill out space, which made it feel really comfortable and personal. Our flower girls roved the evening with polaroid cameras, and we have some great candid photos from the night. We were so thrilled with the wedding, especially as we turned the whole thing around in less than six months and while Marc was overseas working for the year. Kelly’s beautiful photos perfectly capture the special moments, and we couldn’t be happier with the day!

B R I D E’ S D R ES S Bronx and Banco from Bridesmaids Only, Double Bay B R I D E’ S S H O ES Aquazzura and Stuart Weitzman B R I D E’ S H A I R + M A K E U P Hair by Stephanie of Axis Hair, makeup by bride’s aunt Alexandra of Angel Face, Barcelona B R I D ES M A I D S’ D R ES S ES Review F LO W E R G I R L S' D R ES S ES David Charles London B R I D ES M A I D S’ H A I R + M A K E U P Jane and Dijana of Sparrow Makeup G RO OM’S AN D G RO OM SM EN’S SU ITS George & King F LO W E R S + F LO W E R C R O W N S Peony N' Pearl ST YLING Couple’s friends Josephine and Nanette B A N D Something Like This C A R S Couple’s friends C A K E Faye Cahill S TAT I O N E R Y Minted FIRST DANCE SONG ‘Next to Me’ by Emelie Sandé

P I C T O R I A L P R E V I E W PA G E 7

THE RECEPTION


Venue Spotlight F R O M H I S TO R I C B U I L D I N G S TO M O D ER N W I N E B A R S, C A N B ER R A I S F U L L O F H I D D EN T R E A S U R ES W H EN I T CO M ES TO ' O U T S I D E T H E B O X ' V EN U ES F O R YO U R C ER E M O N Y O R R E C EP T I O N .

PARLOUR, NEWACTON Nestled in the hip NewActon precinct, Parlour has a retro charm that draws you in from the minute you walk inside. Its setting is eclectic and elegant, making it the ideal spot for couples after an intimate and unique event.

UNVEILED WINTER 2017

OFFERINGS

“We can help couples host their wedding from start to finish,” says Abby. Planning starts with the menu, with the venue working with the couple to put together an individualised food and beverage menu which suits each couple’s needs and budget.” But with Parlour, the experience goes beyond the venue’s front door. PERFECT FOR

Couples looking for an event with flair and a touch of decadence. “Couples can recite their vows on the lawns under the shade of an oak tree and celebrate into the evening with a cocktail or degustation-style wedding reception bursting with great food and wine,” says Parlour’s manager and events coordinator, Abby.

“We can help connect them with NewActon’s hotels, hair salons and day spa—all at Parlour’s doorstep—as well as Canberra’s most sought-after photographers, florists and designer decorators. Abby says the lawns outside Parlour also provide the perfect location for a ceremony. “To book out the venue exclusively for a wedding day, we charge a minimum spend for the booking, which includes

the entire food and beverage package, use of the space for the day, and does not include a room hire fee per se,” she says. “We do not add charges just because you are putting the word ‘wedding’ in front of the word ‘party.’” C A PAC I T Y

Function sizes range from 10 to 220 people. Parlour can accommodate around 200 people for a canapé/ cocktail event and up to 60 for a sit down event. COST

Minimum spends for each day of the week are: Monday to Thursday $5,000; Friday/Saturday $10,000; Sunday: $6,000. ... Find out more: parlour.net.au


As two of Canberra’s heritage listed venues, Ainslie and Gorman Arts Centres offer a distinctive and intimate setting for a wedding.

PERFECT FOR

Couples craving a flexible space they can make their own, with beautiful garden options for drinks and canapés or ceremonies. “The heritage building is a big drawcard for people—they have a connection to the place, they might have come to the markets or had music classes as a child, so it’s a part of their history and they want to come back,” says event coordinator, Elizabeth. OFFERINGS

Couples can choose to hold their wedding reception at either of the newly refurbished Gorman or Ainslie Arts Centres.

For an outdoor ceremony or alfresco canapés and drinks, there’s a choice of two courtyards in the gardens at Gorman, or the grounds at Ainslie. A wet-weather venue is an alternative included in the cost, saving couples the stress of constantly checking their Bureau of Meteorology app. “On the big day, one of our staff members will be there for the entire time of hire to troubleshoot and help ensure everything runs smoothly,” says Elizabeth. “Other than that the couple are free to organise the styling and catering themselves, which means that every wedding that we’ve had has been completely unique and reflects the couple.”

C A PAC I T Y

Gorman can seat 80 people in the main hall, while Ainslie holds approximately 160 people with a dancefloor. COSTS

Venue hire for a wedding ceremony is $990. Venue hire for a reception (not including catering) ranges between $1400 and $3300, depending on whether it’s held during the day or evening, or indoors or outdoors. ... Find out more: agac.com.au/ space-hire/weddings

P I C T O R I A L P R E V I E W PA G E 9

AINSLIE AND GORMAN ARTS CENTRES


ELM GROVE

UNVEILED WINTER 2017

Quietly nestled behind the northern suburbs of Canberra, this private, heritage-listed property is the perfect combination of natural ‘remote’ beauty just minutes to ‘town’.

PERFECT FOR

Brides and grooms-to-be who are after an exclusive elegant vintage-style setting (with the option of a helicopter arrival!). OFFERINGS

Elm Grove offers exclusive use of the property for their ceremony and wedding photographs. Owner and manager Yukari describes it as "a stunning property with a large array of photo opportunities." “Couples can arrive in a helicopter, horse and carriage, trucks or wedding cars! “When on the property, people feel like they are somewhere very remote but it’s just minutes to town. Its natural beauty and wildlife has couples and guests feeling relaxed and in awe of what’s right on their doorstep.” The Elm Grove team can set up all necessary items for ceremonies, including 28 white wedding chairs, a vintage signing

table with linen and access to a Bluetooth speaker system and microphone. “As we pride ourselves on ensuring the day runs smoothly, the package also includes a onehour rehearsal with the couple’s bridal party and celebrant prior to the wedding day,” Yukari says. “Couples can choose either a marquee or tipi for their reception,” says Yukari. “They can also choose their own caterer that suits their needs and budget.” C A PAC I T Y

Elm Grove caters for a maximum of 100 people for their receptions. COST

Elm Grove offer wedding ceremonies for $880, which includes the use of the private, heritage-listed property for up to two hours (additional time can be arranged).

They also offer a helicopter arrival, with prices starting at approximately $600 on top of the ceremony price of $880. Ceremonies can be held under the majestic elm trees. Elm Grove can also host wedding receptions from $3,300 which includes the ceremony, the hire of toilets, power, water and insurances. ... Find out more: elmgrovecanberra.com.au


TUGGERANONG HOMESTEAD With a rich history dating back to the 1830s, Tuggeranong Homestead offers a secluded country setting for weddings.

PERFECT FOR

Couples who love heritage and history, and who want a vintage or rustic wedding. OFFERINGS

"Ceremonies can be held under our famous 120-year-old oak and elm trees or in the garden or bandstand,” says the venue’s director Ann. “Receptions are usually held in our machinery shed with a marquee, or the homestead itself."

The property has a marquee that can be set up beside the machinery shed (included in the price), so couples get the best of both indoor and outdoor worlds. “This gives views over the old-school house, gardens, the paddocks and the dam. We also encourage people to have croquet, a mechanical bucking bull or other activities at their wedding, as it's quite a big area. Couples can really put their own stamp on their big day." The Homestead has its own commercial kitchen, with some produce grown on site and the rest sourced from local markets. "We're renowned for quality food in generous serves, and it's wholesome and fresh," says Ann. C A PAC I T Y

The homestead can cater for 200 guests for roving canapés or if couples opt for a sitdown buffet, then 150 guests can fit comfortably in the machinery shed.

P I C T O R I A L P R E V I E W PA G E 1 1

The 70-acre Tuggeranong Homestead property features several different options including the sandstone-paved café garden, barn, gardens, old school house, machinery shed, shearing sheds and homestead.

"Our cattle can join in on the photos or some couples sit on the hay bales and make couches out them: we've also had a few picnic weddings and we are pet friendly.”

COST

To hire the property for the whole day (from 9am), including for the ceremony, the cost is $3,500. The homestead can also offer a canapé package from $25 per head, or a canapé and main meal/buffet package for $88 a head (with dessert optional) and there is a minimal tablecloth cleaning fee—so there are only three costs all up. ... Find out more: tuggeranonghomestead.com.au/ weddings


Fast wedding facts FROM H E RC A N B E R R A .COM . AU

Should you expect the bride’s family to chip in?

43%

21%

19%

10%

5%

1%

I would accept it but I would never expect it.

No! Why should they?

A token amount? Yes. For the whole wedding? No.

Only if they’ve done it with other siblings.

Yes! It’s tradition they contribute.

I wouldn’t accept it even if they offered.

UNVEILED WINTER 2017

FRO M T H E AUS T R A L I A N B U R E AU O F S TAT I S T I C S

The average age of marriage 1975

21

Percentages of ceremonies performed

1976

23

Now

28

Living together

1976

16

96% conducted by Ministers of Religions, 4% Civil Servants

%

of couples lived together before marriage Now

30

77%

1999

51% conducted by Ministers of Religions, 49% Civil Servants Now

of couples live together before marriage

27% conducted by Ministers of Religions, 72% Civil Servants

J U S T YO U R AV E R A G E W E D D I N G

136

Guests

Popular months to marry OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

SEPTEMBER

MARCH

45

Bridesmaids

to

Least popular months to marry

JULY

JUNE

JANUARY MAY

45 to

Groomsmen

Average length of engagement

14

MONTHS


UNVEILED WINTER 2017

The Look of Love FIVE BE AUTI FU L BRI DAL T R E N D S F O R YO U R B I G D AY

S T Y L I N G + P H OTO G R A P H Y Peta Rudd


Garden Ploy wears Thurley ‘Princess of Persia‘ dress $799 from David Jones Canberra Centre and floral earrings by The Floral Society.


Left to right: Ploy wears Thurley ‘Princess of Persia’ dress, $799 from David Jones Canberra Centre, ‘Juniper’ headpiece $120 by Ashlee Lauren Designs, earrings $21 from ASOS and ‘Eiffel’ heels $79.95 by Miss Shop at Myer Canberra Centre. Georgia wears ‘Sophia’s Pout’ gown $2,250 by Naomi Peris Bridal and ‘Martina’ nude patent heels $149.95 by Nine West Canberra Centre. Sarah wears ‘Sirens’ Song’ gown $2,310 by Naomi Peris Bridal, ‘Willow’ Crystal Crown $210 by Ashley Lauren, stylist’s own earrings, and ‘Martina’ nude patent heels $149.95 by Nine West Canberra Centre. Rustic vintage ladder courtesy of Willowhouse Weddings & Events and florals by The Floral Society. Sarah sits in Peacock chair $395 by Ishka Westfield Woden, arranged by Sweet Little Sunday. At right: George wears ‘Capri’ shirt $149, ‘Figaro’ velvet jacket $495, ‘Nazzaro’ trousers $200, bow tie $79 and pocket square $49, all by Dom Bagnato at Myer Canberra Centre. Boutonnière by The Floral Society. Wooden crate courtesy of Freedom Fyshwick, gold chargers $1.50 ea from BIG W Westfield Woden, Moet & Chandon Rosé $77.95 from Dan Murphy’s Phillip, stylist’s own vintage champagne glasses.


Classic Romance


P I C T O R I A L P R E V I E W PA G E 1 9

Clockwise from left: Moet & Chandon Rosé $77.95 from Dan Murphy’s Phillip, ‘Austin’ heels $139.95 from Nine West Canberra Centre, stylist’s own vintage champagne glasses, ‘Charbonnel et Walker’ Pink Marc de Champagne Truffles $44.95 at David Jones Canberra Centre, Rifle Paper Co ‘Herb Garden’ Coasters $29.95 from Notemaker.com.au , Home Republic ‘Inca’ platter in gold $49.99 from Adairs, earrings $10 from ASOS, invitation by Artforme Letterpress Studio. At left: Georgia wears ‘Sorrento’ gown $2,690 by Naomi Peris Bridal, ‘Catherine Gold’ crown, $395 by Viktoria Novak and earrings, $10 from ASOS. George wears ‘Capri’ shirt $149, ‘Figaro’ velvet jacket $495, ‘Nazzaro’ trousers $200, bow tie $79 and pocket square $49, all by Dom Bagnato at Myer Canberra Centre. Boutonnière by The Floral Society. Wooden crate courtesy of Freedom Fyshwick, gold chargers $1.50 ea from BIG W Westfield Woden, Moet & Chandon Rosé $77.95 from Dan Murphy’s Phillip, stylist’s own vintage champagne glasses.


Modern Luxe

Ploy wears ‘Electra’ dress $217 by Elle Zeitoune from David Jones Canberra Centre, fishnet tights $12 from ASOS, ‘Goldy’ boots $249.95 from Witchery and earrings $21 from ASOS. Lydia wears Eileen Kirby ‘Passion’ gown $1,035 from Momento Dezigns, ‘Eiffel’ by Miss Shop heels $79.95, from Myer Canberra Centre, and earrings $30, from ASOS. Organic Balloon Wall and balloons by Balloon Brilliance. At left: Georgia wears ‘Catherine Gold’ crown, $395 by Viktoria Novak and earrings, $10 from ASOS.


P I C T O R I A L P R E V I E W PA G E 2 3

Clockwise from left: ‘Goldy’ boots $249.95 from Witchery, ‘Mya’ drop earrings $38 US from Baublebar.com, stylist’s own Tom Ford sunglasses, macarons $1.95 ea from McDonald’s Weston, gold charger $1.50 ea from BIG W at Westfield Woden, invitation by Artforme Letterpress Studio. At left: Lydia wears Eileen Kirby ‘Passion’ gown $1,035 from Momento Dezigns and earrings $30 by ASOS. Wooden crate and ‘Grace’ Ottoman in Blush Cozy $999, both from Freedom at Canberra Outlet Centre.


SIGN OF ANOTHER GREAT

y t r a P

INSPIRING CREATIVITY AND UNIQUENESS FOR YOUR BIG DAY. From the engagement to the ceremony and the day after barbie, Barlens can help to bring your dream wedding to life. Proud winner of the 2017 HRIA Event Company of the Year, drop in to our Fyshwick showroom or give us a call and let us help you to plan your next perfect event.


hausmodels.com.au andrea@hausmodels.com.au @hausmodels

@thehausofartists


Dramatic

P I C T O R I A L P R E V I E W PA G E 2 7

Gold macaron tower by Ali King Desserts . Cakes . Events, ‘Villa’ Fliptop Table, $559.20 from Provincial Home Living at Canberra Outlet Centre, and smoke machine from Nova Multimedia, Fyshwick. At left: Alex wears ‘Alisha’ gown $2,057 from Annabel’s Bridal Studio and Floral headpiece by The Floral Society.


Rustic

Left to right: Ploy wears the ‘Roxanne’ gown $1,950 from Annabel’s Bridal Studio, ‘Juniper’ headpiece $120 by Ashlee Lauren Designs and model’s own shoes. Sarah wears ‘One more dance’ dress $679 by Trelise Cooper at David Jones Canberra Centre, ‘Willow’ Crystal Crown $210 by Ashlee Lauren, stylist’s own Collette Hayman earrings, socks $12.95 from Witchery Canberra Centre and heels $179.95 by Windsor Smith at Myer Canberra Centre.


Georgia wears ‘Rose Garden’ gown $2,430 by Naomi Peris Bridal. Lydia wears ‘Ruby’ gown $399.95 by Bariano from Momento Dezigns. Alex wears ‘Teresa’ gown $2,399 from Annabel’s Bridal Studio and floral headpiece by The Floral Society. Wooden crates courtesy of Freedom at Canberra Outlet Centre, stylist’s own vintage wooden stool, rugs and small ladder. Large vintage ladders courtesy of Willowhouse Weddings & Events, lemon tree by The Floral Society.


UNVEILED WINTER 2017

Sarah wears ‘Teresa’ gown $2,399 from Annabel’s Bridal Studio and ‘Andy Indiana’ earrings $65 by Natalie Alamein.


P H OTO G R A P H E R Peta Rudd, assisted by Bek Day ST YLIST Peta Rudd, assisted by Hayley O'Neill, Emily Crabb, Sophie Mateer and Annie Caughey CO O R D I N AT I O N Amanda Whitley and Belinda Neame V I D E O G R A P H Y Coordinate—Mike Raymond, Tobias Ridewood and Daniel Unsworth MO D ELS HAUS Models—Georgia Mackay, Lydia Banda-Mukuka, Alexandra Rubio, Sarah Parker, Ploy Patcharida and George Volis H A I R 121 Hair—Kathryn Ilijoski and Jess Skokleska M A K E U P Jacqui Scott, assisted by Heather Corrigan, Genna Koumalatsos, Hannah Neil, Daysha O'Hehir Elton and Erin Williams LO C AT I O N The Fitter's Workshop SPECIAL THANKS Ali King Desserts . Cakes . Events, Artforme Letterpress Studio, Balloon Brilliance, Barlens, Freedom at Canberra Outlet Centre, Sweet Little Sunday, The Floral Society, Willowhouse Weddings & Events

P I C T O R I A L P R E V I E W PA G E 3 1

CREDITS


UNVEILED WINTER 2017

Wedding Words BY E M M A M AC D O N A L D

YO U ’ V E B O O K ED T H E LO C AT I O N , S E T T L ED T H E M EN U, PA I D F O R T H E D R ES S A N D D E C I D ED T H E H O N E YM O O N LO C AT I O N . B U T W H AT D O YO U AC T U A L LY S AY W H EN YO U G E T M A R R I ED ? Your wedding is the one time in your life when the words you choose will have the potential to define your relationship. Whether you use poetry, song lyrics or prose from the heart during your vows, readings and speeches, you are setting the tone for your future together. These words declare your love in front of friends, family and all of those you hold dear; and they have the potential to provide a dramatic centerpiece for your wedding ceremony. So it is worth spending time working out what it is that needs to be said on one of the most important days of your life.


VOWS

These words can be very much stock standard if you are opting for a traditional church wedding where you have narrow parameters for personal interpretation. But if you chose a civil service, you can pretty much say what you want. According to civil celebrant Amanda Corbett, the beauty of having a civil ceremony is that there are no limitations on what you can choose to say for your vows—apart from the legal requirement that the couple must say “I call upon the persons here

Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove. O no, it is an ever-fixed mark."

Amanda, who has been a wedding celebrant for 12 years, says that in the end, couples want to deeply to express to their friends and family the qualities they love in the other. “Most people are able to find some special words to say about the person they love,” Amanda says. “Sometimes they may need help with a few questions or suggestions and then away they go. I’ve had quite a few couples send me an email with a page of words and say ‘hey, this is what I want to say but I don’t know if it’s any good’. Usually their words are wonderful and beautiful with so much meaning because they are written with the one person in mind.”

William Shakespeare Sonnet 116

"I love you without knowing how, or when, or from where. I love you simply, without problems or pride: I love you in this way because I do not know any other way of loving but this, in which there is no I or you, so intimate that your hand upon my chest is my hand, so intimate that when I fall asleep your eyes close." Pablo Neruda

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"Love is not love

present to witness that I, (name), take thee, (name), to be my lawful wedded husband/wife.”


SPEECHES

Wedding speeches are now rarely as formal as they used to be. Brides, grooms, wedding party members and mothers and fathers of the bride—all have freedom to adapt their speeches to their own personality and levels of creativity.

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Speak2us consultant Sofia Majewski says the best speeches are personal and direct, do not shy away from emotion, and allow the speaker to engage in a warm conversation with the guests. The Canberra-based TED Talks coach encourages every bride to have her say rather than letting her husband speak on her behalf. She also urges two crucial points—brevity and class.

“Hollywood has had a field day using the disastrous wedding speech as a dramatic device, and there are no excuses for couples who risk their most special day to an unreliable best man, or someone who’s going to visit the bar too many times to speak coherently once they are handed the microphone.”

Keep it courteous at all times and don’t think the put-downs and embarrassing humour from the hen’s and buck’s nights will travel well in front of assembled parents, grandparents, bosses and colleagues. Finally, always express your thanks with genuine gratitude.

Social media ensures you can’t hide from a wedding speech disaster these days, so prevention is your only option. Sofia says avoid clichés such as “without further ado” and “last but not least” and to write the speech with plenty of time in order to refine and rehearse.

"If I could make a wish, I think I'd pass Can't think of anything I need No cigarettes, no sleep, no light, no sound Nothing to eat, no books to read Making love with you

"The minute I heard my first love

Has left me peaceful warm and tired

story, I started looking for you, not

What more could I ask

knowing how blind that was.

There's nothing left to be desired Peace came upon me and it leaves me weak So sleep, silent angel, go to sleep Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you." The Hollies

Lovers don't finally meet somewhere, they're in each other all along." Rumi


READINGS

While the vows tend to be the most formal part of the service and the speeches the most informal, many couples choose readings which allow them to express themselves with words crafted by some of the world’s best wordsmiths.

Award-winning poet, writer and University of Canberra Professor Paul Hetherington believes that poetry will always hold the ability to connect powerfully with people. It is sad, therefore, that

At this time, we are looking for language to express our profoundest feelings and most poignant human connections. “There are many wonderful poems about love, including Shakespeare’s sonnets and Pablo Neruda’s poetry,” Professor Hetherington says. “If readers are prepared to range more widely than these famous authors, they will find beautiful and graceful love poems in many individual collections of poetry by Australian and international authors. One place to start on looking for such poems is in poetry anthologies - such as Carol Ann Duffy’s Hand in Hand: An Anthology of Love Poems.” Poetry understands that much of the most sophisticated

"We are weaned from our timidity In the flush of love's light we dare be brave And suddenly we see that love costs all we are and will ever be. Yet it is only love which sets us free." Maya Angelou

"When the evening shadows And the stars appear And there is no one there To dry your tears I could hold you For a million years To make you feel my love." Adele

and important human communication is feeling-one’s way-towards elusive emotions; or a linguistic dance that links a web of connected and irreducible meanings. And if you are more a ‘sung word’ than ‘spoken word’ enthusiast, there is nothing to stop you from borrowing the words of your favourite musical artist. Few issues inspire modern musicians to wax lyrical more than love, except, perhaps heartbreak. But stick with the love songs and you’ll be good to go. Just remember the perfect words of John, Paul, Ringo and George, “All you need is love.”

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There are no real rules around what can be said and couples can choose words from their favourite song lyrics to a passage from a novel—bearing in mind that shorter readings delivered by animated speakers will always seem more magical than 10 verses delivered in a monotone.

we have few formal opportunities to engage with poetry, save for weddings and funerals.


Four local sparklings for your wedding toast BY K AT E H I B B E R S O N

S PA R K L I N G W I N E S E T S T H E S C EN E F O R E V ER Y W ED D I N G. F R O M UNVEILED WINTER 2017

T H E M O M EN T YO U R G U ES T S WA L K I N TO T H E R E C EP T I O N TO T H E S P EE C H ES I N W H I C H E V ER YO N E W I L L TOA S T. I N D EED, S O M E G U ES T S ( L I K E M E) W I L L B E EN J OY I N G T H EI R S PA R K L I N G A L L E V EN I N G.

While the Canberra District and surrounds are famous for their Riesling and Shiraz there are quite a few great sparkling wines made locally, as well as in nearby Tumbarumba and the Southern Highlands. The process of making sparkling wine can often be a little more involved than a simple dry wine. Local expertise is also needed for disgorging (getting the yeast out of the bottle) and many of the local sparklings are sent to local expert Greg Gallagher. The extra processes, as well as the length of time they often need in bottle before being sold, can account for the higher prices.

Weddings can be very expensive and we all know everyone loves to have a few more drinks than they would on a normal evening. If you’re on a budget (as so many of us are), there are a few ways to save some pennies when it comes to selecting your sparkling; so if these look a little expensive, an Italian prosecco can be a great, fresh, uncomplicated sparkling and often much cheaper (then get a couple of nice bottles just for you and your new spouse). Whether you’re a sparkling fanatic looking for something truly exceptional, or just a nice drop for guests to enjoy for the toasts that fits within your budget, the Canberra District and surrounds has something perfect for every couple.


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This Sparkling has been on yeast lees for three years, adding lovely toasty, bready notes on the nose. A seriously zesty, delicious long and dry style. Available from Mount Majura Vineyard for $30.

With its attractive hint of pink colour, this sparkling has more red fruit and is a little softer and rounder than the zesty citrus style previously. However, good length and acidity certainly mean everyone will enjoy a toast with this sparkling. Get it for $35 from Wily Trout.

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TRADITIONELLE

DE BLANC

The best Sparklings come from cool climates and the Southern Highlands certainly fit this description. Centennial has a beautiful range— while this one is one of their most inexpensive, it’s still great quality. Grab a bottle for $30 from Centennial Vineyards.

Courabyra has a beautiful selection of Sparklings and some of the most complex in the state. This one is fruity, fresh and a little less dry than some of the others but deliciously balanced. $26 from Courabyra Wines.

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M O U N T M A J U R A V I N E YA R D


Seven things your wedding guests will love you for BY A M A N DA S M I T H

T H ES E T H O U G H T F U L I D E A S A R E S I M P L E B U T P O S I T I V E A D D I T I O N S TO YO U R W ED D I N G T H AT W I L L M A K E I T A N A B S O LU T E C R O W D - P L E A S ER .

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01

B L A N K E T S, FA N S O R U M B R E L L A S

Unfortunately, your wedding day doesn’t come with guaranteed blue skies and picture-perfect weather, so making sure your guests are comfortable is key. Providing blankets for a cold shift, umbrellas for rain, and paper fans for hot outdoor weddings are all excellent ways to tackle the unexpected.

02 BUBBLES FOR THE KIDS

And we’re not talking the alcoholic kind. While adults are happy to mill around and talk with other guests, kids aren’t always so agreeable. Providing a mini bubble‑blowing stand for the younger attendees will occupy them while the formalities are wrapping up and shifting to the reception.

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BAT H RO O M K I T S

The concept of the emergency bathroom basket is one that has guests everywhere cheering. Stock yours with mints, lip gloss, makeup wipes, hairpins, tissues, double-sided tape, band aids and the like to cover any minor mishap or touch-up need.


04 CUSTOM DRINK COASTERS

It happens all the time: you get up to dance and your drink mysteriously disappears. Providing your guests with custom coasters that they can pop their drinks on will ensure they come back to the glass they were sipping from rather than flagging down a waiter or accidentally stealing Aunt Cheryl's bubbly.

05 RELIEF FOR DANCING FEET

06 A SAFE RIDE HOME

The last thing you want for your guests is someone driving home over the limit. Providing a bus for them to get back to their hotel, a list of cab companies, or even a special Uber code can help make the journey home a little easier.

07 HANGOVER RECOVERY KIT

This is, by far, the kindest thing you can provide for your guests. Berocca, chewing gum, Panadol, crackers and a small bottle of water will make the morning after the wedding a little easier for those party animals!

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Dancing is arguably the best part of a wedding - the formalities are over, the music is turned up and hair finally let down. To accommodate your guests’ sometimes impractical footwear, provide thongs or rubber ballet flats to ensure the dancing continues ‘all night long’.


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Laura and Carlo's relaxed vintage wedding W E D D I N G DAT E 6 March 2016 C E R E M O N Y Dairy Farmer’s Hill, National Arboretum R E C E P T I O N Two Before Ten Café, Aranda

Photographers Laura and Carlo were married on a sweltering day at The National Arboretum, and later had their reception at one of their favourite cafés (complete with a surprise proposal!) Laura has the details.


G E T T I N G R E A DY

I stayed at Hotel Hotel the night before the wedding with my sister. We had a pretty relaxed morning and had breakfast in the city, followed by slowly getting ready at the hotel. The lovely Telisa and Tegan from The Lab came to our room on the wedding day to do my makeup and my sister had her makeup done at Zaija in the city. Carlo got ready at home with his brother.

DRESS

"WITHIN T WO WEEKS EMME FOUND THE PERFECT D RESS—A SI LK B E A D E D C O L U M N G O W N ."

I searched for a vintage dress for months. I was looking online (mostly on Etsy) for a vintage dress with lots of beadwork and/or sequins. I made contact with Emme from Gossamer, a vintage dress retailer in the U.S. and explained what I was after. Within two weeks Emme found the perfect dress—a silk beaded column gown. The dress is from the 1980s and it does not have a label but I’ve been told that it was hand-beaded/sequinned. There are seriously thousands of beads!


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CEREMONY

We both loved the idea of getting married at the Arboretum and being able to look back on the photos and show our kids (one day) what the place used to look like. We have a particular photo next to one tree specifically for this reason.

RECEPTION

As for the reception, for months we planned to have a backyard wedding. We looked into a few different options and we even started to fix the yard up in preparation. Then one weekend we were having breakfast at Two Before Ten in Aranda with some friends. Our friend Alycia (events planner extraordinaire) happened to work at the venue and we started talking about how it’d be really


We opted for a Turkish-inspired menu, and to keep to my personal beliefs, we requested that all the food be vegan/ vegetarian friendly. The styling was also very mismatched and had a vintage theme. We also received a lot of love from our guests for our charity donations in lieu of wedding favours—each guest had a place card with three charities (Beyond Blue, ACT Rescue and Foster, and M.S. Australia) and we asked them to help us by circling a charity which we’d then make a small donation to. Another highlight: my cousin Charlie proposed to his partner Hayley at our wedding! On the night, I rigged the bouquet toss and handed the bouquet straight to Hayley and then Charlie got down on one knee. She was so shocked - everyone was so shocked. It was pretty special. p.s she said yes!

THE LITTLE DETAILS P H OTO G R A P H E R Michael from Canberra Small Weddings CELEBR ANT Steven Murray from Canberra Small Weddings D R ES S Vintage dress bought from Gossamer

B R I D E' S H E A D P I E C E Flower Crown by Lady Larissa

G RO OM AN D G RO OM SM EN’S SU ITS Suit jacket and pants from Sportscraft, shirt and shoes from Aquila and bow tie from YD. Standard Socks Co supplied groom’s socks R I N G S Grew & Co B R I D E ' S S H O ES Jo Mercer M A K E U P Telisa from The Lab ST YLIST Ceremony - chairs, signing table, drinks stand by Style My Aisle. Reception: DIY and set up by reception venue staff F LO W E R S Lady Larissa Flowers & Styling C A K E Sweet Bones Bakery, Braddon M U S I C Ryan Tredinnick S TAT I O N E R Y Invitations designed by Karl Bala. Menus, place cards etc designed and printed/made by bride and groom FIRST DANCE SONG 'Call My Name' by Mosquito Coast

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cool place for our wedding as they had never had one there before. Carlo and I were sold on the idea straight away and Alycia set the wheels in motion.


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