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Contents

01. Aedicular House _ Collective housing in King’s Cross 02. Society of Forms _ Student housing in Paris 03. Luxury of Real Things _ Hotel in CÊvennes 04. Undergraduate Projects

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Minsoo Kim Address : Busan, Republic of Korea. Email : als90131@gmail.com Mobile : +82 10 5171 7420

Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/als90131/ LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/minsoo-kim-2678b1198/

Education

Architecture Work Experience

Master of Architecture, The Cass - London Metropolitan University Pass with Merit Sep 2018 - Jul 2019 � Designed an architectural project. ‘Aedicular House _ Collective housing in King’s Cross.’ � Designed an architectural project. ‘Three houses and a garden _ Small scale housing in Hampstead.’ � Designed an architectural project. ‘A Bespoke Window in the Arctic.’ Teamed with Nadia Naty-Everard, James Higgins, Laura Pascu, Ruby Silove-Lanesman. � Studied a precedent to explore the relationship between house and garden. ‘Turn End’ designed by Peter Aldington. � Produced a report for the module ‘Integrated Design Study.’ (Incorporating technical and legal requirements with the final design project ‘Aedicular House’) � Wrote an essay about architect’s role in society. ‘Exceptional architecture or misplaced ego in conservation area (The architect’s duty of care in respect of 15 Clerkenwell Close)

Internship at WISE Architecture, South Korea Apr 2015 - Jan 2016 Drew site plan and plan and made collage images for a competition project.

Master of Arts, The Cass - London Metropolitan University Pass with Distinction Sep 2017 - Sep 2018 � Wrote MA Architecture dissertation ‘Society of forms : Implementing figure ground theory in urban architecture.’ � Designed an architectural project. ‘Society of Forms _ Student housing in Paris.’ � Designed an architectural project. ‘Luxury of Real Things _ Hotel in Cévennes.’ � Produced a research booklet. ‘Walking with the walls _ Bibury.’ (About the cityscape and typologies of buildings in Bibury, Gloucestershire). Teamed with Monika Marinova, Robert Haynes. � Wrote an essay for the module ‘Theory.’ Tutored by Dr. Matthew Barac. ‘The Meaning of Architectural Ornament in Contemporary Times.’ � Wrote an essay for the module ‘The problem of Irony.’ Tutored by Dr. Matthew Barac. ‘The Objective Subjectiveness of Le Corbusier’s Architecture.’

Internship at skimA, South Korea Jun 2017 Participated in designing, presentation preparation, drawing, model making. Additional Experience UAUS (Union of Architecture University Students) Exhibition April 2013 - May 2013 VJ and DJ in Video Experimental Group VX Nov 2013 - Feb 2016 Languages Korean Native English Advanced Softwares Autocad Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign Adobe Premiere Pro Adobe After Effects SketchUp Rhinocreos 3D 3ds Max Ableton Live

Bachelor of Architecture, Korea University GPA 3.69 (Maximum 4.5) Mar 2009 - Feb 2017 � Designed an architectural project. ‘Shoes Street _ Shoemaker cooperative headquarter in Seonsu-dong.’ � Designed an architectural project. ‘Book Station _ Adaptive reuse of Yongsan railway hospital.’ � Designed an architectural project. ‘Fractal City _ Collective housing in Bomun.’ � Designed an architectural project. ‘Urban Festival _ Je-gi concert Hall.’

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Aedicular House 2018-19. Tutored by Alex Ely and Michael Dillon The scale of a space massively affects how we experience the space. If a room is small, one can feel intimacy and comfort. On the other hand, one may feel suffocated in the same room if it is too small. If a room is big, one can feel owe and progressiveness, in contrast to one feeling solitude and aloneness in such a big space. This project explored the potential of juxtaposing two different scales in housing. When a small space is juxtaposed with a big surrounding space, it gets a unique character. One feels intimacy in that space, but at the same time, focuses on the bigger space and feels progressiveness. One might be curious about what is happening in the bigger space and look for an opportunity while being in the small secure space. This kind of space is called Aedicule, which originally means a small shrine that enshrines a statue of a deity. This project interpreted bay windows and balconies as aedicules in a way that these elements create small spaces juxtaposed with larger spaces, which are the adjacent exterior spaces. By doing that, the project aims to create a special relationship between interior and exterior, and let people experience different modes of scale in their housing.

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The site is located at 17/21 Euston Road, London. The rectangular site faces St. Pancras station to the north and Argyle Square to the south whereas the two other sides face typical four-storey terrace houses. The existing building on the site is a three-storey brick building built in the 1950s, which is now used as King’s Cross Post Office. This project aims to create a collective dwelling on this site, which can accommodate at least 180 dwellings.

Left Page - View of an aedicule. Scale 1:20 Top Right - Site plan. Scale 1:5000 Bottom Left - St. Jerome in His Study. Painting by Antonello da Messina Bottom Right - Sketch of the entrance floor

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In this project, each unit has an aedicule space inside of them. It starts on the landing space of a stairwell, which can be used as a reading room. The scale of this space is quite small due to the raised-platform and the low-ceiling. This creates contrast with the large living space. The aedicule is extended to the mezzanine floor by the stairs and creates balconies on the street and courtyard facade. The green colour of the aedicule, which is made out of marble and coloured concrete, separates it from the other part of the house. This makes the aedicule look like it is a discrete object inserted in the house.

Left Page - View of a terrace from another terrace. Scale 1:20 Bottom Left - Typical unit plan. Entrance level. Scale 1:100 Bottom Right - Typical unit plan. Mezzanine level. Scale 1:100

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The aedicule adds a sculptural quality to the facade. The service part, which is located between two symmetrical housing layouts, creates a thick solid part where the aedicule can be hung. The thickness of this structure alternates on each floor, which creates harmony with the alternate opening size of the aedicule. The material of the facade is mainly made out of brick and oxidised copper. The red brick has resonance with the surrounding buildings, such as St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel. The green oxidised copper contrasts with the red brick making the aedicules more distinctive and gives of a lightweight expression. The central solid part between the two housing is covered with the light-coloured brick, which emphasizes the repetitive aedicules.

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Left Page - Elevation drawing of street facade. Scale 1:100 Top Right- Study model of a part of the street facade. Scale 1:33 Bottom Left - Typical unit construction plan. Entrance level. Scale 1:100 Bottom Right - Typical unit construction plan. Mezzanine level. Scale 1:100

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Top - Elevation drawing of courtyard facade. Scale 1:100 Right Page- Section AA’. Construction drawing. Scale 1:100

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The mass design of the housing is deeply rooted in the condition of the site. The site was interesting in a way that there are a lot of massive infrastructures on one side, whereas there are small grains of terrace houses on the other side. Also, Euston Road is a hectic road where many passengers pass by to use King’s Cross and St. Pancras station. On the other side, Argyle Square, located in the south, is a small park surrounded by small terrace houses, which are mostly used as hotels. These two different conditions were a critical factor in developing the building’s urban strategy. The urban strategy of this project is focused on how to react with these two different conditions as well as achieve appropriate density for the site. For achieving the appropriate density for the central London site, it is inevitable to create larger volumes compared to the surrounding buildings. Rather than creating a massive mass that is higher than the surrounding buildings, the project suggests placing two rows of low-rise apartments and two pencil towers at the north and south ends of each row. The tower on the north balances with the large-scaled buildings on Euston Road, and the narrow profile of it harmonises with the neo-gothic towers of St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel. Seen from King’s Cross Square, the tower appears as a sculptural object. The tower, on the south, takes advantage of the open green space in front of it. The two rows of low-rise apartments create an intimate streetscape along with the existing terrace houses.

Top - Birds-eye view of the proposal with the site model. Scale 1:200 Middle - The proposal and the surrounding condition from Euston Road. Watercolour painting Bottom - View from Euston Road. Scale 1:200

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The proposal deals with the different degrees of congestion of the site using the exterior spaces with different characters; the front yard, the courtyard, and the backyard. The front yard facing King’s Cross station is a public open space that responds to the busy condition of Euston Road and creates an interaction with King’s Cross Square. The front yard is connected with the middle courtyard via a double-storey height gate, which creates an appropriate threshold for the courtyard. The courtyard is a private courtyard for the dwellers of the estate, which gives a tranquil resting place for them. The courtyard is connected with the backyard, which is on the opposite side of Argyle Square. This open space reacts with the square, creating a communal space for the dwellers and neighbours. The backyard is directly connected to Argyle Square, extending itself to the whole green open space.

Top - View of the courtyard. Scale 1:200 Bottom - View of the backyard. Scale 1:200

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On the street, the aedicules appear as sculptural objects. The three-dimensional shape of the aedicule contrasts with the rest of the facade.

Top - View from King’s Cross Square. Scale 1:100 Right Page - Ground floor plan. Scale 1:500

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In the courtyard, the aedicules appear as repetitive balconies protruded from the mass. These balconies are located on both sides of the courtyard, contributing to the atmosphere. The location of the aedicules is designed to have a diagonal relationship to each other, rather than face each other directly.

Top - View of the internal courtyard. Scale 1:100 Right Page - First floor plan. Scale 1:500

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Standing seam is used to join the copper sheets. To create harmony with the irregular shape of the plane and windows, a vertical and horizontal seam is used at the same time. These seams combined with the peculiar shape of windows create an abstract pattern on the facade. The different depth of the windows adds sculptural quality on the aedicule.

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Top - Horizontal section of typical joints. Scale 1:20 Bottom Left - Interior view. Scale 1:10

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1. Brick 10 2. Cavity 3. Insulation 4. Concrete block wall 5. Steel casement window 1:200 6. Batten and cavity 7. Plasterboard 8. Oxidised with standing seam 5 copper sheet 10 9. Fixing and cavity 10. Plywood 11. Batten and cavity 12. Steel tube structure 1:250 13. Insulation 14. Steel fixed window 15. Insulated panel system 3 15 16. Steel casement window 17. Concrete flags 18. Gravel 19. Waterproof layer 1:300 20. Insulation 21. Vapour barrier 22. Screed 10 laid to fall 20 23. Reinforced concrete slab 24. Insulation 25. Cavity with suspended ceiling fixing 26. Plywood 1:500 27. Terracotta tile 28. Insulation 29. Concrete block wall 10 Steel window fixture 50 30. 31. Sealant 32. Steel window 33. Terracotta tile 34. Cavity with suspended 1:1000 ceiling fixing 35. Waterproof membrane 36. Terrazzo finish 37. Concrete screed with floor heating 38. Sound insulation 39. Coloured precast concrete panel 10 100 40. Sound insulation 41. Cross laminated timber (CLT) 42. Cavity with joist 43. Insulation 1:2000 44. Marble finish attached to honeycomb panel 45. Fixing and cavity 46. Waterproof layer 1

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Society of Forms 2018. Tutored by Stephen Taylor, Theodoros Thysiades 0

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A visual environment of a city is made out of various forms of buildings. These forms of the building are the results of cultural tradition and the natural environment. The image of a city is created by interpreting these forms in the human mind. This image of a city is one of the crucial aspects of the 0 identity of the city, which lies in people’s memory. This project explored how the new contemporary building’s form can interact with the existing urban environment. Paris is known for its unique atmosphere created by its buildings with a simple material palette. Though they have similar materials in their facades and roofs, there has been relentless variation in using these materials and elements in buildings. The 0 1 project explored one of the ways to vary the norm of Paris buildings in a contemporary context. Also, the project suggests how the new building can blend in with the existing city structure by manipulating the figure-ground relationship. 0

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Opposite Page - Bird-eye view from the east. Scale 1:100 Top Left - Sketch of Paris roofscape Top Right - Satellite picture of Paris. Site is marked in red. Bottom - Site plan of existing condition. Scale 1:1000

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The site is in the Marais district of Paris, France. A local market exists on this 1:300 site, which is called Marche couvert des Enfants Rouge. This project aims to preserve the beloved market, at the same50m time, to build a foyer; a safe place 20 for young people, over the market. 1:500

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The figure-ground relationship of Paris is characterised by continuous buildings that define shapes of streets and voids for letting in air and light at the back of the buildings. Likewise, the voids on the west side of the market is surrounded by existing buildings, creating a tranquil atmosphere. However, the height of the market is much lower than the surrounding buildings, and the boundary of the void is left ambiguous.

The proposed building separates the void into three parts, defining the shape of it clearly. The void to the west (1) is shaped by the west facade of the building, forming a threshold space. The void to the south (2) is newly formed by the proposed building, used as an open-air market. This void also allows the neighbour building to let light in and give a view of an open market. The void in the middle of the building (3) forms a courtyard upon the market, creating a communicating space for the dwellers.

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Existing figure-ground condition of the site

Proposed figure-ground condition of the site

Model of existing site condition. Scale 1:300

Model of early mass study with the site. Scale 1:300

Bottom - Birds-eye view from the north-west. Scale 1:200

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Top - Roof plan. Scale 1:500 Bottom Left - Birds-eye view from north. Scale 1:200 Bottom Right - Plan of Hôtel de Beauvais

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Paris has a unique cityscape. The forms of buildings which are similar but different to each other engage together and create harmonious scenes. The simple usage of materials, like limestone, slate and zinc, highlights this relationship of forms. The proposal engages with this conglomerate order of Paris by using similar languages of forms in the contemporary context. Furthermore, by modifying the shape according to the condition of the site and the programs, the proposed building enriches the formal diversity of Paris.

Opposite Page - Interlocking form of roofs and facades. Scale 1:50 Top - Study models for mass design. Scale 1:200 Middle - Study models for mass and facade design. Scale 1:100 Bottom - View from the boulevard. Scale 1:50

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The sequence of entering this building is carefully designed. The future occupier who enters from the grand stairs first encounters a double-height, 0 1 5 boulevard and the courtyard. medium scale space which is open to both the After experiencing this intermediate space, the user enters the courtyard surrounded by the cloister. The cloister, covered by walls with fenestrations, gives a feeling of protection to the occupier. After experiencing these three different spaces, the occupier enters1:100 the building.

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Opposite Page - View of the courtyard from the library. Scale 1:50 1:250 Top - St.Benedictusberg Abbey in Vaals. Designed by Dom Hans Van der Laan Bottom - First floor plan. Scale 1:300

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The rooms are connected with a spacious corridor which is open to the exterior. Between the corridor and room, there is a semi-private threshold 0 1 5 space, mediating two spaces with different characters.

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Opposite Page - Top view of the courtyard. Scale 1:50 1:250 Top - CitĂŠ NapolĂŠon of Paris Bottom - Third floor plan. Scale 1:300

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The proposed building’s main elevation is deeply connected with the typology of existing buildings on the site. The distinct building characteristics in the Marais district; French windows, cornices, gable roofs, and dormer roofs are reflected in the elevation. Furthermore, the asymmetry of the elevation flexibly reacts to the different heights of the adjacent buildings. By reacting to the conditions of the site and programs of the building, the main elevation is not only following the typology of the site but also creating a variation of it. In addition, the gap in the centre of the facade delicately reveals the inner courtyard outside, presenting people on the terrace like a theatre stage. White stained concrete is used for the structure and the skin, giving a monolithic impression to the facade. Also, the subtle changes in the thickness of concrete and the asymmetric cornices make the facade look like a relief.

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Top Left - Sketch of the main facade Top Right - Youlhwadang bookhall. Designed by ARU Bottom - North elevation 1:200

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The courtyard is lifted 5m above ground level where the existing market is located. The proposed building and surrounding buildings create tranquil—an enclosed space for the dwellers. The regular intervals of the wall and fenestrations of the building create a rhythm to the facade. The light wells that brighten the market space form benches in the courtyard, which contribute to the atmosphere.

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Right - View of the courtyard Bottom - Section AA’ 1:200

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Luxury of Real Things 2017. Tutored by Stephen Taylor, Theodoros Thysiades Vernacular buildings around the world show their wisdom and ability to adapt to their natural environments like climate, terrain, etc. They are a result of spontaneous reactions to dwell in their surrounding conditions. This project aims to design a building that resembles the spontaneousness of the existing vernacular buildings on the site, hoping to create something genuine like the existing buildings.

The site is located in CĂŠvennes National Park, France. There is an abandoned hamlet, which consists of several vernacular buildings on the site. This project aims to convert this hamlet to a hotel by renovating the existing buildings and adding additional buildings.

Top of Opposite Page - Roof plan. Scale 1:1000 Left - Early sketch of the scheme Bottom - Aerial view of the proposal. Scale 1:200

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The volumes shaped by pitched roofs appear repetitively. They are sometimes parallel or perpendicular to each other, all together, they create a picturesque disposition. The small volumes created by chimneys add tension to this disposition. The site has many terraces. The existing buildings sensibly use these different heights of terraces and connect them by stairs. Consequently, the site and existing buildings make an architectural promenade.

Top - Sketch of existing buildings from the main road Middle Left - View of existing buildings and terraces from the south Middle Right - Sketch of terraces and a promenade Bottom - Panoramic view of the site from the west

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Since the site has many stairs and terraces with various heights, the project takes advantage of this characteristic. The suggested building naturally follows the contour of the site. The courtyard formed by new buildings is connected to an existing courtyard with a promenade that is formed by the site contour. The terraces with different heights are connected to each room with stairs. These stairs create a threshold space for the hotel room. The courtyard works as a communicating space for the dwellers, like a street with terraced houses in the UK.

Top left - Sketch of the courtyard formed by existing buildings. Bottom Left- The relationship between new courtyard and exisiting courtyard. Scale 1:50 Right - Terrace houses in Notting Hill, London Bottom Right - Bouรงa Housing. Designed by Alvaro Siza

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The lounge space connects all terraces and hotel buildings with the stairs inside of it. The different scales of the spaces enrich the journey to the upper terrace.

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The courtyard is connected to the existing courtyard, creating a place for intercourse. The different heights created by the terraces make the threshold to the individual hotel room.

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Undergraduate Projects 2009 to 2017. Korea University Shoes Street _ Shoemaker cooperative’s headquater in Seonsu-dong. 2016

Outer Skin

Inner Skin

Ramp

Structure

Fractal City _ Collective Housing in Bomun-dong. 2013

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AUTODESK � � � � � � � � � �

AUTODESK � � � � � � � � � �

Urban Festival _ Concert Hall in Jegi-dong. 2013

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AUTODESK � � � � � � � � � �

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1. Stage 2. Auditorioum 3. Technical Area 4. Green Room 5. Man’s Dressing Room 6. Woman’s Dressing Room 7. Toilet 8. Office

Book Station _ Adaptive Reuse of Yongsan Railway Hospital. 2014

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Profile for 김민수

Architecture Portfolio. July 2019 by Minsoo Kim.  

Minsoo Kim is an architectural designer who just finished MA architecture and March course at The Cass (London Metropolitan University). He...

Architecture Portfolio. July 2019 by Minsoo Kim.  

Minsoo Kim is an architectural designer who just finished MA architecture and March course at The Cass (London Metropolitan University). He...

Profile for als90131
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