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tiny house, big thesis alyssa danielewicz


Thesis Master of Architecture

Tiny House, Big Thesis Alyssa Danielewicz

In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture

________________________________________________ Craig Saunders, AIA Thesis Supervisor Department of Architecture

________________________________________________ Daniel Davis, AIA, LEED bd+c Thesis Coordinator Graduate Program Director Department of Architecture

________________________________________________ Louis Manzione, Ph. D. Dean College of Engineering,Technology, and Architecture Department of Architecture College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture University of Hartford May 15th, 2017


I would like to thank Craig Saunders and Ioana Barac for advising and inspiring me throughout the design process. Together they pushed me to achieve a project full of exploration, creativity, and fun.


table of contents


proposal position program analysis precedents conceptual design schematic design design development final design references epilogue

6 8 20 30 68 90 110 136 186 192


proposal


This thesis will study the tiny house movement, focusing on completely designing one tiny house. The tiny house movement is about the simple and environmentally conscious lifestyle achieved by living in residences that are less than 500 square feet. This movement has become a craze because of its many appealing benefits, such as affordability, connecting with nature, on experiences rather than possessions, having a sense of community, and sustainable design. The question I am studying with my thesis is How can a minimalist lifestyle be reflected in architecture?

I am intrigued by the tiny house movement and its many benefits to people and the environment. Through the design of a tiny house and a community, I can explore ideas of the movement at different scales. I would like to either work for or start a firm that specializes in tiny houses, which is what inspired the idea for my thesis.

7 proposal

The majority of tiny houses are built on wheels, allowing owners to frequently travel. This is why I am proposing to study my tiny house in multiple different contexts. In order for my design to be successful, it needs to respond to different surroundings. Although it is highly uncommon and undesirable for architecture to not have a strong relationship with its site, the success of this thesis will come from the ability to relate to multiple sites. The tiny house movement has created a new sense of community, where homeowners are bonded digitally, as they reside all over the country. The ability to travel and meet up with one another creates ever-changing physical communities as well.

tiny house

Each tiny house is fully customized to its owners’ lifestyle, so it is impossible to design one “perfect� prototype. To accomplish the design of a tiny house, I will select a client with specific interests. The house will be detailed in its entirety (as it is a small project). Because of the project size, many tiny house owners construct the project themselves, or at least assist with it. Therefore, I would like to also explore and present the most appropriate construction methods for the project.


position


Introduction Domestic architecture is one of the few building types that embody character and experience, reflecting the people that reside in them. Houses are unique because of how personalized they can be, since they cater to homeowners rather than the general public. In recent years, the tiny house movement has become increasingly popular, allowing homeowners to get rid of all their unnecessary items and pair down to the essentials. Tiny houses, although containing a bare minimum of belongings, are able to portray their owners’ character much better than a traditional sized house. These homes also allow the owners to connect strongly with nature and live a more fulfilling life.

“In recent years, the tiny house movement has become increasingly popular, allowing homeowners to get rid of all their unnecessary items and pair down to the essentials.”

1.1

1.2

9 position

“The best location for a microhouse is somewhere as wild and natural as you can manage.”

building type

Building Type In The rustic, ‘temporary’ microhouse, John Vivian analyzes tiny homes and provides suggestions on how to build them based on the most successful techniques that have been employed by owners and builders of tiny homes over the years. The article begins with acknowledgment of the original tiny house, the owner of which has inspired Vivian and many others to follow in his footsteps. “The foundations of the first true American microhouse—and the philosophy that changed society’s attitude toward personal freedom and man’s relationship with nature—were laid ‘near the end of March, 1845,’ when Henry David Thoreau, a Harvard dropout from Concord, Massachusetts, borrowed an ax, walked a mile and a half to Walden Pond, and began to build a ten-by-fifteen foot one-room cabin of hand-hewn logs and recycled shanty boards fastened with salvaged nails and wooden pegs” (Vivian, 1998).


building type

According to Vivian, the best location for a microhouse is somewhere as wild and natural as you can manage. These smaller homes often do not require a foundation, therefore bringing very little disturbance to nature. “A hand-built microhouse rests lightly on the earth, and you can site one in places where limited access, rugged topography, environmental ethics, or law prohibits conventional construction” (Vivian, 1998). The majority of these homes are on wheels, allowing them to be transported to multiple sites without leaving much of a footprint. By taking mobility into consideration, owners of microhouses have the ability to discover and become part of different environments, creating a strong connection with nature.

position

10

Perhaps the most important aspect to tiny homes is multi-functional space and furniture, carefully selected and designed to serve multiple purposes. Vivian references Thoreau’s 150 square foot cabin for its admirable use of space. “Thoreau’s high shallow Rumford-design fireplace and stove were flanked by simple cooking facilities on one side and a combined work and dining table and chairs on the other. At the far wall was the bed and a nightstand or two for the water pitcher, washbowl, and chamber pot…Against the middle walls was a small desk to keep writing supplies and a freestanding closet or chest of drawers to store clothing, tools, and equipment…Thoreau built his table with three legs, which saved foot space” (Vivian, 1998). Because everyone has different needs, tiny houses should be designed specifically for the owner and what is essential to them. Thoreau’s main hobby was writing, which is why fitting a desk into his house was of utmost importance. Every square inch of a microhouse matters, therefore minimizing down to the bare essentials is a requirement for anyone looking to live in one. This task is more commonly known as downsizing; before building a tiny home, owners will go through all of their belongings and eliminate anything that does not serve a daily purpose. “I have a theory that anything you really need should be in sight and available for instant use. Anything you squirrel away in a drawer or closet is as good as lost forever…The same is to rid of stuff that gets dusty; it’s not being used enough to warrant keeping” (Vivian, 1998). Vivian suggests designing with plenty of windows for natural light, and using the remaining wall space to hang belongings. Integrating clever storage ideas, like floor to ceiling bookcases that have a small footprint, or hanging items that are frequented less often from the rafters, will help make use of all available space. It is important for every item to have a home and a purpose. Every microhouse owner needs to fully embrace minimalism in order to live successfully in one of these homes.

“Every square inch of a microhouse matters, therefore minimizing down to the bare essentials is a requirement for anyone looking to live in one.” Domestic architecture is constantly evolving based on current needs and desires of society. Dwellings may also be designed as a way to disagree with contemporary methods and ideas. Thoreau designed his house on Walden Pond as not only a way to retreat from society, but also as an attempt to live a minimalistic lifestyle that opposed living in excessive luxury.


Houses began to grow in size alongside improvements in economy and healthcare. The development of medicine offered a much longer lifespan that prevented people from dying at an early age. This inclined people to build larger houses and own more things; they began investing in long term lifestyles. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average U.S. single-family house in 1900 was 700 square feet. This jumped to 1,000 square feet in 1949, 1,660 square feet in 1973, and 2,500 square feet in 2007. When the housing market crashed, the average size dropped below 2,400 square feet by 2010, but rose again to 2,600 square feet by 2014. (McFedries, 2015).

1.3

building type 11 position

Average household size 1.4

Tiny houses, on the other hand, are typically one-tenth the size of today’s average house. In fact, they are often under 200 square feet, some even as small as 100 square feet. (McFedries, 2015). However, the tiny size doesn’t restrict owners from having the same amenities of a normal house, they just have to be more creative by making spaces multi-functional and reducing their belongings. (MacLeod, 2015).

“Tiny houses are typically one-tenth the size of an average house.” The recent trend in domestic architecture is referred to as the tiny house movement. Similar to Thoreau’s house on Walden Pond, the movement is a direct response to society’s trend of presumed need to have an excessive amount of space and belongings. More and more people are jumping on the tiny bandwagon, with the goal of pairing down to bare necessities and living simply.


building type

The tiny house movement offers a lifestyle with many attractive aspects. One of the main reasons the movement is growing so rapidly is because of the affordability. “According to thetinylife.com, in 2013 the average tiny house cost a mere $23,000 to build versus $272,000 for a full sized house” (MacLeod, 2015). The size alone is an obvious reason as to why tiny houses are so cheap, but owners are able to reduce their costs in other ways as well. Many tiny houses are built with reclaimed materials; since there is not much to cover, it is more practical to build a tiny house with recycled materials than it is for a larger house. Constructing tiny houses is also much easier than traditional home construction, making it possible for homeowners to participate in manual labor, which further assists with building costs. “While the interior architecture of a full-sized house can afford ornament and a dose of pomp, tiny houses are restricted to a minimalist approach due to lack of space” (MacLeod, 2015). This is yet another way that tiny house owners are able to cut down on costs. Tiny houses also produce cheaper bills when living on the grid, or even no bills when living off the grid. Again, the size makes it easier to do so. By saving a significant amount of money, people who live in tiny houses are able to work less and enjoy life more. Extra money can also be spent on traveling and more worthwhile activities, an opportunity that is less available when spending the majority of money on bills and unnecessary items.

“In 2013 the average tiny house cost a mere $23,000 to build versus $272,000 for a full sized house”

position

12

average size typical [2,600 sf] tiny house [250 sf]

average cost typical [$272,000] tiny house [$23,000]

people that own their home people with no mortgage typical [65%] typical [29.3%] tiny house [78%] tiny house [68%] 1.5


With global warming looming over our heads, it is more important than ever to employ sustainable design in architecture. Being green is another important reason as to why people are going tiny; there are many ways that tiny houses can minimize leaving an environmental footprint. As previously mentioned, tiny houses can be built with reclaimed materials and manual labor. Owners can also opt to incorporate products that promote sustainable design; most tiny houses utilize one, if not all of these systems. For starters, solar power is a great way to provide electricity to a tiny house. Because of the size, few panels are required to fully power the entire house. Composting toilets are also a common feature in tiny houses, which do not require water and are able to give fertilized matter back to the earth when the composting process is complete. If homeowners choose to use a water collection system in conjunction with a composting toilet, they are able to live without connection to public water. These systems will provide filtered water to the house that can be used on a daily basis. It is also common for tiny house owners to embrace sustainability even more by growing their own food. These are just some of the few eco-friendly elements that are incorporated into tiny houses.

cutting a home’s size in half reduces its life-cycle emissions by 36%

largest environmental benefits of downsizing: reduced electricity & fuel use

more than 80% of greenhouse gas emissions during a home’s 70-year life-cycle are attributed to electricity & fuel consumption

13 position

The tiny house movement encourages homeowners to embrace nature, not only by protecting the environment through sustainable design, but also by living in it. As mentioned previously by John Vivian, smaller footprints allow these houses to be built on uncommon sites, typically in nature. Homeowners can build attached or detached porches, which create an outdoor space for when they are feeling cramped indoors. Living simply and in less space allows for more time to be spent outdoors. Tiny houses in nature provide owners with plenty of room to explore and participate in outdoor activities.

building type

“With global warming looming over our heads, it is more important than ever to employ sustainable design in architecture.”


environmental benefits

building type

because of their size, many tiny houses are built from recycled materials

less lumber and other building materials

less space to heat and cool

smaller/fewer appliances

14 position

personal benefits

mobility

decreased maintenance

reduced carbon footprint

little or no debt

lower taxes

self sufficiency

1.6


Deciding to convert from a traditional house to a tiny house almost always improves the lives of those who do so. Tiny homeowners are able to live a happier lifestyle when they are able to remove clutter from their lives and focus on what’s important. The small size reduces time spent cleaning the house, a common complaint of owners before they go tiny. There is also a lack of privacy, which some people may see as a negative, but it actually allows those living together to become closer. People are able to spend more time together when they are not locked away in individual rooms, and they are forced to work together when adjusting to the new lifestyle. Nearly every person who is interviewed about going tiny recommends it to others because their lives have drastically improved.

Heidegger, a psychologist, studied how phenomenology influences architecture and humans in architecture. Specifically, he discusses how we create place in the space around us. Essentially, Heidegger explains that the space is a void, which is filled with a place. Once the void is filled, the place has social activity. Buildings are the embodiment of the spirit of that place, and to fully understand the building, we first have to understand the place. In The Four Elements of Architecture and Science, Industry, and Art, Gottfried Semper is adamant about the importance of craft. He acknowledges that successful art and architecture is rooted in man’s full understanding of materials and methods used. Admirable craft stems from an evolution of learned skills and an attempt to carefully perfect them. He recognized that art and architecture of the past are beautiful because man created a strong connection with the methods and materials he employed. These works of architecture have a strong sense of character because of man’s desire to perfect craft and have an understanding of what was being created. Because man would create a connection between himself and his work, there was always a spirit/character present in said work.

15 position

Theory/Conceptual nature of the building type/Approach Phenomenon is defined as the object of a person’s perception; what the senses or the mind notice. Phenomenology, therefore, is an approach on architecture that concentrates on the study of consciousness and the objects of direct experience. It focuses on the human experience and, in terms of architecture, how to create buildings that define a certain place’s character and provide experiences. Gottfried Semper, Christian Norberg-Schulz and Kenneth Frampton are three prominent theorists who explored phenomenology after reading Martin Heidegger’s Building, Dwelling, Thinking.

theory/conceptual approach

“Deciding to convert from a traditional house to a tiny house almost always improves the lives of those who do so.”


Christian Norberg-Schulz uses a different approach to address phenomenology in his works, The Phenomenon of Place and Heidegger’s Thinking on Architecture. He focuses on the strong connection buildings should have with their locations, as well as with their visitors. Addressing man’s senses and feelings is an important aspect in design. Schulz also introduces the idea that architecture should embody a certain spirit/character of the place it is situated in. By creating a connection to the space (location), the place (the built environment) will define a boundary between the landscape and the living space.

theory/conceptual approach

“The theory of phenomenology highlights both the importance of place and human relation to it.”

position

16

Kenneth Frampton also emphasizes the importance of resolving the connection between the natural and built environments in his essay On Reading Heidegger. By fully understanding the place and the threshold it creates, architects can give buildings character with not only a physical appearance but also a social appearance. He feels that buildings should emerge from the earth and fill the void between the earth and the sky. By doing so, buildings are able to maintain a strong connection with nature (the space). The theory of phenomenology highlights both the importance of place and human relation to it. Theorist Gottfried Semper defines phenomenology with the importance of craft. He admires art and architecture created by those who learn the methods and materials used and attempt to perfect them. People who are able to manually construct their homes, a common notion when going tiny, not only gain a better appreciation for craft, but also create a strong connection with the house itself. Putting personal labor into one’s house will bring about feelings of accomplishment for years to come, as the owner will constantly be able to admire his or her handiwork. Doing this will also allow the owner to truly customize their home, designed to perfectly suit their lifestyle and belongings. Every element of a tiny house is customized to its owners, creating a sense of character that caters to them. Christian Norberg-Schulz and Kenneth Frampton, on the other hand, have a similar approach on phenomenology that emphasizes a connection between man, space and place. Tiny houses are also able to accomplish this. For obvious reasons, there is a strong connection between man and the built environment. Tiny houses strongly embody their owners, allowing people to feel completely comfortable inside. When owners of these homes have guests over, the guests will immediately be able to identify a spirit of place.

“Every element of a tiny house is customized to its owners, creating a sense of character that caters to them.” As for a connection between space and place, tiny houses often propose a unique situation. Sometimes these homes are built on a foundation, typically in nature. In this case, the site is carefully selected and the building is designed and constructed with a strong connection to it. However, many tiny houses are constructed on wheels, allowing the owners to live a more adventurous lifestyle and have the opportunity to reside in different locations. This makes it more difficult to design a building that can strongly connect


to one specific place. The way homeowners accommodate this challenge is by knowing the type of space they would like to park in. Commonly, the space is in secluded areas of nature, so the owners will design windows and porches that still allow for a strong connection when inside the building. Porches allow for a connection between indoor and outdoor space, the outdoor space extending over a vast area in nature. From the inside, lofted bedrooms can feature skylights or sidelights that can be oriented toward a particular view. Owners can then appreciate this view whenever relaxing in their bedroom and create a collection of the many different views they have experienced through the window. Every element in a tiny house can be designed in this way because it is easier to pay attention to every aspect of the design. Tiny houses also leave a tiny footprint, allowing them to embrace nature and connect with it by disturbing it very little. theory/conceptual approach 17 position

1.7

Gottfried Semper The Four Elements of Architecture and Science, Industry, and Art

1.8

Kenneth Frampton On Reading Heidegger Physical and Social appearance

Importance of craft Connection between natural and built environments Architecture of the past was beautiful because there was a strong connection to methods and materials Connection between man and his work Spirit/Character in design

Man-Space-Place


Context The majority of tiny houses are on wheels, allowing them to be easily transported to different locations. Owners of tiny homes therefore have a great amount of flexibility; they are able to easily pick up and move their entire lives to a new location as frequently or infrequently as they’d like. Combined with the opportunities to be off the grid and have career flexibility, tiny homes allow for a nomadic life centered around experiences.

context

As the tiny house movement is scaling quickly, the amount of locations homeowners can reside in is also growing. What began with a handful of organized tiny house communities and personal land to reside in has now become so much more. There are approximately 50 existing organized communities specifically for tiny houses, as well as dozens more in the planning stages. Spur, Texas is the first town in the country to become “tiny house friendly”. The town’s mission statement focusing on re-creating a sense of community and self sufficiency that has been lost to cities. Spur is a unique circumstance; it will not be common for existing towns to focus their efforts on tiny houses.

position

18

However, there has been a recent surge in towns looking to legalize tiny houses as primary residences. There is currently no defined codes for tiny houses, which presents many problems for homeowners. Tiny houses are being built and classified as RVs, or as non-primary residences. A Tiny House Appendix for the International Residential Code has been recently written and approved by the International Code Council (Morrison, 2017).Now that the code has been accepted, those interested in seeing tiny houses becoming recognized and legalized must bring the code to their local town, city, or state and make a case for adoption. Once the code is adopted, it will be acceptable for people to build and reside in tiny houses without searching for loopholes to do so. Along with the organized opportunities that welcome tiny houses, there is also a growing list of land that people can rent to reside in. The website tinyhousecommunity.com offers an updated map and lists of private land, RV parks, communities and eco-villages that are rented for tiny houses. Harvesthosts.com offers similar services, but at more unique locations. Homeowners are able to park at the wineries and farms listed on these website for a shorter period of time. Because the tiny house movement promotes self-sufficiency and flexibility, I have chosen to design my tiny house on a trailer, allowing it to move freely to various locations. I will continue to explore the many opportunities for tiny houses to be settled in, and present my design in multiple different contexts, rather than one. The ability and desire to move around to different sites presents an unfamiliar challenge to architecture; typically architecture responds strongly to its site and surrounding context. Since most tiny houses are on wheels, they need to respond to multiple contexts successfully. I will be taking this design opportunity into careful consideration throughout the design process. The final design will presented in contexts that differ significantly, in order to prove successful.


People are also able to live a more freeing and happier lifestyle, enjoying themselves and nature in the process. By living simply, people are able to focus on what is meaningful to them and learn to appreciate what is important in life, like experiences and personal relationships.

19 position

“The tiny house movement is a direct response to today’s typical lifestyle of living in oversized houses, owning an excessive amount of things, and losing ourselves in things rather than experiencing life. People now more than ever want to reconnect with nature, themselves, and their loved ones.”

conclusion

Conclusion The tiny house movement is a direct response to today’s typical lifestyle of living in oversized houses, owning an excessive amount of things, and losing ourselves in things rather than experiencing life. People now more than ever want to reconnect with nature, themselves, and their loved ones. Going tiny not only allows for this, but also enhances the experience. Tiny house owners are able to rid of all their unnecessary crap and keep only what is important to them. Tiny houses are catered to the owners, forming a need and appreciation to every item that makes up the house. The things that owners do keep are used often and provide meaning. The extremely personalized houses create a sense of belonging and happiness to the owners, making them feel much more at home than in a large mansion full of endless things that show no personality.


program analysis


typical spatial requirements tiny spatial requirements kit of parts before and after going tiny travel

22 24 26 27 28


typical spatial requirements

typical spatial requirements Room Name

Foyer

Mud Room

Average Size

80 sf

48 sf

Room Name

Master Bedroom

Master Bathroom

Average Size

280 sf

96 sf

Room Name

Laundry Room

Powder Room

Average Size

48 sf

25 sf

program analysis

22


Dining Room

Kitchen

Pantry

320 sf

192 sf

160 sf

12 sf

typical spatial requirements

Living Room

23

Bedroom

Bathroom

Guest Bedroom

144 sf

144 sf

70 sf

168 sf

Den/Basement

Office

Garage (2 car)

Attic

700 sf

168 sf

576 sf

700 sf

program analysis

Bedroom


tiny spatial requirements Cooking

Dining

Required Elements

Counter Space Sink Cook-top/Oven Refrigerator/Freezer Storage Pantry

Dining Table Seating

Adjacencies

Dining/Living

Kitchen

Description

The kitchen will be located at one end of the house. The counter will be ‘L’ or ‘U’ shaped to allow for an ample amount of prep space in the small area. Major appliance locations will be decided upon first. Storage will be secondary, fitting into leftover spaces.

The dining area will be part of a multi-functional space also comprised of the living area. Primary seating will be shared with the living room. Additional seating can be put in hidden storage when not in use. The dining table will either remain in the space with the capability of becoming larger, or will fold away into hidden storage.

tiny spatial requirements

Activity

program analysis

24


Bathing

Sleeping

Couch Storage

Work Table Seating

Toilet Shower Sink Washer/Dryer Toiletry/Towel Storage Laundry Hamper

Bed Stairs Clothing Storage Personal Item Storage

Kitchen, Bathroom, Bedroom

Kitchen, Living

Living, Bedroom

Bathroom, Living

The living room will be primary function of the house’s multi-functional space. It will be centrally located in the house, allowing for open space. The entrance will be located in this space, which should be designed to allow for a flow between the indoors and outdoors.

The work space will be located in a loft above the kitchen. It will be accessed by a ladder that can be stored out of the way when not in use. Having a loft for work space will allow for some privacy and minimize distractions when it is in use.

The bathroom will be on the opposite end of the house as the kitchen. It is the only closed off space in the house for privacy reasons.

The bedroom will be located in a second loft above the bathroom. It will be accessed comfortably by a staircase that contains storage. The bed will be sunken into the floor to allow for extra headroom in the space. Storage that doubles as a privacy screen will be located on the edge of this space.

25 program analysis

Working

tiny spatial requirements

Living


program analysis

kit of parts

kit of parts

26


beFore & aFter going tiny These graphics show the differences one family found when going tiny (top graphics) after living in a traditional sized house (bottom graphics).

before & after going tiny 27 program analysis


travel 1 Boneyard Studios - Washington, D.C. 2 Community First - Austin, TX 3 Wildflower Villages - Flat Rock, NC 4 Orlando Lakefront @ College Park - Orlando, FL 5 Caravan Tiny House Hotel - Portland, OR 6 Opportunity Village - Eugene, OR

travel

7 The Sanctuary - Ogilvie, MN

program analysis

28

8 Lemon Cove Village - Lemon Cove, CA 9 Tiny House Village - San Francisco, CA (future) 10 Tiny House Village - Granby, CT (future)

While thinking in terms of design, I also began considering the technical aspects of a tiny house. Below is a diagram of the maximum dimensions a tiny house can be if it is to be legally towed by the owner. Tiny houses can be no wider than 8’-6” and no longer than 60’-0” including the towing vehicle.


travel 29

program analysis


PRECEDENTS


little shelters alpha survival house carmel place koda ecocapsule camper swiss army knife

32 38 44 50 54 58 62 66


little shelters building type precedent students of taliesin west

scottsdale, arizona

100 sf [average] key features: siting strong concepts recycled materials owner-inspired design

1.1


little shelters

My interest in the tiny house movement began when I visited the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture (Taliesin West) in 2011. I learned that the shelters were designed and built by students to use as sleeping quarters while attending the school.

precedents

34

Taliesin West is isolated in the desert, allowing the students a large expanse of land to play with. Image 1.2 shows the majority of the land that has been developed on. The students were encouraged to use local materials they found and fully embrace the landscape in their designs. The function of these little shelters are primarily for sleeping, and often included a fire pit.


little shelter 35

precedents

1.2


precedents

little shelters

1.3

1.4

36

1.5

1.6


little shelters 37

precedents

1.7


alpha building type precedent new frontier tiny homes

no permanent location

246 sf

key features: multi-functionality program organization building form openness light indoor/outdoor space

2.1


alpha precedents

40

I chose this precedent because of its innovative multi-functional features. The majority of these elements are centrally located in the house. This space has the ability to transform throughout the day accounting to the owners’ needs. The opaque walls are folded up for protection during travel or when privacy is desired. When the building is stationary, these walls can be folded down to open up the space and serve as an exterior deck.


2.2

precedents

2.4

2.5

alpha

2.3

41


alpha

Not only do the exterior walls of the house change, but the interior space has that ability as well. The images below show how this central area of the house can be transformed into living, dining and work spaces.

Surrounding this flexible, central space are the more static areas of the house. The bedroom and bathroom are stacked to one end of the house, shown in image 2.1. The kitchen is located on the opposite end of the house, shown in image 2.12.

2.6

2.7

2.8

2.9

2.10

2.11

precedents

42


43

2.12


44


survival house building type precedent tiny house nation

no permanent location

260 sf

key features: indoor and outdoor gardens building form outdoor storage two lofts/access

45

3.1


survival house precedents

46

I chose this precedent because of its unique building form and spatial organization. This home features two lofts at different heights that are reflected by the exterior. To make the interior spaces feel more open, there is plenty of natural light. Because the lofts are the shortest spaces in the house, they are surrounded on all sides by windows to create a sense of openness. As shown in photograph 3.1, the exterior glass doors can remain open to allow even more light and fresh air into the house. A compact L-shaped staircase was designed to access the bedroom loft. This allows for a more comfortable transition between spaces and even provides standing room at the top step. The only interior door is to the bathroom, which is located next to the staircase. To save space and not get in the way of the stairs, a sliding barn door was used.


3.2

3.3


3.4

3.5


Because the kitchen takes up so much room, a unique solution was created for accessing the loft above it. This loft serves as a living space and second bedroom. A portable ladder to access this space is stored as the loft’s railing when it is not in use.

49 precedents

The innovative use of exterior storage is another design element I am studying in this precedent. There is a space under the smaller loft that contains a pop-out outdoor grilling station as well as storage for outdoor activities. The strong emphasis on using both indoor and outdoor spaces helps make this a successful tiny house.

survival house

Below the taller loft is a kitchen with a gas range stove, full size refrigerator and large sink. The house was designed for a couple that enjoys cooking and wanted to grow their own produce, an aspect that I would also like to incorporate in my design. Because of the emphasis on cooking, the kitchen takes up a lot of space, leaving less for living and dining. A solution for both a dining table and extra kitchen prep space was a pop-up table that is stored under a raised couch when it is not in use.


50


carmel place building type precedent

nARCHITECTS New York, New York

260-360 sf

key features: multi-functionality modular design organization tall ceilings juliette balconies

51

4.1


Our Community 1 borough, 1 neighborhood, 1 block, 1 street.. 1 Mount Carmel Place

Construction of this micro-living precedent was completed in spring 2016. It features 55 rental apartments and shared amenities. There are 5 modular apartment configurations that are stacked into four 11 foot wide towers. The individual apartments have design features that make them feel larger than they are. Ceilings reach 9’-8” and the end walls feature 8’ tall sliding windows with juliet balconies. Flexible built-in furniture integrate the bed, couch and storage that allow for a multi-functional open space. The modular designs, flexible spaces and creative use of storage are what can be taken away from this precedent.

carmel place

Our Micro Towers 55 units, 4 towers, 10 floors, 1 community

precedents

52

Our Shared Spaces 3,525 sf exterior space, 5,470 sf interior amenities..1 key card

4.3

Our Micro Modules 75 modules, 5 weeks to erect them

My Micro Unit Average 286 sf, 2 zones, 1 home 4.2

4.4


Linear Storage Loft 70 cuft 16’ x 1’-10” H x 2’-6” D: the same volume of storage as a Volkswagen Jetta Sportwagen.

Bathroom/Closet Accessible bathroom with shower; full depth closet.

Juliette Balcony 63 sf 7’-0” W x 9’-0” H Sliding doors and a laminated glass guardrail.

carmel place

4.5

Kitchen 70 cuft Efficient factory built kitchen with folddown table/counter, full height pull-out pantry, full height fridge, range and space for a convection microwave.

53 precedents

4.6


54


koda technical precedent designed by: kodasema

no permanent location

size: 326 sf

key features: undefined multi-functional space public/private division indoor/outdoor space unapparent mobility

55

5.1


koda

5.2

precedents

56

5.3

Koda is a movable pre-fabricated house that promotes thinking green and healthy living. Through the use of solar panels, smart systems, well insulated walls, quadruple glazing, LED lighting and more, the house does not allow any energy to be wasted. The materials it is built with is another sustainable aspect; one unit only requires 9 cubed meters of concrete. The house is not on wheels, however, it is easily assembled and disassembled in four to seven hours. It is not fixed to the ground by a foundation, therefore it does not leave a footprint on the earth. Koda is unique because of its flexibility; the large amount of open space allows it to take many forms. “Koda can become whatever you want...a city centre home, a lakeside summer house, a cosy cafe, an office, workshop or studio or even a classroom.�


koda

5.6

57 precedents

5.4

5.5

5.7


58


ecocapsule technical precedent designed by: nice architects

no permanent location

size: 86 sf

key features: compact size off the grid-wind/solar power rainwater collection mobility only essentials form follows function

59

6.1


ecocapsule

I chose this precedent because it is the most compact example of an off the grid tiny home. Every aspect of this building is designed according to purpose. The exterior form is designed to maximize use of the natural elements. Equipped with both a wind turbine and solar cells, enough power can be gathered to sustain the house when there are periods without wind or sun. The round shape of the house allows for easy rain collection that can be purified and re-used. The small size also allows the building to be easily transported and stationed to nearly any location.

precedents

60

6.2

6.3


6.4

ecocapsule 61

precedents

6.7 6.6 6.5


62


camper anti-precedent 267 sf

designed by: r-vision travel trailers

no permanent location

size: 267 sf

key features: pop-out living space lack of craft/personality seasonal use generic materials one story

63


camper precedents

64

A common argument against the tiny house movement is that there is no difference between tiny homes and campers/RVs. This is why I have chosen the camper my parents own as an anti-precedent. I disagree with the argument and would like to provide evidence as to why it is not true. A major difference between the two is materiality. Campers are typically designed with cheaper, more generic materials. For the most part, they are used seasonally, and therefore do not require the careful construction and durable materials that are found in tiny homes. Campers are created with no specific client in mind, unlike tiny homes which are entirely customized to reflect their owners.


65


7.1

swiss army knife

I chose a Swiss army knife as an abstract precedent because it perfectly represents tiny homes. The exterior case of the knives can vary in texture, color, material and size, depending on a person’s preferences. The tools within each case also vary depending on a person’s needs. These tools are cleverly compacted into the small case, utilizing the entire interior space.

precedents

66

7.2

7.3


swiss army kniFe abstract precedent designed by: victorinox key features: compact different material options different tool options personalized

67

7.4


conceptual design


project approach concept sketchbook evolve flux shift transit roam wander reflection

70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88


project approach

less than 500 square feet mobility

I began the conceptual design phase by creating a list of words that describe tiny houses (left). The intention of this list was to find inspiration for design through these descriptive words. It is common for tiny house companies to have an underlying theme or concept with their models, along with unique names for each type of home (see examples on following page. The list allowed me to easily come up with concepts for six tiny houses.

green design strategies

project approach

personalized

conceptual design

70

amalfi

cabin in the woods

little tahoma

elm

9.4

napa

10.3

mt. everest

10.4

mt. kilimanjaro

11.3

11.2

11.1

cypress

loft

10.2

10.1

castle peak

9.3

9.2

9.1

farallon

11.4

roamoke


organic

reduce

eco-friendly

connection

struggle

reuse

satisfying

human scale

adaptable

recycle

gratifying

relationship

roaming

identity

affordable

craft

expressive

individual

nature/natural

character

unique

habits

experience

customized

whimsical

importance

minimalism

belonging

movement

informal

mobile

comfort/cozy

active

link

travel

happiness

evolving

detail

community

free

flux

harmony

explore

purpose

shift

convenience

essentials

compact

transplanting

relaxation

fulfilling

green

transit

liberate

multi-functional

rewarding

wandering

unrestricted

downsizing

enjoyable

commonality

micro

personalized

accomplishment

discovery

collective

lifestyle

passion

reveal

accommodate

off the grid

wild

effective

adjust

71 conceptual design

outdoors

project approach

sustainable


concept : movement

concept

The overall concept for my tiny houses is movement, reflecting the mobility of the homes as well as the tiny house movement. Within this concept are six individual tiny house designs, each named after a different form of movement.

conceptual design

72

evolve [to develop gradually]

flux [continuous change, passage or movement]


shift [to move from one place/position/direction to another]

transit [passing across or through]

concept

roam [to travel with a purpose but no destination]

73 conceptual design

wander [to travel without a purpose or destination]


sketchbook

sketchbook

These images from my sketchbook show how the six concepts were developed simultaneously.

conceptual design

74


sketchbook 75

conceptual design


evolve [to develop gradually]

evolve

Evolve is a prefabricated home that can be modified by adding or subtracting modules. The one-module home is a 12’ x 12’ x 12’ cube intended for one owner. The roof and upper windows can be raised or lowered to adjust light and privacy in the home. As a person’s family unit grows, so can the size of their home.

conceptual design

76


evolve 77

conceptual design


Flux [continuous change, passage, or movement]

flux

Flux is the most adaptable unit, allowing the owner to create different spatial configurations as desired. The home expands and contracts by means of sliding floors, walls, and ceilings. This design is perfect for the person who likes to constantly change the layout of their living spaces.

conceptual design

78


flux 79

conceptual design


shiFt [to move from one place/position/direction to another]

shift

Intended for families, shift is a larger unit that can accommodate up to six people. Essentially, shift is composed of two tiny houses that can be attached to one another in a variety of ways. When traveling, the houses need to be towed separately. When parked, walls can be moved out of the way to allow for a connection of the two buildings. There are three bays in each home, with eight walls that can be moved for connections to the other home or with nature.

conceptual design

80


shift 81

conceptual design


TRANSIT [passing across or through]

transit

Transit is an off-the-grid home that allows for frequent travel. It is ideal for people with jobs that require constant relocation, such as traveling nurses, disaster relief workers, salespeople, and migrating farmers. The home is simple and serves as a relaxing space for these hardworking people. The bed sits on a platform to allow for easy access. The platform has storage that rolls out from under the steps. There is also an option to grow food on a small private roof garden. The exterior walls are made of photovoltaic insulated panels that can be clipped on and off to reveal windows.

conceptual design

82


transit 83

conceptual design


ROAM [to travel with a purpose but no destination]

roam

Roam is intended for people looking to travel and share their talents/businesses with others, such as performers, researchers, pop-up shop owners, and artists. The sleeping and bathing spaces are stacked on one end of the home, allowing the rest of the home to be completely open for any type of display. The exterior walls on one side can fully open, creating a deck and overhang that is the full length of the house. This allows for the homeowners to interact with the public easily.

conceptual design

84


roam 85

conceptual design


WANDER [to travel without a purpose or destination]

wander

Wander is intended for the minimalist who just wants to life live through experiences. Inspired by ancient nomadic tents, wander is scaled down to provide the homeowner with the essentials and allow them to easily travel with the home. The home is very simple with its contents, but has a unique form that helps it stand out and inspire adventure.

conceptual design

86


wander 87

conceptual design


reflection

reFlection

conceptual design

88

This first phase of design allowed me to explore many different conceptual ideas at once; by thinking about these ideas simultaneously, I was able to gain a significant amount of understanding for what I wanted to achieve from the project. The different concepts allowed me to explore various client needs/requirements, as well as underlying building designs. For the next phase of design, I plan on combining the most successful aspects of these six concepts, as well as further developing the ideas behind them. At the completion of the next design phase, I would like to complete two or three stronger conceptual designs that are at a more developed state. Along with building design, I will begin focusing on other influential aspects of the project, such as building systems, furniture design, and potential site locations.


critique | 2.3.17 + consider aluminum structure = lightweight + does the house need to be accessible?

+ where are the water tanks and batteries stored? + look into technical aspects, apply to designs

+ reconsider precedents + explore facade design/building expansion with origami/paper folding + calculate water and energy requirements

89 conceptual design

+ develop and combine designs

reflection

+ how do different ages react to the house (infant - elderly)


schematic design


travel sustainable design strategies rainwater collection sketchbook expansion concept 1 expansion concept 2 expansion concept 3 reflection

92 94 96 98 100 102 104 108


travel

travel

The following maps show the current options for travel with a tiny house. The map below shows short-term rentals, located on farms and wineries. The lower map is comprised of other rental options, such as backyards or RV parks. The red and white map shows which states have developed tiny house communities.

schematic design

92 12.1

12.2


california beach rv park coastal living habitats tiny homes the lavra lemon cove village napoleon complex tiny house village colorado sprout tiny home community florida orlando lakefront at college park rockledge tiny house community iowa sofair farms indiana towering pines vineyard lomax tiny house community kansas dapper tiny house park

maryland blue moon rising minnesota brainerd the sanctuary minnesota missouri dancing rabbit new york amazing acres north carolina camp tiny house of the triad coral sands point recreational village earthaven eco-village high coves eco-village highland lake cove sacred mountain sanctuary the village of wildflowers new mexico caballos de las estrellas eco resort city of the sun

travel

ohio loveare homestead what hill mobile home community oregon dignity village lakeview tall town tiny village opportunity village simply home community south carolina city in the woods texas austin live | work commmunity first healing hands ranch spur vermont headwaters garden and learning center washington quixote village wisconsin occupy madison tiny house village

93 schematic design


sustainable design strategies

sustainable design strategies

schematic design

94

typical water usage activity

1 person

2 people

drinking

1 gallon

2 gallons

shower (2 gallons/minute)

10 gallons

20 gallons

wash hands/dishes (1 gallon/minute)

4 gallons

6 gallons

total (per day)

15 gallons

28 gallons

water needed (monthly)

x

231 (conversion factor)

roof area (inches)

=

rainfall depth needed (monthly)


minimal environmental impact (no foundation)

insulated glazing

water collection system

composting toilet

water-conserving fixtures

SIPS (structural insulated panels)

grey water collection

water re-use

sustainable design strategies

using recycled / recyclable materials

cross ventilation

95 schematic design

photovoltaic panels

LED lighting

tankless water heater

garbage composting

energy efficient appliances

recycling

biomass stove


rainwater collection 1 person, 8x10 sf house 15 gallons of water per day 9” of rainfall needed per month

rainwater collection

1 person, 8x20 sf house 15 gallons of water per day 4.5” of rainfall needed per month

schematic design

96

1 person, 8x30 sf house 15 gallons of water per day 3” of rainfall needed per month

1 person, 8x40 sf house 15 gallons of water per day 2.3” of rainfall needed per month

2 people, 8x30 sf house 28 gallons of water per day 5.6” of rainfall needed per month

2 people, 8x40 sf house 28 gallons of water per day 4.2” of rainfall needed per month

january

february

march

april


may

june

july

august

september

october

november

december

rainwater collection 97 schematic design


sketchbook

sketchbook

The following sketches are a small number of the many explorations I thought about in terms of building expansion. I studied different ways to do so with moving volumes, panels, and unfolding fabric. After exhausting these ideas, I came up with three different concepts.

schematic design

98


sketchbook 99

schematic design


expansion concept 1

expansion concept 1

schematic design

100

This first attempt at building expansion focused primarily on moving planes and folding fabric structures. By opening up the front end of the house with moving planes, the living area achieves a more comfortable scale. A half-circle expansion located above the sleeping loft allows for more headroom and the possibility for light and air circulation to occur in the space. This design felt a bit random to me and did not embody a strong architectural character. The back end of the house also feels tight and does not relate well to the outdoors.


expansion concept 1

101 schematic design


expansion concept 2

expansion concept 2

schematic design

102

The second concept focused on movable volumes, rather than planes. I see this approach as being more successful than the previous concept, however a major disadvantage is that it is difficult to occupy the space when the volumes are not expanded. The ability to expand so significantly through different methods, on the other hand, offers extremely promising opportunities that I recognize should be further explored.


expansion concept 2

103 schematic design


expansion concept 3

expansion concept 3

The third concept combines the previous two, as well as explores some new thoughts. Through intricate unfolding, plane movement, and lifting, the building is able to successfully create a more comfortable space and relate to the environment from all angles.

schematic design

104


expansion concept 3

105 schematic design


schematic design

106 proposed design


proposed design

107 schematic design


reflection

reFlection This second phase of design allowed me to focus on ways to expand the building. I was able to create three well-developed concepts that expanded the building in very different ways. However, I realized that the three concepts did not embody a strong architectural style. The overarching methods of expansion were successful, but need to be developed further.

schematic design

108

For the next phase of design, I plan on focusing on how the house will expand in size. Having a tiny home that is capable of growing in size has many benefits, such as the ability to collect rainwater and sunlight, remain as compact as possible when traveling, and provide more living space when stationary.


critique | 2.17.17 + develop strong concept + define client necessities + design supports/kinetics + make building spatially dynamic - diagonal space is a good start + study nomadic appliances + resolve how rainwater collection works

+ develop mechanical systems

+ consider personal space + make sure two people can adjust everything + show how things work = craft (hydraulic pulleys/gears) + how can it be sustainable when driving? + can the roof become livable space? + expand down + no swinging doors

109 schematic design

+ study building in different contexts

reflection

+ develop structure


design development


design approaches client requirements project development concept plans + sections kinetics structure water technology furniture + materials renderings reflection

112 113 114 116 118 122 124 125 126 127 128 134


design approaches

design approaches

theoretical personal connection craft hard work personalization

off the grid connection to nature

connection to nature

112 design development

practical

cultural acceptance comfort what is home?

multi-functional design space furniture easy to transport

location (infinite sites) practicality

community technology (digital community)

the way of the future affordable green building movement


client requirements alyssa: traveling architect frank: traveling accountant hobbies: art, cooking

queen bed clothing storage shoe storage shower sink with counter space composting toilet combination washer/dryer linen storage dirty laundry storage personal supply storage

113 design development

herb garden oven/range refrigerator freezer pots/pans storage spice storage coffee maker dry food storage sink/drying rack counter space serve-ware storage

client requirements

comfortable couch seating for friends two desks book storage art material storage dining table


project development

project development

The first idea I came up with in this phase of design began with a compact rectangle comprised of two volumes. The inhabitable space is enlarged by expanding and contracting the two volumes. In addition to this volumetric motion, certain planes fold out to also expand the space and connect to the house’s surroundings. The combination of both volumetric and planar expansion was inspired by previous concepts from the past two design phases.

design development

114


project development

115 design development


concept

concept

After further exploration of volumetric expansion, I found that the opportunities for an architectural statement were greater when the volumes did not move in the same plane. This idea is achieved by rotation at a hinge, where the full building expansion results in a square-shaped space rather than a narrow rectangle. The diagrams below show how other parts of the house adapt to site conditions through other means of kinetic expansion.

design development

116


concept

117 design development


plans and sections energy efficient appliances

floor plans

water-conserving fixtures

tankless water heater

design development

118

using recycled / recyclable materials

SIPS (structural insulated panels)


garbage composting

water re-use floor plans 119 design development


cross ventilation building sections

water collection system

composting toilet

insulated glazing

design development

120

minimal environmental impact (no foundation)

water collection system


building sections

photovoltaic panels

121 design development

photovoltaic panels


design development

kinetics

kinetics

122


13.2

13.3

kinetics

13.1

123 design development

13.4

13.6

13.7

13.5

13.8


structure

PV Panels 4 1/2” SIP Roof Interior Ceiling Finish

structure

Alucabond Metal Panel Siding 4 1/2” SIP Wall Sliding Glass Wall 1/2” OSB

Recycled Wood Floor 4 1/2” SIP Floor Trailer Water Containers Plumbing Wheels

design development

124

trailer


water

water

plumbing

125 design development

water storage


technology

When looking into technology, I knew I wanted to start with an integrated photovoltaic panel system. The four images below are examples of Tesla’s roof cladding systems that realistically represent certain materials, but are actually made of PV cells.

technology

The second set of images are of the smartglass system, which changes glass from translucent to opaque at the flip of a switch. This type of technology is imperative to the narrow strip of glass that is along both the bathroom and bedroom spaces.

design development

126


Furniture + materials The exterior of the tiny house will be clad in a durable metal panel system. There are also significant amounts of exterior glazing, which will need to be protected during travel as much as possible. The interior will feature recycled wood flooring, counter-tops, and beams, as well as a steel structure and accents. The lower diagrams show early development of movable furniture inside the house. The bathroom will feature

a sliding door mounted on an overhead track; a typical swinging door would take up too much space in the house. The only detached piece of furniture is the couch/dining table. The couch backing can be flipped to become a table which also separates the seats. In the kitchen space there is an overhead cabinet above the counter-top, which can be raised and lowered by a pulley system for easy access and to remain out of the way when not in use. This allows for utilization of what could have been dead space all the way up to the ceiling. The kitchen also features fold-up counter space that can also serve as workstations. These counters are folded down when not in use or when traveling.

furniture + materials 127 design development


renderings

The following renderings look at the tiny house in three different contexts. The building adapts to the sites differently in order to respond to its surroundings. I chose three sites that contrast greatly in order to show the house’s entire capabilities. urban The house is compacted to its smallest size, allowing it to fit snugly between other buildings, as well as provide some privacy. mountain The house is rotated for expansion. The sliding glass walls help protect the interior from wind and other weather conditions. The glass walls frame the view and create a strong connection between interior and exterior spaces. beach The house is fully expanded and opened to fully integrate with nature. The most comfortable and private sites allow for interior and exterior spaces to become one.


reFlection

reflection

reFlection

design development

134

At this point in the design phase I feel that I have developed an extremely strong concept that supports all of my original intentions. This design is miles ahead of the past concepts I came up with, and has the ability to strongly connect with any site. The large number of changes that the house can undergo allows for an exciting and ever-changing environment. For the final phase of design I plan to take this concept to a more realistic level. There is nothing major that I would like to change about the concept or design, but there are many smaller tweaks and developments that need to occur.


critique | 3.17.17 + resolve how kinetic elements work + create a secondary means of egress

+ diagrammatic axons of all building systems + bring floors closer to ground

+ insert hobbies/professions/character into design + consider weight of building + consider building movement (transportation)

135 design development

+ integrate planters into walls

reflection

+ develop a stronger architectural identity


136

Final design


sketchbook precedents exterior kinetics furniture design kinetic details building systems rainwater collection urban mountain forest beach site comparison model images reflection

138 140 142 144 146 150 152 154 160 166 172 178 180 184

137


sketchbook

I began the final phase of design by returning to my sketchbook. I sketched out ideas of how I thought each kinetic element would work. This helped me gain an understanding of exactly how many moving elements I was working with, as well as what types of systems I needed to develop.

sketchbook

The sketches to the right show my ideas for a clip-on cable system that helps stabilize the building when it is traveling.

final design

138

The final sketches on the last page are how I developed a new building form that features a sloped roof as well as sloped bathroom/bedroom wall. This decision creates a more dynamic and appealing form, allows for rainwater collection and makes the building more aerodynamic.


sketchbook

139 final design


precedents

precedents

final design

140

The following precedents provided a significant amount of inspiration for the more recent design decisions. These precedents employ the sustainable design strategies and building adaptation that I am also searching to achieve. watershed - FLOAT alpha - new frontier tiny homes swiss army knife delta shelter - olson kundig


15.1

17.1

14.1

15.2

17.2 16.1

16.2

16.3

16.4

17.3


final design

exterior kinetics

exterior kinetics

142


The following images diagram the exterior and interior moving parts of the tiny house. The images on these pages highlight all of the exterior kinetic elements of the house, and show the house as being fully expanded. The images on the following two pages show how the interior space adapts and is used. In addition to the interior elements I had previously designed in the design development phase, there are also easels and bar stools that can be stored out of the way when not in use. These diagrams are followed by sketches of how I intend for each kinetic element to behave.

exterior kinetics 143 final design


final design

furniture design

furniture design

144


furniture design

145 final design


kinetic details

kinetic details

glass wall @ kitchen entry

planters

final design

146

deck @ kitchen entry


lifted walls @ kitchen

bar table @ kitchen

kinetic details 147 final design

building rotation @ hinge

sliding roof @ corner

sliding glass walls @ corner


kinetic details

desk and storage @ bedroom

final design

148

bathroom door

easels @ kitchen


kinetic details 149

bar stools

counter-tops @ kitchen

final design

wall cabinets @ kitchen


building systems

building systems

trailer

structure

energy collection

electrical @ bedroom

final design

150


building systems

plumbing

electrical @ bathroom

electrical @ kitchen

151 final design

rainwater collection


rainwater collection

rainwater collection

2 people, 200 sf, closed 18 gallons of water per day 5.6”-6”-6.2” of rainfall needed per month

year-round

january

february

march

april

may

june

july

august

september

october

november

december

final design

152


2 people, 376 sf, open 18 gallons of water per day 2.7”-2.9”-3.0” of rainfall needed per month

february

march

april

rainwater collection

january

year-round

153 final design

may

june

july

august

september

october

november

december


urban I chose to first locate the house in an active Charleston, SC neighborhood. The tiny house in an urban context is as compact as possible. This allows for it to easily and comfortably fit between two existing buildings. Although the space is as compact as possible, there is still a comfortable amount of room for two people to live in. The main access into the house is through the glass door at the bathroom. Windows that can be exposed in the kitchen space allow light in during the day, and can be closed for privacy at night. The lower right rendering highlights the desk at the foot of the bed, which can be raised when needed. When lowered, the desk becomes part of the loft floor and is completely disguised.


final design

156 urban


urban

157 final design


final design

158 urban


urban

159 final design


forest The second environment I chose to locate the house in was a forest; the house becomes completely integrated with nature. There is a visible bleeding between indoor and outdoor spaces. The house is hinged open because there is plenty of room to expand. During the day, one of the sliding glass walls is hidden in the pocket wall so people can walk in and out of the house with ease. At night both glass walls can enclose the space so animal’s don’t get in the house. The following renderings successfully show the house’s transparency. Apparent in the rendering below, there is visibility through the entire house; nature is brought into the house by being framed in multiple locations. The rendering below also shows the exterior bar seating that is created by an unfolding wall bar stools. When not in use, the stools are pinned and stored between the kitchen beams, as seen in the right two renderings. The right two renderings also show the kitchen cabinets being lowered for access. The amount and sizes of the shelves were designed specifically for the client needs. There are also two drying racks that are located above the sink.


final design

162 forest


forest

163 final design


final design

164 forest


forest

165 final design


mountain The third location for the tiny house is in a rough terrain that can normally be difficult to access or build upon. With just enough generally flat ground for the house to rest upon, this site offers privacy and an extraordinary view through the expanded corner. The sliding glass walls enclose the space, protecting the interior from wind and rain. When the bathroom door is closed, a hidden fireplace is revealed and has the ability to heat the entire house. Even in the worst weather conditions, the house still feels protected and cozy.


final design

168 mountain


mountain

169 final design


final design

170 mountain


mountain

171 final design


beach For the final site selection, I wanted to exhibit the house in the most ideal and comfortable weather conditions, allowing the house to be completely integrated in nature. In this configuration, the least amount of walls enclose the building so a cool breeze can constantly flow through the house. Ideal views of the ocean are framed differently throughout the house, whether it is when painting at the kitchen window or sitting in bed. The lower right rendering shows the great amount of bathroom storage in the house. The storage spaces reflect the stairs on the opposite side of the wall. Here, close can be hung, shoes can be stored, and laundry can be washed and dried in one compact machine.


final design

174 beach


beach

175 final design


final design

176 beach


beach

177 final design


charleston, south carolina

rocky mountains, colorado

environment

urban

mountain

178

square feet

200 sf

308 sf

rainwater collection

jan feb mar apr may june july aug sept oct nov dec

jan feb mar apr may june july aug sept oct nov dec

kinetic components used

easels planters desk @ bedroom

building rotation | sliding glass walls |sliding roof | kitchen walls kitchen counters |fireplace

site comparison

location (state)

final design

site comparison


laguna beach, california

forest

beach

376 sf

376 sf

jan feb mar apr may june july aug sept oct nov dec

jan feb mar apr may june july aug sept oct nov dec

building rotation | sliding glass wall _sliding roof kitchen cabinets | kitchen walls | outdoor bar table bar stools | entry deck

building rotation | sliding glass walls sliding roof | kitchen walls | easel kitchen counter | outdoor bar table bar stools |entry deck | entry glass wall | entry canopy |planters

site comparison

acadia national park, maine

179 final design


final design

model images

model images

180


model images

181 final design


final design

182 model images


model images

183 final design


reFlection

reflection

reFlection

final design

184

This final phase of design allowed me to focus my efforts to developing and improving ideas from the previous critique. Because the conceptual idea and first attempt at design were very strong, I was able to resolve the project’s smaller details. The project was pulled together nicely and I am satisfied with the extent of exploration I was able to achieve. Although there is more development to be done, I am glad I chose to explore as many different aspects to the building as I did, rather than focusing intensely on just a few. If I had more time to work on this thesis I would not make any major changes, but instead, continue to think about the less developed aspects of the project.


critique | 4.24.17 + project was well thought out and well done + thoroughly studied, developed, and presented + mechanical hardware was not fully explored + building systems diagrams are highly successful

+ nice use of context drawing + images

+ floor plans could be clearer and have better labels + model helped sell the project + details relate nicely to statement about craft + create maps of solar, internet to match rainfall + strong case for design

185 final design

+ missed exploration of an artist and accountant

reflection

+ necessary to see entire process for best understanding


reFerences


position precedents design

188 189 190


position reFerences

1.1 Thoreau, H. D. (2014, March 30). Walden Pond Hut [Title Page Illustration - 1882 Edition]. Retrieved from http:// uudb.org/articles/henrydavidthoreau.html 1.2 Olcutt, T. G. (2014, March 7). [A modern studio retreat in the woods]. Retrieved from https://smallhousebliss. com/2014/03/07/a-modern-studio-retreat-in-the-woods-workshop-apd/sony-dsc-11/ 1.3-1.6 Page, T. (2015, April 21). Less Is More: The Tiny House Movement. Retrieved from http://homestead-honey. com/2014/09/01/less-tiny-house-movement/ 1.7 Kinoshia, M. (2013). [Kumiko assembly]. Retrieved from https://nanatsuboshi-gallery.jp/user_data/artists_detail. php?artist_id=109

position

1.8 Frankel, E. (2013, May 21). Unplugged [Cabin in the woods]. Retrieved from http://nymag.com/homedesign/greatrooms/34728/

references

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Frampton, K. (1974). On Reading Heidegger. Oppositions, (4), 1-4. Heidegger, M. (1997). Building, Dwelling, Thinking. In N. Leach (Trans.), Rethinking architecture: A reader in cultural theory (pp. 98-109). New York: Routledge. (Original work published 1951) MacLeod, F. (2015). 5 Things Architecture Can Learn from the Tiny House Movement. Retrieved April 23, 2016, from http://www.archdaily.com/772637/5-things-architecture-can-learn-from-the-tiny-house-movement McFedries, P. (2015, October). Tiny Houses, Big Lexicon. IEEE Spectrum, 28. Morrison, A. (2017, March). Call to Action: Help with the Appendix Adoption Process. Retrieved May 07, 2017, from https://tinyhousebuild.com/tiny-house-appendix-adoption-process/ Norberg-Schulz, C. (1983). Heidegger’s Thinking on Architecture . Prospecta: The Yale Architectural Journal, 20, 6168. Norberg-Schulz, C. (1976). The Phenomenon of Place. Architectural Association Quarterly, 8(4), 3-10. Semper, G. (1989). The four elements of architecture: And other writings (pp. 102-6). (H. F. Mallgrave & W. Hermann, Trans.). Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press. (Original work published 1851) Semper, G. (1989). Science, industry, and art: proposals for the development of national taste in art (pp. 133-6, 1424). Cambridge: Cambridge Univ. Press. (Original work published 1852) Vivian, J. (1998). The rustic, `temporary’ microhouse. Mother Earth News, (168), 50. Witherell, E., & Dubrulle, E. (1995). Reflections on Walden. From http://thoreau.library.ucsb.edu/thoreau_walden.html


precedents reFerences

2.1 Taliesin West [Map]. (2017). In Google maps. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/maps/place/Taliesin West 2.2 Frazee, D. (n.d.). FLW School of Architecture Shelter [Digital image]. Retrieved from http://archinect.com/davefrazee/project/frank-lloyd-wright-school-of-architecture-shelter 2.3 Naik, P. (n.d.). Hanging Shelter [Digital image]. Retrieved from http://naikpranav.wixsite.com/site/hanging-shelter-taliesin-west?lightbox=image248q 2.4Hook Shelter [Digital image]. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.vidafine.com/blog/2010/03/taliesin-shelters/ 2.5 FLW Shelter [Digital image]. (2005, September 5). Retrieved from http://archinect.com/news/article/25088/taliesin-teardown-ruffles-feathers

2.7 Brittlebush [Digital image]. (2010, October 24). Retrieved from http://boiteaoutils.blogspot.com/2010/10/brittlebush-by-simon-de-aguero.html 3.1-3.12 Alpha [Digital image]. (2016). Retrieved from https://www.newfrontiertinyhomes.com/tiny-house/gallery/

5.1-5.6 Carmel Place [Digital image]. (2016). Retrieved from http://narchitects.com/work/carmel-place/ 6.1-6.7 KODA [Digital image]. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.kodasema.com/en/ 7.1-7.7 Ecocapsule [Digital image]. (2014). Retrieved from http://www.nicearchitects.sk/en/ecocapsule 8.1 Swiss Army Classic [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Swiss-Classic-Pocket-Knife/dp/B00004YVB2 8.2 Swiss Army Camper Knife [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Swiss-Army-Camper-Knife/dp/B000IAZDDG 8.3 Swiss Champ Pocket Knife [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-SwissChamp-Pocket-Knife/dp/B0001GS19U 8.4 Swiss Army Knives [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.swissarmy.com/us/en/Products/Swiss-Army-Knives/c/SAK

189 references

4.1-4.5 Survival House [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.fyi.tv/shows/tiny-house-nation/pictures/survival-house/thn-survival-house-1

precedents

2.6 Beers, P. (n.d.). Taliesin West [Digital image]. Retrieved from http://www.peterbeers.net/interests/flw_rt/Arizona/ taliesin_west/taliesin_west.htm


design reFerences 9.1-9.4 Mint Tiny House Company. (2014). Retrieved from http://minttinyhomes.com/ 10.1-10.4 Tiny Mountain Houses. (2016). Retrieved from http://www.tinymountainhouses.com/ 11.1-11.4 Tumbleweed Tiny Houses. (2016). Retrieved from https://www.tumbleweedhouses.com/ 12.1 Host Map [Map]. (2017). In Harvest Hosts. Retrieved from https://harvesthosts.com/maps 12.2 Tiny Housers Seeking Places [Map]. (2017). In Tiny House Community. Retrieved from http://www.tinyhousecommunity.com/map/#3/45.58/-99.93

design

13.1, 13.8 Pole Pass Retreat [Digital image]. (2017). Retrieved from http://www.olsonkundig.com/projects/polepass-retreat-2/ 13.2 Studhorse [Digital image]. (2017). Retrieved from http://www.olsonkundig.com/projects/studhorse-2/ 13.3-13.4 Art Stable [Digital image]. (2017). Retrieved from http://www.olsonkundig.com/projects/art-stable/

references

190

13.5, 13.7 False Bay Writer’s Cabin [Digital image]. (2017). Retrieved from http://www.olsonkundig.com/projects/ false-bay-writers-cabin/ 13.6 Olson Kundig Office [Digital image]. (2017). Retrieved from http://www.olsonkundig.com/projects/olson-kundig-office/ 14.1 Watershed [Digital image]. (2016, October 3). Retrieved from http://www.archdaily.com/796403/watershed-float-architectural-research-and-design 15.1-15.2 Swiss Army Camper Knife [Digital image]. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Swiss-Army-Camper-Knife/dp/B000IAZDDG 16.1-16.4 Alpha [Digital image]. (2016). Retrieved from https://www.newfrontiertinyhomes.com/tiny-house/gallery/ 17.1-17.3 Delta Shelter [Digital image]. (2017). Retrieved from http://www.olsonkundig.com/projects/delta-shelter/


epilogue


The work completed in this thesis is only a small step in the study of tiny homes; the research and design could easily continue for years to come. The tiny house movement is a plausible living solution that addresses many environmental and political issues we are faced with today. If the movement continues to grow at a rapid pace, urban solutions will need to be developed. There are existing micro-apartments, such as Carmel Place, but there should also be a solution for those with portable tiny homes. The sketches below are a conceptual study of a simple tower that can house hundreds of tiny homes on wheels. Homeowners can come and go as they please and parking spots can be constantly rented out. Although this type of solution is not necessary any time soon, it allows us to look ahead and imagine the potential that the tiny house movement can bring. The opportunity to spend a year studying the movement and designing a personalized solution has allowed me to grow significantly as an architecture student. Being able to gain a comprehensive understanding of the subject provided me with the tools and ideas necessary to developing a successful design solution. The passion I have put into this thesis will continue as I advance in my career; I will further my education on the subject and hope to start my own firm that specializes in tiny houses.

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Tiny house, big thesis  

Tiny house, big thesis  

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