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CEC and Europe on the Move

Annual Report 2013

of the Church and Society Commission of the Conference of European Churches


Church and Society Commission of CEC Rue Joseph II, 174 - BE - 1000 Brussels, Belgium tel.: +32 2 230 17 32 - fax: +32 2 231 14 13 e-mail: csc@cec-kek.be website: http://csc.ceceurope.org Edited by Mag. Elizabeta Kitanovic Design by Altitude (Brussels) - www.altitude.be The reproduction of this report or parts of it requires prior agreement of the Church and Society Commission of the Conference of European Churches Printed on ecological paper Photo Credits Cover Pg. 1 Pg. 2 Pg. 3 Pg. 5 Pg. 6-7 Pg. 8 Pg. 9 Pg. 11 Pg. 12 Pg. 13 Pg. 14 Pg. 16-17 Pg. 18-19 Pg. 21 Pg. 22-23

Altitude Design/Shutterstock Altitude Design/Shutterstock Rev Silke Tosch – Panel Discussion on “Religion in the public sphere” and photo from CEC-CSC Europe Secretaries meeting by CEC-CSC/Rev Richard Fischer Same as cover Planning CEC-CSC/CALL conference on “Sharing opportunities for churches and diaconia to shape the Europe 2020 strategy and its social objectives” by CEC-CSC – Bottom photo: Ms. Veronica Lope Fontagné MEP Altitude Design/Shutterstock Hearing on Blasphemy at the EP, Hearing on the New constitution in Egypt in the EP Conference on Church–State Relations in Etchmiadzin - Armenia, Training on Social, Economic and Cultural Rights - Palermo, Italy. Conference on Churches Together on Human Rights, Helsinki - contributors CEC-CSC/Mag Elizabeta Kitanovic, Armenian Apostolic Church Kerk in Actie, The Netherlands and CEC-CSC/Mag Elizabeta Kitanovic CEC-CSC Europe Secretaries meeting by CEC-CSC/Rev Richard Fischer CEC-CSC EUL WG by OKR’in Katrin Hatzinger “High Level Religious Leaders meeting” © European Union 2013, ‘’’EU FRA – Training on Social, Economic and Cultural Rights”, dialogue seminar on “Citizenship” © European Union 2013, “Inauguration of the Ecumenical center” by CEC-CSC, “CEC-CSC Europe Secretaries meeting” by CEC-CSC Renovated Ecumenical Centre by CEC-CSC and photos of CEC-CSC staff and members of the CEC-CSC Executive Committee CEC-CSC Europe Secretaries meetings by CEC-CSC Mag Elizabeta Kitanovic, Rev Richard Fischer, Rev Silke Tosch CEC-CSC Commission Members by CEC-CSC Altitude Design


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Being Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Annual Report of the Church and Society Commission 2012 2013

Introduction

2013

will definitely be a memorable year for the Church and Society Commission of the Conference of European Churches as well as for CEC itself in many respects. Unlike in other years, CSC was pretty much centred on and concerned with itself and the future of its programmatic work in the frame of CEC. Our Plenary meeting in April was held under the theme of “Europe for Citizens”, echoing the fact that the European Institutions declared 2013 the “European Year of Citizens”. Both the European Union and the Council of Europe develop programs to promote “Education for Democratic Citizenship”. But while we were trying to identify how the Churches, which are the civil organisations gathering the biggest number of members in Europe, can better play their civil role, we could not ignore the highly precarious economic situation of millions of citizens throughout the continent in the aftermath of the so-called “economic and financial crisis” and its collaterals in so many countries, not only in the southern part of Europe. It reminded me of a slogan the Salvation Army used to describe its work, the “three S”: Soup, Soap, Salvation. The ranking, the order of this slogan is important and programmatic: soup comes

first, then soap, meaning human living conditions. How can we address and ask people to behave as citizens when they are starving or have lost everything? That Churches alongside with so many other groups had to open soup kitchens or distribute clothes in so many cities of our countries was felt as a failure and a shame upon our democratic and humanistic European tradition. This year was also special because the delegates of the CEC Member Churches gathered in Budapest in July for the General Assembly and decided on a new Constitution for CEC that will have big consequences for CSC. The members of CSC who took part in the Assembly were well prepared to actively contribute to the debates and give a new orientation to CEC. “CEC is on the move”, and “CSC goes into transition”. The next pages will tell you more about it. But the Churches will keep believing and acting with others and, as the new Constitution states (Art. 2.1), “work towards building a humane, social and sustainable Europe at peace with itself and its neighbours in which human rights and solidarity prevail.” Visit our website http://csc.ceceurope.org


CSC Goes into Transition Rev. Serge Fornerod, CSC Moderator

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ith the new Constitution of the Conference of European Churches, a new era begins. The Churches in Europe are committed to the work CSC does in Brussels, Strasbourg and with the churches. But they want to have one organisation only which covers the CSC issues, the theological and ecumenical issues and the work areas covered by CCME. Therefore it was decided that - the legal structures of the various CEC bodies have to be simplified into only one legal entity, - this entity has to be established in Brussels, - as well as the Secretariat, which would be managed by the General secretary of CEC.

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The new board of CEC was elected after the new Constitution had been approved. This also means that they carry the new vision and are in charge of its implementation. Implementation will take some time, and CSC too has engaged in managing and planning this transitional period. One of the first results of this new situation was the parting from Rüdiger Noll, the long-standing Director of CSC based in Brussels. He accepted a new professional challenge and position in his home country. CSC organized a farewell party for him in Brussels in late June with the various partners of CSC (see p 17). Another issue was and still is to take care of the staff that last year was more than ever put in a stressful situation, with a view to facilitate the continuation of quality work in both offices. The Executive Committee now has to foresee the necessary legal steps to

Being Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Annual AnnualReport Reportof ofthe theChurch Church and andSociety SocietyCommission Commission2012 2013

be taken in 2014 in order to achieve the implementation as soon and as smoothly as possible for all stakeholders involved. Frank-Dieter Fischbach was designated as “interim team coordinator” till beginning of 2014; an educational training was organized for the staff; the workload was reduced and more focused. Moreover, the building of the Brussels Ecumenical Centre was entirely renovated and made more welcoming and user-friendly. In this sense, all the preconditions for a renewed CEC are now in place: new mission, new premises, new board, experienced staff, simple structure and clear leadership. The issues CSC stands for are also still there, and work is not lacking. Let’s move forward in 2014 in this mood!


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Being Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Annual Report of the Church and Society Commission 2012 2013


Churches’ Voice on Social Affairs

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or years many Member Churches of CEC have been struggling with the social consequences of the financial, economic and debt crisis in Europe and at various levels of the society, experiencing the rising need for help and support but also witnessing despair and helplessness. This is not at all an academic debate as very often existential help is needed – and provided by the churches and others at the grassroots. But of course it is also the task of the Church and Society Commission to engage in the discussion with the European institutions on political ways out of the crisis. In 2013 one element of this involvement was a joint conference on 10-11 April with our partner Eurodiaconia on the European Semester, a mechanism by which the European institutions pursue the goals of the Europe 2020 strategy. One of the five defined goals is the fight against poverty and social exclusion, which is at the heart of the churches’ engagement and which has become even more urgent in these times of severe crisis. Fifteen delegates representing 13 European countries discussed opportunities for a stronger engagement in the European semester process. It was notable that the implementation of the European Semester has hardly been

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criticised by the European Parliament. Ms Verónica Lope Fontagné, MEP, EPP, Member of the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs and rapporteur on the European Semester, underlined that the European Parliament is demanding a stronger role and participation of the national parliaments and the European Parliament as well as of civil society and social actors in deciding on the content of the European Semester. She emphasized that most of the states do not reach the objectives of the Europe 2020 strategy. Reflecting on the experiences of the EP and her personal role as rapporteur on the European Semester 2013 she criticized the very tight timetable of the European Semester. Regarding this timetable and the drive of its process she diagnosed a clear lack of transparency and legitimacy. She also supported the demand to protect the national social budgets against austerity measures in this time of crisis. The conference demonstrated in which different but in the end not sufficient and satisfactory ways churches and diaconal organisations are involved in shaping the European Semester process on the national and European levels. It also became obvious how difficult and complex European procedures are for organisations like the churches.

Being Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Annual AnnualReport Reportof ofthe theChurch Church and andSociety SocietyCommission Commission2012 2013

Complementary to this work the working group on sustainable economy of the CALL network – Church Action on Labour and Life – carried out a brief survey by means of a questionnaire on how CEC Member Churches have reacted to the crisis in Europe. The answers were then evaluated, and the commitment of the churches was again underlined. But it was also evident that the perspective and argumentation in the churches is still national and regional, thus lacking an in-depth reflection on the European perspective and context of the crisis. We can therefore conclude that there is still a lot of work to do and opportunities to seize for the churches within the framework of the Conference of European Churches.


Europe 2020 strategy Youth employment

CEC and Being Christian Europe Citizens: on the Move What does it mean for European society? Annual Report of the Church and Society Commission 2013 2012

European Semester

Europe 2020 strategy

Social budgets Stronger engagement Fight against poverty Youth employment

Health care

Social budgets Fight against poverty European Semester

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Health care


Climate Change – Are we Ambitious Enough?

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nvironment and energy, with a particular focus on climate change, are policy areas where most of the EU citizens acknowledge that none of the Union Member States alone can manage to address them effectively without coordination and cooperation with others. They expect a decisive action from the EU. The European Union has become known as a champion in promoting ambitious climate policies on the global scale paving the way for achieving a hopefully global agreement on reducing greenhouse gases emissions. However, as a consequence of the economic and financial crises, the EU climate policies started receiving less attention than before.

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In 2013 climate change partially got back some of the previous attention. In September the 5th report of the UN climate panel was presented to the public. In its main message the report underlines that climate change is ‘extremely likely’ induced by human activities. For most of the political arena the earlier announced target to reduce CO2 emissions by 80% until 2050 remains unquestionable. It would keep temperature increase by the end of the 21st century within the limit of 2 degrees. Less clear for decision makers is, however, the process of achieving this target, considering the fact that for most of them this timeframe is beyond the horizon of their political career.

Being Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Annual AnnualReport Reportof ofthe theChurch Church and andSociety SocietyCommission Commission2012 2013

It is well known that the EU committed itself to reduce both the CO2 emissions and energy consumption by 20% and to increase the share of renewable energy by 20% by 2020. Presented intermediate results proved that the Union is on the way to achieve these goals. However, the review made clear as well that the EU has a capacity for even more ambitious targets. The reality characterising the present situation is the absence of political will to increase the 2020 targets. That decreasing political will is a feature accompanying the process of establishing the EU climate targets for 2030 as well.


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In the course of 2013, CSC in cooperation with ECEN contributed to the EU public consultation on 2030 targets, as well as to the formulating of the EU policies on sustainable development. On those and other occasions it was underlined that churches in Europe are in favour of an active and ambitious EU approach to climate change. Unfortunately the economic crisis situation in Europe is not very favourable for pursuing strong climate policies. Governments in a number of EU Member States are expressing some hesitation. The argumentation of the industry that ambitious climate targets would endanger economic recovery and contribute to

CEC and Being Christian Europe Citizens: on the Move What does it mean for European society? Annual Report of the Church and Society Commission 2013 2012

rising unemployment is put forward more than ever before. The EU climate policy is then a target of increasingly polarised arguments between economists and environmentalists. Balancing the shortterm gains and long-term sustainability is becoming a more and more tricky process. Regrettably, nowadays the decisions very often favour immediate or short-term benefits. This discussion will go on in the EU and its Member States also in 2014. Global negotiations on climate change are organised under the authority of the UN. The 2013 annual UN conference (COP 19) took place in Europe, in Warsaw. An ecumenical delegation participating

in the conference was led by the WCC. European churches contributed to these efforts. One of CEC’s priorities was to involve the local churches in Poland into this process. A programme developed in cooperation with the Polish Ecumenical Council enabled us to make the churches’ position visible, as well as to strengthen a frame for a deepened cooperation with churches in Poland in the future. It is foreseen that the 2015 UN conference, which will take place in Paris, will be the place for signing a comprehensive global agreement on climate change. It should be an opportunity for churches in Europe to make clear that CO2 reduction is part of the care for creation to which they are willing to contribute.


Churches’ Human Rights Advocacy vis-à-vis European Institutions and Action to protect Human Dignity

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he year 2013 was fruitful in terms of EU developments in the area of human rights and freedom of religion or belief. In June 2013 the European Union (EU) Foreign Affairs Council adopted the EU Guidelines on Freedom of Religion or Belief (FoRB) in Luxembourg. The guidelines were produced as a result of the Strategic Framework and Action Plan on Human Rights and Democracy that was adopted in June 2012. CSC has developed close links with the External Action Service and participated in the public consultations, but also used art. 17 TFEU to advocate for the above-mentioned guidelines during the Dialogue seminar “Freedom of Religion: A Fundamental Right in a Rapidly Changing World” in 2012. Freedom of religion or belief as a fundamental right is equally important for minorities as for majorities, for individuals as for communities. With these guidelines, churches, religious commu­ nities and individuals outside of the EU borders can report violations against the right of freedom of religion or belief to EU delegations in third countries. As a result of the reported violations, the EU can take action through the mechanisms at its disposal; these include raising the freedom of religion or belief violations at bilateral talks, issuing demarches and recommendations for specific countries.

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The guidelines were also an issue during the Armenian Chairmanship of the Council of Europe as part of the implementation of the Council of Europe’s programme on the religious dimension of intercultural dialogue “Freedom of religion in today’s world: challenges and guarantees” for the development of which CSC among others provided resources. In terms of institutional relations CSC was working closely with the European Parliament Working Group on Freedom of Religion or Belief (EPWG on FoRB) which promotes issues of freedom of religion or belief in the EU’s external actions. In 2013 CSC organized two hearings in the European Parliament with MEPs Dennis de Jong and Peter van Dalen, Co-Presidents of the EPWG on FoRB: one on the “Misuse of Blasphemy Law and Rights of Religious Minorities in Pakistan” in cooperation with its long-standing partner, the International Affairs Commission of the World Council of Churches, and the other on the new constitution in Egypt, bringing the voice of the Egyptian Christians to the EU with Senator Ehab El Kharrat and Dr Freddy Elbaiady reporting on the need to work on the human rights situation and state of democracy in Egypt, in collaboration with the Swiss Protestant Federation.

Being Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Annual Annual Report Report of of the the Church Church and and Society Society Commission Commission 2012 2013

In order to maintain a close relationship with the EU Fundamental Rights Agency CSC was active in the work of the Advisory panel of the EU Fundamental Rights Platform, the main task of which was to organise the platform meeting related to the issues of equality, non-discrimination and hate crime. The second term of the CSC Human Rights Secretary’s function as member of the Advisory Panel of the EU FRA ends in April 2014. With regard to the cooperation with the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) CSC gave an input during the public consultation on “Guidelines on the Legal Personality of Religious or Belief Communities” which took place in Brussels and was co-organized by the CoE office in Brussels. The aim of the consultation was to update the already existing guidelines and prepare the draft for the review of the Venice Commission. According to the well-established practice CSC continues to monitor legal and institutional developments of the International Institutions calling for more transparency in relation to the condemnation of human rights violations in Europe and outside its borders.


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CEC and Being Christian Europe Citizens: on the Move What does it mean for European society? Annual Report of the Church and Society Commission 2013 2012

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s part of CSC’s work on human rights a public consultation on the theme of “Churches together for Human Rights” took place from 3-7 March 2013 in the Orthodox Cultural Centre Sofia in Helsinki. The conference was jointly organized by the Church and Society Commission of the Conference of European Churches, the EvangelicalLutheran Church of Finland, the Orthodox Church of Finland and the Finnish Ecumenical Council. The conference discussed legal, political and theological approaches to human rights. There was a common understanding during the conference that the churches could do more in the future as advocates for human rights for all people and work on the concept that human freedom is at the same time a task and a responsibility. Those who wish to learn more about what churches are saying about human rights may consult the Churches’ approach to human rights - library where you can find more than 60 documents on human rights http://csc.ceceurope.org/issues/ human-rights-library/.

As part of the programme “Churches’ voice on human rights” a “Training on Social, Economic and Cultural Rights in the Euromediterranean Region” took place from 30 October to 1 November 2013 in the diaconal centre of the Waldensian Church in Palermo, which gathered 30 participants from 13 European countries. Representatives from churches in Europe, the All Africa Conference of Churches, represented by Ms Vivi Akakpo from Togo, NATO and other institutions gave their input. As NATO is developing a programme for cooperation with civil society, its delegates presented what NATO calls “the comprehensive approach” which is supposed to include

humanitarian and social aspects in military activities. Among the speakers were former Italian MP, Valdo Spini, who pinpointed the human rights challenges of today, and the Mayor of Palermo, Professor Leoluca Orlando, who gave the example of Palermo as a multicultural city and addressed the struggle against the mafia.


CEC submits complaint against the Netherlands to defend rights of undocumented migrants

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n January 2013, on the request of the Protestant Church in the Netherlands (PCN), the Conference of European Churches filed a “Collective Complaint” to the European Committee on Social Rights (ECSR) against the Netherlands for disregarding the rights of undocumented migrants to food, clothing and shelter. The collective complaint procedure is provided by the Revised Social Charter of the Council of Europe (based in Strasbourg – 47 member states). So far only 13 states have accepted the collective complaint procedure which allows trade unions and a number of Non-Governmental Organisations – among which CEC - to file complaints. The legal and documentation work is carried out by the PCN, but the process has been and still is facilitated by the Strasbourg office of CEC and monitored and administered both by the CEC General Secretariat and the Strasbourg office. The text of the complaint is available under the link: http://csc.ceceurope.org/fileadmin/ filer/csc/Social_Economic_Issues/ Collective_complaint/CEC_Complaint_ Social_Charter_January_2013.pdf

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During the CEC Assembly in Budapest in July 2013, CEC was informed that the Committee had declared admissible the complaint. Also upon request of the PCN, CEC then submitted to the Social Rights Committee a request for immediate measures, based on a provision which states that “the Committee may indicate to the parties any immediate measure the adoption of which seems necessary with a view to avoiding the risk of a serious injury and to ensuring the effective respect for the rights recognized in the European Social Charter”. In October, the Committee decided to invite the Dutch State to take the following immediate measures: - Adopt all possible measures with a view to avoiding serious, irreparable injury to the integrity of persons at immediate risk of destitution, through the implementation of a co-ordinated approach at national and municipal levels with a view to ensuring that their basic needs (shelter, clothes and food) are met; - Ensure that all the relevant public authorities are made aware of this decision.

Being Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Annual AnnualReport Reportof ofthe theChurch Church and andSociety SocietyCommission Commission2012 2013

In its decision, the Committee underlines the exceptional character of immediate measures. It reminds that “the aim and purpose of the Charter, being a human rights protection instrument, is to protect rights not merely theoretically, but also in fact”. It considers that the persons concerned by the complaint evidently find themselves at risk of serious irreparable harm to their lives and integrity when being excluded from access to shelter, food and clothing. It notes that in the light of the information provided on the Dutch situation, it is possible to find solutions in order not to exclude irregular migrants from access to facilities relevant to the fulfilment of their basic needs. See text of the decision: h t t p : / / w w w. c o e . i n t / T / D G H L / Monitoring/SocialCharter/Complaints/ CC90DecisionImmediateMeasures_ en.pdf


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The decision triggered a large public debate in the Netherlands. The PCN initiative received big public support, namely in newspapers, on the radio and television. The municipalities of Utrecht, Rotterdam, Amsterdam and The Hague appealed to the Dutch government to take the decision very seriously and see how to change the existing rules. The final decision on the complaint is expected in the course of the year 2014.

Beingand Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC Europe Citizens: on the Move Annual Report of the Church 2012 and Society Commission 2013


In Brief CSC of CEC urges right to a pension for retired pastors in Spain

CEC

 was alerted by one of its members, the Spanish Protestant Church, to the dire situation of some 120 Spanish Protestant pastors who until 1999 had been unable to pay their retirement contributions and are therefore not entitled to a pension from the government. The favourable decision by the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg concerning a case involving one pastor (MANZANAS MARTIN v. SPAIN) signalled hope to those who find themselves in a similar situation.

On the basis of the information provided by the Spanish Protestant Church, CSC of CEC drew the attention of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe (the highest decision-making body of the Council of Europe) to the situation of the other Spanish pastors. CEC’s Strasbourg office prepared and sent a “Communication” to the Committee of Ministers, to which Spanish authorities responded: https://wcd.coe.int/ViewDoc.jsp?Ref=DHDD (2013)1186&Language=lanFrench&Site=CM

They also presented a plan on their strategy of measures to solve the problem: https://wcd.coe.int/ViewDoc.jsp?Ref=DHDD( 2013)1145&Language=lanFrench&Site=CM

CSC European Secretaries meeting, 20-22 November, Brussels

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nder the title “Europe at the crossroads? The crisis in Europe – challenging policy, societies, churches” more than 40 participants discussed the current challenges of the social and economic crisis which hit the European Union in 2008. During three different and very engaged panel discussions with representatives of the European Commission, the Council of Europe, civil society and church organisations the participants discussed the consequences

of the crisis and the actual austerity and budget consolidating policy and possible ways out of the crisis. The complexity of the issue became obvious, but also a gap between the discourse of the European institutions and what people experience at the grassroots. CSC therefore has to translate and to introduce those concrete experiences into the discussions with and inside the European institutions. The participants assessed the debates and came to the conclusion that the churches

Guide for decisions in end of life situations

CSC

of CEC enjoys observer status in the Council of Europe Steering Committee on Bioethics (DH-BIO) since 1997. Over the past three years, CSC actively contributed to the discussions which resulted in the Guide for the decision-making process regarding medical treatment in end-of-life situations. At its November 2013 meeting in Strasbourg, the DH-BIO agreed:

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- to send the Guide as approved to the Steering Committee for Human Rights (CDDH); - to invite the CDDH to take note of the Guide and to submit it to the Committee of Ministers for taking note; - to launch the Guide at a Conference organised under the Austrian Chairmanship of the Committee of Ministers on 5 May 2014.

Being Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Annual AnnualReport Reportof ofthe theChurch Church and andSociety SocietyCommission Commission2012 2013

in Europe have to raise their voice together to fulfil their task. They stated that a close communication between churches on regional, national and European level is needed to ensure that the crisis and its consequences for the people on the ground are addressed on all responsible levels. The CSC European Secretaries meeting finally proved the necessity of such forums for discussion and exchange between the churches.


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CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Being Christian What does it mean for European society? Annual Report of the Church 2013 and Society Commission 2012

EU Legal Affairs

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n 21 and 22 February 2013, European church lawyers from 18 countries met for a conference on the “European Convention on Human Rights and the Churches - Recent jurisprudence of the European Court on Human Rights (ECHR) and challenges in the new fundamental rights framework” organized jointly by the EKD Brussels office and the Church and Society Commission of the Conference of European Churches (CEC). This was the second European church lawyers’ conference after the first one in November 2008 set up with the expertise and input of members of the CSC Working Group on EU legislation.

of the churches in Europe and to raise the church representatives’ awareness regarding the interpretation of Art. 9 ECHR (freedom of religion) by the Court. After the input of prominent experts in the field the participants lively exchanged views about the most recent developments in their home churches and home countries in different working groups. The church lawyers agreed that the content discussed and the exchange with participants from other churches and countries had been experienced as very fruitful. Especially representatives of smaller churches found it helpful to meet similar problems and experiences and to learn from each other.

The conference aimed to lead to a deeper understanding of ECHR case law and its significance for the position

During the other meetings of the year the Working group discussed about the latest ECHR judgements linked

to churches. Moreover the group deliberated on current EU legislation like for example the data protection regulation by inviting external experts to analyse the state of play and by discussing the legal implications of the draft for churches. In the autumn the Church of Finland hosted the Working group allowing the members to gain a better insight of Finnish State-Church relations.”

Threats and Challenges of Globalisation – Churches in Europe and Latin America in Dialogue the Church CECandthrough Society Commission  

and the Council of Latin American Churches (CLAI) have been in dialogue since 2009. In 2013 this dialogue came to its conclusion. Highlights of the last months were visits of Latin American partners in Europe, their discussion with

European church leaders, exchange in the European Commission and the European Parliament, as well as the participation of a CLAI delegation and the keynote address by Bishop Julio Murray at the CEC Assembly in Budapest. The findings of the dialogue have been summarized in the film Threats and

Challenges of Globalisation – Churches in Europe and Latin America in Dialogue. The outcomes of the dialogue have also been fed into the programme of the WCC Assembly in Busan. DVDs of the film can be ordered from CSC office.

Lutheran Church (Hungarian and Slovak) and the Armenian Church. ‘Churches, in mutual respect, acting together in Christian faith for social justice, human dignity, reconciliation and integrity of creation.’ The main purpose of AIDRom is to promote social justice and human rights in order to

achieve the standards of an EU state. AIDRom is associate member of WCC, CEC and CCME, being involved in the work done by WCC, CEC and CCME on women issues and gender equality, on labour rights and unemployment as well as on migration and the integration of migrants into society.

AIDROM AIDRom is an ecumenical organisation of five Churches, founded in 1991, representative of both confessional and ethnic diversity in Romania: the Romanian Orthodox Church, the Reformed Church (Hungarian), the Evangelical Church A.C. (German), the Evangelical


CSC GOES PUBLIC 2013 January • Press release: Europe and Family Policy Paper adopted by CSC • Europe and Family Policy – A Policy Paper of CSC/CEC March • Press release: Addressing Injustices in the World – undeniable task of the churches • Press release: Churches Together for Human Rights • Press release: Europe needs a Social Dimension – Churches tell Irish EU Presidency

November • Press release: Churches’ Voice on Human Rights – Training on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in the Euromediterranean Region • Press release: Europe at the crossroads? The Crisis in Europe – challenging policy, societies, churches

April • CSC-Eurodiaconia press release: Churches and Diaconia call for more Civil Society Influence in the European Semester • Press release: CSC Discuss European Year of Citizens – Rüdiger Noll leaves CSC June • CSC-COMECE press release: European Citizenship - we need a sense of belonging to a community • Press release: CSC welcomes EU Guidelines on Freedom of Religion or Belief October • CSC-COMECE press release: Churches on Climate Change: a Matter of Solidarity and Global Justice

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Being Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Annual AnnualReport Reportof ofthe theChurch Church and andSociety SocietyCommission Commission2012 2013


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CEC and Being Christian Europe Citizens: on the Move What does it mean for European society? Annual Report of the Church and Society Commission 2013 2012

CSC Main Events 2013 January • UEPAL-CSC meeting (Strasbourg) • CSC-CLAI dialogue follow-up (Brussels) • Meeting with deacons from the Church of Sweden (Brussels) February • CSC Executive Committee (Brussels) • Committee of the Conference of Churches Along the Rhine (Strasbourg) • Lawyers’ conference: ”The European Court on Human Rights and the churches” (Brussels) • TF Globalisation Conference (Brussels) March • UEPAL-CSC meeting (Strasbourg) • Conference: Churches together for Human Rights (Helsinki) • CSC-COMECE meeting with Irish EU Presidency (Dublin) April • CSC-Eurodiaconia Conference on Europe 2020 (Brussels) • CSC Executive Committee (Brussels) • CSC Plenary Meeting 2013 (Brussels) • CoE INGO Working Group on Human Rights and Religion (Strasbourg) • Meeting of CoE Christian NGOs (Strasbourg) • CoE INGO Working Group on the Religious Dimension of Intercultural Dialogue (Strasbourg) • EU FRP meeting/workshop on training on ecosoc rights (Vienna) • Visit of John Bradley, General Secretary of Churches Together in England (Strasbourg)

May • Annual Assembly of the Conference of Churches Along the Rhine (Strasbourg) • UEPAL-CSC meeting (Strasbourg) • European Semester - ad-hoc coalition (Green budget Europe) (Brussels) • High-Level Religious Leaders Meeting with the EU Institutions (Brussels) June • Dialogue Seminar with BEPA and COMECE on Citizenship (Brussels) • Panel discussion on Religion in the Public Sphere (Brussels) • CSC-WCC EP Hearing on the Misuse of Blasphemy Law in Pakistan (Brussels) July • CEC 14th Assembly (Budapest) September • Ecumenical Church Council (Strasbourg) • UEPAL-CSC meeting (Strasbourg) • General Assembly of the Chapel for Europe (Brussels) October • Dialogue Seminar on Climate Change as a Challenge for EU Policies (Brussels) • Heidelberger Katechismus Jubilee with EU Representation of Baden-Württemberg (Brussels) • HR Training Course on Social, Economic and Cultural Rights (Palermo) November • Visit of Egyptian MPs to HR Departments in the EU institutions (Brussels) • Meeting of Church and Society Staff of European Churches (Brussels) December • UEPAL-CSC meeting (Strasbourg)


Members and Staff of the Church and Society Commission of CEC The Commission

Dr. Charles Reed* Church of England

Rev. Ewan Aitken Church of Scotland

Rev. Dr. Raag Rolfsen Church of Norway

Metropolitan Arsenios of Austria Ecumenical Patriarchate

Dr. Verena Taylor* Protestant Church in Austria

Ms. Tina Barnett Methodist Church in Ireland / Irish Council of Churches

Ms. Silke Tosch Union of Evangelical Free Churches in Germany (German Baptist Union)

Dr. theol. Lubomir Batka Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Slovakia Rev. Christine Busch Evangelical Church in Germany Ms. Laura Casorio Federation of Protestant Churches in Italy

(* = Member of the Executive Committee)

The Staff DIRECTOR

Prof. Jean-François Collange (Member ex-officio) Union of Protestant Churches of Alsace and Lorraine

Rev. Rüdiger Noll (Brussels) (until October 2013)

Rev. Christer Daelander (since September 2012) Joint Future church / Gemensam Framtid

STUDY SECRETARY

Mr. Vincent Dubois (since September 2012) United Protestant Church of Belgium

Rev. Dr. Peter Pavlovic (Brussels) EXECUTIVE STAFF

Rev. Jan Dus* (Co-Moderator) Evangelical Church of Czech Brethren

Rev. Frank-Dieter Fischbach (Brussels) (interim team coordinator as of June 2013)

Rev. Serge Fornerod* (Moderator) Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches

Rev. Richard Fischer (Strasbourg)

Rev. Jacob Franken (since September 2012) Protestant Church in the Netherlands

Mag. Elizabeta Kitanovic (Brussels)

Rev. Prof. Alexandru Gabriel Gherasim Romanian Orthodox Church The Rt. Rev. Rusudan Gotsiridze Evangelical-Baptist Church of Georgia Mr. Adam Hamori Reformed Church in Hungary Mag. Katerina Karkala-Zorba* (Co-Moderator) Church of Greece Ms. Rachel Lampard Methodist Church of Great Britain Prof. Dr. Aila Lauha Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Finland

SUPPORT STAFF Ms. Véronique Dessart (Brussels) Ms. Véronique Engels (Brussels) Ms. Maria Pomazkova (Strasbourg) Ms. Katharina Stolberg (Brussels) Ms. Charlotte Vanderborght (Brussels) ASSOCIATE STAFF Rev. John Murray (Anglican Chaplaincy, Strasbourg)

Dr. Joanna Matuszewska Evangelical-Reformed Church in Poland Very Rev. Fr. Mesrop Parsamyan Armenian Apostolic Church H.G. Bishop Porfyrios of Neapolis* Church of Cyprus

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CEC Europe Citizens: on the Move Beingand Christian What does it mean for European society? Annual Report of the Church and Society Commission 2013 2012

Farewell to Rev. Rüdiger Noll, Director of the Church and Society Commission of CEC ith a panel discussion on “Religion in the Public Sphere” on 20 June W 2013 the Church and Society Commission

and its Moderator, Rev Serge Fornerod, said farewell to Rev. Rüdiger Noll as Director of CSC. From September 2002 until October 2013 he was the Director of the Church and Society Commission of the Conference of European Churches (CEC) and Associate General Secretary of CEC. Previously he worked for CEC on issues of human rights, justice, peace and the integrity of creation. The panel discussion focused on religion in the public sphere, a key theme for Rüdiger Noll and the work and raison-d’être of the Church and Society Commission. The participants in the panel were: Dr Michael A. Köhler, Director for European Neighbourhood Policy, European Commission, The Most Revd Archbishop Jeremiasz of Wroclaw and Szczecin, MEP Margrete Auken, Deaconess Dr Alessandra Trotta, President of the Evangelical Methodist Church of Italy and Rüdiger Noll. The panel was moderated by Katharina von Schnurbein, of the Bureau of European Policy Advisers, European Commission, and analysed the changes in various European societies in the relationship of church and state, but also of religion and society. They highlighted that the European policy with its institutions and the development of the treaties reflect on the one hand the interest in the topic and its significance but also that it is still not decided how Europe will define the relationship. In

this time of crisis in Europe and the European Union, which is also a crisis of values and trust, as President Barroso was quoted, the engagement and commitment of Christians and churches to the European project is still essential. The discussion was followed by a reception in which it was underlined that Rüdiger Noll during his years as Director of Church and Society Commission worked hard to convey the common voice of the churches to the European Institutions and strongly advocated for the rights of minority churches. He was very much involved in the work related to the art. 17 of the Lisbon Treaty. The CSC wishes him all the best in his new career as Head of Department for Europe and Ecumenism of the German Protestant Academy in Berlin.

Rev. Frank-Dieter Fischbach – CSC Interim Team Coordinator After the departure of Director Rüdiger Noll from CSC to take up his new position in Berlin, Rev. Frank-Dieter Fischbach was asked to serve as Interim Team Coordinator for CSC, acting as the link between all colleagues and the Executive Committee and the CEC General Secretary. With the growing involvement of CEC General Secretary, Rev. Dr Guy Liagre, in the work of CEC and CSC that function of coordinator will gradually fade away. It is thanks to the good collegiality within CSC that this sort of responsible team work could be established.

“Low energy building” rue Joseph II, 174!

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he Ecumenical Centre is owned in association by CCME & CSC of CEC. Both have their offices in the building besides to three other associations who are renting office space. The renovation of the Ecumenical Centre is the result of a long process which started in 2006 with a thorough architectural study. The works started early 2012. They were implemented in successive stages from roof to cellar. The ongoing work of the organisations was not

interrupted except when moving internally within the building. The association of owners is grateful for the understanding of all the tenants/staff who went through the dusty and noisy times of the renovation. The achieved standards of safety, hygiene and environmental management represent our small contribution to the protection of God’s creation.


CSC Working Mechanisms Working Group on Education Ms. Hanna Broadbridge Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Denmark Mr. Vincent Dubois United Protestant Church of Belgium Mr. Maximilian Karrasch World Student Christian Federation-Europe Rev. Dr. Daniel Schmid-Holz Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches

Dr. Peter Schreiner Evangelical Church in Germany + ICCS + IACE Rev. Dr. Wolfgang Wünsch Evangelical Church A.C. in Romania Dr. Kostas Zorbas Church of Greece

Working Group on EU Legislation Dr. Altana Filos Greek Evangelical Church

Mr. Fredrik Nilsson Björner Church of Sweden

Ms. Lena Kumlin LLM Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Finland

Prof. Dr. Gerhard Robbers (Adviser) Evangelical Church in Germany

Dr. Gianni Long Federation of Protestant Churches in Italy

Prof. Dr. Rüdiger Stotz Evangelical Church in Germany

Dr. Joanna Matuszewska Evangelical-Reformed Church in Poland

Ms. Ilaria Valenzi World Student Christian Federation-Europe

Prof. Dr. David McClean Church of England

N.N. Ecumenical Patriarchate

Task Force on Globalisation Ms. Elvira Gömböcz Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Hungary

Rev. Dr. Ulrich Möller, OKR Evangelical Church in Germany

Mr Nicolas Kazarian Ecumenical Patriarchate

Rev. Dr. Raag Rolfsen Church of Norway / Ecumenical Council

Rev. Dr. Tamas Kodacsy Reformed Church in Hungary

Ms. Sofia Svarfar Church of Sweden

Prof. Chris Lefebvre United Protestant Church of Belgium

Mr. Rob van Drimmelen APRODEV

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Beingand Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC Europe Citizens: on the Move Annual Report of the Church 2012 and Society Commission 2013

Working Group on Bioethics Prof. Dr. Stavros Baloyannis Church of Greece Dr. Theo Boer Protestant Church in the Netherlands Dr. Andrea Dörries Evangelical Church in Germany Prof. Dr. Ulrich Körtner Protestant Church in Austria

Prof. Karsten Lehmkühler Union of Protestant Churches in Alsace & Lorraine Rev. Dr. Brendan McCarthy Church of England Ms. Miriam Szurman Lutheran Church in Poland

Working Group on Human Rights Rev. Peter Ciaccio Federation of Protestant Churches in Italy

Rev. Thorsten Leißer Evangelical Church in Germany

Dr. Göran Gunner Church of Sweden

Mr. Alexandru Gabriel Negoita Romanian Orthodox Church

Fr. Nektarios Ioannou Church of Cyprus

Ms. Natallia Vasilevich World Student Christian Federation-Europe

Ms. Kati Jääskeläinen Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Finland

Dr. Donald Watts Presbyterian Church in Ireland

Dr. Peter Krömer Protestant Church in Austria

Working Group on Social Issues Rev. Cornelia Coenen-Marx, OKRin Evangelical Church in Germany

Rev. Matthew Ross Church of Scotland

Dr. Alexander Heit Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches

Mag. Martin Schenk Protestant Church in Austria

Mr. Vladimir Moravec Czechoslovak Hussite Church

Ms. Elena Timofticiuc Ecumenical Association of Churches in Romania


Our Resources

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he audited accounts (income and expenditure) of the Church and Society Commission (CSC) of the Conference of European Churches (CEC) for the budgetary year 2013 were closed with a total of €966.188,14. The financial volume compared to the accounts of 2012 has increased by €21.613,07 due to programmatic activities. Compared to 2012, regular membership contributions have been maintained. Thanks to additional earmarked contributions from Member Churches, church related organisations and foundations, CSC was able to implement specific projects which could not have been achieved otherwise. CSC is grateful for all these contributions without which much of the work would not have been possible, a.o. Otto per Mille (IT), Konrad Adenauer Stiftung, Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland, Evangelische Kirche in Westfalen, Church of Sweden, Aeropagos, Church of Norway and EED/ Brot für die Welt. The Commission wishes to express special thanks to the Church in Rhineland and the Community of Protestant Churches in Europe, to the Conference of Churches along the Rhine and the Union of Protestant Churches in Alsace and Lorraine as well as to the Evangelical Church in Germany for supporting its activities through seconding staff or associate staff. Many Churches also contributed with in-kind contributions in hosting meetings or covering the costs of their participants. The following charts show the different sources of income and their allocation to specific work areas.

Expenses related to work areas Year 2013 Total expenditure € 966,188.14 100% Education 2.37% Bioethics 2.73% Environment 3.93%

EU Legislation 1.16% Member Churches relations / Management 45.20%

Communication 4.45% Social Issues 6.18%

Globalisation 6.52%

Assprop and others 12.87%

Human Rights 14.59%

Income related to work areas Year 2013 Total income € 966,188.14 100% Other income 1.15%

Seconded staff 9.83%

Own funds 0.11% Contribution Members & Associated Members 41.72%

Programmatic activities income 11.97%

Assprop and others 12.87%

CEC general budget 22.35%

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Beingand Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC Europe Citizens: on the Move Annual Report of the Church 2012 and Society Commission 2013

Plenary 2013 European Year of Citizens

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he European Year of Citizens 2013 has been the main theme of the annual plenary meeting of the Church and Society Commission of the Conference of European Churches which took place in Brussels from 18 to 20 April 2013. Carsten Lietz, member of the cabinet of Commissioner Reding, introduced the activities and the background of the Year that has been declared by the EU. The European Union (“Education and Training – ET 2020”) and the Council of Europe develop programmes to promote “Education for Democratic Citizenship”, which have a substantial Human Rights component where CSC of CEC is also heavily involved. The purpose of the main theme was to explore citizenship from a European perspective and how churches relate to it. Reflections on Theology and European Citizenship were offered by different Christian theologians and by the joint publication of CSC and the Intereuropean Commission on Church and School (ICCS-IV) “Education for Democratic Citizenship in the context of Europe”,

edited by the moderator of the CSC Working Group on Education, Dr Peter Schreiner. The CSC members stated that the transparency of decision-making processes needs to be improved on the national and European level, and that the citizens should clearly know where and how they can be involved in the political processes in order to bring change into their society. “Love your neighbour” is a theological principle for bridge building between the national and the European level when citizenship is being discussed, as citizenship can be a source of inclusion but also of exclusion. Civil society representatives from the European External Action Service (EEAS) shared their experience about the efforts made to establish a Charter on Citizenship as well as about the possibility for every resident to apply for naturalisation if so wished, freedom of access to information, etc. The Commission members affirmed their commitment to keep on urging governments to safeguard democracy,

human rights and the rule of law, especially when facing a difficult daily reality caused by financial and economic crisis. Bishop Porfyrios of Neapolis from the Church of Cyprus then briefed the Commission members about the current situation in Cyprus which had to face economic and financial downturns just after the Cyprus EU Presidency. He informed about church activities which at the time were multiplying their charity markets to help people cover their basic needs. Participants expressed their solidarity with Cypriots on that occasion. The CSC plenary confirmed that CSC work must be preserved in the new CEC structures which were discussed during the 14th CEC Assembly on 3-8 July 2013 in Budapest, Hungary. The Plenary expressed its thankfulness for the work of Rev Rüdiger Noll, who served in Brussels as Director of CSC and Associate General Secretary of CEC for 11 years.


CEC Member Churches and Associated Organisations* CEC Member Churches Albania Orthodox Autocephalous Church of Albania

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia United Methodist Church in the FYR of Macedonia

Armenia Armenian Apostolic Church

France Federation of Evangelical Baptist Churches of France Malagasy Protestant Church in France Union of Protestant Churches in Alsace and Lorraine United Protestant Church of France

Austria Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in Austria Old-Catholic Church of Austria Reformed Church of Austria United Methodist Church in Austria Belgium United Protestant Church in Belgium Bulgaria Baptist Union of Bulgaria Pentecostal Assemblies of Bulgaria United Methodist Church in Bulgaria

Georgia Evangelical Baptist Church of Georgia Germany Catholic Diocese of the Old-Catholics in Germany Evangelical Church in Germany Union of Evangelical Free Churches in Germany (Baptist Union) United Methodist Church in Germany Greece Church of Greece Greek Evangelical Church

Croatia Baptist Union of Croatia Church of God in Croatia Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Croatia Evangelical Pentecostal Church in Croatia Reformed Christian Church in Croatia

Hungary Baptist Union of Hungary Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Hungary Reformed Church in Hungary United Methodist Church in Hungary

Cyprus Church of Cyprus

Iceland Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Iceland

Czech Republic Czechoslovak Hussite Church Evangelical Church of Czech Brethren Old-Catholic Church in the Czech Republic Orthodox Church in the Czech Lands and Slovakia Silesian Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in the Czech Republic United Methodist Church in the Czech Republic

Ireland Church of Ireland Methodist Church in Ireland Presbyterian Church in Ireland

Denmark Baptist Union of Denmark Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Denmark Estonia Estonian Evangelical-Lutheran Church Estonian Evangelical-Lutheran Church Abroad (Canada) Orthodox Church of Estonia

Italy Christian Evangelical Baptist Union of Italy Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Italy Evangelical-Methodist Church in Italy Waldensian Church in Italy Latvia Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Latvia Latvian Evangelical-Lutheran Church Abroad (Germany) Liechtenstein Evangelical Church in the Principality of Liechtenstein

Finland Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Finland Orthodox Church of Finland

Lithuania Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Lithuania Lithuanian Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Germany Luxembourg Protestant Churches of Luxembourg Netherlands Mennonite Church in the Netherlands Old-Catholic Church of the Netherlands Protestant Church in the Netherlands Remonstrant Brotherhood Norway Church of Norway Poland Baptist Union of Poland Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in Poland Evangelical-Reformed Church in Poland Old-Catholic Mariavite Church in Poland Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church Polish Catholic Church (Old-Catholic) United Methodist Church in Poland Portugal Evangelical-Methodist Church of Portugal Evangelical-Presbyterian Church of Portugal Lusitanian Catholic Apostolic Evangelical Church Romania Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in Romania (Sibiu) Evangelical-Lutheran Church of the Augsburg Confession in Romania (Cluj-Napoca) Reformed Church in Romania (Kiralyhagomelleki – Oradea District) Reformed Church in Romania (Transylvanian District) Romanian Orthodox Church Russia Euro-Asian Federation of the Unions of Evangelical Christians-Baptists Evangelical-Lutheran Church of Ingria in Russia Russian Orthodox Church (suspended its membership in 2008) Serbia Reformed Christian Church in Serbia and Montenegro Serbian Orthodox Church Slovak Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in Serbia United Methodist Church in Serbia * Organisations in Partnership since July 2013

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Slovak Republic Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in Slovakia Orthodox Church in the Czech Lands and Slovakia Reformed Christian Church in Slovakia H HH

Slovenia Evangelical Church of the Augsburg Confession in the Republic of Slovenia Spain Spanish Evangelical Church Spanish Reformed Episcopal Church Sweden Church of Sweden Uniting Church of Sweden Switzerland Evangelical Methodist Church in Switzerland Federation of Swiss Protestant Churches Old-Catholic Church of Switzerland

CEC and Being Christian Europe Citizens: on the Move What does it mean for European society? Annual Report of the Church and Society Commission 2013 2012

Ukraine Reformed Church in Transcarpathia United Kingdom Baptist Union of Great Britain Church in Wales Church of England Church of Scotland Congregational Federation of the United Kingdom Council of African and Caribbean Churches Methodist Church of Great Britain Presbyterian Church of Wales Salvation Army UK Territory/Ireland Shiloh United Church of Christ Apostolic Worldwide United Reformed Church International Areas Ecumenical Patriarchate Evangelical-Lutheran Church in Russia and Other States Moravian Church in Continental Europe - Brüder Unität Salvation Army - International Headquarters United Methodist Church - Nordic & Baltic Area

CEC Associated Organisations* Action of Churches Together in Scotland Christian Council of Norway Christian Council of Sweden Church and Peace Church Mission Society (withdrew on 21 August 2013) Churches Commission for Migrants in Europe Churches Together in Britain and Ireland Churches Together in England Churches Together in Wales Conference of European Clergy Conference of European University Chaplains Council of Churches in the Netherlands Ecumenical Association for Adult Education in Europe Ecumenical Association of Churches in Romania / AIDRom

Ecumenical Council of Churches in Slovakia Ecumenical Forum of European Christian Women Ecumenical Youth Council in Europe (withdrew on 8 November 2013) Estonian Council of Churches Eurodiaconia European Baptist Federation European Forum of Christian Men European YWCAs Federation of Protestant Churches in Italy Finnish Ecumenical Council French Protestant Federation InterEuropean Commission on Church and School International Association for Christian Education International Prison Chaplains’ Association – Europe

Irish Council of Churches Josef Cardijn Association for Worker Education Oikosnet Europe – EAALCE Portuguese Council of Christian Churches Spanish Committee on Cooperation between the Churches Union of Evangelical Free Churches World Student Christian Federation (Europe) YMCA Europe (European Alliance of YMCAs) * As a result of the CEC General Assembly in Budapest (July 2013), the constituency has somewhat changed. The above list of associated organisations was valid until September 2013, and a new list will be published next year.


Who We Are

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he Church and Society Commission is one of the commissions of the Conference of European Churches (CEC). The CSC links CEC’s 114 Member Churches from all over Europe and its 40 Associated Organisations with the European Union’s Institutions, the Council of Europe, the OSCE, NATO and the UN (on European matters). It engages its Member Churches and Associated Organisations in studies and projects relevant to church and society and thus supports and strengthens the common witness of European churches vis-à-vis the European Institutions and in the respective European societies. The

CSC was established in 1999 as a result of an integration process between CEC and the European Ecumenical Commission for Church and Society (EECCS), both of which had a longstanding record of working in the field of church and society. CEC was founded in 1959 as a bridge-building organisation between the churches in Eastern and Western Europe. 1984 can be regarded as the founding date for EECCS, which was established as a representation of churches vis-à-vis the European Institutions. Following this integration process, CSC received a special status within

CEC. Its work programme as well as its working mechanisms and methods are determined by a 24-person Commission in agreement with CEC’s Governing Board. The Commission Plenary meets once a year and elects the CSC Executive Committee. In consultation with the General Secretary of CEC, it can make public statements on issues within its remit. The CSC has secretariats in Brussels and Strasbourg and maintains strong links with the CEC headquarters in Geneva. In 2014 CSC and CEC will merge into one single organisation, and the headquarters of CEC will be relocated to Brussels.

Mandate and Methods Our mandate • Study and examination of Church and Society questions in a socio-ethical perspective such as EECCS and CEC have undertaken up to now (for example: peace, justice and the integrity of creation, reconciliation, churches and governments); • Monitor the European institutions: European Union, Council of Europe, Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe, in relation to themes such as the European integration process, democratisation, establishment of the rule of law, human rights and minority questions, European security, economic and social questions, the environment; • Deal with the specific responsibility of the churches in the Member States of the European Union for the internal policies of the EU.

Acronyms A.C. APRODEV BEPA CALL CCME CDDH CEC CLAI CoE COMECE CSC DH-BIO ECEN ECHR Ecosoc ECSR EEAS EECCS EKD EP

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How we work • The Church and Society Commission (CSC) monitors developments in the European institutions and makes inputs to the institutions on behalf of its Member Churches. • CSC acts through its working groups which study church and society issues and engage Member Churches in consultations and projects on specific topics. • CSC closely cooperates with other churchrelated organisations and NGOs such as CCME, Eurodiaconia, APRODEV and COMECE. • CSC bases its actions on its work programme through flexible and ad-hoc working mechanisms and methods. More information on http://csc. ceceurope.org. • In the implementation of its agenda, regular communication between CSC and its Member Churches and the institutions is of crucial importance.

Augsburg Confession Association of WCC-related Development Agencies Bureau of European Policy Advisers Church Action on Labour and Life Churches Commission for Migrants in Europe Steering Committee for Human Human Rights (Council of Europe) Conference of European Churches Latin American Council of Churches Council of Europe Commission of Bishops’ Conferences of the European Community Church and Society Commission Steering Committee on Bioethics (Council of Europe) European Christian Environmental Network European Court on Human Rights Economic and social (rights) European Committee on Social Rights European External Action Service European Ecumenical Commission for Church and Society Evangelische Kirche in Deutschland European Parliament

Being Christian What does it mean for European society? CEC and EuropeCitizens: on the Move Annual AnnualReport Reportof ofthe theChurch Church and andSociety SocietyCommission Commission2012 2013

EPWG EU FoRB FRA FRP HR ICCS INGO IV MEP MP NATO NGO OSCE PCN TF TFEU UEPAL UN WCC

The following working mechanisms have been established until the CEC Assembly 2013: • Working Group on Bioethics • Working Group on Education • Working Group on EU Legislation • Task Force on Globalisation • Working Group on Human Rights • Working Group on Social Issues

European Parliament Working Group European Union Freedom of Religion or Belief Fundamental Rights Agency Fundamental Rights Platform Human Rights InterEuropean Commission on Church and School International Non-Governmental Organisation Internationaler Verband für christliche Erziehung und Bildung Member of the European Parliament Member of Parliament North-Atlantic Treaty Organization Non-Governmental Organisation Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe Protestant Church in the Netherlands Task Force Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union Union of Protestant Churches in Alsace and Lorraine United Nations World Council of Churches


Brussels Church & Society Commission of CEC (Directorate) Rue Joseph II, 174 BE – 1000 Brussels, Belgium Tel.: +32 2 230 17 32 Fax: +32 2 231 14 13 E-mail: csc@cec-kek.be http://csc.ceceurope.org

Strasbourg Church & Society Commission of CEC 8, rue du Fossé des Treize FR – 67000 Strasbourg, France Tel.: +33 3 88 15 27 60 Fax: +33 3 88 15 27 61 E-mail: csc@cec-kek.fr http://csc.ceceurope.org

Geneva CEC General Secretariat P.O. Box 2100, 150 route de Ferney CH – 1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland Tel: +41 22 791 61 11 Fax: +41 22 791 62 27 E-mail: cec@cec-kek.org www.ceceurope.org


On the basis of our Christian faith, we work towards a humane, socially conscious Europe, in which human rights and the basic values of peace, justice, freedom, tolerance and solidarity prevail. (Charta Oecumenica) Table of Contents of the Annual Report 2013 1 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 15 16 18 20 21 22 24

Introduction CSC Goes into Transition Churches’ Voice on Social Affairs Climate Change – Are we Ambitious Enough? Churches’ Human Rights Advocacy vis-à-vis European Institutions and Action to protect Human Dignity CEC submits complaint against the Netherlands to defend rights of undocumented migrants In Brief CSC Goes Public 2013 CSC Main Events 2013 Members of the Church and Society Commission of CEC and Staff CSC Working Mechanisms Our Resources Plenary 2013 CEC Member Churches and Associated Organisations Who We Are

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CEC and Europe on the Move Report 2013