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THE SPIRIT OF DETROIT ALPHA SIGMA TAUS 1964 CONVENTION " SPIRIT OF T H E CITY," massive bronu b路y sculptor Marshall Fredericks dominat n th e front entrance of Detroit's towering CityCounty Building.

Convention Theme:

FAITH OF OUR FOUNDERS As we gather again m the district of our founding, it seems fitting that we renew our faith in our sororityth e faith of our founders-

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that Alpha Sigma Tau would become a rich and meaningful experience in the lives of its members, that the lives of all we contact become richer because of us, that Alpha Sigma Tau would grow and prosper as its members carried the torch .

Will you be with us to renew the

FAITH OF OUR FOUNDERS?


liHIE ANCHIO R. o/ _A~ha Sigma 'Jau

VOL. XXXIX NO. 2

THE ANCHOR is published in Fall and Spring by Leland Publishers, Inc., The Fraternity Press, official sorority publishers, at 2642 University Avenue, St. Paul 14, Minnesota. Subscription price, $1.50 per year. Bound ANCHORS available at Cent ral Office.

SPRING, 1964

In This Issue ... Su BJ ECT

PAcE

196 4 Convention R egistra ti on Bl a nk .............

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Conve ntion Program

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Convention Q uestions and An swers .......... .. ... .. .

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H eading th e Pla nning ................. ........ ... ........ ...

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Conve ntion Committees Tips to T ouri sts in D e troit

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D o D ynamic D etroit !.. No Conve nti on Bell es? ..... ...... .. Send all editorial ma terial a nd pictures to National Editor , Mrs . B. L. McBee, 11 83 Avon St. , Akron 10, Ohio . C opy to a rrive not later tha n July I a nd February 1.

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Sing Along with El eanor .... .... ..

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N a tiona ) Panhell enic Conference ........... ... .. ..

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Lucy M organ 's N ew Yea rs Lett er ................. .... 22 W ha t H a ppens to K a nsa ns?

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Catherin e Smith St resses th e Va lue of Speech .. 25 One Day in O ctober.... .

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Tra veler Sue D yson N a med R epresentati ve

Send change of address. vital statistics, in memoriam notices, and all sorority business correspondence to Alpha Sigma Tau Central Office, 6200 Hoffman, St . Louis. Missouri 63139.

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D oro thy Hughes I s Collec ter, Sch olar a nd

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a tional Alumn ae ....................

T o p T a us .. .. .. .... ..................

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Coll egiate H onors ...... ..................... .................. ... 3 7 Coll egia te N ews ... .... .. .. .... ....... .. .... ...................... 46 Ru sh Chairmen .. ....... ..

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An Urgent M essage to Alu m nae ........................ 5 3 Alpha Sigm a T a u R ecom mendations Blank ...... 54 R ecomm endations f.:h a irm an ...... .. .... . .............. .. 55

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No Packaged Prog ra m ... .. .................. .... ............... 85 Alumnae News .. .. .... .. ........................... .... ... .. ...... 86 Direc tory ............ .. ... .... .. ........ ..... ........... ......... ... ... 99

Th ird class pos tage paid a t St . Paul , Minnesota.

ANCHOR


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'64 CONVENTION i::f

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AUGUST 24-AUGUST 27 i::f

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SHERATON-CADILLAC HOTEL i::f

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DETROIT, MICHIGAN

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ALPHA SIGMA TAUS!

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I 1 I Date ........ .. .. .. ...... .. ...... .. .............................. . Deadline, AUGUST I, 1964 I Please type or print (Additional blanks may be obtained from the Central Office} I Your maiden name ............ .. .... . ............................................................................................................................ II Married name ................................................................... I (Give husband's lull name) I ALPHA SIGMA TAU CONVENTION REGISTRATION BLANK

Your home address .... ...... ........ .. (street)

(tip cocle)

(state)

(city)

Your coli ege address .............. .. ........ .. ........... .. .... ... . (if you are in college) National Officer Delegate

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.. College

am a

Chapter.

........ Alumnae Chapter Visitor ........................... College Chapter .... .

Alumnae Chapter

Chapter in which I was initiated .... .

... Year .................. .

I plan to attend convention affairs on : _ Mon., Aug. 24.. ....

Wed., Aug. 26 ........ ..

Tues., Aug. 25... I have attended

Collegiate DelegatesDO NOT SEND any fees . REGISTRATION FEE ($5} for all others MUST ACCOMPANY THIS BLANK. No refund after August 15.

Thurs., Aug . 27 .. . .... previous conventions.

Send to : Mrs. Edward Collins 15491 Heyden Detroit, Michigan 48223

Make checks payable to: ALPHA SIGMA TAU

ALPHA SIGMA TAU HOTEL RESERVATION BLANK Date .........

.. Deadline, August I, 1964

Name

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I I I II I I I I

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Send to : Mrs. Edward Collins 15491 Heyden Detroit, Mich. 48223

Street City and State ................ ..

Please enter my reservat1'on as indicated below for ALPHA SIGMA TAU CONVENTION , Aug. 25-27, 1964. Room Request

Name of roommate preferred .............. .. .. .. .... ............... . Address .. ............ .. .... .............. ............ .. ......... .......... ....... .. . (city} (street}

... ... ... ... .. ...

(state}

Single

................ ..

Double

.............. ..

Roommate must include reservation in same envelope.

Twin ..................... .

Arrival (date} .... .. ........................................... .. . .... ... AM ............ P.•M.

Rollaway ............ ..

I Departure (date} ... P.M ... ................ .. ............ .. .......... ... .A.M. I Check your confirmation from the hotel carefully. I I Note: ·Each person or couple, use only one blank. To avoid duplication do not make reservations for others. I L--------------------------------------~ ANCHOR

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One Volkswagen will not be enough to carry ALPHAS to convention. They're only 30 minutes from Detroit!

MONDAY, AUGUST 24

7 :00-10:00 P.M. -R egistra ti on 8:00 P.M. -District Get-Acquainted Session 9:00 P.M.- Grand Gathering of the Clan TUESDAY, AUGUST 25

7: 30- 8: 30 A.M. -R egistration 9:00 A.M . -Official Opening 10: 00 A.M.- Collegiate Workshop 11 : 30 A.M .- Convention Chorus R ehearsal 12: 30 P.M.- Queens and Belles Luncheon 2 : 30 P.M.-Collegiate Workshops 4 :00 P.M.- Convention Chorus R ehearsal 5 : 30 P.M.- Dinner R ecess 7:00 P.M.- President's At H ome 9: 30 P.M . -Collegiate Buzz Session WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26

9:00-11 :00 A.M.- Alumnae Workshop 11: 15 A.M. -General Session 12 :30- 1:45 P.M.- Lunch R ecess 2:00 P.M.--General Session 3 : 30 P.M.- Model Business M eeting 7 :00 P.M.- Formal Banquet

FOR THE DISPLAY TABLE

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Convention publicity from your local newspaper Scrapbook

Caps, jackets, etc. , with sorority emblem. Articles you sell for money-making projects Alumnae yearbook

THURSDAY, AUGUST 27

8: 00A.M . - rational Staff M eeting 10:00 A.M.- General Session 12:45 P.M .- Yellow Rose Luncheon 2 : 30 P.M . -Ceremonials Pledge, Initiation, M emorial Formal Closing 4 :00 P.M .- Na tional Sta ff M eeting 4

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Materials on your philanthropy

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What is the cost of the hotel? Single rooms: $8 Double Bed Rooms: $1 3 Twin Bed Rooms: $13 Rollaways: $3.50 These rates are subject to a 4% state sales tax .

Naturall y Akron-Canton is in good voice for th e '64 Con vention. Eleanor Halas, center, N ation a/ Music Chairman , is a m emb er of the grou p.

Can Alpha Sigma Tau families have this rate? Yes, through convention registration. Do rates apply to early arrivals and those staying longer ? Yes What is the Convention Registration Fee? $5.00 for the entire convention Part-time attendance: $2.00 each for August 25 and 26 $1.00 for August 27 Do members' fami lies pay registration fee ? No, they do not. What does the full-time registration fee include? Programs, favors, Alpha Sig-Nal What are the costs of the planned affairs? Banquet $5.75 Queens, Belles Luncheon $3.85 Yellow Rose Luncheon $3.85 I ncludes gratuity and tax Parking for cars? FREE PARKING IN THE HOTEL GARAGE FOR REGISTERED GUESTS! That's rea lly something in our city! Parking across the street from the hotel at the day ra te cost a fortune ... park at least 4 blocks away! What part of delegates' expenses are paid by the National Organization? This information was covered in the March, 1964 Central Office Bulletin . What sort of clothes are needed? For business sessions: Tailored dresses, summer cotton, suits Ceremonials: White dress or pastel, preferably white Banquet: Long or short formal or dinner dress Luncheon: Informal dress Evening or sight-seeing: Light weight wrap, woo l jacket sweater Air Conditioning: Stole, jacket, or sweater Shorts and slacks??? Tut, Tut, you know that's NOT in order!

ANCHOR

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HEADIN.G THE PLANNING:

Rose Marie Schmidt Nationa l Pledge Chairman Nationa l Convention Chairman

ROSE MARIE SCHMIDT is a natural as convention chairman-sh e's attended every one since she p ledged Theta Chapter a t Wayne State University in 1944! Attending first as a visitor, then Detroit Alumnae Chapter delegate and finally as na tional officer, conventions have become for h er a time to renew friendship and make new acquaintances. Profession ally, Rose Marie i admini trative as istant in the Personnel Department of the Detroit Board of Education . H er responsibilities are in the area of elementary teacher assignment. Presently she is comp leting work on her doctoral dissertation a t Wayne State in the field of educationa l administra tion. Swimming at the cottage on Lake Huron during the summer and skiing at Caberfae in winter are wedged into the program when time permi ts.

MARLOWE FRA KO, D.D.S., has served Theta Chap ter and D etroit Alumnae in ma ny roles since she was initiated in 1950. As officia l delegate at Washington and a lumn ae representative at the St. Louis Convention, she served actively in nationa l fun ctions as well. Dr. Franko practiced dentistry in Detroit as a public h ealth dentist for children in school and hospital clinics. Interest in advanced professional training led her to take th e year to continu e graduate study in pedodontics a t the Un iversity of D etroit School of Dentistry. Marlowe's dry sense of humor enlivens the socia l groups in wh ich she is a m ember and serves her in good stead in planning for the nat ional convention .

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Marlowe Franko, D.D.S. Theta Alumnae Representative local Convention Chairman

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REGISTRA liON Mrs. Edward Collins (right ) Miss Adeline Shaw (left ) Keeping track of the money as treasurer of the Detroit Alumnae Chapter, Hila is in practice to handle the reg 路 istration duties.

PUBLICITY & PRINTING Mrs. H erbert T. Meister Lillian displays a collection of badges used in previous conventions as she selects the one which best suits all needs.

COURTESY Mrs. William Fitzgerald (right ) Mrs. Ellis C. Wood These sisters are adept at the courtesy functions necessary to a national convention.

ANCHOR

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FLOWER ARRANGEMENTS Mrs. Theodore Briggs Lenore knows that poinsettia are not in season in August, but she has plans for the many arrangements needed.

Miss Dorothy Dobo The m erry twinkle in Dorothy' eye m eans plans are afoot for some good sightseeing tips.

FAVORS Mrs. Harold J ennett Marlene's pen i busy writing to organizations which might wish to contribute favors for the convention.

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FORMAL BANQUET ~t~l:~@~:~~mm~:~~tl~WN@]:~t~i速~=t~~~N=:tt~~HHt~I~

Mrs. William Monticello Mrs. Betty Roeling (pictured ) Betty looks over banquet programs of the past in planning for this gala event.

QUEENS AND BELLES LUNCHEON

Mrs. Casimer Cislo Millie admires the china bell presented to the " convention belles" at the 1960 convention. Three times makes a winner at convention !

, , , Ad~ MtUUtd ~ dtJd ta pt<:ue f!tUUt {3uweattUt! ANCHOR

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YELLOW ROSE LUNCHEON Mrs. Leon Sowell Mrs. Fred Schoen Busy with luncheon arrangements, Ladene and Emita take time for the camera.

EXHIBITS

GET ACQUAINTED SESSIONS

Mrs. J. B. Carpenter Ypsi-Ann Arbor Alumnae

Mrs. R. B. Cross Mrs. Justin G. Doyle Mrs. John Simpson Mrs. Joseph Steen

INFORMAL GATHERING

Mrs. Preston Sewell

Mrs. Russell Clark Flint Alumnae

CEREMONIALS Mrs. Justin G. Doyle

CANDLE LIGHTING

Mrs. Bernard McBee

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Mrs. D. C. Phipps

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MUSIC Mrs. George Halas 10

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TIPS TO TOURISTS EATING:

Summer crowds and unexpected functions make it a good practice to reserve yo ur lun cheon or dinner accommodations if you plan to go to a well -known restaurant, especially the Top of the Flame. You may even want to do some of it before you ge t here! Arrive on tim e or you will be cancelled out. Luncheons in a ll fine restau rants are less expensive (a lmost one-half) and you sti ll get plenty of food. Make dinner a light one-on the di et as well as the pocketbook!

DRIVING:

Parking is expensive in th e downtown area. SOc per hour and 20c each additional hour. Don't be fool ed by the 30c signs-that's for a half-hour! Your reservation g ives you FREE parking in the hotel garage. Parking m e ters in Detroit are usuall y Sc per hour, some near th e Cultural Center will g ive you two-h our parking. Th e back of the Art Mus eum is the best spot , or Wayne State Student Lots ( !S c) . One way stree ts will catch you downtown as well as going out of th e city. kind to strangers!

Don' t panic, we're

DSR BUS:

The ci ty bus lin es are a ll DSR, fare 25c, main lines run frequently. Wood ward Avenue, Second Ave nue w ill take you to th e main sightseeing spots. Just watch th at you d on't get an EXPRESS . They won' t stop! Interurban buses will take you to Greenfield Village and the D etroit Zoo. Call the hotel travel d esk or transportation d esk to h elp you out with place to begin, fare, tim e.

CABS: Fare

is 40c for first quarter mile, 5c each additional quarter. No extra fare for extra passengers, so if there are 3 or more of you it's more economical than DSR for short runs . NO CA B TO GREENFIELD VILLAGE, ZOO, or AIRPORT- it will take a month's wages!

WALKING:

You' ll enj oy doing mos t of your sightseeing this way. N eed we remind you that a single girl o r even two at night isn ' t smart in any city !

CANADA:

Both th e tunnel and the Ambassador Bridge are fun to try . Th e tunnel is closer t o the center of the city and you can use the bus to get to Windsor to explore a short while. You wi ll need car registration papers if you drive over, and natura lizati on papers if you were born outsid e

the U.S.

THEATER TICKETS:

Write to the Fisher Theater, Detroit, Michigan, for informa tion on what's goi ng to be playing and tickets if you wish a larger number. A single or couple can be picked up after a phone call on the day of the show. Matinees for the most part are sch eduled fo r W ednesday and Saturdays.

GETTING TO KNOW THE CITY:

Buy a newspaper at your local out of the city d ealer or send 25c to th e D etroit News and they' ll mail one to you .

ANCHOR

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MC NICHOLS (SIX MILE RD .)

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Civic Center Expressways McGregor Center Main Library Art Institute Historical Museum Briggs Stadium Hudson's Downtown

Greenfield Village University of Detroit II Detroit Zoo 12 Genera I Motors Tech Center 13 Metropolitan Beach 14 Sheraton-Cadillac Hotel (headquarters) 15 Belle Isle 9

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DYNAMIC DETROIT to the Detroit River at th e foot of Woodwa rd Avenue to our CIVIC CENTER just five blocks from the hotel. You'll see CANADA across the river (and maybe take the tunnel bus 15c. to visit Windsor just fifteen minutes away ) or watch the freighters, both lakes and ocean-going. You' ll proceed ... to COBO HALL, th e city's convention building and the circular convention arena that adjoins the H all. You'll walk by the VETERANS MEMORIAL BUILDING and see its symbolic spread-eagle and continue to the FORD AUDITORIUM, the home of the D etroit Symphony Orchestra. Tucked into the left corner of the Civic Center is th e MARINERS CHURCH which dates back to 1848 and once served Great Lakes seamen. Finally, you ' ll pass the C ITY - COUNTY BUILDING, the 20-story skyscraper that houses city a nd county offices. The massive brcmze statue i Marsha ll Frederi cks' " Spirit of D etroit. "

in the shopping district along Washington Boulevard and Wood ward Avenue from Campus M a rti us to Grand C ircus Park (three blocks from the hotel ) . The 25 -story J. L. Hudson Company on Woodward Avenu e dates to 1881 and ranks among the world's largest department stores. Most stor,es remain open until 8:30 on Mond ay and Wednesda y evenings. ANCHOR

A section of " Streets of Old D etroit," on e of th e lifesize exhibits at the D etroit H istorical Museum. The streets, side walks and store front s of 1870 were reconstructed with the actual building materials of that period . Note the ce dar block paving and the h orse trough .

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at the newest Stauffer restaurant, ' 'Top of the Flame." The view from this top floor of th e Michigan Consolidated Gas Company Building is one yo u mu st see night a nd day wheth er you eat there or not. P.S. The view from the ladies' rest room wi ll knock you off your sea t! If you like to ee th e boats on th e river it's the ROOSTERTAIL for you . It's quite a distance- and quite expensive unle you do it a t noon. At the PONCHARTRAIN WINE CELLARS you' ll find the delicately flavored herb dishes, da rk rooms and wine. But if you just like p lain prime rib that melt in your mouth- and at a rea onabl e you' ll join the baseball crowd at pric CARL'S C HOP HOU E. For a light lunch that make you think you 're at the sidewalk cafes in Pa ri eat in the Art In titute. Those sweet roll are mouth watering路! 13


The new PUBLIC LIBRARY has beauty and utility-you've got to walk through it to believe it. Across the stree t is the WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY complex which enrolls some 20,000 tudent in 11 colleges on a 30-block expandina campu . The McGREGOR CONFERE CE CE TER on Second Boulevard designed by Minoru Yamasaki is of pecial architectura l interest.

Cranbroo k, just north of Detroit in rolling Bloomfield Hills , is a world-famous combination of beautifully landscaped park and outstanding museum s, schools and church . The peristyle breezeway in this patio, designed by the late Eliel Saar inen, links the library of the Cranbrook Academy of Art and the noted Cranbroo k Museum of Art. The bronze â&#x20AC;˘sculpture of "Europa and th e Bull" in the foreground is one of many pieces by the fam ed Carl Milles w hich dot the grounds.

If you still have energy you' ll continu e (by Second Bus) to the Grand Boulevard area where the gigantic General Motors Building and Fisher Building top your view. Th e Fisher Theater a fabulous new legitimate theater, will have a hit show pl aying.

1I fi6U '-atte Hetne

, , in the beautiful CULTURAL CENTER, a ten-minute bus ride (take Woodward DSR bus- 25c ) . You'll get off on Kirby and walk to the ART INSTITUTE which displays representative pieces of every great art-producing culture in history. After touring there, you'll walk down Kirby to the HISTORICAL MUSEUM which has changing exhibits and permanent collections on the streets of 1840-1870. Don' t forget to stop at the silent movie. Continuing on Kirby, you'll visit the CHILDREN'S MUSEUM, a fascinating place of nature and science for children to touch and try. It even has its own planetarium. 14

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GREENFIELD VILLAGE, where yo u' ll find more than 100 historic buildings moved from all sections of the country and restored in every detail to appear as they did a century and more ago. CRANBROOK in Bloomfield Hills, with its famous art academy, museum, institute of science, and planetarium, Saarinen architecture and Milles sculpture are world famous . DETROIT ZOOLOGICAL PARK with 122 beautiful acres and uniquely housed animal in open enclosures which simulate their homelands. A miniature diesel railroad and the chimpanzee how delight children and grownups alike. FORT WAYNE is a century-old fort nO\ a mu eum of militar history.

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UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT whose new buildings add a young look to the city's oldest university is one of the world's largest Catholic universities.

NO CONVENTION BELLES?

THE ASSEMBLY LINES of the automotive industry all welcome visitors. Especially well visited is the Ford Rouge Plant, world's largest industrial concentration. Two square miles of factori es, foundries, steel mills, glass plant, rail lines and ship docks.

No convention belles in this group of Alpha Thetas. A convention belle is attending her third convention and Alpha Theta Chapter was not installed until 1959! Bell es are honored at the Queens and Belles Luncheon . Won' t you check this li st and indicat on your reservation form the number of conventions that you've attended ?

BELLE ISLE, the 1,000-acre island playground that contains a Children's Zoo, the Mother Goose setting for tame and baby animals; conservatory, aquarium, famous fountains, and concerts under the stars can keep you busy for an entire day. BOB-LO ISLAND is a recreational park in Lake Erie- a long 20-mile trip by boat which leaves the Civic Center dock every day.

WHEREVER YOU GO Front R ow: Marlene Piet, Marie Gray, Gail Chop , Barbara Busby. Second row: Camille Gut, E velyn Ad11ms, Betty Pawl, Geraldine Parus. Third ro u:: Jean Wersching, Mary Sue R oulo, Carol Harrzs.

WHATEVER YOU DO DYNAMIC DETROIT WILL FASCINATE YOUI

ANCHOR

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Detroit, Michigan .. .. ... ... ...... Detroit, Michigan ........ .... .. .. Buffalo, New York .... .... ........ Denver, Colorado ........ .......... Cleveland, Ohio .. .. .. .... .... .. .. .. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania .. .... St. Louis, Missouri .. .... .......... Cincinnati, Ohio .................... Detroit, Michigan ................ Chicago, Illinoi s .. .... .............. Roanoke, Virginia .. .. .. .... ...... Buffalo, ew York ................ Washington, D . C ......... .. ...... St. Louis, Mi ouri .. .... .. ...... .. Detroit, Michigan ... .............

1925 1927 1929 193 1 1934 1936 1939 1946 1949 1952 1955 1958 1960 1962 1964 15


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A Cor~vention

Theme ARRANGED FOR YOU o

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A MELODY OF FRIENDSHIP, TOO!

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Patriotic Songs

The following songs will be used a t the 15th Na tiona l Conventi on at D etroit, Michigan . 1- The first rre nera l meeting will be opened with Th e S taT Spangled Banner followed by the Pledge of Allegia nce. The meeting will close with God Bless America. 2- The second general m eeting will be opened with Th e Bat路tle H ymn of the R epublic and the choru s singing a descant . Th e meeting will clo e with A m erica and the chorus singing a descant. 3- The third general m eeting will be opened with A m erica the Beaut ifu l a nd the chorus singing a descant . The m eeting will close with A Grand O ld Flag.

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Ceremonials

EVERYONE SHOU LD LEARN THE FOLLOWING SONGS: Fmt ernity H ymn

O urselves

Grace Before M eals

Blest Be the T ie T hat Binds

(sung )

I n the Candlelight

ANCHOR

Parting S ong R ibb ons of A lpha Sigma Tau

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Convention Song Winners

1958

1960

1962

Chi

Glenda Steward Iota

Mary nn Black Nu Alumnae 1964

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Convention Songs

us AlTA' N

CONVENTION SONG WINNERS Second Place Winner, 1958 ... ..... ..... .... .... .. . Page 31 Through Life Words and music by (Nu) Doris Burkett, Winona Brown. Second Place Winner, 1960 ................... ..... Page 36 Our College Days With A.T. Words by Marie Burns ; (Iota) music, " Sometimes I'm Happy." Second Place Winner, 1962 ... .. ................. .. Manuscript Who Knows the Word? Words and music by (Zeta) Carol Underwood, Kay Sigmund. Third Place Winner, 1957 ...................... .... Page 32 Praise W e Sing Words and music (Alpha ) . Third Place Winner, 1960 .... ...................... Page 37 Show M e a Scotchman Words by (Iota Alpha) . Third Place Winner, 1962 .... ...................... Manuscript (Alpha Epsilon ) Words and music by Mary Louise Wagner. ANCHOR

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In a formal pose at th e Na tion a l Panhellenic Conference, from the left: Mrs. Helen Cr oss. Vice-President; Mrs . Mary Alice Pe terson, Na tion al Presid ent; a n d Mrs. Virginia M a xson, National Ru'sh Chair man .

National Panhellenic Conference A rlington Hotel, Hot Springs, A r kansas Novembe r 13 to 17, 1963

;\; "A LooK Ahead" was the keynote of the collegiate day of the 38th ses ion of the National Panhellenic Conference held at the Arlinaton Hotel, Hot Spring , Arkansas, November 13-17, 1963. A resolution passed at the 1961 biennial meeting of PC, provided for an experimental program to include collegiate representatives at this 1963 Conference. PC had included co llegiates in the 1933 and 1935 meetings and then discontinued the program because of long distances traveled, time necessari ly out of classes and the heavy expense involved. However, with modern transportation it now seemed possible to include collegian . The Executive Committee invited all college panhellenics within a 250 mile radius of th e meeting place at Hot Springs, Arkansas. D elegates came from 30 campuse , with their deans or Panhellenic advi ers. "A Look Ahead" was the theme of the talk given by Mr . E. Granville Crabtree, Pa t President of Kappa Kappa Gamma, Past Chairman, PC, and now Secretary of IRA . The words used to portray thi were "samenes and changes" a applied to college women. The business of the meeting was conducted in the usual manner and many re olution were presented by Mrs. George Rudolph, D elta D elta D elta Chairman of the R e olution Committee. It is highly significant that many of the resolutions which were adopted and others reaffirmed concerned campus problems and the fraternity image at that level. Th e included de-emphasizing participation in Homecoming and other activitie renewed emphaIS on scholarship and simplification of ru h rules. 20

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"A Look Ahead" keynotes collegiate day RESOLUTIONS Whereas, There h ave been critical comments concerning th e behavior of memb rs of fraternity organizations ; and Whereas, On some ca mpu es there i a relaxa ti on of rules governing sta nda rds .of b havior, RESOLVED, .T hat N a tional Panhellenic Conferen ce endorse th e following resolution of the Interfra ternity, R esearch and Advisory Council as follows: "BE IT RESOLVED : That IRAC continu e to emph asize its positi on in uph olding the high social a nd moral standa rds of its m emb er Conferences and their chapters, a nd be it furth er resolved th a t : IRAC d eplore present day trends toward the removal of regu lations rela ting to student living, believing the current trend s toward laxity permits, encou rages and contributes to th e lowering of these stand a rds." Be it furth er resolved: Tha t on a camp us withou t adequate regulations rela ting to stud ent living the N a tional Panh ellenic Conference C ha pters, by mu tual agreemen t, estab li h for their groups a set of rules relating to resid ences and the social condu ct of their members. A representa tive of the J ack H. Pessin and Associa tes, In c., ta lked with groups who have housing n eed s since this firm is in a position to build a nd help with the fin a ncing of sorority a nd fra ternity h ouses. Th e Admini stra tive Workshops h eld on Friday evening divided us into fou r groups: Presidents, Collegia te Progra m, Alumn ae Program and Fin a nce. At the alumnae meeting ideas were excha nged on how th e various groups h andled such problem s as organization, a wa rds, n ewsletters, money-making proj ects, yearbooks, etc. Several grou ps gave recep tions to which all d elega tes were invited. Mrs. Ga no E . Senter, the profession al par liamentarian for the conference, gave a course in parlia mentary procedures four m ornings for those who were sufficiently eager to meet from 8 :45 to 1 :45 in the mo rning .

NEW OFFICERS Mrs. Willi a m Tash , Chairman of NPC for thi s biennium, presided with cha rm a nd effi ciency. At th e closing session she h anded her gavel over to the incoming C ha irm an, Miss Elizabeth D yer of C hi Omega a nd presented the in coming m embers of the committee, Mrs. K a rl Mill er of Sigma Kappa as Secreta ry and Mrs. G eorge Roller of Alpha Omicron Pi, as Treasurer. A sta nding ovation was given to Mrs. N ash for her splend id adm ini tra tion of the conferen ce and h er effectiven ess as a presiding officer. The n ew C hairman appointed the committees to work with h er in the coming b iennium a nd the 38 th session was adjourned. W e were represented by Mrs. Peterson, Mrs. T. R eed M axson, a nd Mrs. R a lph C ross.

*

*

From the Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin The true way to be humble is not to stoop until you are smaller than yourself but to stand at your real height against some higher nature that will show you what the real smallness of your greatness is.-PHILLIPS BRooKs ANCHOR

21


LUCY MORGAN'S NEW YEARS LETTER January 1) 1964 D ear Friends: Once again it is my happiness to send you New Years greetings from Penland and from my new home in Sylva. In my last letter) I said I was going to try to stay away from Penland for an entire year. I did it) excepting for short visits! Five months of 路that year I spent with my " Fairy Godmother/) Mary Clark ) in California. Some of you will remember that in 1959-1960 she gave m e that wonderful year in Europe) including that unforgettable experience of living for five weeks in Pension Daheim which is owned and operated by Frau Anton Lang and her son. "Moth er)) Lang) bless her) got tickets for my n ephew) Ralph) and me to see the Passion Play. On this year's visit to Mary we did not go to Europe) bu t as is always th e case with her) she did give m e some unforgettable experiences. At the first party) K itty and H enney started the ball rolling by asking me to tell some funny story that they recalled from "GIFT FROM THE HILLS. )) That gave me a good send-off and abou路t everyone at that party gave another party for m e. Th ese parties were always small enough so that they were chatty and we really had an opportunity to get acquainted . One of the early garden parties was given by Mr. and Mrs. Lord-Augusta and Denhamand it was there that I met Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Wallac e. H e was writing the musical scoTes for Disneyland. Mary Lou Ramey was another close n eighbor who took walks with me over the hills w hich are made of tremendous boulders. Mary L ou and I seem ed like old fri ends foT a close relative of hers was Mrs. King who was editor of the women)s section of "Country Gentlem en)) and w ho was at Penland years ago and wrote an article about us. Mary Clark likes 路to spend Octob er in our mountains when the fall coloring is at its height ) so we flew to Asheville on S eptember 22. Bonnie and Ralph both m et us at th e airport and Mary went with "our)) n ephew to Sylva and I with Bonnie to Penland where Bill and Jan e Brown gave m e a wondeTful welcome and I felt almost as if I had never been away. Th e Browns and I have had tremendous adjustments to make-they to a job that was big and hard) and I to retirement from that big and hard job which had kept m e busy and happy for forty-t wo years. But Bill has been just as original) refreshing) and full of ideas as I expected him to be afteT all the enthusiastic recommendations we had from the schools where he had taught and wheTe he had his training. J.t is a comfort to m e to know that the school is being guided and is gTowing under the lo ving care of such peo ple as Bill and Ja ne) with Bonnie)s help and encoUTagement. Many of you know John and L ouise Morgan whose summer home is " H eavens Above)) on the hill abo ve the Penland School. I went back to R ichmond with them after Thanksgiving 路 where I have been spending a quiet and happy time) but before you receive this letter I will be back at Syl va in my own new house which is now all finish ed and waiting for me) and it is from there that I will be wishing you happines and peace for the New Y ear. Sinc erely)

..fuclf B. M~Q,H. Bru:. 66B s~, 22

N011.t1t.

e(J/Jo~,;,a. ANCH R


What Happens Mrs. Westebbe 's " Bruce," her youngest son, modele d in clay, cast in plas ter.

To Kansans?

" ... It was 20 years ago 路t hat I went from KSTC to a rural country school, my teaching certificat e clutched in my 16-year-old hand. Th e children of that school passed their county boards and I returned to KSTC for another year, living at the Alpha Sigma Tau house. "From Kansas to Washington, D. C., to Boston to Holland, and back to Washington we have travelled and now are living in Athens. I have lost touch with many of my friends but I thought it might be of interest-what happens to Kansans."

Mrs. Richard M. Westebbe, an Emporia, Kansas, Alumna, was born Barbara C. M . Liebst, writes under several pseudonyms and is a reporter under the by-line of Colleen Cody. For the last three and one-half years she and her husband, Director of the Foreign Trade Administration of Greece, have lived in Athens with their three children, Mark, 10; Shelly, 8, and Bruce, 6. For two years Mrs. Westebbe has studied sculpture with Nikos Sophialakas, a specialist in Greek marble. In his studio, which is like another world- fig trees, almond blossoms, pomegranates and roses surround the yarda few young Greek sculptors work. Their next show wi ll open about the middle of November. ANCHOR

While Mrs. Westebbe was working, her 'instructor did her head in marble, and has sold this piece to the Museum-the first to be bought with an American model for its subject. The head of the young girl No. 553 was a lso purchased by the Museum. Mr. Westebbe, who was acknowledged in Th e American M en of Science, serves on the American School Board, on the Propeller Club Board and the newly established Harvard C lub of Athens Board. The International Committee for Indu trial D evelopment has asked him to be chairman of it Athens Chapter. Mrs. Westebbe continues her intere t in welfare. For two years the Kifissia Chapter of the Foreign Friends of Greece met in the

23


A letter from an Emporia Alumna reveals a varied and creative life Westebbe home to sew for 120 Greek infants. Mrs. Westebbe also helps whenever possible with the Schools of Northern Greece Committee, the Society for Abandoned C hildren, A.W.O.G., the H ellenic American U nion Program Committee and the H ell enic American Woman's Organization, in whose 1962 show she exhibited both sculpture and wa ter colors. Mrs. Westebbe writes a regul ar colu mn for the A thens Post, an English lan o-uage n ewspaper, a nd help with publi c rela tions

Sophialakes' sketch of Mrs. Westebbe, done while she was working.

BEFORE YOU

MOVEWRITE! 24

for the Boy Scouts the Girl Scouts and the American Club. The children speak p erfect Greek, fair French and, of course, love Walt Disney's comic books in English. They h ave a 13year-old cat- off-sprino- of a special Galbreth N ew H ampshire breed tha t has been with them sin ce Harvard days-an all-black kitten, an all-white kitten, a poodle and a p a rttime donkey. The donkey was a gift from a Greek fri end who thought his America n friends hould round out their Greek experiences.

Nikos Sophialakes' "Portrait of a Young Girl."

Send a letter, card or post office cha nge-of-address notice. Give both your new and old addresses. At least a month before you move, notify: Mrs. James Alexander, Executive Secreta ry Alpha Sigma Tau Sorority 6200 Hoffman Avenue St. Louis, Missouri 63139 CH R


New subject is considered as essential to cultural background as art and music ...

Catherine Smith Stresses the Value of Speech ;t SPEECH, a n ew cour e, more basic than

reading or writing, was introdu ced thi winter for every pupil in School 12, 33 Ash St., Buffalo, N ew York. No other school in the city and few in the country furnish special speech instruction to every pupi l. "Good speech is certain ly as essential to a cultural background as art and music," Miss Catherine E. Smith, Buffalo a lumnus, School 12's speech teacher, explains. But, a lthough the Buffalo schools long have had directors of art and music and special programs in these fields for a ll children, speech ha been considered part of the education for the handicapped and offered on ly to those elementary school pupils who had definite speech deficiencies. "Th e first thing a prospective employer notices is appearance, the second is speech. Qualifications come third, but if the first two are bad, you' ll never get a chance to show your qualifications," Miss Smith maintains. AN EXPERIENCED BACKGROUND To organize her new course, made possible by the Ford Foundation grant to School 12 for cultural enrichment, Miss Smith wand ered through the school and listened to the children to discover those area where they most n eed ed help. To her new job she brought a background of years of teaching remedial speech to sma ll groups of five or six pupils, at a different school each day of the week, and a wealth of experience at the Studio Theater and the Grand Island Playhouse. "Listening an d speaking are the first steps in learning to write," she told a class. "Don't whisper and don ' t shout," she warned as she got each pupi l to stand up and speak before his classmates, seem ingly just part of a game they were playing. ANCHOR

CAN WRITE 0\-VN POEM The speech class is a time of special pleasure for the children as Miss Smith drills th m on basic sou nd by teaching poem which include such lin es a " the shoemaker's shop is shut today, oh what wi ll I do with m y shoes?" or, from " A Mitten Song," " thumbs in the thumb p lace, fin gers all together. " When Miss Smith find s no suitab le poems for th e age level she is working with on a particular clay, she writes her own. Another tim e, she will give narrow strips of paper to her pupils to hold in front of their mouths and blow gently clown as th ey pronounce words ending in "th." Good speech can come from listening to good speech, she maintains. She herself peaks very distinctly to her pupils and ends each class read ing narrative poem , which he a lways calls "stories" to th e pupils. DEVELOPS APPRECIATION "C hildren love stories," she exp lai n , "but they think of 'poetry' as something different. " Miss Smith is not only interested in training pupils to speak well, she is interested in training ch ildren to grow up and appreciate the beauty of good speech and good literature. She is interested in good grammar a nd good posture. " I gues I get involved in almost everything- but it all affects speech," she explain . The attractive teacher, who alter her elfwritten curri culum every week a he watche her pupils, a lso is continuing ,,路ith her teaching of remedial speech to those pupil in School 12 who n eed additional help. In pa t years in other schoo ls, Miss Smith ha had some of her remedial speech pupil picked to represent their schools in speakina competitions.- From an article by Sue Fruch tbaum in the Buffalo E vening N ews.

25


Sisters of Alpha Sigma Tau

Together

Attended

E vent at Macomb, Illinois

ONE DAY IN OCTOBER ;\; ONE group came by plane! Another group drove more than 1000 miles to be with their sisters for four hours. What was the attraction? STATE DAY- hosts ALPHA EPSILO CHAPTER of Western Illinois Universi ty, Macomb, Illinois, O ctober 12, 1963.

into six buzz ession and were assigned one of the following topics :

Was it worth it ? A unanimous affirmative !

3) H ow to elect better service projects

What happened? After lunch served in the newly decorated dining ro~m of Alpha Epsilon's house the group convened in the beautiful parlor of the M ethodist church for an inspiring talk by patroness Mrs. H arold Stiffl'er on "The Role of Sororities on th e U niversity Campus."

4 ) H ow to promote higher aca d em i c sta ndards

The panel discussion that followed involved one girl from each chapter and topics were: 1) leadership, 2) personal qualities 3) aroup relationships, and 4) loya lty. After the punch-cooky break we di ided 26

1) H ow to design a more meaningfu l pledge period 2) H ow to improve entertainment for exchanges and m iscellaneous partie

5 ) H ow to make the individual a\ are tha t he co nt ri b utes to the group image 6 ) H ow to map a plan for the election of ru bees Each group's ecretary ga e a brief um mary of these spirited sessions when the arou p reconvened. There wa just time to chanae for dinn r which\ a held at a re taurant call d tud nt

H R


Did enjoy seeing old friends Attending buzz sessions

Y es-it was S tate Day-host, Alpha Epsilon

Prince. Mrs. Peterson and I learned the hard way that there is a Student Prince East and a Student Prince West. A highlight of the evening was the short talk by one girl from each chapter represented telling of one outstanding event they had sponsored which they considered other chapters might like to try.

A brief "exchange" of favorite songs and a successful State Day was officially closed . Chapters represented were Alpha with four girls, Alpha Alpha with ten and Alpha Eta with four. HELEN C R OSS

C entral District President

I

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is for ambition for sorority to grow

is for the love that we have come to know is for the patience we've learned to have for all

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is for tomorrow, we'd like to share with you is for always, though college years are few is fo r unfinished, which 9ur poem must be, 'Cause we wil'l

neve~ find the words to describe AST.

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27


Lansing Alumnae Chapter ...

Dorothy Hughes Is Collector, Scholar & Traveler ;\; IF you wish an enjoyab le hour or two spend an evening with D orothy Hugh es, language teacher in Charlotte , Michigan High School. You wi ll find mu ch to entertain and enlighten, whether it be edu ca tion, travel or souvenirs of many lands. Dorothy, Alpha 1932, holds the following degrees : A.B. , Eastern Michiga n University, 1932 ; M.A. , Michiga n State Univer ity, 1944 ; M .A. Escuela espanola, Middlebury Co ll ege, 1950 ; and H onorary M.A., Eastern Michigan University, 1956. In addition she has done graduate work at the University of M exico; University of Havana, Cuba; the Sorbonn e, Paris; U niversity of Bordeaux a nd Toulouse a t Pau, France. Sh e held a Ford Founda tion F ellowship for a year of research in Spain and a Fulbright grant for summer study in Fra nce. Sh e has pent th e sum mer of 1963 in France and Spain. Dorothy has also written several text-books: Pedro, I ntroduccion al esjJa il ol, Conchita de Cuba, Ni1ios de Espana, Madeleine, Premier L ivre de Franyais. Besides her membership in A~T she i a m ember of D elta K appa Gamma, th e Executive Council of the American As ociation of T eachers of Spanish and Portuguese and the Michigan State F oreign La ngu age Committee, of vvhi ch she is vice-president. In h er cia ses in Charlotte her language students have c onstru c t e d much of their eq uipment, financed from their F rench a nd Spanish club treasuries-money tha t they had earned. The language laboratory was th e second in the tate. They h ave just built a marionette stage six feet wide a nd ten ta ll. The dolls are the string type brought from M ex ico. They also have built a puppet taae with puppet from M adrid.

28

Dorothy doe much traveling and doe n't hesita te to "rouah it" in order to gain a better under tanding of the peop le of a country. he ay : " I a lway leave for my trips with one tin y uitca e for my clothe (two y ar ago it mea ured only 17" by 12" by 4" ), a nd I alway have to buy a big cheap suitca e in which to h a ul back a ll of my loot. The basement of my house is loaded with d ime- tore uitcases from France, pa in, I ta ly and ba kets from M exico. '路Did I tell you abo ut the time I went over into Africa? Just to Tangier. I learned later that tourist are driven to the ca bah so that they can look, but they do not ge t out of the

Dorothy Hughes at home.

H R


car, because it is too dangerou . The car just drives through so that they can take a peek. I was living in the casbah for five days and roaming in and around the little dark corners of the streets and walking around at night to the see the market with its flares on the tables to provide light. I did not know until the day I left that there was any other part to Tangier but the casbah. "In '56 during the dock strike I learned an hour before sailing that my ship would not leave. Passengers were taken aboard an immigrant vessel sailing for Halifax. F irst, second and third class all in one dormitory of 48 bunks. There was no privacy, no room and people were sick all around. M en were coming in at all times to get into baggage of their wives, to h elp dress children and so forth. It was a great experience and I wa glad to arrive. "I lived cheaply at pensions in France and Spain. Living was especially cheap in Spain. I lived in Madrid for 87 cents a day. The food was good and always so very clean and so elegantly served." "I am a born collector and my house is practically a museum. I have mugs from th e United States and the other countries, a col lection .o f small spoons, one of boxes, including about 20 music boxes-unusual on es, such as cruitar and an organillo. Th ere is a large c ollection of dolls from M ex ico, Centra l America, the W est Indies, and from severa l countries in Europe, with 40 from Spain alone. "On m y kitchen wall are typ ical kitchens in wood carving from France, Spain, England, Italy, Switzerla nd , Germany and M exico. As for slid e of my travels- ! now have 8,000 slides! (Horrible, isn' t it! ) " In addition there is my coll ection of records, including a t least a h unci red Fren ch and Spanish ones. And books!!! " Certainly time spent with Doroth y Hughes is very much worth while.

See

Warrensburg Physician Is Featured In Magazine ;t. A CHARTER member of the Missouri Academy of General Pra ti ce, Dr. T. R eed Maxson , husband of Virginia M axson, Rush Chairman, of Warren sburg, has been engaged in the practi e of m edicine in Warren sburg since July, 1946. Sin e 1951 , he has increasingly devoted much of his time to the practice of a llergy. In 195 2, he became an as oc iate Fellow, American Co llege of All ergists, a nd in l 958, became a F ellow of th e American College of Allergists. R eared in lol a, K a n as, Dr. Maxson received his B.S. degree from the L niversity of Kansas in 193 i a nd his M .D. degree in 1941. H e is a member of Phi Beta Pi M edical fraternity a nd interned at Illinois en tral H o pita! in Chicago from July, 1941 until J uly, 1942. Doctor M axson is married to the former Virginia Griffith, of Emporia, K a n as. She attended K an sas State Teachers Col lege and is a registered nurse. Th ey have three chi ldren M elany 12 路 Tristan 9, and M arla Beth: 5. The 'fami,ly resides at Arilen Acre , three miles west of Warren burg.

tau t~e ZJeWJa I rlu9eta 24-27

ANCHOR

On the go at NPC. from the left: Mrs. Peterson, Helen Cross and Virg inia Maxs on.

29


For Rho Chapter . ..

SUE DYSON IS NAMED NATIONAL ALUMNAE REPRESENTATIVE ;\. THE National Council of Alpha Sigma Tau is pleased to announce the appointment of Miss Sue Dyson as National Alumnae Representative for Rho Chapter. Sue, a 1963 graduate, is teaching this year in Paul's Valley, Oklahoma. As a collegiate she served as President of her collegiate chapter, editor of the Yearbook, business manager of Th e Southeast ern and president of Music Educator National Conference. Sue also was a member of Pi Kappa Delta, was listed in Who's Who Among Students and was a Top Tau in 1962. Sue has written that she is looking forward to serving Alpha Sigma Tau as an alumna and we feel most fortunate in securing her services. Sue's duties are two-fo ld- to inspect and offer assi tance to the Collegiate Chapter in solving their problems and to report the n ews of Alumnae members through an annual Newsletter. Without the assistance, co-operation and encouragement of each of you, he will not be able to fu lfill either responsibility well. With your help she ""ill be able to bring you the satisfaction of closer friendships with each other and with the Collegiates as well as pleasure in knowing that your Collegiate Chapter is stronger. I wou ld like to urge those of you who live in the Durant area to try to re-organize the Alumnae. An organized Alumnae group near the campus can be of invaluable ervice to the Collegiate Chapter, and Rho would appreciate your physical and moral support.

Sincere! and f ra tern ally ELIZABETH WIL 0 ational Alumnae Chairman

30

OH R


TOP TAUIS Carol Buzolits. Alpha Alpha, vicepresident, chaplain and president of Alpha Sigma Tau; Panhellenic Representatives; Sigma Alpha Eta; Federal Grant for Deaf Education (scholarship).

~

Karen Hind, Iota, treasurer and president of Alpha Sigma Tau; Pledge Class Scholarship Bracelet; "Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges"; Zi Phi; President's Honor Roll; Publications Board; People-toPeople Steering Committee.

Francesca Moriconi, Theta, vice-pres ident. secretary, chaplain and pledge mother of Alpha Sigma Tau; Dean's List; Association of Women Students; delegate to Young College Republicans Convention.

:»>»-+ Karen Shuster. Delta, pledge master and rush chairman of Alpha Sigma Tau; Dean's List; Westminster Foundation; NEA: Pennsylvania State Education Association: Women's Athletic and Recreation Association.

ANCHOR

31


liOP llAUIS Carolyn McVay, Rho, pledge trainer and treasurer of Alpha S igma Tau; Pi Omega Pi; Cardinal Key; Outstanding Sophomore Student; Rose of Sigma Tau Gamma; Boule; Savagettes; Intramural Sports .

~

Jeanne Trautwein, Pi. corresponding secretary and vice-president of Alpha Sigma Tau; ""Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities"; Dean's List; Kappa Delta Pi; Class Treasurer; Corresponding secretary of Student Congress.

Martha Lewis Walker, Psi, Panhellenic Representative; '"Who 's Who in American Colleges and Universities"; Sigma Phi Lambda; Kappa Delta Pi; Student Government legislative vicepresident; Outstanding Junior and Outstanding Senior.

1)),7- ~

Helen Collins. Alpha. president of Alpha Sigma Tau; Delta Psi Kappa treasurer; Michigan State Board of Education Scholarship for three years; Wesley Foundation; Goddard Hall Council; Women 's Recreation Association.

32


llOP llAUIS Mary Anne Lipford, Zeta Tau, Panhellenic Council; "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities"; Student Government president; Madrigal Singe rs; College Choir; " Rotunda" stall; "Virginian" stall.

~

Martha E. Becker, Zeta, Panhellenic Council, vice-president and president of Alpha Sigma Tau; " Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities"; Student Cooperative Council; Women's Athletic and Recreation Association.

Faye Ellen Fronabarger, Alpha Delta, culture chairman and courtesy chairman of Alpha Sigma Tau; Dean's List; Sociology Club. -<~

~r

Bonnie Newmark, Alpha Omega, vice-president and Panhellenic Representative of Alpha Sigma Tau; Sigma Alpha Eta; Pi Lambda Phi Sweetheart; Sophomore of the Year Award; Executive Council Awards Committee.

ANCHOR

33


TOP TAUS Mary Sue Lowe, Alpha Lambda, pledge chairman and music chairman of Alpha Sigma Tau; "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities"; Orchesis; Glee Club; Junior Class and Senior Class president; May Day Commission. +~

~

Charlotte Holman, Alpha Epsilon, historian and president of Alpha Sigma Tau; '"Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities" (two years); Sigma Tau Delta; Pi Delta Epsilon; Junior Marshal; Yearbook layout editor; University Choir; Panhellenic Representative.

Carol Fisher, Alpha Iota, Alpha Sigma Tau recording secretary; Panhellenic Council; Dean's List; Syracuse Semester in Italy; AIESEC: International Business Organization president.

?-+ Edna Spurlock, Upsilon Alpha Sigma Tau chaplain; "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities" (two years); Homecoming Queen; Friendship Bride in Student Christian Association Friendship ceremony; Copha Chi; Royal Rooters: Student Christian Association vice-president and secretary.

34

ANCHOR


liOP TAUIS Linda Koch, Alpha Zeta. vice-president and social chairman of Alpha Sigma Tau; "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities"; Women's Recreation Association. +--ÂŤÂŤf

fh'r+

Nancy Gross, Alpha Kappa, president and vice-president of Alpha Sigma Tau; "Who's Who in American Co'lleges and Universities"; "The Marcolian" (college paper) managing editor and copy editor: American Association of University Women Award; Beta Beta Beta; Pi Delta Epsilon; Intaglio.

Barbara Puckett, Chi, Alpha Sigma Tau president; "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities"; Dean's List; Kappa Delta Pi: Choir; Shepherd College Student Court judge.

ANCHOR

35


liOlP llAUIS NOll PIICliUIIRIEID Lydia Wague spack, Phi. treas u rer and vi cepresident of Alpha Sigma Tau; "Who's Who in American Colleges and Unive rsities" (two years); Kappa Delta Pi presid e nt; Thirte e n Club president; Green " S" Award; Student Government Award; Dean's List.

Judy Gabel. Alpha president; "Who's and Universities"; Ring (two years); Delta Alpha; Phi

Eta. Alpha Sigma Tau, vice Who in American Colleges National A ~ T Scholarship Lambda Iota Tau; Gamma Sigma Pi; Student Council.

Nancy Avery, Alpha Mu, historian and custodian of Alpha Sigma Tau; Campus Favorite; Women's Recreation Association treasurer; Student Senate; NEA.

Marie Gray, Alpha Theta, editor and pledge mistress of Alpha Sigma Tau; Dean's List; Women 's League; Panhellenic Council vice-president.

Madge Kehl. Alpha Nu. Alpha Sigma Tau chaplain; Kappa Delta Pi; Alpha Phi Delta; Acacia fraternity calendar girl.

Betty Ingles. Omicron, Alpha Sigma Tau treasurer: "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities"; Dean's List; Student National Education Association president; Year book staff; Kappa Delta Pi: Cardinal Key.

Anna Jean Van Tine, Nu, Alpha Sigma Tau rush chairman and Panhellenic Representative; Honors Program.

36

Mar y A lice Peter on N ational President

Inspection Builds Determination, Confidence and Inspiration WHAT doe In pec tion ac tually accomplish ? It is a time where th e a tiona! contact is alive a nd the Collegia te Chapter becomes aware tha t the N a tional offi cer do know and understa nd their problem a nd care greatly that they be solved . The offi cers and members are given new incentive to work cheerfully in the local Cha pter for something they realize is good . When a n inspection has been completed each m ember better understands her responsibility in the entire sorority program . She no longer feels isolated from the l ationa! officers and ational chairmen . Our a tiona l President has just completed the 1963-64 in pection of the Col legiate, and ma ny of ou r Alumnae C h apter . Mary Alice, Mr . Peterson, i n ot only the a tional President but a de oted ister of Alpha Sigma Tau a nd an in piration to all. he is truly an exampl of a perfec t i ter- o-iving, ha rina and JoYing.

AN H R


COLLEGIATE HONORS


QUEENS

Sheri Westbrook, Rho, was named TKE Dream Girl.

Sandra Carson, Chi. is Shep- Liz Lennon, Alpha Kappa, wa s herd College's 39th Homecom- a Homecoming Queen candiing Queen. date at Mari e tta College .

Zelma Beeman. Rho, was selected Homecoming Queen by the Southeastern State College football team.

38

Marilyn Johnson, Alpha Theta's Vice-Presi dent, was a Homecoming Queen candidate for the Society of American Military Engineers at the University of Detroit.

AN H R


. . . for campus Homecomings, local pageants and fraternities ...

Earlena Mossman, Iota, is President of Panhellenic Council and a Homecoming Queen candidate.

Sue Marks, Alpha Mu. was selected Commerce Queen and First-runner-up to Most Beautiful Girl on Campus at Arkansas A&M College.

Cathie Patte rson, Omicron, is a dheerleader, Homecoming Queen Candidate and is fea tured in "Who's Who."

. .. excel as leaders and scholars, too. Lydia Waguespack. Phi, wa's a member of the Homecoming Court and Miss SLC Court. was elected to Phi Kappa Phi and the Thirteen Club and named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

ANCHOR

Elected Pi Kappa Alpha's ''Dream Girl" and representative to Longwood's May Court. Amy Haley, Zeta Tau, is also President of the campus Newman Club.

39


Featured in "Who's Who," Chapter officers & campus organizational heads

Kim Bowman. Alpha Delta's President, has been named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

Pam Emswiller, Chi. was named to ''Who 's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

ALT

Pat Baker. Omicron's Historian, is member of Student Government and is featured in "Who's Who."

40

Barbara Puckett, President of Chi, was named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

LEADERS

Harriette Jane Buzbee, Alpha Mu, is a member of the "Mademoiselle" 1964-65 College Board.

Carolyn Hughes, Omicron, is member of Cardinal Key, President of SNEA and is featured in "Who's Who."

H R


Marlene Johnson, Iota, is a member of the State Board of Young Republican's, A I p h a Delta Pi, Spanish honorary, and was named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

Judy Partrea, Zeta Tau. has been elected to " Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities," has served on the Freshman Commission and is President of Longwood's Panhellenic Council.

Carol Samuels, Alpha Lamb da's Pledge Mis tress is President of Orches i s Conc e rt Dance, a member of Kappa Delta Pi and was named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

. . . are prominent in Panhellen ic work, student government and journalism.

Marjorie Twilley, Zeta Tau's President. returned from a summer in Mexico to serve as Vice President of the YWCA and Chairman of Religio~ Emphasis Week; and she has been elected to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

ANCHOR

A Past President of the Freshman Commission, Milly W codward, Zeta Tau, is serving on Student Government for her second year as Treasurer and has been tapped by Alpha Kappa Gamma, National Honorary Leadership Fraternity for Women.

Margie Huber, Alpha Epsilon's Rush Chairman, is "Courier" Editor, a Student Government Junior Senator, Panhellenic Representative, a member of Pi Delta Epsilon and was named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

-1- l


Alpha Sigma Taus also hold class offices, in addition to being top students.

Helen Collins. Alpha. is Treasurer of Delta Psi Kappa.

L

E

A D Joan Bockbrader, Alpha. was elected President of Delta Psi Kappa.

Mary Sue Lowe, Alpha Lambda. is President of the Class of 1964 for the second year and was named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

E

R

s Rebecca Walton, Alpha Lambda, is President of Aquamaids.

42

Emma Overstreet, Alpha Lambda, i's Vice-President of the Class of 1964, a dormitory president and has been named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

A

H R


Karen Hind, Iota's President is a member of Xi Phi and was named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities." *Âť-+ Carolyn Hyslop, Nu's Publicity Chairman for the Greek Follies, is secretary of the International Relations C I u b, founder and chairman of the Greeley CORE chapter, a member of the Big Sister Program (IFC) study chairman of United Campus Christian Fellowship. a representative to the Ecumenical Planning Committee and a delegate to the National Student Christian Federation Quadrennia'! Conference and to regional U.C. C.F. conferences.

JoAnne Wharton, Alpha Lambda, is President of Cotillion Club and was named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities."

Bobbie Jo Loepp, Iota 's VicePre si dent is Corresponding Secretary of Phi Beta Lambda, Grand Worthy Advisor for the Order of Rainbow Girls in the State of Kansas and a member of Pi Omega Pi business honorary.

Carolyn Barnes, Alpha Epsilon's Recording Secretary, is the President of CCUN, a Senior Class Senator. Secretary of Student Government and was named to "Who's Who in American Colleges and Univer'sities."

Beverly Davis. Alpha Delta, graduated Cum Laude in the summer.

ANCHOR

43


LEADERS

Tonni Beth VanHook, Alpha Delta, graduating Magna Cum Laude, is valedictorian of her graduating class.

Karen Kuhns is Iota's Corresponding and Recording Secretary, Campus Secretary and Publicity Chairman for the Collegiate Young Republicans, State Executive Secretary for the Young Republicans, Secretary of the Hospitality Committee of the Student Union Activities Board, a member of Sigma Delta Pi, Spanish honorary, and hen; been on the Dean's Honor Roll for three semesters.

44

Sharon Gehbauer, Pi, is a member of Beta Beta Beta, Biology honorary.

Margaret Kleinert, Pi, is a member of Kappa Delta Pi, Education honorary.

Judy Worley, Phi, was elected into Phi Kappa Phi and the Thirteen Club.

Sondra Dexter, Pi, is a member of Beta Beta Beta, Biology honorary.

AN H

R


. . . have been named to Beta Beta Beta, Kappa Delta Pi, Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Omega Pi and the Thirteen Club

Carol 路Buzolits, Alpha A'lpha, is a member of Sigma Alpha Eta and has received the Federal Grant for Deaf Education scholarship.

Marsha Clark, Chi. was initiated into Kappa Delta Pi.

Claire Agaiss.e. Phi's President. has been inducted into the Thirteen Club and Phi Kappa Phi. national honorary.

A T Janice Sibley, Phi, was honored with induction into Phi Kappa Phi and the Thirteen Club.

ANCHOR

Iris Brann, Phi. was inducted into the Thirteen Club. a local honor society. and Phi Kappa Phi.

+5


Collegiate News

ALPHA

At Homecoming Eastern Goes Western ;t, OuR FIRST activity of the fall semester was the annual N ew Student Days mixer. It was co-sponsored with our brothers- Sigma Tau Gamma. Homecoming was held the week of O ctober 27-November 2. The theme this year was, "Eastern Goes Western." The inter-sorority Chick relays were one of the first activities. We were honored to have one of our sisters, Sylvia Jacob, as a finalist for Homecoming queen a nd m ember of the queen's cou rt. Our floa t, which depicted " Spanish California" and placed second in sorority competition, was gai ly decorated in a multitude of colored flowers arranged in a garden setting, with a la rge white trellis and sandstone walk. Riding the floa t, and dressed in costumes of Spanish California, were Peggy Aboud a nd Barbara Dieterle. Christmas proved a very busy season. Our sorority a nd alumnae Christmas party wa a t the home of our patroness, Mrs. N esbitt. Everyone enjoyed plenty of food and a lot of fun . We constructed a large snowman, and had a snowball throw at the a nnual All-

46

Sus an Scha mwe b er is Alpha 's new a dvis or.

Campu Christmas Party. ext we went caro ling at Byer M emorial Hospital which i an annual project. E er on of u liked doing thi and it omehm h lped to put A CH R


veryone more in the Christmas Spirit. After the caroling we had dinner, and later caroled at Mrs. Bates' (our advisor) house. We had punch and cookies there and sang some more. The biggest activity of this season is the allcampus Christmas Sing, in which all organizations and dormitories participate. Everyone spends long hours preparing for this event. We sang "No Candle Was There And No Fire." We also trimmed the Christmas tree in the library as a service project. The Panhellenic Board at Eastern has undertaken the all-sorority proj ect of adopting a child overseas. The A::STs are contributing to this philanthropy which was initiated this semester. A::STs took second place in volley-ball competition. We were all pleased and had a lot of fun playing. We are proud to have one of our recent alumnae, Susan Scharnweber, as our new advisor. Sue graduated this semester, a nd is a critic teacher in physical education. We are very happy to have Sue as our n ew advisor! Helen Collins and Joan Bickbrader were elected as treasurer and president, respectively, of Delta Psi K appa, the physical education honor sorority. Initiation was held J anuary 11 , followed by a luncheon at the Westerner. Vve were happy to welcome our pledges, Linda Beasley and Nancy Overly, into our sisterhood . At our last m eeting of the semester, we held our senior farewell, presenting the girls with corsages of yellow roses. We bid five of our sisters- Peggy Aboud, Susan Scharnweber, Marcia Speck, Kris Segerlund and Sharon Cole- good-bye and THE BEST OF LUCK in the future. We are all looking forward to next semester's activities, especially our formal rush, with optimism. - CoNNIE GRIFFITH

mester. Local merchants don ated gifts m addition to those given by the memb rs of our sorority. Homecom ing brought much excitement as well as work. The theme of " Madison Avenue" was selected. We immediately began working on a float that wou ld repr s nt us as well as the Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity. Homecoming Day began with an Alumni Breakfast at our sorority hou se, fol lowed by th e excitement of the football game. Much thanks is to be given to Dottie 1elson whose excel lent work as Hom ecoming chairman pleased everyone. Lynette Lucas acted as hostess and greeted Dads as they arrived for th e Beta D ad's Weekend. All girls accompanied their D ads to a football game and then came home to a lu scious dinner of Swedish meatballs. Thi s was followed by entertainment in which all participated. Th e evening end ed with everyone quite exhausted, but happy. Sunday breakfast climaxed the fun-fill ed weekend. Th e Alpha Sigma Tau- Alpha Chi Omega Coker was a big success. Th ere was much visiting and talk of Greek life in general. Karen Antcliff was chairman. This semester brought with it the A::STTKE Picnic at Island Park. A mixture of hot dogs, cider, baseball games a nd dan cing appealed to all. The Th eta Chi Fra ternity entertained th e Betas at their hou se with a mixer. R efre hments of coke and potato chips were sen 路ed. Pl edges put on skits and afterward a ll joined in singing. Jan LaBelle, chairman, did a good job in produ cing an enjoyable evenina. Th e ann ual A::ST Christmas Party was at 6:00 A.M. with party attire as pajam as and robes, ever yone woke up by singing carol . During the caroling Sa nta Claus (D otty Carruthers ) a nd her elf helper (R eef ) arrived . Presents h ad a ll been placed under the tree and Santa pa sed th em out. Hot chocolate BETA a nd homemade cinnamon roll (baked b our housemother, Mrs. Spradlin ) were aobbled down before everyone scurried for classes. Jan LaBelle, Cindy Stroebel, Ester Moreno, Arlene Groce, Marilyn Pearce, Ann John on ;t, THE annual "House Shower" for the Beta Chapter successfully opened our fall se- and Jan Pamvel became n ew pledge thi

"House Shower" Opens Fall Semester

ANCHOR

47


fall. Jan Pauwels was honored with the be t pledge award . Diane Thurston, Norma Wismer, Sandy Kamer, Sally Benedict and Gloria George were honored at Senior Farewell. R efreshm ents were served and m any sad and tearful good-byes and good luck wishes given to these graduating seniors. The end of fall m eans the beginning of winter and soon after m a ny expectations of an eventfu l spring rushing season.- SHERRIE STAFFORD

DELTA

Initiates Thirteen ;\; D ELTA chapter's fall sem ester began with rushing for our newest p ledge class. On September 26, we welcomed 13 lovely pledges into Alpha Sigma Tau. They a re : La urinc Batis, Peg Byers, Faith D ' Piazzo, Georgia H urlston, K aren Ingelido, J ean J edina k, atalie Jo J ess, E laine McLaren, Judy Monaco. Vicki R ich, K aren Ruffo, Connie Smith a nd Ruth Wi llson. At in itiation, ata lie J ess received the Outsta nding Pledge Award. T he long, ha rd hours tha t go into making our Homecomina floa t soon bega n. " World C ities" was the theme for the p a rade a nd the T a u floa t, "Berlin," was a somewha t a bstract representa tion of East and West Berlin. Carol K orch and Rosi R am sey, floa t co-ch airmen. instructed the sisters in the construction of the float. Some of the D eltas cheered Indiana's "Big India ns" on to a Homecoming victory, while others served a t the alumnae tea. Following the ga me, a buffet-dinner for rela tives, friends and alumnae was held in the n ew banquet room of the Student U nion Building. Pa t Kopcak was a candidate for H om ecominoQu een and is also a m ember of the Sigma"' T a u Gamma White Rose Court. R.O .T.C. Queen Selection cam e a nd the D eltas nomina ted Joyce Ka lback to repre ent the sorority. Judy Ga rfield is a m ember of a trio, the 'Bontones," tha t provided part of th e entertainment at the Selection.

48

Thirteen new sisters entered into our bond initiation night. The Big-Little Sister party was held the evening before in the sorority room . At that time the pledges gave their big sisters the paddles they had made for them. The pledge proj ect, a bea utiful gold-trimmed punch bowl with m a tching cups, was al o presented to the sorority at this party. The D eltas were very pleased with their scholastic average last sem ester . W e placed fourth a mong the ten sororities on our campus, a nd seventh na tiona lly among the lpha Sigma T a u ch apters. everal of our g irls p a rticipate in varied indi vidua l activities. Marcee Eich enla ub is studying abroad this year. She is a t the U niversity of Besa n<;on in Fran ce. Ro i R am sey a nd Pa tsy a nd P anda Kuhlke formed a folkong group a nd have performed a t several fun ctions on campus, including rush pa rties helped to success by their singing and guitar playing. Judy K aylor a nd Claire 0 Brien were initia ted into K appa Omicron Phi, honorary home economics fra ternity. Peg Byer and C a rol Korch were elected to Student C ouncil by the members of their departments. Pau la Miller, D elta's new president, is al o a feature writer for the I ndiana Penn, the school newspaper, a nd Carol K orch is one of the writers of a weekly column in the Penn . The fa ll semester ended as it began - with r ushing. All of us a re n ow anxiously waiting to see who will go the Tau way this spring.C AROL K oRCH

THETA

Now Offers Sewing Lessons ;\; WITH THE timula tion of fa ll fa hion and the beginnina of the new q uar ter T heta wa ready with needle, thread and thimbl . Rush outfit ' ere m ade b everyon e under the capable direction of Trudi pitzbarth, rush chairman, who helped an one who a t

H R


Crossword puzzles puzzled actives at an informal weekend.

Posing outside the cabin at Island Lake are Trudi Spitzbarth. Diane Hardy, Ursula Menger and Frankie Moriconi.

hopelessly enta ngled in thread . Th e out fi ts were compl eted by the d ay of the first ru sh pa rty, a nd consisted of a white, long-sleeved blou se; a n A- li ne, d a rk olive green, wool ski rt, a nd a sleeveless jacke t of the green m a teria l. Th e second rush pa rty h ad a T ea house of the August Moon th em e, a nd costumes from last spring qu a rter were a ltered to suit thi s th em e by the now proficient sewers. N eedl e a nd thread put a way temporarily, a ANC HOR

After eating at an informal. Theta's pose ou tside the early American Bo tsford Inn.

bowling and pizza p arty came immediately after r ushin g as a welcome break for the weary p ledges a nd acti ves. Fou nder ' Day then came a nd was celebrated on a high pla ne at Top of the Fla me restaura nt by the D etroit a lumnae and th e acti ve of Alpha Th eta a nd Theta. H a lf of the money from a bake a le in November was dona ted to T heta's philanthropy- Leader D ogs for the Blind, R oche ter, Michigan . La ter, toys were ta ken to C hildren' s H ospital for the C hristmas sea on . With C hristm as vacation, three parties followed swiftl y as the "studious" Thetas beca me somewha t less stu dious at a Christmas party, a party with th e Al pha T heta chapter a nd the traditiona l ew Year's E ve party. C lim axing th e vacation was our in formal weekend on J anu ary 3, 4 a nd 5. I t was a bea utif ul weekend ( om ewhat rare by Detroit's winter weath er standards) at a co ttage a t I sla nd L a ke, Brighton, Michigan . Bowling, m a ny good cooks and mu ch good food, walks and a rduous card games made an enjoyable time. O n the fi fth, the alumnae a nd the actives met at Botsford Inn . With the beginning of a nother q uarter, it is tim e for the initia tion of Germa n m aJor U rsula M enger.- KAY K uTT E R

See

~cut in ZJet~uUt

rleu;ua 24- 27


IOTA

Enjoys A Profitable Semester ~

HoME sweet home ! How good it was to return to the Alpha T a u house in th e fall of 1963. Everyone was full of pep a nd ready to work for a rewarding fall sem ester. Rush started the fall activitie succes full y. We pledged the following girls in formal and open rush: Claralee West, J ean Cla rk , Patty Russell, Connie Wood, Earlene Coon , D onn a Ace, Judy Tjaden, Barbara Rice, D ori J ackson, Betty Butcher, J ane R obin son, Patty Ramsey, Jal ene H ammon Linda F erkins Collene N eal, M a rkeeta M ajor, M ary Jan~ Phejfe, Judy Lockard, Sharon Wilhite, M ary Foa rd a nd Mary Baker. Go team go! Glenene Brown, Judy W all er and Barbara Rice were elected cheerleaders on September 19 by the student body. Also, congratulations to Claralee W est who was elected twirler and to Sherry Bonine who was elected to the Student Union Activities Board. We are very proud of our new housemother, Mrs. Mildred Lhuillier, who comes from Bartlesville, Oklahoma. We gave a tea in her honor on October 20. We were happy to have the National President, Mrs. Peterson, as a guest for a few days. Homecoming was a success! Out of the five Homecoming Queen finalists, three were Alpha Taus: Nancy Woodland, Sherry F eltner and Sharolyn Hall. We were delighted to accept second place for decorations. Smile pretty girls! The Alpha Tau house was well represented in the Miss Sunflower contest by Tommy Hodges, Nancy Thompson, Glenene Brown, Judy Waller and Cheryl Burns. Mentioning pictures- the Alpha Taus went all out for their informal " A~T Premiere." Everyone came in a costume depicting a movie title. Entertainment was a takeoff on the Oscar Awards Presentation, and refreshments were served from a concession stand.

50

At the

" A ~T

Premiere" Si Corti and Kay Starkey showed the best costume design.

The Alpha Tau house is turning m ultilingual ; Sally Clerico and Carolyn Ulrich were selected for the honorary F rench fra ternity, Pi D elta Phi ; a nd M arlene Johnson a nd Karen Kuhns were elected for the honorary Spanish fra ternity, Alpha D elta Pi. Congratula tions to Karen Hind, Sherry Feltner and M arlene Johnson, all of whom were recently selected to be in Wh o's Who in American Colleges and Uni versities. Alas came semester break ; the Alpha Tau house was evacuated and each girl went her separate way for the holidays. However cold that day seem ed the girls were warmly anticipating the achievement to come durin<T the 0 second semester. -SANDY SPARKS

ANCHOR


May Sun . Mon . T ue. \\W . Thu . Fri.

Sat.

1 8 15 22 29

2 9 16 23 30

3 4 5 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 17 18 19 20 21 ~1 25 26 27 28

N

W IS THE TIME

• TIME TO: 1. Check the graduating girls you lmow. 2. Look ahead-don't wait until the last minute to recommend girls you would like to see Alpha Taus. 3. Continue building an ever-strong Sorority. 4. Utilize your opportunities to search out fine prospects. • TIME TO: 1. Tell her about Alpha Sigma Tau and your interests in her. 2. Let others lmow about Alpha Sigma Tau through your friendships, church and civic relationships. 3. Share your pride in your sorority with her. 4. Laud Alpha Sigma Tau achievements. • TIME TO: 1. Send complete recommendations to Collegiates early. 2. With a little effort, help Alpha Sigma Tau grow. 3. Put action with good intention. 4. Do your part.

NOW IS ANCHOR

THE TIME 51


RUSH CHAIRMEN Spring Term 1964 CHAPTER

COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY

ADDRESS

CHA IRMAN

Alpha

Eastern Michigan Univ. Judith Lehr

212 King Hall, Ypsilanti, Mich.

Beta

Cent. Michigan Univ.

Sandy Karner

906 South Main, Mt. Pleasant. Mich.

Delta

Indiana State College

Claire O'Brien

llS Wahr Hall, Indiana, Pa.

Zeta

Lock Haven S. College

Rita Marino

Woolridge Hall, Lock Haven, Pa.

Theta

Wayne State Univ.

Gertrude Spitzbarth

14926 Manning. Detroit 5, Mich.

Iota

Kansas S. T. College

Janeen Bundschuh

1006 Constitution, Emporia, Kans.

Nu

Colorado State College Karen Luke

1715 lOth Ave .. Greeley, Colo.

Omicron

Concord College

Brenda Roberts

Athens. W.Va.

Pi

Harris T. College

Marilyn Schroer

1810 Switzer, St. Louis, Mo.

Rho

Southeastern S. Coli.

Nikita McKinney

1024 W. Evergreen, Durant, Okla.

Zeta Tau

Longwood College

Ann Marie Haley

Box 468, Farmville, Va.

Upsilon

Arkansas S. T. College

Tommie Sue Kirtley

A.S.T.C .. Conway, Ark.

Phi

Southeastern La. Coli.

Toni Giaconne

Rt. 3, Box 132 D. Hammond. La.

Chi

Shepherd College

June Hamstead

Kearneysville, W.Va.

Psi

Madison College

Andrea B. Lacey

Box 632. Harrisonburg, Va.

Alphct 'A lpha

Ball State College

Billie Bassett

Baker Hall, Muncie, Ind.

Alpha Gamma

Henderson S.T.C.

Alma Ruth Patterson H.S.T.C .. Arkadelphia, Ark.

Alpha Delta

Southwestern M.S ..C.

Cheryl Stockton

839 Walnut, SpringtielcL Mo.

Alpha Epsilon

Western lll. Univ.

Margie Huber

308 W. Adams, Macomb. lll.

Alpha Zeta

Queens College

Laura Nuzzi

33-54 171st St .. Flushing 58, N.Y.

Alpha Eta

Alma College

Diane Kovacs

Newberry Hall, Alma, Mich.

Alpha Theta

Univ. of Detroit

Mary Beth McCarthy 17380 Appoline, Detroit. Mich.

Alpha Iota

Syracuse University

Susan Kleeman

760 Comstock Ave .. Syracuse, N. Y.

Alpha Kappa

Marietta College

Barbara Ligon

215 Fourth St., Marietta. Ohio

A'lpha Lambda

Radford College

Patsy Snow

524 Randolph Ave .. Pulaski, Va.

Alpha Mu

Ark./ A & M College

Susan Peterson

Ark. A & M, College Heights, Ark.

Alpha Nu

Cent. Mo. State Coli.

Jean Graham

Yeater Hall, Warrensburg, Mo.

Alpha Omega

Brooklyn College

Bonnie Wohl

1658 East 23rd St .. Brooklyn. N. Y.

52

ANCHOR


An Urgent Message to Alpha Sigma Tau Alumnae Since a sorority began, its ability to endure and survive in the future has been determined to a large degree by the type of people it has added to its membership each year. Today the measure of that aspect of the sorority development has increased importance, for the sorority system faces a sharp threat from forces which fear its strength as a Christian and democratic institution. This fact places a real challenge in front of every member of Alpha Sigma Tau. The challenge is selecting members who show promise of strength of character, who have demonstrated in young lives favorable qualities of leadership, intellectual attainment and individual thought and who evidence belief in the ideals that underlie our sorority. Selection of new members of Alpha Tau is definitely not a matter which is merely the concern of collegiate chapters alone. It concerns each one of us who wish to maintain the standards and prestige of Alpha Tau. Will you assume your share of the responsibility to be on the alert for prospective members during the weeks and months just ahead? Having experienced the joys of membership yourself, will you help extend that privilege to others by sending recommendations to collegiate chapters? Be on the alert for girls who are going to colleges where we have chapters. On your own initiative, send recommendations early in the summer. Send it either on a recommendation blank or a letter containing the same information to the chapter rush chairman just as complete as you can make it, and have it reach the chapter rush chairman well before the rush season begins. REMEMBER THE NEWLY INSTALLED CHAPTERS, TOO! They have fewer graduates from which to obtain references. Your loyalty, cooperation and assistance are earnestly sought to the end that next year's rush season will be an exceptionally outstanding success for each of our collegiate chapters. VIRGINIA GRIFFITH MAXSON ,

National Rush Chairman

ANCHOR

53


ALPHA SIGMA TAU RECOMMENDATION BLANK (U additional apace ia needed. attach an extra aheel of paper) Name of Ruahee

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ANCHOR


ALPHA SIGMA TAU RECOMMENDATIONS CHAIRMEN ALABAMA Birmingham

Hrs. Edward H. Horde (Psi) Mrs. T. J. King, Jr. (Psi)

P.O. Box 5818 1845 Lakeridge Road (9)

Miss Joan Schipper (A E)

6516 N. 12th St.. Apt. 6

Dr. Ada Jane Harve y (Up) Mrs. Ken Snow (Up) Mrs. Robert Smith (A G) Mrs. Bob Shaddox (A G)

703 Donaghey 6606 Blue Bird Dr. 2103 Pine 1001 E. 32nd St.

Mrs. C. W . Bouch (I) Mrs. W. Barrett (I)

1467 W. Gage 92632 6272 Sea Breeze Dr. (3)

Mrs. Roy Jacobs (Nu) Mrs. Norman Page (Nu) Mrs. Clarence Anderson (Nu) Grace E. Quinby (Xi) Miss Norma D. Campbell (Nu) Mrs. Howard C. Elgin (Nu) Mrs. Frederick Trimmer (Nu) Mrn. Roy Smith (Iota)

654 Glen Eyrie 803 South Flamingo Court Rte. 2, Box 16 309 S. Sherwood St. 236 Gunnison Ave. 1802 13th St. Box 85 801 Minnequah St.

Miss Nancy Jensen (A K)

8 Vine Street

Mrs. Howard J. 'B urkhart (Pi)

4627 Westem Ave. N.W.

Mrs. Lallah C. Waite (Om) Miss Ellen H. Smith (Z T)

1001 S.E. lOth St. 2327 2nd Ave. North (6)

ARIZONA Phoenix

ARKANSAS Conway Little Rock Pine Bluff Texarkana

CALIFORNIA Fullerton Long Beach

COLORADO Colorado Springs Denver Eaton Fort CoUins Grand Junction Greeley Kersey Pueblo

CONNECTICUT E. Hartford

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA Washington, D. C.

FLORIDA Ft. Lauderdale St. Petersburg

ILLINOIS Annawan Bradley Des Plaines E. Peoria Forreston Glenview Kankakee Kewanee La Harpe Macomb Moline Mt. Prospect Springfield Tiskilwa

ANCHOR

Mrs. Fenno Dewey (A E) Mrs. Joe Koomar (A E) Miss Marsha Zweife'l (A E) Mrs. Elmo Haney (A E) Mrs. Joseph Beja (A E) Mrn. W. D. Baughman (A E) Mrs. Russell Downhour (A A) Mrs. Chas. Schwerbrock (A E) Mrs. Keith Fowler (A E) Mrs. Richard Frowein (A E) Mrs. Virgil DeVolder (A E) Mrs. Robert Fasick (A E) Mrs. Richard Doedtman (A E) Mrs. Floyd Pruitt (A E)

311 S. Prairie 130 Northwest Hwy., Apt. I 317 Brookview Rd. 1734 Stevens Drive 995 S. Poplar Ave. 803 S. EaSt St. 314 West Adams 1406 25th St. 61265 303 S. Williams P. 0. Box 1526, 1918 Lee St. Box 359

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INDIANA Anderson Crawfordsville Elkhart Indianapolis Kokomo Lafayette Muncie

Mrs. Robert Reifel (A A) Mrs. Earl Peterson (Iota) Mrs. Robert Wallase (A A) Miss Grace Hood (A A) Mrs. Robert H. Price (A A) Miss Jean E. Hilker! (A A) Mrs. Robert E. Smith (A A)

2814 Apache Rural Route 1 2215 Lexington 6082 Garver Rd. 1540 West Walnut 835 High'land 2105 Belmont Dr.

KANSAS Alma Anthony Burlington Clay Center Deerfield Derby Emporia Garden City Hamilton Herrington Hugoton Junction City Kanscrs City Kingman Lincoln McLouth McPherson Neodesha Prairie Village Satan a Seneca Shawnee Valley Center Washington Wichita

Mrs. Darold Marlow (I) Mrs. Vernon Carr (I) Mrs. Paul J. Stotts (I) Mrs. Gloria R. Beck Mrs. Vernon Eberhart (I) Mrs. Wayne Russell (I) Mrs. Richard Stauffer (I) Mrs. Ralph Burkett (I) Mrs. Clark Ulrich (I) Mrs. LeRoy Kurtenbach (I) Mrs. Charlotte Schmidt (I) Mrs. G. W. Hargreaves (I) Mrs. James Sherbon (I) Mrs. Bernard J. Thissen (I) Mrs. Clarence Cole (I) Mrs. Harold Fair (I) Mrs. Robert Eberle (I) Mrs. Kesner Jones (I) Mrs. Gerald Gutzman (I) Mrs. Roy R. Leathers (I) Mrs. Melba Slocum (I) Mrs. Frank Louk (I) Mrs. Hestell M. Nuckells Mrs. Mildred Kolterman (I) Mrs. Thos. E. Curry (I) Mrs. Lowell Willcut (I)

223 Franklin 727 Niagara 1115 Dexter 1127 N. Kokomo 2018 Lincoln Box 407 R. R. No. 1 P.O. Box 1122 606 West Ash 7845 Ella RFD No.1 129 Younger Route 2 lOS N. Charles 708 North 8th 8420 Briar Lane 206 Castle 5142 Mansfield Lane 321 N. Colby 9228 Shade (12) 250 N. Ridgewood Dr.

LOUISIANA Lafayette New Orleans Ponchatoula

Mrs. H. J. Froeba (Phi) Mrs. Dianne Woes! Howell (Phi) Mrs. J. F. Zaleski (Phi)

318 Maplewood Dr. 291 W . Robt. E. Lee Blvd. (24) 141 N. 7th St.

Mrs. James A. Box (A K)

26 Beckford St.

Mrs. James E. Blocker (A) Miss Anna Ukrop (Th) Mrs. Russell Clark (B) Mrs. Fred Howes (A) Mrs. G. F. Fitzgerald (A) Mrs. Richard Custer (A) Mrs. J. J. Soltesz (Th) Mrs. Donald Sorensen (T) Mrs. Gilbert Pearson (A) Mrs. Lee Robinson (B) Mrs. Robert Court (A)

711 Greenwood 20536 Schoenhert (S) 5039 E. Coldwater Road 4206 Greenbrook Lane 135 Moran Rd. 79 F. RFD No. 1 9126 Frederich Dr. 23846 Woodland Ct. 15600 Lakeside 1720 Newberry 547 Brookside

MASSACHUSETTS Beverly

MICHIGAN Birmingham Detroit Flint Grosse Pointe Lansing Livonia Mt. 路Clemens Plymouth Saginaw Ypsilanti

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MISSOURI Florissant Independence Kansas City Maplewood Rolla Springfield St. Louis

Mrs. Carl Emerick (Up) Mrs. Albert J. Gerhardt (A Nu) Mrs. Victor P. Wolf (Pi) Mrs. Clement Orf (Pi) Mrs. George Baumgartner Mrs. Cad H. Nieman (A D) Mrs. James Alexander (Pi) Miss June McCarthy (Pi) Mrs. T. Reed Maxson (I) Mrs. Fred Griffith (I) Mrs. Arlen Soendker (A Nu)

210 St. Madeline 11307 E. 15th St. 630 E. 74th Terrace 7363 La Veta 63117 508 E. 2nd St. 1Sl3 Ron 6328 Potomac 63139 4602 W W. Florissant 63115 Arilen Acres 64093 406 E. Marke t St.

Mrs. Albert J. MoffiU (Pi) Miss Kathleen Kelchner (Rho) Mrs. Arthur V. Schopp, Jr. (L)

165 Center Ave. 43 A Laurel Pl. 145 Spruce Dr.

Mrs. L. J. Paddison (I)

911 Parkland Circle

Miss Margaret Macdonald (S) Miss Elaine Backe (A Z) Mrs. Harold Peterson (S) Miss Alice Koch (A Z) Mrs. Edward Fries (A Z) Mrs. Florence Rubinson Mrs. Thomas McNamara (S) Mrs. Joseph Steen (S)

673 Richmond Ave. (22) 249 Kennedy Avenue 230 Knowlton Ave. 85-13 125th St. (15) 104-16 104th St. 1801 James St. 189 Cresthill Ave. 147 N. Union Road

Akron Canton

Mrs. Bernard McBee (Eta) Mrs. W. W . Cooper (Om)

Carrollton Columbus Hamilton Marietta Poland

Mrs. C. Victor Kendall (Eta) Mrs. H. E. Staehle (A) Mrn. R. M. Reinert (K) Mrs. Matt Villani (Om) Mrs. Keith McGowen (Eta)

1183 Avon St. 101 Middlesworth SW, N. Canton (20) Rte. 5 481 Torrence Road 136 Mavern 201 Brentwood St. 5 Apache Lane

Mrs. Bob Krueger (Rho)

Box 35

Miss Sylvia Kattoul (D) Miss Doris Edwards (D) Mrs. Patricia Edwards Miss Mabel Schreiber (L) Miss The resa Howberg (Z) Mrn. Earl I. Stern (Z) Mrs. Richard Crossley (Z) Mrs. Robert O'Dell (L) Miss Phyllis McCabe (D) Mrs. Virginia Plankenhorn (Z)

1901 16th St. 666 Grant St. 1107 Club Dr. 511 Chestnut St. 661 W. 3rd St. R.D. 760 Pine St. 222 W . Tabor Rd. (20) 1413 Evanston (4) 336 Woodland (12)

Mrs. W. D. White (A) Mrs. Eugene Derichsweiler (Rho)

4224 Hawthorne 1701 Waterloo Ave.

Warrensburg Wellington

NEW JERSEY Chatham Eatontown Shrewsbury

NEW MEXICO Albuquerque

NEW YORK Buffalo Hempstead Kenmore Kew Gardens Ozone Park Syracuse Tonawanda Williamsville

OHIO

OKLAHOMA C.olbert

PENNSYLVANIA Altoona Indiana Johnstown Lebanon Lock Haven Mill Hall Montoursville Philadelphia Pittsburgh Williamsport

TEXAS Dallas Denison

(Continued on Page 101 )

ANCHOR

57


NU

Has A "Bearslide" ~

FALL QuARTER found us back a t school and eager to get to work. I t was good we felt that way for Greek Week activities were upon us. We were all proud of D eni Garrigues, over-a ll chairman of this event, who did a wonderful job organizing a nd co-ord inating the speakers, the exchange dinner between th e Greeks, the games and contests on Fun Day and the dance the Greeks gave for the campus. At the dance Miss Sorority a nd Mr. Fraternity were an nou nced . Our candidate this year was K a thy I acob ucci. No sooner was Greek vVeek over than Homecoming was here. Our them e th is year was Tiger Luau to R emember. The decorations were a giant bear, complete with hula skirt, tending a tiger on a revolving spit in front of a n Hawaiian hut. After th e Homecoming game we had a tea for a ll our a lumnae. One of the "fun" times of fall quarter is Sigma C hi Derby Days. F or a week before the big event it is not unusual to see a la rge group of gi rls chasing a lone male through the library, across campus a nd over tables and chairs in the student union just to get his derby hat. We entered this activity with great spirit despite being dragged to their house where a layer of shaving cream was applied. Sharon Lowe was our candidate for D erby Days Queen . In October we had initiation for Myrna Arms, Margi Campbell, June Fansl er, Micki Kra l, Sharon Lowe, Esther Miller, Betsy Szadaj and Anna J ean Van Tine. After the ceremony the new actives entertained us with a mock fashion show. They presented the sorority with a beautiful trophy case. Our next event was the A WSFashion Show. We a ll enjoyed watching Myrna Arms model the la test styles. About this time Margi Campbell was initiated into Lambda Sigma Tau science honorary. CEA holiday fo und us enjoying a n early Founders' D ay luncheon with the Denver alumnae. On returning from the brief holiday we were caught up in a rush. Our theme party

58

Nu's new actives presented a "fashion show." Modeling the latest styles are, from the left, Betsy Szadaj, Esther Miller, Sharon Lowe, Micki Kral. Anna Jean Van Tine, June Fansler, Margi Campbell and Myrna Arms.

had an India n motif featuring a "melodrama" of a fair young Indian maid and a vill ainous cowboy. The skit was very funny and enjoyed by all. At preferential tea we were happy to welcome our new i ter, Sue Van Velzor. We had a ba lloon shaving booth a t the IK Carnival. It was a lot of fun even though we ended up with more shaving cream on us than on the balloons. We also sponsored Doug Hammond for Ugly Man and were busy campaigning a nd writing songs for him. During the quarter we took time out for a trip to the mountains with fri ends. Our faculty sponsor, Dr. Lewis, was kind enough to let us use her cabin for the day. We a ll enjoyed mountain climbing, hiking, singing and such. Later in the quarter Dr. L ewis had a party for us at her home; we all had a wonderful time. In addition we had several slum ber parties and taffy pulls. Fall quarter ended on a joyous holiday note with our Christma dinner where we all exchange cards and gifts are given to the hou e. 路 At this time we also learned that we'd won second place in the ice-carving conte t with our entry " Whisper of the First Christma . ' After the Christmas holidays we came back ready for the first campus activity, our bearslide. A bearslide is a casual, after-the-aame dance for the entire campu . vVe ha nomtnatecl Esther Miller to run for ii s Cashe La Poudre. Our next project wa ru h. Th theme

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party this quarter was Tau Big Top. We a ll dressed up as d ifferent acts in a circus. We had a bearded lady, lion, panther; elephants, trapeze artists, a sword swallower, monkeys, clowns, a two-headed lady, a fat lady, a snake charmer and a fortun e teller . Our final party was very inspiring and all the gir ls looked lovely in long formals. W e were very happy to welcome our new p ledges, Eva Nash and Judy Stark. The next week we held initiation ceremonies for J ean Brumage and Sue Van Velzor.- BEVERLY TuTTLE

OMICRON

Hayseed Hop Is Big S~,Lccess ;\", THE HAYSEED Hop was the high light of fall semester for the Omicron Chapter of Alph a Sigma Tau. Th e ripp ling skirts of the square da ncers against a background of fodder shocks, h ay, rail fences and pumpkins set the atmosphere for our a nnu al hop cosponsored by our brother fraternity, the Theta Xis . In traditional country sty le, the half-time ceremonies hilariously complem ented the theme by including hog-ca lling and egg-throwing contests and prizes for the

best dressed . Warren Dower was chosen th Alpha Sigma Tau sweeth eart, and J eann Runions, the Th eta Xi sw etheart. In the first semester ru sh, Alph a Sigma Tau pledged fou r wond rful girls, Beverly Hurt, Norma Parker, Becky Pru ett and Carolyn Taylor. A Christmas Party for the actives climaxed their pledgehood . Best pledge for first semester was Becky Pruett. Omicron is fortunate in having severa l active alumnae chapters in the area. They joined us in celebra ting our Founders' Day with a banquet and program. O micron has also added to the list of patron esses, which now include Mrs. Smith Bradley, Mrs. Ralph Cunningham, Mrs. Ralph K lingsm ith, M rs. Doris McNeer, Mrs. Virginia Price, Mrs. Hoye Wells and Mrs. Albert Wright. Alpha Taus took an active part in campus life showing a variety of leadership and capabi lity. Janice F eazell and Cathie Patterson are cheerleaders. Cathie, who is a lso our president, was first runner-u p for H omecom ing queen. Patricia Shepherd leads th e band as majorette. Ellen Gunter was th e first sem ester editor of the Concordian, our school newspaper. Pat Baker, Carolyn Hughes Betty Ingles a nd Cathie Patterson were selected to be members in Who's Wh o I n American Co lleges and Univ eTSities. Omicrons are looking for ward to a nother busy and successful semester.- NANCY ELLISON

PI

Wins Three Firstplace Trophies

Alpha Taus and their dates enjoyed the Hayseed Hop.

ANCH O R

;\", THE FALL semester at H arris T eacher Coll ege in St. Louis, Missouri, saw the girl of Pi Chapter wearing beautiful yellow ro e corsages as they welcomed the freshman students. One of th e first activities held was our annual picnic a t Hillacres, O ctober 20. All the girls and their fami lies spent a wonderful day enjoying nature, hiking a nd, in gen eral just

59


Under the " Scents of the Island" Phis lent fragrance to the rush scene at this party.

getting better acquainted with one another. Later the same month, we enjoyed a hayride a nd wiener roast at H ill Crest Country C lub. The St. Louis Alumnae helped us celebrate our Founders' Day banquet on November 6, which was held at Carpenter's Hall. Our evening came to a tremendous climax when we learned our chapter of Alpha Sigma Tau had won the National Scholarship Trophy. G leaming rocketships sped the invita tions to our informal rush party, which had an Outer Space theme. For this event, J eanne Trautwein's home was transformed into a minia ture M il ky Way complete with stars, constellations and a rocketship. Out-of-thisworld entertainment was provided by Bonnie Onder and Cheryl Yuchs. Green pillow lettered with gold were given as favor a nd programs for the even ing were hap ed like fleecy clouds. Our form a l rush party had a Gay ineties them e. A showing of the fashion of the period was enjoyed by a ll. Every girl received an umbre ll a fash ioned from a hanky and a beautifu l corsage. With much happine , our

60

chapter received ten lovely pledge : andra Carter, Jeanine Delgmann, Pat Graham, Geraldine Hann, Kathy Postol, Mary chrnidt Kendall Schneider, Carol Vedder, Barbara Welsh and Janet Woelm. This semester Pi chapter won three firstplace trophies at Harris. The Panhellenic Scholarship Trophy was won for the econd time in a row. This trophy is given to the sorority a ttaining the highest scholastic average on campus. The Pi chapter also won first p lace in the Ca r Parade prior to the Homecoming Ga me. Our car was d ecorated with a rocketship bla ting out of a pink cloud. The third troph y won was the Christmas Trophy given for the best Christmas decorations at H arris. Our theme was Winter Wonderland. Our president, Joyce Fu ller, wa a pecial Maid at th e Student Congress Dance; Marilyn Schroer a! o served in this court. Cheryl Yuchs repre ented Alpha Sioma T au at a dance given by another sorority on campus. A our money-making proj ect for thi sem ester, we compil ed and sold the " Harris Buzz Book," in which is listed the names, addresse and telephone numbers of all the students a t the college. Natalie Cox and Sharon Gehbauer were co-editors of this profit-making project.

Barbara Lentz, left, and Bonnie Onder, Pi. sold Buzz Books at Harris Teach ers College.

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Cox, Cu stodi a n ; a nd M a ril yn L sh, Editor. We hope to sec all of yo u a t th e Nationa l Con vention in D etroit thi s summcr.- S III RT.E Y HILLEBRAN D

RHO

Mrs. Peterson's Visit Highlights Year ;t TH E HIGH point of Rho chap ter's year wa

Kathy Postol. Pi, Pledge President. stands by part of the prize-winning Christmas decorations.

Many honors were a tta in ed by Pis thi s semester. Sondra D exter and Sharon Gehbau er were initiated into Beta Beta Beta, th e National Biology Honor Society. Many m embers joined the S.N.E .A.-Ca rol Rohlfing was made president ; M a rilyn Schroer, secretary; Louise M eserve, treasurer. C heryl Yuch earned a regular spot on the cheerleading staff of which Darlys Moore is co-captain. A graduation party wa given a t Sharon Hoppe's home for our two seniors-M a rgaret Kleinert and Carol Rohlfing. A good luck wish to our 11 apprentices and to our new officers. The officer a re : Sharon Hoppe, President ; Barbara Lentz, Vice President ; Bonnie Onder, R ecording Secretary; Cheryl Yuchs, Corresponding Secretary ; Sondra Dexter, Treasurer ; Faye Schaedlich, Chaplain; Pat Poehling, Historian ; Natalie ANCHOR

a visit by Mrs. M a ry Alice Peterson, our N a tiona l President. Whil e specificall y inspecting Rho's adherence to regul a tions, Mrs. Peterson offered ma ny timely suggestions fo r im provement and adjustm ent to each Al pha T a u offi cer and member. Rh o was honor d by Mrs. Peterson's three cl ay visit a nd will benefit greatly from her help. We hope she will includ e Rho cha pter a t Sou th eastern on her itinera ry again soon. Again Rho was bestowed with one succes after a noth er. Th e sorority rece ived ma ny desen 路ed honors a nd rendered various serv ices during the past term. T o begin the fa ll semester, Al pha Tau elected Jimmy Green as th eir A ~T Beau for

Rho 's own Grocho Marx interviewed Bridgette Bardo! at the Mardi Gras rush party while other costumed Taus watche d.

61


Jimmy Green, Alpha Sigma Alpha Beau lor 1963-64, was serenaded by Alpha Taus and presented an engraved key chain.

1963-64. Jimmy, yvho is vice-president of Southeastern's Student Senate and a lso sings folk songs with a group called the "Tres," was presented an engraved key chain as members sang the traditional A~T Beau song. Four new members were the result of a n exciting fall Mardi Gras rush party. The girls who pledged Alpha Sigma Tau were Kathy Barker, Eleanor Bramlett, Nancy Huckabee and Sheri Westbrook. C lub Alpha Tau was the setting and Mardi Gras was the locale of one of the most entertaining and beautiful rush parties Rho has ever given . The yard of Tau m ember Anita Sweet's grandparents provided an interesting backdrop for the Mardi Gras theme. On the "Club's" stage performed the dancing Irma laDouce, Connie Frances and guest MC Groucho Marx, who introduced the various other costumed celebrities in the audience. A special feature of the program was a ballad song fest by Alpha Tau beau Jimmy Green and Phillip Dunham, who was later chosen pledge beau. Japanese lanterns hanging from trees lighted the red-checkered tables which were arranged along the sides of the yard. Masks, noise makers and the traditional A~T yellow rose marked each rushee's place. In keeping with 62

the Mardi Gras th eme, rrumature floats paraded down the head table and all Alpha Tau members were costumed and masked. A~T beauties gathered in many of the campus favorites durin()" the fall semester. Zelma Bowman was voted Homecoming Queen and one of the ten Savage yearbook queen finalists, as was Camilla Campbell and Suellen Smiley. Sheri Westbrook was chosen TKE Dream Girl. Honor winners in Alpha Tau include Tia Juana Hattensty, who was selected to be placed in Who's Who in American Colleges and Univ ersities. Rho is also proud of Zelma Bowman and Christine H enson who are recent initiates of K appa D elta Pi, a national honorary educational fraternity. A new project on campus this year was a special calendar with p ictures of sse coeds. It was printed and sold to the students. Alpha 路 Tau girls represented five of the 12 months. They were Zelma Bowman, Judy Burke, Camilla Campbell, Carolyn MeVay and Suellen Smiley. For Thanksgiving Alpha Taus at Rho chapter made place cards with special printed verses, which were distributed to each re t home and nursing home in Durant. Other services Tau members perform for their school during the year include selling flower for ANCHOR


Homecoming and selling daily newspapers where each Alpha Tau h as a turn a t delivermg. To complete a very busy and successful semester for both pledges a nd members, a tota l of 21 Alpha Taus were carried off on a p ledge sneak the week before Christmas vacation. Destination of the excited group was La ke Nurray Lodge in Ardmore, Okla homa . A funfilled night of eating, laughing and singing â&#x20AC;˘ followed. After a very early start the next morning all the tired-but-happy girls returned to sse in time for their 8 o'clock classes!DrANN THOMPSON

ZETA TAU

Has "Alpine Stopover" Party ;\; A cozy ski-lodge atmosphere . . . A~T steins swinging to the rhythm of "Vive Ia A~T . " . . . Indeed, our cider, singin', and sisterhood held us in good stead during '63's fall rush, and after our highly successful Alpine Stopover theme party, we proudly pinned the cherished green n ' gold ribbons on 13 new pledges. Sporting A~T sweatshirts a nd wide smiles were Linda Ba rron, Bill Cuthriell , Eva D eak, Lynn Gardner, Pat Gravely, Bonnie Hall, Gail Nolan, Beth Otwell, N ancy Piland, Kit Swezey, Dianne Tate, N a ncy Tymosko and Betty Williams. The perk y pledges pitched right into sorority life-and delighted collegiates with copies of a complete A~T mailing and birthday list. A~T ' s 64th birthday found Longwood Zeta Taus in a festive mood. We celebra ted our sorority's beginning by donning white for classes on November 5, and with our traditional Founders' Day Banquet in the college Tea Room. Margie Twilley, cha pter president presided graciously over the candlelight dinn~r and welcomed D ean of Women Ruth Wilson, President and Mrs. Fred Wygal, and local a lumnae Miss Virginia Bedford and Miss Mary P. Nichols. The closing candlelight service brought tears to the eyes of some ANCHOR

sisters-and pride to th hearts of all. Happiness well ed in our hearts, too, a l Christmas as we wrapped gifts for underprivil eged children at our pa rty in th e chapter room. Still a nother party brought us together for fun, food and poster-ma king. Ou r not-so-artistic masterpieces p romised to be eye-catching reminders of th e Februa ry 6 Bloodmobile Zeta Taus would sponsor on campus. Our chairman, Connie Birch, consulted R ed Cross and college officials a nd began early collecting typists, nurses a nd sandwich-ma kers. All of Zeta T a u looked forwa rd to this cha nce to contribu te to communi ty life. Zeta Tau contributions were seen in other fi elds of endeavor, too. Pert M ary Lea Shoulders was co-chairman of her class's C ircus skit and sophomore representa tive to the C ircus Queen's Court. Betty J ean Russell was general chairman of the entire C ircus weekend . Millie Woodward made Zeta T a us pro ud as punch as she was tapped into Alpha K appa Gamma, National Honora ry Lead ershi p F raternity for Women ; Amy H a ley a nd Sydney Fansha w brought home the fra ternity sweetheart honors. Amy was chosen Pi K appa Alpha Dream Girl and the Lambda Chi Alphas dubbed Sydney their C rescent Gi rl. Theta Chi elected a Zeta T au a lumna, J an ice H arris, their sweetheart. Gold en Who's Who charm dangled from the bracelets of Judy

63


Partrea, Betty J ean Russell, Margie Twilley and Mary Anne Lipford. Even the pledge copped their share of honors ; Linda Barron. Lynn Gardner and Gail Nolan dived into college activities and carne up with a bid to join " Corkettes," the coll ege's synchronized swimming team. All Zeta Taus-collegiates a nd pl edges alike - send greetings and a warm "hi" to sisters everywhere whose code of li ving includes " Affection . .. Sincerity . . . Truth .' - MARY ANNE LIPFORD

UPSILON

Cherishes A Rewarding First Semester ;\. UPSILON Chapter of Arkansas State Teacher's College cherishes a re\\路arding first semester and has gone into another that looks just as rewarding. The rush ees and members of Alpha Sigma Tau met first semester in the newly decorated sorority room for tomato juice and hors d'oeuvres. Later they went to the mirror room of McAlister Hall for a candlelight buffet dinner and entertainment provided by Gay ichols, Miss ASTC, with an " Autumn Leaves" dance following. From this rush, ""e were revvarded with eight upperclassmen pledges: Marialyce Brinkley, Julia Ewan, Sheila Hammond, Cheryl January, Marian Riddell, Anne Shugart, Louise Vincent and Brenda Walker. In J anuary they were all initiated and Cheryl January was awarded the best pledge padd le. Four of our members were selected for Who's Who I n American Universities and Colleges. They are Edna Spurlock, Julia Bailey, Sue Flake and Tommie Sue Kirtley. Edna Spurlock was ASTC Homecoming Queen and has recently been nominated for most beautifu l Greek. To say the least, we a re very proud of Edna. She excel scholastically as well as socially. 1x of our girl made the Dean' List: Betsy Green , Linda Maddox Sue Flake,

64

Carol isk. Pat Halsey and Marion Riddell. \Ve haYe four member in Alpha Chi the honorary cho la tic fraternity: Tonm1ie ue Kirtl ey. Carol i k, Su e Flake and Edna Spurlock. Marial yce Brinkley, u ie Minton and Bit y J a nes, Vice President of the nior cla s, are ervina on th e tudent enat . Student Christian A ociation Council m embers include Edna purlock, Tommie Sue Kirtley, Sue Flake. Marion Riddell, Joy Phillip , Marialyce Brinkley and Bit y Jane . Thi is th e tim e of year we enaage in our social en 路ice projects. We plan to do the same as last year by helpina at Conway M emorial Ho pita! and aiding at the Arkansas Chi ldren's Colony on Saturday . Our two cu lture programs have dealt with philosophies of life. Our last program wa conducted in th e home of Dr. Ada J a ne Harvey, th e national culture chairman . Mr. Charles Evan , a college in stru ctor of hi tory, spoke on his per onal ph ilosophy of life. Mrs. Da\路id Ritter is psilon' new ponsor. vVe are certainly fortunate in having two wonderful ponsors, Mrs. Betty Young and Mrs. Ritter, and we feel th ey contribute much to our sorority life. Upsilon is anxiously awaiting our freshman rush , and we hold the promise of a wonderful pledge class. Th e informal rush party is in a house boat on the Arkansas River. With " Showboat" as the theme, we are anticipatina a great party. We are all looking forward for the best to Alpha Taus everywhere.- B!Tsv jAN E

PHI

Smiles & Restyles ;\. THIS HAS been a busy semester for all our members in Hammond. Rush was the fir t bi.a item on our calendar of events. Iter a summer of preparation we began with partie under the ge nera l theme of ' Perfume R flections" and specifically within the aroma tic sphere of 'Prophec " and ' c nt of the Island." Our chapter was ery proud of ecuring 15 pledae from our fall ru h .

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Activities in preparation for the Homecoming Parade were second in importance on our agenda . This year we entered a car with the theme " L ion Bait," one of our favorite yell s. The p ledges were expected to help the members design and decora te the Alph a Sigma !au car. F~r this, their first officia l p ro ject m the soronty, they did an admira ble job. The Phi chapter this year enjoyed a pleasant, brief visit with Mrs. Peterson. She inspired the girls with her ta lk given during o ur regular weekly m eeting. Sh e was a ble to give ma ny of our new officers invalua ble advice on their duties and responsibilities, and to im part a bit of inspira tion a nd wise advice to our newest p ledges. W e a re grateful fo r her suggestion s on restyling Ph i cha pter. Amidst a ll this activity our m embe rs found time to receive numerous honors. E lected to the Miss Southeastern were Iris Brann a nd Lydia Waguesp ack. Lydia was also elected a member of our Homecoming co urt. Our school honor society, t he 13 C lub, indu cted Lydia as well. This club requires a n over-all " B" average with no grade less than "C." The n a tiona l honor society has now claimed for membership : Iris Bra nn, Judy Worley, C laire Agaisse, J a nice Sibley a nd L ydia Waguespack. Honored by being n am ed to W ho's W ho a re J a ni ce Sibley, Lydia Waguespack, Iris Brann a nd, our presid ent, C la ire Aga i e. The two most im porta nt word s for us thi s semester have been smile and Testyle . ' "'e a rc conducting a smile campaign to restore the friendly a tmosphere on our campu s, and we a re restyling our cha pter from some suggestions of a tiona l Presiden t Mrs. Peterson.CH ERYL J OLIVETTE

CHI

Are Enthusiastic About A Busy Year .t TH E CHIS enthusiastically began their yea r with both a business m eeting a nd an executive m eeting on September 17. At this time old acquaintances were renewed a nd p lans were m ad e for the new year. Committees were appoin ted fo r Homecom ing, fall ru sh ANC H O R

" How do you do and who a re y o u ?" g reete d the jack-in-the-box a s Peggy Lewis entered the "Wonderful World of Alpha Tau."

a nd ou r dance, whic h wa to have been held on November 23. On Sunday, September 22, we assisted our brother fra ternity, T a u K appa E psilon, with a tea held a t th eir fraternity house. On Saturday, O ctober 5, the Ch is were proud of sister Sand ra Carson who served as the 39th H omecom ing Q ueen of Shepherd College. Th a t day was especially bu y for all of the C his. We were up a t the break of daw n to decorate the goal post a nd to put up wel coming signs for m a ny alumn i and friend who returned to th e campus. We were glad to welcome back alumn ae si ters at our an nua l co ffee hour held on Saturday morn ing. For this occasion, our sorority room wa ga ily decora ted with the fa ll co lors. On O ctober 11 , Governor Barron of '\ e t V irginia a nd his staff vi ited the campu ; the members of Alpha Sigma T a u assisted in serving lunch to th is group. F all rush got underway with the Pa nhellenic T ea on O ctober 15. On the fo llowing M onday we held our fa ll rus h party. "H ow do you do a nd who are you?" greeted the jack-in -the-box as the rushees entered the " Wonderfu l World of Alpha T a u.' After being introduced, the ru hee were eated a nd

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the evening's events unfolded. New Street Methodist Church was the scene of Alpha Sigma Tau's fall rush party. The theme of the party was "Story Book Land." Both the members and guests came dressed as characters from different stories. Tinker Bell (Vice President Arlene Kauer) led the group through the book of Alpha Sigma Tau Rhymes. The highlight of the evening was a song by sisters Sandra Carson, Martha K ephart and Emily Strite titled "Hello Members Hello Guests" to the tune of "Hello M uddah' H ello Faddah." Following more skits, mem~ bers and guests joined in games and songs. To close the program the members sang "The Land of Fri endship" and then form ed a n arch through which th e rushees left. On the following Thursday, the girls who had received bid were called in to sta te their sorority preference. After their statem ent the p ledge walk and ribbon pl edging wa~ held. Then th e m embers and pledges ate dinner together in the college cafeteria. Those girls who pledged Chi chapter were : Donna Kay Abrell, Gail Cline, Lynn Cooney, Carolyn Crump, Sandra Gary, Wanda J ean Kitchen, Peggy Lewis, Barbara Maxwell , Lisa Schmidt, Patricia Snell and Betsy Wysong. We were exceedingly proud to have these 11 girls pledge Chi! On Saturday, October 26, Mrs. Charles Atherton, one of our patronesses, invited us to have breakfast in her home. Our National Founders' Day was observed by m embers wearing a paper pin in the ha pe of a crown stating the ela te and location of our founding . Peggy Usak prepared a display of Alpha Sigma Tau material to be placed in the showcase in the College's Administration Building. To further observe our founding, the Chis participated in a banqu et with our local alumnae chapter a t Shady R e t R esta urant. To become better 路 acquainted with our pledge sisters, the Chis held a slumber party at the home of Mrs. Steven Sinnett, our alumnae representative, on the weekend of November 16. Both members and pledges presented skits and participated in game which were enjoyed by all. To raise money, a White Elephant ale wa 66

held on December 4, and over $20.00 was received at this time . Many gaily decorated packages were sold. On Friday, December 13, the chapter had a "turn-about" day at which time the pledges had the upper hand. This was a day of fun for all! A Christmas party for the members and patronesses was held on December 16 at Irela nd Cottage. This is the home of our advisor, Dr. ara H. Cree, and one of our patronesses, Dr. Ruth Scarborough. Gifts were distributed a nd Christmas carols sunrr. Everyone joined in the fun. Chi berran the new year with the initiation of its 11 pledge . These girls worked hard during their pledge period to raise money for the orority and them elves, and to spread good will on campus. In order to raise money, they sold records and a homemade fruit cake, a nd had a bake sale. On Monday, J a nuary 6, a " Fun Initiation" was held, and on Tuesday our form al initia tion was conducted. W were proud to h ave these 11 girls join our sisterhood. After the ceremony was over we went to Ireland Cottage for a surprise birthday pa rty given in honor of our advisor, Dr. Cree. As a <Troup, Chi chapter has worked h a rd to m a inta in its na me on campus a nd in the community during the past term. At Christm as time we distributed baskets of food to a

Chi girls relaxed and admire d their work after making posters for Homecoming .

OHR


needy family in Shepherdstown. We also sent a box of school supplies to Pine Mountain Settlement School. Individual members have also brought many honors to the sorority this past term. Sandra Carson and Patti Kave have worked hard as cheerleaders. We are also proud of Emily Strite who has served as alternate cheerleader. Robby Hutchison and Pat Snell have worked diligently in the school plays. Sisters Pam Emswiller, Barbara Puckett and Jane Specht were named to Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. Also, sisters Carolyn Osburn and Marsha Clark were inducted into Kappa D elta Pi, nation al educational honorary. Our teams have played hard in the intramurals and we are proud to have won first and second place in archery, and fourth place in the volley ball tournament. As the fall term comes to an end, we look back with honor a t our many accomplishments and look ahead with hope to an even better spring term .-CAROL A. WEEKS

PSI

Is Delighted With Their New Address ;\; CARNIVAL music, a laughing, playful clown, and green and gold cotton candy greeted Psi's fall rushees. On the day of " Walk" green and gold were worn proudly by 21 new pledges : Mickey Anderson, K ay Carns, Carolyn Cox, Murph Doherty, Betty D eutz, Pat Ferguson, Mary Jo Gaynor, Day Golt, Ann Haines, Christine H errick, L ynda McGonigal , Betsy McPherson, Fay M eads, Nancy Myers, Fay Pleasants, Ch ippie Ridgeway, G loria Smi ley, Jane Swanson, Elizabeth Talbot, Pat Thomas, Sandy Wade and Judy Vryland. The wonderful 21 were joined by Betsy McPherson, who walked on an open bid, thus bringing the number of new Psi p ledges to 22 . Of course they are the best pledges on campus. M issing " Walk" but representing Madison ANCH OR

beautifully and proudly as Princess at the Harvest Festival in Roanoke, Virginia, was Nancy Spady, senior. Nancy is the second A~Ter in two years to be elected by th student body as Princess at the festival. Serving Psi as officers this year are: Jill Myers, President (Jill took over from Barbara Ford White who is now the proud mother of Gordon White, Jr. ); Diane Pennewell, Vice President; Carole Mauk, Recording Secretary; M ary Jane Murray, Corresponding Secretary; Shirley Thactson, Treasurer; and Andy Burkley and Lynda Krebs, Rush Chairman. Freshmen were greeted at Madison by 10 A~T sen ior counselors: Joyce Ousley, Sue Harrell, Betsy Thomas, Jill M yers, M ary Jane Murray, Shirley Thactson, Barbara Sweeney, Lois Cardarella, Cindy Hillbrink and Pat Gay. We are proud of our sisters who were chosen by the Student Government Association and the Dea n of Women at Madison to h elp and advise our incoming Freshmen. Emily Reid is ranked as the senior with the highest scholastic average in the senior class. Barbara Sweeney was chosen as sweetheart of Phi Alpha Epsilon social fraternity. Miss Judy Vryland represented A~T in competition for queen of Sigma Delta Rho social fraternity. Serving as senior cia s officers are Shirley Thactson, Vice President, a nd Sue Harrell, Treasurer. Senior Class mirror recipients were Carolle Mauk, Most Dignified ; Nancy Spady, be t looking a nd best dressed ; Sue Harrell, most cooperative, and Shirley Thactson, most dependable. Mimi Hunt serves as A sistant Editor of the Bluestone yearbook a nd attended the Associated Collegiate Press Conference in ew York City. There are more than enough A~Ts on Stud ent Government to constitute a quorum . A~T council members are: Nancy Spad Judicial Vice President ; Marty Walker Legislative Vice President ; Lois Cardarella Chairman of the Recreation Council; Carole Gorry, Editor of the Student Handbook 路 Mary Jane Murray, senior representative ;

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Shirley Thactson, semor representative ; Elaine M cGlathery, junior representa tive and secreta ry of L egislative Council ; and Mary Jo Gaynor, sophomore representative. Sally Mansp eaker, senior representa tive. and Pat Thomas, sophomore representa tive, serve their respective classes well on H onor Coun cil. A::ST contestants in the M adonna Pageant were Pa t Gay, Cindy H illbrink, and M arty Walker . Selected for recognition in Wh o's Wh o A mong S路tudents in A m erican Co lleges and Uni versities are Carole Gorry, N a ncy Spady, Shirley Thactson and M arty Walker . Elec ted by their classm a te as ou tstan ding stud ents a re Carole Gorry, N ancy Spady, Shirley Thactson a nd M arty Walker, seni or . a nd Betty D eutz, sophomore. These stud ents were chosen for the coll ective a ttributes of schola rship, leadership a nd citizenship . C hosen as contesta nts in th e best dressed contest sponsored by Glamour Magazine were senior A::STs Lois Cardarella, Ca role M au k, Dia ne Pennewell and Nancy Spady. Th cso candida tes were selected for th eir poi e, tas tf' in clothing, fashion awa ren ess, charm a nd beauty. A::STs are proud that Nancy Spady was chosen as the best dressed girl on campus. Sh e will represent M adison in th E' GlamoU1路 contest. Nancy continues a three year winning streak in the contest h eld by AlT.

Lois Ca rdarella, Pat Gay, Ca role M a uk , Dian e Pennewell, N ancy Spady and Marty Wa lker h ave been chosen to " Wa lk" for senior a ttendants, princesses, M aid of H onor and M ay D ay Queen. Elected as candid a tes in the M iss Mad ison contest on the basis of schola rship, leadershi p, extracurri cu lar activities and p ersonali ty were Carole Gorry, Carole :r<.1auk, N ancy Spady and Marty Walker. R epresenting M adi son as delega tes a t th e Middle South United N a tion s Model Gen era l Assembly are Lois Card arella a nd Carole Gorry. Psi C hapter is delighted with the accepta nce of Miss Beverly Anne P leasants, Bio logy instru ctor, to our invitation to be an ad vi er. Mi ss Pleasants joins Dr. Marilyn

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Crawford, Associate Professor of Physical and H ealth Education, as adviser . K ay Carns and Andy Burkley were tapped by the a tional Honor Society, Kappa D elta Pi, a t their recent school assembly. Sorority life h as not been just play for the Psi girls. A large package was sent by the pledges to the Pine Mountain Settlem ent H om e. In addition, patients at Rockingham County Hosp ital a nd the college infirmary were seren aded by the Psis a t Christmas time. T wen ty-three m embers of the sorority h ave joined other campus sorority members and a re now living in the beautiful modern P anhellenic dorm itory, Hoffman H all. Hoffman H all, however, marks the passing of an era on campus for sorority wom en . Beginning nex t year all sorority houses will be torn down to make way for n e1N acad em ic buildings and dorm itories a t M adison. Zirkle is not just a house to A::STs, but a home. Zirkle has served as our refuge, our social center and a p lace of fond memories and gath erings. I t is with sadne tha t we think of the day vvhen Zirkle will be yet a nother addition in an era of progression at M adison. U ntil the n ext time we meet, wh ether personally or through letters in THE ANCHOR, we a t Psi send best wish es and A::ST love to all our sisters.- C AROLE Ga RRY

ALPHA ALPHA

Are Busy ... As Bees ~ FALL QUARTER saw Alpha Alphas return-

ing to campus rested and eager for the coming events. A worksh op h eld in the sui te September 14 reminded the Alpha T a us of the activi ties before them , a nd September 18 marked th e first big task of the year. A d an ce was h eld in co- ponsorship ' ith the R ed Gross for the veteran of the M arion County Hospital. R ound dancing a nd quare dancing domina ted th e evenina' entertainment, with Barba ra Ward inging " I Enjo Beina a Girl" a nd Judy M artin, ancy D ehnbo tel and K a ren Soper singina "The Pr ach r and the Bear" during intermi ion .

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began acttvllt es again with a H a lloween record hop held October 28 as a o-sponsored affair with the Theta Xi frat mity. Gre k Week on campus began Nov mber 4 with President aro l Buzolits as a o-chairma n of the big event. The week includ ed a banquet and a bonfire singing ceremony, deigned to draw the Greeks on campu. closer together. ovem ber 4 also marked Founders' Day and we d ined on chicken served by the alum nae in the suite, and participated in the candle lighting ceremony followin g the banquet. Shortly after returning from Thanksgiving vacation, the Alpha Alphas began th eir quarter with the initiation of Jud y Martin into active membership. During the Thanksgiving a nd ' hri Lilla

Barbara Ward models the Alpha Alpha's Home coming outfit.

October 11 -12, members of the Alpha Alpha chapter traveled to Macomb, Illinois, to stay with the Alpha Epsilon chapter for a State Day program. Work on the float for the Homecoming parade had begun during th e summer and by the end of September was well under way. Homecoming outfits also arrived in plenty of time. The entire outfit consisted of an olive green, shift jumper with a tie belt and round neck; a cardigan sweater, white with threequarter length sleeves trimmed in olive green , and with an accent of olive green and go ld in a diamond formation on the front ; black heels ; white gloves; and big smi les. Three convertibles carried the Alph a Alphas as they rode in the Homecoming parad e October 19 behind the float wh ich consisted of a 10-foot tall Paul Bunyan chopping down Sycamore trees, and his side kick, Babe the Blue Ox, looking around the crowd. The Homecoming tea in the afternoon was well attend ed by both visitors and alu mnae. After resting for a week, the Alpha Alpha s ANCHOR

Santa Claus paid a visit to the

A~T

Suite.

Alpha Alpha's Homecoming float stood ready to roll.

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Decorative Christmas candles sold as money-making project .. seasons, decorative candles were sold on cam pus and in the community as a money raising project. Nile Shields of Phi Sigma Epsilon represented Alpha Sigma Tau at the annual Chi Omega-Sigma Phi Epsilon Knight to Remember Coed Ball. June Beuglas was selected to repre ent the Alpha Alphas as a "Campus Cutie" for a new calendar b eing printed by a camp us organization. Two Christmas parties were held during the few weeks before Chri tmas vacation. One consisted of the sorority members in a $.50 gift exchange ; th e other was given for a group of orphans from Muncie. Ruth Ann Whittig represented Alpha Alpha as a candidate for Miss Junior Personality at the annual Christmas dance. Formal rush began immediately after Christmas vacation. After three week-ends of teas, costume parties and formal parties, Alpha Alphas were delighted with the five new pledges (the Fabulous Five ) and are eagerly looking forward to open and spring rush and another increase in membership. The Costume Party theme for this year was "The Good Ship Lollipop" and Alpha Alphas appeared in sailor dress to escort the rushees, dressed as little boys and girls, through Candy Land . Liz Ellison was chairman of the event. Susan Staples was selected as a candidate from AlT for Honorary Colonel of the annual Military Ball. On January 30, new additions to the Alpha Sigma Tau suite brought members running from all over campus. Brought to the suite that morning was a 15 x 15 olive green area carpet and three new lamps. ext on the list will be upholstering, drapes and perhaps a television. With a future full of many plans, the Alpha Alphas are looking forward eagerly to the rest of the school year and work in AlT. -KAREN K. SoPER

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Alp h a Delta 路s h eld a rush p a rty in their new h ouse.

ALPHA DELTA

Wins College Volleyball Tournament ;t. ANOTHER busy semester has ended for the

Alpha Delta chapter at Southwest Missouri State College. One of the biggest events of the fall seme ter is the annual All-Greek volleyball tournament. The past two years we have taken third and second place, respectively, so this year we were determin ed to take fir t and we did!!! We have a beautiful, large trophy with our nam e engraved on it. Congratula~ tions, team ! The year began with the excitement and hard work of moving into a new orority house. All new dining room and livino- room furniture was bought for the hou e. Vl'e are very proud of our beautiful, spaciou hou e. Homecoming activities beo-an with the lection of Homecoming Queen and building a float. Penny Ohlman was our candidat for 1964 Hom ecomina Queen. Durino- her cam-

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paign we kept very busy making posters, having rallies and an Open House-Tea in Penny's honor. The theme for our float this year was "Victory Ahoy." The float, which was done in red and blue, featured a sailboat complete with waves and three pretty Alpha Sigma Tau passengers. Hom ecoming activities were concluded with a combination Alumnae-Founders' Day Banquet held at the Grove. Three new p ledges, Fran Davis, Selena Schwarz and Linda Paganini, were pinpledged during informal rush. Among their many activities and projects they presented the active chapter with curtains a nd cushions for the house. Our Annual Turkey Tromp was held in the Student Union Building in November. A large crowd was in attendance. During the dance those who attended selected a Miss Cranberry Sauce and Mr. Tom Turkey. During Parents' Day an open house was given at the sorority house for our parents. Open house was also held for all freshman girls shortly before formal rush. Formal rush began with our first party entitled, "Adventures in Tauland." Our second party, the traditional "Magical Moments," was given by our alumnae. The last party, which was the preferential tea, was held at the sorority house. One yellow rose was given to each rushee in attendance. During most of our parties we wore matching green wool jumpers which we made especially for such activities. C limaxing rush was the ribbon, and later pin p ledging, of our enthusiastic new pledges, Carol Chilton, Barbara Farthing and Julie Siddens. Alpha Delta's money-making project for fall semester was selling return address labels. This proved very profitable and will be continued throughout the year. The Alpha Nu chapter from Warrensburg paid us a visit during January. Our sisters came down for a ball game and spent the weekend with us at the house. Much fun was had by all and we look forward to being with them again. Among the Alpha Deltas deserving congratu lations for honors are: Tonni Van ANCHOR

Hook, who graduated magna cum laude and as Valedictorian of her summer graduating class ; Beverly Davis, cum laude; Kim Bowman, who was our president, was elect d to become a member of Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities,路 Cathy Boes, candidate for Christmas Queen and a member of the all-school volleyball team ; J an Perkins, our candidate for O zarko Queen ; Kay Wilson, recently initiated into Mu Phi and D elta Psi Kappa, honorary fraternities ; and Faye Fronabarger, who once again made the D ean's List with a 4.0 grade pointCHERYL STOCKTON

ALPHA EPSILON

Hosts ILlinois State Day in Fall ;\; ON RETURNING to the WIU camp us this fall , Alpha Epsilon's first exciting activity was planning a State Day for the Alpha, Alpha Eta and Alpha Alpha chapters. It was quite an experience meeting our sisters from other chapters, and we all gained a great deal in new friendships and new ideas that day. The same weekend as our State Day, our chapter underwent a national inspection by Mrs. Mary Al ice Peterson and Mrs. Helen Cross. We felt that our conferences and chats with our two national officers helped us enormously, and we are looking forward to another visit from them soon. Homecoming was another great event for us, since Alpha Epsilon won first place for our house decorations and Grand Sweepstakes for our float. Campus elections brought many honors to the Alpha Taus. Carol Morrisey and Margie Huber are editors on the Courier, the campus newspaper ; and Sharon Hutton and Carol Morrisey are associate editors for the Sequ el, the WIU yearbook. Among Who~s Who In American Colleges and Universities are A~Ts Carolyn Ba rnes, Jo Haas Charlotte Holman, Margie Huber, Carol Morrisey and Donna Novak .

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Anne N euroth (Sophomore ena tor ), Linda R olf (Sophomore Senator ) and Arlene ada ( A:ST repre enta tive ) . Another oraan ization in which our chapter i qu ite ac tive i the niver ity U n ion Board with Trudie Ambler (secretary), Ju lie H eitsch ( treasurer ), C harlotte H olman, J enny Mielke, Pa tti Simo nide, Barb Tornillo and J oyce Scranton . P i D elta Ep ilon, honorary journa li m fraterni ty, claim Carol M orrisey (vice pre ident ), M argie H uber (treasurer ) and Charlotte H olman. In Sicrma Tau D elta honorary Engli h fratern ity, is Cha rlot L H olman who i treasu rer. The A ~T a lso par ticipated in the a nnua l Career Ca rni val, a nd Cha rlot te H olma n wa elected Career Carni\路a l Q ueen. Alpha Epsilon 's Pres ident is shown above with Mrs. Pete rs on.

Other A ~T s are active in the Porn Porn Squad . These include Pa ttie Simonide (cha irman ) , T r udie Ambler, Bonnie Buergner, Bonnie Campbell, Linda Hick, D iAnne Neuroth a nd Donna Tovak. A~T s D oris Ba rzyk and J o Haas a re in their secon d year as WIU cheerleaders. Among Alpha T au representa tives to Student Government there are T rudie Amb ler (Pa nhellenic represen tative ) , Carolyn Ba rnes (Senior Sen a tor and Student Govern ment secretary) , J ane Hill (Corbin H all representa tive ) , M a rgie Huber (Junior Senator ) , Pa t J ones (Corbin H all representa tive ) , DiWIU's Alpha Sigma Taus visited th e "Eme rald City."

A~T 's

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Club Jamaica.

And we are very proud of J oyce Scranton, Miss M acomb, who placed a econ d runnerup in th e Miss Illi nois Pageant Ia t summer. In forma l rush for uppercla smen wa he ld fo r the fi rst time this fall , a nd we pledcred Bonnie Coleman, Sharon H utton and Donna M organ. F ormal R ush W eek ha ju t come to an exciting clo e, high lighted by our " E mera ld City' ' theme for our informal partie , which was adapted from the " W izard of O z" tory, an d by our trad ition a l ' lub J amaica" theme fo r our for mal partie . 11 our p la nning a nd hard \\路ork wa w 11 worth it, fo r we h ave ju t pre ent d the emeralda nd-go ld r ibbon to b rand-new p i dcr

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Dianne Borecki, Marjo Cooper, Irene Ferguson, Carolyn Grant, Kathy Karner, Lynn Maldaner, Mimi Sandell, Bonnie St inke, Linda Torpi and Pat Winter. This fall the Alpha Ep ilons also "adopted" two little girls from the Macomb area as a local social service project. The entire chapter has enjoyed entertaining our "littl e sisters" with a Christmas party, several dinn ers at the sorority house, Saturd ay afternoon movies and Sunday School activities. The WIU Alpha T a us are looking forward to even more exciting events a head, in rehearsing our "H obo" skit for th e Commun ity Chest Stunt Show, prepa ring a boo th for \!\linter Carnival and p lanning th e events for th e campus' third a nnu al Greek Week this spring.- KATHI CHAMBERS

ALPHA ZETA

Whirls Through A Flurry of Activity ;\". THE SCHOOL year started and we got right into full swing with rush p lanning . Our first rush was the traditional " Yellow Rose T ea" where all perspective p ledges were introdu ced to our sorority through a motion picture ta ken in th e summ er. The joking and good na tured kidding th a t accompanied its showing served to bridge a ny gap exjsting between th e sisters a nd th e ru shees. "A Portrait of \1\Tom anhood" whi ch m ade such a big hit las t year had its rev iva l thi fall with a nother stunning success. Th e d ifferent kinds of women cha racteri zed werethe Exoti c, th e Sophisticate, th e Innocen t and the Intell ect pl ayed by Ca rol Vo ln y, Valerie Stumpf, La ura Nuzz i and J oyce Cox. Our last rush had the color of old pai n as we extracted a ll the loca l fl avo r from th e experiences of our presid ent, D olore Casa l. Dolores went to Spa in for the umm er, a nd as she lived in her fami ly's home he was able to bring back stories, pictures, obj ects and favors which the ordinary tourist would ANCHOR

Members of the "Intellectual-Bounce S et" were, from the left, back row, Eileen Hethy. Valerie Stumpf and Josephine Chang; standing. from the left, Marian Wischhuse n , Carol Veiny, Deanna Condina and Dolores Casal; seated on the floor, Laura Nuzzi.

not come in contact with . We a ll had a most instructive time. M eatballs and spaghetti m ay not be characteristic of F ounders' D ay, but the \\路ay I ngrid owatiu s make them they shou ld be adop ted as a F ounders' D ay tradi tiona l dish.

At the Founders' Day Dinner are. fr om the left. Pat Colaton, Doris Bernstein. Joyce Cox and Dolores Casal.

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and Deanna Condina did a take off on the commercial where two girls meet again and reminisce after many years out of college. Linda Koch played hostess to a meeting where we drew plans for a very busy spring calendar including a card party, song fest, installation dinner dance and many other activities.-VALERIE STUMPF

ALPHA ETA

Gains Five Wonderful Pledges Shown in a " Portrait of Womanhood" are, from left, Joyce Cox. Laura Nuzzi. Valerie Stumpf and Carol Volny.

The candlelighting ceremony was very impressive and created an atmosphere of rededication to sorority ideals and a sudden awareness of our awesome and somber responsibilities. All work and no in tellectual stimulation makes Alpha Zetas du ll an d uninteresting. I n 路 order for the la tter never to occur Joyce Cox p la nned a most rewarding even ing. The general theme was "A Ph ilosophy of L ife." It was surprising to see how deeply we searched for our own values and criteria that form the basis of our philosophy. J oyce had prepared so many sheets of discussion probes that we were un able to examine them all. Therefore we have planned another of these evenings soon. We just held a very successful dance called the "Bavarian Bounce" which just goes to show we can be intellectually stimulated to bounce, too. During Christmas vacation we spent a day at Eileen Hethy's home in Lake Ronkonkoma, Long Island . Ice skating and snow was the order of the day, and we all enjoyed ourselves, even those of us who spent most of the time on the ice and little on our skates. Greek Letter Day was postponed from December to J anuary due to President Kennedy's death. The pledges Josephine C hang

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;\; OuR FALL semester began by extending our knowledge beyond that of our own chapter. It was all possible when Gayle McKenny, Lorraine Jessop, Janis Cash and Gail Lynch went as representatives of our chapter to a district convention given by the Alpha Epsilon Chapter at Western Illinois University. Although our mernbers were only able to attend the weekend meeting for a short while, they did bring back many useful and exciting suggestions. The Sunday our district representatives returned we had our sorority rush teas. Our tea m ust have been successful, because we gained five new and wonderful pledges. Tradition has held that the pledges give a party for the members before they become active. aturally, the fall semester was no exception. Our pledges gave a breakfast party centered around a Swiss skiing theme. The members came in costume according to the theme, and as decided by the pledges. It proved to be a lot of fun, but was also a chance for actives and pledges to tie the bonds of sisterhood more securely. Homecoming was the highlight of the semester. We were very proud of Gayle McKenny and Ann Jeffries who were elected to the Homecoming Queen' s court. In addition, we were awarded first prize for our float depicting the song "I've Got the World On String Sitting On A Rainbov ." Founders' Day was celebrated b havinoour parents attend a Sunda afternoon dinner. Then our Pre ident Ga le M Kenn ',

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d~re~ted the traditional ceremony. Not only

d1d 1t reaffirm our ties of sisterhood but also helped our parents understand the ' meaning of sorority more fully. Our brother fraternity, Sigma Tau Gamma, helped us celebrate th e Christmas holiday. W e first went to the Baptist Children's I:Jm~ e where we entertained the chi ldren by smgmg carols, serving punch and cookies, and by distributing gifts. In addition, at our brother's fraternity house, we presented Holly House, an open house for the whole campus. As other years, both these events were a success and very rewarding. Now we are looking forward to the sprinO' semester which should be as busy and excit~ ing as in the past. We also hope that our sisters in other chapters have a good and prosperous spring.- ANN MAciNTOSH

ALPHA THETA

Homecoming Highlights A Busy November ;\'. "To BE or not to be ... a Greek" was the name of the skit depicting sorority life presented to all the University of Detroit rushees at the first general rush tea. Behind the scenes were Chairman Mary Beth M cCarthy and Co-Chairman Marie Gray anxiously looking on as m embers from the five sororities on campus acted out the skit on sorority life. After the skit, the rushees circulated among the sorority members. The A:::ST's wore the green suits tha t the members had made for themselves last summer. A white blouse with a green monogramed ~T complemented the skirts and jackets. Two other rush teas followed this initial tea. At the conclusion of rushing, Mary Sue Roulo was ribboned pledged. Greek Week in September was an exciting, as well as hectic, week for the Alpha Theta chapter. During the tandem bike race, Carol Harris skinned her leg after missing a turn and falling off the bike. Luckily, that was the only mishap for the Alpha Theta chapter during Greek games. ANCHOR

Initiation time for Ma ry Sue Roulo. front row center.

Our congratulations are extended to Mary Beth McCarthy, who was elected treasurer of the Panhellenic Council at U. of D. ~T members, Marilyn Johnson and Barbara Busby, were privileged to ride in the new 1964 Chrysler during the half-time show of an October football game. The Top of the Flame was the restaurant where the Alpha Theta chapter joined the Theta chapter and the Detroit a lumnae in the candlelighting ceremony to celebrate Founders' Day on November 2. Mrs. John Shada was the guest speaker. The menu consisted of roast sirloin of beef, browned potatoes, salad of tossed greens, homemade bread and French vanilla ice cream. The girls had a delicious lunch , as well as a wonderful time meeting other A:::ST's. The highlight of ovember was Homecoming for Alpha Theta chapter. The girls worked hard and long on the float, which had the theme of the Kool cigarette commercial. The Kool penguin, worked inside the float by Mary Sue Roulo and Barbara Busby, skied down a hill right over the head of the opposing football player. The penguin was dressed as a victorious U . of D . football player . The A:::ST's had a tremendous job working on this float ; but, with the help of the alumnae, they constructed an attractive float. Another one of A:::ST's projects during

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Homecoming week was the supporting of Marilyn Johnson for H omecoming queen. The Society of American Military Engineers sponsored Marilyn. After eight weeks of pledging, Mary Sue Roulo was initiated as a member of the Alpha Theta chapter at .the home of Marlene Piet. The A~T ' s attended Mass together before the

Marilyn Johns on. Alpha Theta, ran for Homecoming Queen.

ceremony. The morning was concluded with breakfast at a nearby restaurant. Several parties were planned for the A~T' s and their dates this fall semester. Before Thankgiving, a fall party was planned. In D ecember, the plans for a surprise Birthday party for Carol H arris were successful. The Saturday between Christmas and New Year was the time for another date party. During the C hristmas holidays, a hen party with Theta chapter was held at the home of Marie Gray. Since th e Alph a Theta girls are intere ted in diamonds, a representative from the C ha rl es K ent R eaver Company poke to th e o-irls about the important factor to watch for in a diamond. After the talk, diamond were displayed, a nd the girls tried on differe nt diamonds and etting . Th e a nnu al niversity of D etroit Christmas Basket contest was entered . The basket was made in the shape of a church. Also, for Christmas, the Alpha Sigma T au sorority wi hed the students of U. of D . a M erry Christmas by writing in th e snow. To conclude the fall semester, the Alpha Th eta o-irls a ttended a frolicking pajama party at the home of Marilyn J ohnson. Plans are now b eing made for a successful spring rush.-BARBARA BusBY

ALPHA IOTA

Renovates House

Cold w e ath e r brought warm g reetings from Alpha Sigma Tau-a m essage in the s now in front of the Union.

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;\; TH E ISTERS of Alpha Iota returned this fall to find the living rooms and kitchen of the chap ter house painted a bright, cheerful, off-white. The living room al o boa t brand -n ew draperies and r euphol tered furni ture. The deep blue-green of our n ew carpeting in the front h all and on th e tair matche the furniture a nd drape . Our social activities b eo-an earl y thi ear. On eptember 30 we invited our alumnae to our first all-sorority buffet dinner of th ear, and everyone enjoyed the ta t di h e of our n ew cook. The sororit h ad it fir t cultural A


Pictured above is Alpha Iota's Susie Kleiman and her cardboard trombone.

theater party. For those sisters who rise early on Saturdays, we have an almost-we kly bowling party at a nearby country lub. Two of our sisters, Juniors Janet Glunts and Nancy Ach'ber, have left us this semest r to participate in, respectively, th e Syracuse Semester-in-Italy a nd Semester-in-Fran e programs. Two others, Senior Ell en Ch rman and Junior Sue Rubinsohn are happily planning June weddings. We are now engross d in plans for pring semester. N ext week we will have a bevy of n ew fre hman pl edges to share it with us.V ALERIE Er EN

ALPHA KAPPA

Has A Rousing and Successful Year

Louise Baumann and Joy Flachner, Alpha Iota, share a story during the Founders' Day buffet.

event on October 7, when we all went to hear Mantovani and his orchestra. His record albums will now swell several Alpha Sig collections, we're sure! On October 9 we had a faculty tea at the house, to which we invited many of our favorite professors. Autumn also brought formal upperclass rush, and we pledged three lovely girls, Barbara J aslow, Ronnie Bogart and Laima Sans. The first social event in which the e new girls participated was our annual quare dance, held this year in conjunction with Gamma Phi Beta sorority. We celebrated Founders' Day November 4 with a buffet supper and ceremony, and four days after that we had a formal sorority dinner at the Hotel Syracuse, followed by the annual Panhel Ball. During the Christmas vacation those of us from the New York area met on Broadway for a most enjoyable ANCHOR

;'\; THE FIRST half of th e 1963-64 co ll egiate year was a rousing one for Alpha K appa Chapter. Under the direction of Rush Chairman Barb Ligon the membership quota ha been fill ed. During formal rush in ovember we p ledged 18 girls: J ennifer Dunbar, Barb Kopp, Louise Stephenson, Judy F ee, M arcea Overbeck, Stahr Pateman, Barb Bingham, Sandy Baratta, Nancy Malsin, Ruth M erritt Linda Frigard, Bonnie Mac Leod, Loui e Burger, Linda Taber, Cindy O stanek, Annette Santagata, Karen M ylenbu h and J udy Faris. Later Pl edge Trainer Marsha Thayer added Sally Elliot, Libby Estel, Bonnie Pedel pher, Paula Shore, Jill Simons and Cindy H erman to the list of those preparing to become A~T actives. Our group now has 60 m embers. Part of our successful rush season re ulted from the round of parties, the bigo-est one being our theme party "The Land of O z." For this most of the members dressed in pastel shirt waist dresses covered with pinafores, and a few girls represented various characters from the fairy tale Th e W izard of Oz. The decorations included a yellow brick road leading up to and through the orority

77


"The Land of Oz" rush party even has a tornado blown house .

Patricia K. Smith. Alpha Kappa Chapter, has joined Eli Lilly and Company as a microbiologist. She will assist in the mutation, selection and evaluation of antibiotic-producing organisms. Born in Steubenville, Ohio, Patricia was reared in Follansbee. West Virginia, and was graduated from high school there in 1958. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Marietta College in 1961 and a Master of Science degree in microbiology from West Virginia University in January. 1964. Patricia is a member of the American Society for Microbiology and Beta Beta Beta, biology recognition society. She resides at 3710 North Meridian Street in Indianapolis.

house, poppy fields, a mural of the Emerald City, a huge rainbow and even Dorothy's tornado-blown house. The rushees particularly enjoyed their favors, barking toy dogs,

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representative of our real dog Todo, the liveliest member of the affair. Homecoming preceded formal rush. Liz Lennon our energetic and bevvitching queen candidate, and our chicken-wired whale, riding on his float bed, brought Alpha Kappa into the limelight. Liz was presented to the campus in a traditional campaiun serenade, at which we showed her as a "Sophisticated Lady." The whale spouted out a football victory to complement the float slogan "MC Whale Swallow Hiram. Spout out a Victory." Alpha Kappa changed its way of living by redecorating the sorority house living room. Thanks to the interior decorating skill of Mrs. Gross, mother of sister Nancy, we have a lovely blue and white living room. We proudly opened it to campus admiration February 19 at our annual Open House. Our Big and Little Sister Christmas Party uncovered a much-needed surprise. The mothers presented us vvith a 50-place setting of silver. In addition the alumnae gave us a silver tea set and a center piece. Members of the sorority have reaped campus honors. Nancy Gross, sorority President, was elected to Who's Who In American Colleges and pledged Pi Delta Epsilon, the journalism honorary. Kathy Olson was invited to join the history honorary, Phi Alpha Theta. Alpha Psi Omega, the dramatics honorary, pledged Judy Plummer. Reine Reele and Ginny Eaton were given bids to the economics honorary, Tau Pi Phi. '"'e are formulating plans for an orphans' birthday party in March. W e have been sending birthday card to the children at the Ma.rietta Childrens' Home. The party vvill be a combined celebration of the birthday . Thanks to a lot of hard working A~T our understanding hou emother, Mom Miller, our patient ad isors, Mrs. Hutt and Mr . Draper, and our helpful patrones e and alumnae, we are riding high.- JuDITH PLu !lMER

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ALPHA LAMBDA

Has A Full Calendar of Activities ;\; THE ALPHA Lambdas tore the last leaf from the calendar of 1963 a nd opened a new year in fine style. Beginning with rush the activities were fun -fill ed and exciting. The annual coke party, held by the Panhellenic Council was . ' enJoyed by all girls interested in sorority and sorority girls alike. An open house was next and gave the spirited Tau's a chance to unveil their n ew outfits of emerald green shift jumpers and yellow monogrammed blouses. We are all very proud of the new outfits and of what they represent. " Sleepy Time Tau" filled the next spot on the calendar and found girls in night clothes, equipped with stuffed animals and pillows, enjoying food and entertainment. Favors of green and yellow slippers and hairnets decorated in green and yellow were given each girl.

Alpha Lambdas pictured around their advisor, "Miss Pat," at a rush party.

ANCHOR

Alpha Lambdas gathered at the home of a patroness.

O ctober 16 marked the day of the departure of the " Alpha Sigma Tau Showboat," the last rush party of th e season. As it traveled down the river the old South came alive with the old colonel, wife and son, Old M ammy, Tom Sawyer, a nd even a swamp tree stepped down the gangpla nk. Tall glasses, decorated with a Southern face, were fi lled first with mint julep-A~T style-and later with a goldfish, to be given as favors. Candy dishes fill ed with green and yellow mints added to the favors. Bids were issued to 20 girls a week after their return, via the Showboat, from down river. These girls were : Barbara Blecher, Carol Cobert, M ary Ann Cuba, M artha English, Barbara H a rmon, Anne Harrison, K ay H eppner, Audrey Hoy, M ary K ent, Dorothy Miller, Sybil orris, Sherry R eeve, Burley J ean Semones, Emma Violand, Julia Ware, Sandi Wa tkins, K endall Westbrook, H elen Whitehurst, Patti Wilkins and Brenda Wilson. The days slipped by and the n ational Founders' D ay was celebrated with a banquet a t Grant's T avern. Miss Pat, our advisor, gave us th e message of "Hold High the Torch. " Mi ss D a niel, our former advisor, added thoughts on what reflects a sorority. Mrs. Fred M cCoy a patroness, joined us as a special guest. The pledges did a fine job with the Pine Mountain Settlement School supply collec-

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Miss Maryland,

1963

Th e title of Miss Maryland of 1963 was won by Miss Carolyn Bond Wright, Alpha Lambda, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bernhardt Wright of Fo rest Hill, Maryland . Winning this title gave Carolyn the opportunity to enter the coveted Miss America contest, a $1,000 scholarship to furth er her education and opportunities to serv e her state by visiting institutions and hospitals and participating in social events.

Carolyn Wright parades in fo rmal competition for the 1963 title of Miss Maryland.

Alpha Lambda is very proud of Carolyn.

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ti~n . The pledges have a lso made us happy w1th the new decoration theme they have beg~n in the sorority room--one we hope to contmue. The days passed quickly on the calendar and the Christmas season was upon us. To begin our Christmas festiviti es the m embers were given a supper by the patronesses at the home of Mrs. Fred McCoy. Good food , singing and pleasant company were enjoyed. As exam week crept in upon us, Miss Pat gave a "coffee" in her home as a rest in studying and as a final chance to get together in 1963. The "Big Sisters" and " Little Sisters" h ad a pizza get-together to begin the n ew yea r on a fri endly note and move the activiti es of Alpha Sigm a Tau into 1964. Alpha Lambda's have earned many individual honors. Joan Brown and J ani e Jones hold dormitory council offices. Esther Skrivseth and Carol N eubauer were chosen to be junior residents. Carolyn Wright was chosen Miss Maryland and participated in the Mi ss America pageant at Atlantic City. Carol Samuels was issued a bid by K appa D elta Pi, an honorary fraternity. Four Alpha Lambda's were elected to

Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities. They are Mary Sue Lowe, Emm a Overstreet, JoAnn Wharton and Carol Samuels. W e are proud of the Alpha Lambda's and their ach ievements.-DIANE HAZELwooD

Alpha Mu 's "Little Stars" from China.

stalled as members in the Zeta chapter of Alpha C hi. They were Judy K emp, Ann Connell and Susan Peterson. Ann Connell was elected to the coll ege Wh o's Who. H arriette J ane Buzbee was selected as a member of the M ad emoiselle 1964-65 College Board. For our fall rush parties we asked " '"' hat' Behind The Green Door?" and took the rushees on a "Trip Around The World With The Alpha Taus." The Alpha Taus a nd our brothers, Sigma Tau Gamma, won third p lace on the float display by presenting the " Wheel of Proo-ress." Nancy Avery won second place on the decora ted windows in the schoo l cafeteria.

ALPHA MU

Observes Founders' Day t THE ALPHA Mu chapter of Alpha Sigma Tau at Arkansas A&M observed their Founders' Day October 29, 1963. The m embers, pledges, advisor and patronness enjoyed a breakfast at the home of the advisor, Mrs. Lela Willis. After the traditional candlelighting ceremony, the girls welcomed their new patronness, Mrs. Donna Smith. The Alpha Mu chapter is proud to an nounce that three of their members were inANCHOR

The Alpha Mu fall rushees enjoyed a Hawaiian Luau.

Bl


NATIONAL COTTON PICKING QUEEN THE MISS NATIONAL COTTON PICKING QUEEN title was won by Bobbye Faye Gammel, Alpha Mu, 20-yearold daughter of Mr . and Mrs. ] . P. Gamm el, at a cont est in Blyth eville, Arkansas. Bobbye Faye's first appearance as a queen was in 1960, w hen she was Chicot County Fair Queen. Sh e then was named Miss South east Arkansas of 196 1. Wh en she was a freshman at Arkansas A&M College she was named Miss Arkansas A&M, and later participat ed in th e Miss Arkansas pageant and was a finalist. I n the fall of her sophomore year she was second runner-up to the Fairest of the

â&#x20AC;˘

1963

Fair, at the M id-S outh Fair, in M emphis, T ennessee. I n the summer of 1963, Bobbye Faye was A rkansas A&M's representative in the N ational Queen of Queens Pageant held in Pensacola, Florida, where she was third runn er-up . H er next honor was being named first runner-up to th e Arkansas Poultry Princess w hich is Arkansas' R epresentative in the Miss Un iverse Pageant . After being named the National Cotton Picking Queen, she was named Miss Personality of Arkansas. Bobbye Faye is a junior at Arkansas A&M College and is acting President of the Alpha Mu Chapter of Alpha Sigma Tau .

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Bobbye F ay e pr e se nts President Babin of Arkansas A&M College a certifica te naming him an honorary National Cotton Picker.

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A

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BOBBYE FAYE GAMMEL

Sue Marks, of Pine Bluff, won ommerce Queen for 1964. Also, she was first runnerup in the Miss Boll Weevil contest. Once again we are very proud of our president, Bobbye Faye Gammel. In O ctober she won the National Cotton Picking Qu een contest held in Blythevi lle, Arkansas. Thi s yea r's Miss America, Donna Axum, was the holder of the title last year. Bobbye F aye was a gu est at the Homecomings for Donna Axum, Miss America, held in Hot Springs and El Dorado, Arkansas. Bobbye Faye was also elected as Miss Personality of Arkansas. She is al so going to compete in the annual Miss Arkansas Pageant. Carol Hickingbothm is the editor of th e school annual.- J uoiE BJHM

ALPHA NU

Is Off With A Running Start

Bobbye Faye stands under an arch of cotton holding a bouquet of cotton balls after being named National Cotton Picking Queen.

Also named "Miss Personality" of Arkansas

ANCHOR

;\; THE BEGINN ING of fall classes brought the beginning of many activities. Of course, full-time rushing started again. Shortly after the term began, Hom ecoming weekend rolled around. Tha t m eant that a floa t must be made. We constru cted one with a la rge kicking mu le and a fa ltering bearca t. Following th e game, vvhich we won, our chapter held a n Alumnae T ea in the Student U nion . It was ni ce to see some of the girls again. Some had come a long way for that weekend. Promptly after Homecoming activities, we had our Founders' D ay Ba nquet. Tha t was held on N ovember 17- a little late becau e of other confli cting activities. The dinner was h eld a t Todd Private Dining Hall. The beginning of winter classes brought the beginning of rush parties. There wa one progressive party before the Christmas vacation , and the formal rush p artie were in January. Just before vacation, Mrs. E arl F . Peterson, our National President, visited us to give us a few tips on rushino- b efore formal rush

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actually began . We are thankful for all h elpful advice. Mrs. J. vValdo Hinshaw, our new area supervisor, was able to be with us a nd attend our first rush party in J anuary. We really enjoyed h aving h er, too, as she gave u a lot of h elp a nd encouragement. R egardle s of the fun at all the parties, everyone was glad wh en rush was over. The new p ledges are now busy on their p ledge lessons a nd the actives are busy making plans for com ing convocations and our formal. The formal will be in March, but there is never enough time for arrangements. We p lan to h ave a n Oriental theme. Spring term, too, prom ise to be very bu y. There will be election of new officers, spring com 路ocation and dances, bake sales, work days and a great many other activities.CAROL WEBSTER

Aria Cantor is Alpha Omega's Greek Goddess.

ALPHA OMEGA

Enthusiastically Travels The Sorority Road " A N ever-Ending R oad .. ." Sorority life is like a n ever-ending roadwinding, curving, twisting, bending-leading orors to unknown p laces and " 路onderful moments. Alpha Omega Chapter enthusiastically traveled this road and had a wonderful fa ll term. After rushing " Around The World" we pledged 24 lovely and talented girls, thus adding new laurels to our group . The pledges began a successfu l pledge period by winning second a nd third place in the Freshman Queen Contest. Another lu cky pledge was accepted as a semi-finalist in the Honorary Cadet Colonel Contest of the Angel Flight on campus. During Greek Week, the pledges continued to make us proud by winning third place in the Greek Goddess Contest and econd place in Play-Day. At Pledge ing

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our girls p ut on a wonderful show. Finally, using th e theme of the " Suffering of Job," the Pledge C lass of 1963 won fir t p lace in the Pledge Scrapbook Contest. Other highlights in our successful fall term were our Parent Open H ouse and our Thanksgiving Open H ouse. Activitie continually enter the Alpha Omega oror' life-a trip to Bear M ountain, an ice-skating party a drag, a faculty tea, a theater party to a Broadway show. During intersession, 35 girls went to You ngs Gap H otel in Liberty, New York. They enj oyed everything from kiing a nd ice-skating to wimming a nd dancing. There is also a serious part of sorority life. During the pledge period, our pledaes collected money for the L eague School for mentally retarded children. Thi spring, we will again, a nd we hope ju t as ucces fully as before, collect money for the American Cancer Society. We are a! o planning to run, in conjunction wi th Alpha Epsilon Pi fraterni ty the Sweetheart D a nce on campu . These events will, we hope, make our prinoterm a ucces fu l and a wonderful a the fall term.- R OBERTA ILVER TEl

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No packaged program by Catherine Alt Schultz, Chairman, Chapter Programs, in The Spring, 1961 , Key of Kappa Kappa Gamma t You wouldn't dream of building a house without a plan. No matter how simpl e your needs, a design must be made, a blueprint followed, if you are to be sure that the finished product fulfills your ideas, your aims and your satisfactions. Building your chapter program is like building a house. It requires this same kind of pre-planning and execu tion. You must know what you need, what you want, what materials are available a nd what methods you vvill use to bring it into being. When you look at your design, your blueprint, ask yourself th ese questions: Does it have a strong foundation? Your scholarship is the strong firm base upon w hich everything else rests. A quiet house, an intellectual atmosphere, guidance, encouragem ent - these are the building blocks of a good scholarship program. It is functional? Chapt er organization must be streamlined enough to eliminate unnecessary duties yet be strong and firm enough to give smooth, efficient and unobtrusive operation. Is it comfortable? Th e program of the personnel committee is responsible for this phase . D oes your plan have dignity, warmth, charm? I s there time for friendship, provision for individual diff erences, opjJort unities for development? Does it look to the future? Th e pledge training program must be strong and vigorous and geared toward the more mature st"udents entering college today. I n their hands lies the contin ual growth and wellbeing of the chapter. Does it have large windows? Our campuses are rich in cultural resources and opportumttes. Mak e provision for )lOUr chapt er to participate and enjoy them. During their undergraduate years students' tastes are being d etermined and interests stimulated. Is the ornamentation adequate a nd in good taste ? R ecreation and social events are n eeded and desirable in any well-balanced program. Be sure that .fun and fello wship are pro vided in satisfa ctory proportion and are always in good tast e. Kappa Kappa Gamma offers you no packaged program, no ready-made bluep rint. Any program for Youth must be flexible and creative if it is to help young people find their way in a changing world. We must m eet the challenge of today's ma ture tudent and liYely curriculum. It is up to each individual chapter to assess its needs and its resource a nd de ian its program with discrimination, courage and imagination . One chapter which ha a lready done this writes: "We've stopped vegetating and started cogitating. Soon we hope to begin acti\路a tina." ANCHOR

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Alumnae News

A Message From ______

ELIZABETH WILSON, NATIONAL ALUMNAE CHAIRMAN t THE growth of a sorority may be indicated by the number of collegiate chapters added to the roll, but its strength can be measur ed only by the loya l support of all alumnae. Those of you who read Walter Cronkite's article,- " Why Fraternities," in the 1963 Fall ANCHOR, will agree that we, too, received much from sorority as collegiates, and many of u are sti ll receiving as alumnae. When you accepted membership in Alpha Sigma Tau you pledged your continued lo a lty and support as an alumna. In accordance with the Panhellenic Creed Alpha i!!IIla Tau Alumnae fee l that " loyal ervice to chapter, co llege and communit " i an ideal for 86

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FROM ELIZABETH WILSON ~hich to strive. Although you may not be privileged to parttc1pate actively in an organIzed Alumnae Chapter or Club and enjoy continued close friendship with sorority sisters, you can lend support to Alpha Sigma Tau in your own way as an individual- offering encouragement and assistance to the National Staff and Collegiate Chapter. Have you thought to send a message of congratulations to a collegiate sister for an honor bestowed? . . . have you returned to your Alumnae R epresentative the request for news about yourself? . . . have you expressed to her your appreciation for compiling the Newsletter? ... have you informed the Central Office of your new name or address ? .. . have you sent to the Collegiate Rush Chairman the information about a girl whom you would like to see an Alpha Sigma Tau? These courtesies, which require little time and less effort, will revive those feelings of p leasure enjoyed as a collegiate member by keeping alive your active interest in Alpha Sigma Tau.

AKRON -CANTON

Will Know ALL The Convention Songs ;\; THE AKRON-CANTON Alumnae Chapter began its fall season with a luncheon and business meeting at "The Pines Country Club" in Canton. Nora Cooper acted as hostess. A business meeting followed the luncheon and detailed plans were made for the 1963-64 m eetings. In October, the Chapter was entertained at the home of President Eleanor Halas. Clothing was collected by members to be sold to the new, and nearly n ew shop. Proceeds will go toward our Philanthropic Project. And this year we will donate the proceeds of any money-making project to refurnishing and refinishing the A~T Room at Penland School. The Founders' Day Luncheon was held at the Country Club in Canton on November 2, 1963. Lillian Ackerman and Barbara Gordon acted as hostesses. The tables were beautifully decorated with flowers, candles, favors and place-cards. An impressive candle-lighting service followed the luncheon. We spent the remainder of the afternoon singing soror-

ANCHOR

ity songs with our President, who directed and accompanied us on the pia no. (This N ational Music Chairman says tha t one chapter will know all the songs to be sung a t the Convention in D etroit. ) The Christmas luncheon was at th e home of Susie M cBee. Christmas music tha t had been previously taped was played throughout the afternoon. Gifts were exchanged by m embers and after a short business meeting, pla ns were made to help a needy fa mily. Susie's home as always was very beautifully decorated . In F ebruary, Thelma Eggleston hosted our meeting in h er home. After the busines m eeting, we took pictures for the ANCHOR. Thelma has a beautiful n ew H a mmond organ- and Eleanor again m ad e us practice Convention songs! In March we will gather at Fra ncis Miller's home in Akron. After the business m eeting, our social hour will be devoted to "D ecorate a Hat," for auction. The girls buying the hat must wear it to the April meeting. Proceeds will go towards the Penland Fund. The May meeting will be at "The Women's City Club" in Akron . Hostesses are Pansy Croye, La Grace Foote and Eleanor Halas. The June m eeting will be held in Alliance, Ohio, at the Alliance Country Club. Hostes es are Jan Gross and Kay K endalL- MIRIAM GRUNEAU

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S TATES -I T&M

PH OTO

In the left foreground is M iss Camille D orothy Gennaro, a Baton R ouge Alumna, who reigned as Queen of the recent Kreive of Anubis Carni vall Ball at the Municipal Auditorium during Ma rdi Gras. H er maids are pictured in the background.

BATON ROUGE

Re-Organizes ;\; 0 ' NovEMBER 19, 1963, Mrs. Susie M cBee, ational Editor, visited our group and helped us reorganize and elect officers. The officers selected were Camille Gennaro, Presid ent: M a ry Ann Parker, Vice President: Fra n Winstan ley, Secretary ; and Noye R obbins, Treasurer. Our first get-together was for Founders' Day. Six of us m et a t Don's R estaurant for a n even mg supper. On D ecember 7, we had luncheon at Bob a nd J a ke' R esta urant. Our first business meeting wa held a t two of our m embers' homes, Mary Ann Parker and oye Robbins, on J a nuary 18. As our yearl y project we are coveri ng two pillows in the sorority colors to present to the Southeastern Phi collegiate cha pter for use in their sorority ceremonies. We were proud to learn tha t Phi collegiates received th e second highest number of 88

pledges in this year's fall rush. We are hoping to make future p lans with the collegiates so we might become better acquainted. On January 14, President Camille Gennaro reigned as queen of the Krewe of Anubis Carniva l ball in ew Orleans durina- the M a rdi Gras festivities. (S ee photo above.) Our group, as of now, is small, but we are trying our best to interest m an y other i ters. - CAM ILLE GE NARO

If any Alumnae in the Baton R ouge area or new Alumnae are interested in the Baton R ouge Alumnae Chapter please contact Mrs. Fran Winstanley, 2867 D rusilla, Baton R ouge 9, L ouisiana. W e would be delight ed to have you at our m eetings.

BLUEFIELD

Enjoys Poetry Program ;\; THE FIR T faJl meeting of the Bluefi ld Alumnae of Alpha i!!ma Tau wa ep-

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tember 3, 1963, at the home of Virginia Bailey. All the new officers were present and President Marcella Whitlock called the m eeting to order . There were 13 m embers and one guest who enjoyed an interesting program, "The Life of Christ," given by M rs. Darlene Buchanan, sister-in-law of our vicepresident, Mrs. Joyce Buchanan . The presentation featured colored slides depicting scenes of the life of Christ as seen in sta tue form ; the narration by D arlene was very informative. The O ctober m eeting was a never-to-beforgotten event h eld a t th e home of the p resident, M a rcella Whitlock. Dr. Louise M cN eill Pease, alumna of the sorority, member of the Concord College faculty and poet, was the guest speaker . Dr. Pease, who received her doctorate at West Virginia U niversity, is a native of West Virginia. She has had three books of poem s published : Mountain Whit e, Gauley M ountain and Time I s Our H ouse. For the progra m Dr. Pease read some of h er best poems ; and a ll present enjoyed them thoroughly. November was by fa r the busiest month of sorority activities for the Bluefield Alumnae. The month started with the annual Founders' Day Banquet, h eld November 3 at Concord College in the college Center. Collegiates from Omicron chapter a nd alumnae from Athens, Bluefi eld and Princeton attended the dinner. The n ext event of the month was a joint m eeting of the Princeton-Athens and Bluefi eld Alumnae at the home of Betty Sue H edrick, in Athens. Also invited to this m eeting were the Athens C ollegia te C hapter and patronesses. The program was "The History of Concord College," given by Mrs. R. T. Hill of Athens. W e ended our November activities with a Thanksgiving dinner m eeting November 17 a t the home of N ancy Ruddell. Guests were the husbands of the m embers ; Dr. and Mrs. M eade M cN eil of Athens (Mrs. M cN eil is a p a troness of the collegiate chapter and charter m ember of the sorority ); Miss Mary Catherine Bones of Princeton, alumna representa tive; and friends of the sorority m embers. The D ecember m eetin g was h eld at the home of Mrs. Joyce Buch ana n in Bluefield, Virginia. The gu est speaker was Mrs. R eANCHOR

becca Lineberger who presen ted "The Season of Adven t a nd C ustoms Associat d W ith It." After th e p rogram mem bers wrapped packages for a six-yea r-old boy. We know hi s heart was gladdened by the many lovely clothes a nd toys that were u nder h is C hristmas tree. In J a nu ary we met at the home of Mrs. H enrietta H a milton a nd our president preen ted a progra m on cul ture-its defin ition a nd a pplication. M embers have con tin ued to support the building fu nd for the collegiates with the proceeds of th e monthly "goody prize" going to th e fun d . Also we have continued helping th e collegia te chapter with our a nnual $5.00 gift.- BARBARA WARDEN

BUFFALO

Hat Fashion Show Bene/its Social Service ;\:. E u NICE Pu NDT was hostess in August a t a p icnic supper for the board members at her summer home in So uth Wales. Fin al p lan s for the year's p rogram s and events were d iscussed and a rranged. In Septem ber, we enj oyed a delicious potluck supper at the lovely home of Ruth La ne in East Pembroke. T hen we shared our urnmer activities and experien ces. Catherine Crocuston was our graciou hostess for a dessert m eeting in O ctober. M embers of the classes of 1939- 1944 were spe ially contacted and honored . Catherine, our social service chairm an, guided us in the con truction of paper turkey favors for child re n in the hospita ls a t T ha nksgiving time. President E velyn G ra mpp enterta ined the board members a t a m eeting in her home in O ctober. Our a nnu al celebration of Founder ' D ay was held on Saturday, November 2, a t the O ld Post R oad I nn. After the m pmn a candle-lighting ceremony led by eromca

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Wilkins, with a special candle in memory of Adeline Easterling, we enjoyed a presentation by Agnes Mullarky. " Talking Through Your Hat" was complete with lovely hats representing various periods of our nation's growth. In November, we enjoyed a Dinner-andTheater-Party. After a delicious dinner at the Prime Rib R estaurant, we saw a fine performance of "Critics Choice" by the Amherst Players at the Smallwood Drive School. This was a benefit performance for Buffalo City Panhellenic. Our annual Christmas Punch Party was held in D ecember a t the beautiful home of Hazel Turner. About 40 members and their guests enjoyed punch and snacks prepared by the hostess and co-chairman, Edith Ramaley, and a fine committee. Janet Bartlett was hostess for our January dessert meeting. Each member brought a beautifu lly gift-wrapped white elephant. Following the business meeting an auction sale was held, and all profits were used to benefit the Sorority Convention Fund. On February 24, we enjoyed a dinner at Helen N eville's which was followed by a fashion show of new spring hats. All proceeds will benefit our Social Service Fund. The Buffalo Panhellenic Association will sponsor a Sherry Party and an exhibit of the art of Hans Hofmann at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in April. This event is a lways a highlight of sorority activities in our area.ORMA MARTIN

DENVER

Works With Group of Retarded Children ;\; OuR SEPTEMBER meeting was at the home of President Bobbie Larve. We had a white elephant sale- and it was a huge success. In November we went to the Profile Room in the Stanley Plaza Hotel for the Founders' Day Luncheon. A very lovely g roup from

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Greeley brought their new advisor-Mrs. John Hickman. A Peace Corps representative was the speaker for the occasion. Juanita Emenick was our hostess in November when Mrs. H . Hubbard gave a very interesting demonstration on gift wrapping. Our Christmas lunch eon was a t Edna McCormick's house where we had a aift exchange and Edna's da ughters entertained us with folk singing. Margaret Cudmore hosted the January meeting and we had an interesting landscapina lecture. We are looking forward to our February "hat party'' which will be at Ruth Ewer's house. A local firm is supplying the hat which will be sold for $3.98 each . For every ha t sale we receive a certain percentage of the purchase price for our treasury. After the sale we will have dessert and play cards. M eeting attenda nce has been very good, and we have had some fine programs and, we feel, a good year thus far. We still busily work with a group of retarded ch ild ren .VERNA PAGE

DETROIT

Welcomes You to 1964 Convention ;\; THE DETROIT Alumnae chapter has had a most enjoyable half-year, highlighted by some very interesting programs a t our meetings, a noticeable increase in a ttendance and especially, anticipation and enthusiastic ~Ian足 ning for the coming Convention . We are all looking forward to welcoming our sisters to D etroit and Michigan, the "Water Wonderland" of the U .S.A. Do plan to make the AlT convention a part of your family vacation this year! Our September meeting was held in the beautiful lounge of Wayne State University Alumni House. We heard a most intere tina talk on the atomic reactor plant in Monro , Michiaan. Rose Marie chmidt r ported on A

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the summer meeting of the Convention Planning Committee. We invited our collegiate sisters from Theta and Alpha Theta chapters to our October meeting at Genevieve R epeta's, and entertained them and ourselves with folk songs on record. As a special treat, we heard a "live" performance of beautiful interpretation and depth by a friend of Ellenjane Soltesz' . Founders' Day took us to the "Top of the Flame," one of Detroit's n ewest and "viewest" restaurants. Theta chapter members made name tags for the occasion, and Alpha Theta members made candle holders. We were all inspired and impressed by the talk on " The Wonderful World of Women" given by our guest speaker, Mrs. John Shada. Our November m eeting was held at the home of one of our newest and most active members, Bette Roeling from Iota Chapter. Freda Harrington, the advisor for Theta Chapter, and a m ember of Wayne State's Art Education D epartment, showed us how to make original Christmas decorations. At Christmas time, we m et at Marlene Jennett's lovely new house trailer. We each brought a gift for an underprivileged teenager. Later, Anna Ukrop and Ladene Schoen brought the gifts to Berat House and entertained .the girls at tea . A speaker from the Lafayette Clinic, a public psychiatric clinic in D etroit, discussed the work of that organization at our January meeting at Ruth Brundle's.- KATHLEEN MoNTICELLO

EMPORIA

Works Closely With the Actives ;\. THE EMPORIA Alumnae Chapter m et at the Iota Chapter house in September. Officers were elected a nd installed by the outgoing President Jan Zerener Green. I n October we entertained the new pledANCHOR

In

Me~nori aJU

JANE K. ATWOOD WILE R or. ' g~ mzer, sponsor a nd alu mna of Alpha S1gma Tau at Emporia, passed into the Chapter Eternal on February 13, 1964. A teacher, club woman and historian M rs. Wilbur was associate professor of geography at Ohio University. A charter member of the Fort Gower Chapter of the Daughters of the American Colonists, and a charter member of the Da ughters of the American R evolution, during World War I Mrs. Wilbur did Red Cross work a nd was in military intelligence, servi ng in Washington,

D. C.

ges. This is always an enj oyable time and one the pledges apparently appreciate, too. Founders' Day was celebrated with the collegia te chapter a t a downtown restaurant. The patronesses and the Dean and Assistant D ean of Women were special guests. A local minister spoke to us, and the evening ended with the traditional but ever beautiful candlelighting ceremony. A Christmas party was held in the new home of our President, J an Zug Birch. An exchange of Christmas tree decorations was part of the evening's entertainment. Our husbands were special guests at a dinner held in on e of the n ewly decorated rooms in the Student Union on the campus. Cards were played but most of us enjoyed " just visiting." A few alumnae were able to meet with Mary Alice Peterson when she came for her inspection trip. We always enjoy our isit with h er. Suddenly rush week was over a nd there was a new group of pledges for us to meet. Sorority is so n ew to them they are eager for any informa tion we can give them . We also suspect they enjoy being the center of attention again after being so suddenly dropped from the rush week activities to the " lowly pledge" routine. Seriously though , there are never any complaints from them. They all seem to enjoy pledgeship but are glad when it is over.- Bu RNICE AcE

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FLINT

Founders' Day Program Highlights Their Year ;\. PERHAPS highlighting the year for Flint Alumnae chapter were the Founders' D ay dinner and th e cu ltura l program, the latter with husbands as guests. Ba rbara VanDette, Donna Essy and Pauline D empsey pl anned the former, with a professional book reviewer concluding the evening. For the latter event at the home of Lucille MaWhinney, a charming Negress, who had served in Liberia as Goodwill Ambassadress for the Chamber of Commerce, traced the history of the Negro in the United States and frankl y discussed racial problems. This year, the chapter returned to a mother-daughter luncheon ; Ross Church and Pauline Scudder served on the committee. As money-raising functions, the Chapter continued with its fall rummage sale and its January white-elephant sale. How one p erson's white elephant can be another's prize possession is amazing! Three new m embers are attending meetings: Joane Whiteman and Johanna Jung, Beta ; and Susan Halling, Alpha. Eloise Howes replaced Hazel Schultz as Alpha Eta Alumnae Representative. And to have Louise Leroy and J eanne Toomey back on the good-health list is gratifying. J eanne Toomey, by the way, is now supervising at the Michiga n School for the D eaf, the cadet teachers from University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Eastern Michigan University. J eanne Clark is serving this year as Flint Panhellenic president. Among proud parents are Shirley Green, whose daughter Susan participated in a European foreign-lang11age project ponsored last summer by Central Michigan niversity ; Pa uline D empsey, whose on David, Jr. , a senior at Howe Military School, is treasurer of the teenage group affili a ted with th e Internation a l A socia tion of Per onnel in Emplo -

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m ent Security and will assume his duties at the 1964 Convention in San Francisco which h e will a ttend with his parents this summer ; a nd V erna N ewman, whose son, Alfred, auditioned and was accepted to perform with the Russia n Bolshoi Ballet in East Lansing . In F ebruary, Eloise Howes and her husband enjoyed a Caribbean cruise, which included Panama and Caracas; a nd Hazel Schultz and her sister flew to H awaii. In M arch, Lucille M aWhinney a ttended the Conference for College Composition and Communication in New York City and spent a few extra days there with her husband . And in April, P auline Scudder and her husband vacationed in Florida and William sburg.LuciLLE MA vVHINNEY

KANSAS CITY

Hear A Handwriting Analysis Expert ;\. K.C .'s NEW slate of officers took over our September meeting at the beau tiful home of Louise Robertson . They are President Mary Anne Steinkuehler ; Vice-President, H elen Bowen ; Secretary, Marge Schneider ; Treasurer, Carol Thomas ; Historian and Editor, Georgine Wolf ; Chaplain, Carole Louk ; Social and Program Chairman, M arie Chamberlain. We h ad a wonderful turn-out and it was so enjoyable to see everyon e again and cha t over the past summer activities together. In O ctober, we had our annual White Eleph ant party at the home of Carole Louk and, needless to say, some of the items were truly " White Elephants," and no doubt \viii make a return appearance next year. All in all, it was grea t fun a nd created many a hearty laugh . Instead of celebrating with our u ual dinn er-out on Founder ' Day ,. all enjo red a deli ciou mea l a nd fitting proaram at the lovely home of M ara chneid r.

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In December our m e ting was cancelled because of severe weather. A bridge party followed the bu siness portion of our January m eeting a t th e cha rming home of Joy Lyons. Much to everyone's delight bridge a nd ch atter do m a ke a happy combination. Our F ebruary m eeting should p rove fascinating, for our guest tha t evening will be a handwriting analysis expert. N o doubt 路we' ll all learn some en lighten ing facts about ourselves. April will find us en tertaining our hu sbands with a dinner pa rty a t th e home of Connie Manahan. Connie was so gracious to offer h er lovely home for this occasion, which is one of the high lights on our year's calen da r. M ay arrives with the election of offi cers and a bridge session following. We do not meet through the summer so we bid " Adieu" until fall. If any n ew alumna has moved into our area or plans to be here in the future, p lease contact us, as we would be delighted to h ave you a t our m eetings.GEORGINE B. WoLF

LANSING

MUNCIE

Interesting Programs Highlight Meetings t

A ERIES of most in t resting topics has high lighted th e M uncie Alu mnae meetings this fall a nd win ter. In September, M rs. J osephine H arsh man narrat d slides she and her family h ad made titled "Our Cou ntry is Born ." She has a very extensive historical project a nd it was enj oyed by all of us. In D ecember, we were privileged to participate in th e " App recia tion of H oliday Music" at the home of Miss Ethel Li melick. Ou r most recent very in teresting and very edu cational activity has been "A Look at La pida ry." Mr. Edward Zetterberg, retired Muncie teacher of chemistry, shares most enthusiastically his eight-year-old hobby. These activities h ave been combi ned with get-togethers with the collegia tes at H omecoming, the Founders' D ay observance, P anhellenic T eas and parties, and so forth. Best wish es to Alpha Sigm a Tau in 1964! N ELL You NG

Is Small, but Loyal t O u R CHAPTER is sm all but the members are loyal. When we m et with Em ily K ane a nd E llen M yers in J anua ry, 12 Alph a Sigma T a us were present. W e added one new m ember, J eananne (Frederick ) Dixon fro m Mun cie Indiana. J eananne is teaching in Lansing~ while her husband is a student a t Michigan Sta te. The evening was spent discu ssing the coming Convention a nd our pa rt in th e preparation. At G ertrude Kimmick's in N ovember we observed Founders' D ay with the cand lelighting service.-MAY WALTON

See

tftJ芦- tie ZJet~ttlit

Au9wt 24-27 ANC HOR

PHILADELPHIA

Features "Back to Temple" Meetings t FALL got

underway for Philadelphia Alum nae C hapter with a September offi cers' m eeting at the home of Pre ident Peg Brown in Abington. T he pre ence of all those expected to come seemed to foretell a good year for A:ST. And thus far it has been- better th an usual attendance. interesting meetings, a nd good group pirit. The first event of the season was a lunch eon in O ctober at the lovely home of Carolyn Potser in Qu a kertown . Colorful Penn , 1-

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vania autumn, good food prepared by Carolyn and her mother, and the sharing of summer vacation activities gave a sum total of a most p leasant afternoon. For our Founders' Day celebration we planned a luncheon which was arranged by Jean Goldman's brother, who is the assistant manager of the Benjamin Franklin Hotel. In addition to the fine food and service given in this old Philadelphia hotel, and the traditional candle-lighting ceremony associated with Founders' Day, we were delighted with the theme of the afternoon- Back T o T emple. Most of us have had little contact with our alma mater for more years than we like to count, so it was a special trea t to have as our speaker the Dean of Women, Miss Lu cille M. Scheuer, a most charming and enthusiastic p ersonality. We were thrilled to hear of the tremendous growth and spectacular building program which are two of the chief characteristics of the University today. Temple is indeed a very active and impressive factor in the revitalization and redevelopment of a la rge part of our city. A luncheon early in December gave us a headstart on Christmas. This time we traveled far up in the northeastern section of Philadelphia to visit Peg M cCullough. W e were enchanted with the many charming Christmas decorations, nourished by a very substantial and delicious m eal, and delighted with the souvenirs of jolly holiday matches-all provided by our hostess. Special devotions by our chaplain, Virginia Burke, and carol singing with accompaniment by Peg Brovm on Peg M cCullough's n ew piano were the principal elements of a pleasant program . The second Saturday in January found a dozen of us assembled for lunch at Fishers' R estaurant, a place little changed since the days when we went there as T empl e students. This luncheon was a prelude to a return visit to the University. Our president had arranged for a guide to take us on a tour of the new campus and its buildings and facilities. We were amazed and impressed by the many wonderful add itions and changes to this sprawling University. Both the brisk January wind and the many new things we saw made this an exhilerating afternoon.

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A trip to Mexico by way of movies taken by Jean Goldman and her husband on a recent trip, a white elephant sale, an evening party to include husbands, a spring luncheon, and a family picnic are all events we look forward to in the remaining months of the season. Greetings to Alpha Taus everywhere from Philadelphia.

SHEPHERDSTOWN

Features "Shoes Through The Ages" Evening ;'ti THE SHEPHERDSTOWN Alumnae chapter

started their activities for fall with a cookout supper a t the park in M artinsburg, where plans for the coming meetings were also made. In October the group toured the Schmidts Baking Company, after which the members went to the home of Mrs. Arnold Slonaker, mother of Mrs. Greg Shipley (Ann Slonaker ) for their business session. We ce'Iebrated Founders' Day with the collegia tes and their advisor as our guests on November 19 with dinner at Shady R est. Mrs. Stephen (Sylvia ) Sinnett conducted the candle-lighting ceremony. Mr. Howard Siler, father of alumnae Jane Siler, presented a talk " Shoes Through The Ages." H e showed a shoe collection dating from 1890-1920. Collegiate M arsha Clark led the collegiates in singing a group of pep songs. Genevieve Pitzer was hostess for our a nnual C hristmas party a t h er home in Gerrardstown. Christmas games were played a nd a very interesting program about stories and legends of Christmas was presented by members of the group. In January Ruth Seibert entertained at her home with a very enjoyable musical pro,DTam. Children of the alumnae m ember performed on the piano and Miss Wanda Mason ana two numbers. Other plan call for a March meetinu with the collegiates at Shepherd Colleu , a tour of the Internal R evenue ervic a pro!IT tve

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dinner in April and our annual initiation ceremony and installation of n ew officers. Our m eetings are the third Tuesday of each month. If any new alumnae have moved into our area, we would be happy to see them at our meetings.-ANN SIMPSON

SPRINGFIELD

Assists Actives In "Magic Moments" Party ;\'.. THE ALPHA DELTA Alumnae Chapter has had an interesting 1963-64 year. In the spring of 1963, we held our annual banquet honoring the graduating seniors from the active chapter. Beverly Davis and Tonni Van Hook were initia ted into the Alumnae Chapter after dinner. The Nyda Sebring Award was presented to AT active Beverly Davis. This Award is based on outstanding contribution to sorority and campus life during the year and is in memory of one of our alumna. During the summer a "Dollar Dinner" (one of our favorite fund -raising projects ), was held at Shirlee K eller's home. Lucky us!!! We were especially treated with swimming before and after dinner in the K ellers' n ew private pool. In late October, we celebrated Homecoming at SMS. This is always one of the biggest social events of the year a nd it was good to see the many alums back from outof-town. After the Homecoming parade, there was a Homecoming dinner for alumnae, actives and pledges. We had introductions and learned a little about each girl present. We combined our banquet with the Founders' Day program, which was conducted impressively by our alumnae president. Then, off to the football game and open house at the new sorority house. We were so pleased with the house and its beautiful furnishings. As a new philanthropic project, this year we held a benefit bridge party and style show at the sorority house. Actives and alumnae ANCHOR

modeled winter clothes, and a well-known local hair stylist showed the latest fashion in hair-dos. The remainder of th e evening was spent playing cards. The alumnae assisted th e actives with one of their December rush parties. It was the memorable Magical Moments party. After refreshments, talks were given by an alumna, active and p ledge about each phase of sorority life. Sorority songs ended the evening. Traditionally we hold an alumnae Christmas dinner. The decorations were gorgeous in this festive season . We each brought a covered dish and the treasury 'bought a ham . In F ebruary, we will have a joint meeting - social gathering with the active chapter. Next month, we have planned another "Dollar Dinner" with an Italian theme. We will eat spaghetti, garlic bread, salad and dessert in gay Italian surroundings. That's about it so far this year, but we have exciting plans for the coming season! MARY J UNE HASTY

ST. LOUIS

Enjoys an Easy and Profitable Book Fair ;\; OuR FIRST get-together after summer vacations was at the Pancake House R e taurant for brun ch the first Saturday in September. The September meeting, a pot luck supper, was held in the home of Elizabeth Wilson . A philanthropic project to fold bandages for the Peregine Society, which we had started in the May meeting, was resumed for this year. The October meeting was preceded by desserts provided by our hostess, Carolyn Alexander. A notice of this meeting told us ' e would have a program with a "mystery guest ( P.D. )" The clue we discovered at the m eeting was a policeman. He presented the problems his department encounters in the control of narcotics and dope within a large metropolitan area.

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We celebrated Founders' Day on November 2 with the collegiates. They took full charge for the dinner arrangements, table decorations and program. Mrs. Oliver Duggins presented an entertaining and informative musical program while playing varied musical selections on th e piano and organ. The November m eeting was at Vi Miller' house where a money-making program was held in the form of a book fa ir. M embers were notified to bring no,_;els, 路children's books and paper books to the rn"eeting. The books were circu lated among the m ember , commented upon and then purchased, if desired, for a small donation. This book fair was an easy, enjoyabl e and profitable program. Instead of a D ecember meeting a Christmas luncheon was held in the home of Alice Vit. Preceding the luncheon the ho tess served a Christmas punch. After an appetizing m eal a friendly game of " Password" was enjoyed by all. A monetary dona tion was collected for Pine Mountain. Our regular J a nuary business was at the home of Virginia U lrey. The program consisted of a discussion within the group on life philosophy. Dates were set for two bridge games in February, th e profits of which will be given to the St. Louis Panhellenic Group for their Scholarship Fund. In addition to the money-making proj ects a lready mentioned, the St. Louis Alumnae have been taking orders for fruit cakes, nylon stockings, address labels and magazine subscriptions. Several of the alumnae helped the actives of Harris Teacher's Col lege with two November rush parti es. - MRs. R SSELL GIESELMANN

TRI-CITY

Christmas Bazaar Is A Huge Success ;\; PREPARING for our first Christmas bazaar took long hours and ,hard work, but it definitely was a financial success. Beeswax candles, gai ly decorated soaps, piggy banks

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crayon boxes, candlestick holders and centerpieces were just some of the items we made and sold. We hope to make this an annual proj ect- if we have the stamina. We sponsored the Homecoming breakfast at Beta chapter again this year but were disappointed in th e turnout. At Christmas time we did something that was so mu ch fun other groups might like to try it. We held a Christmas party for all of our ch ildren. Twenty children ate all the ice cream a nd cookies they po ibly could and then each received a o-ift from a welcome visitor- a nta Claus. W e moth ers enjoyed it almo t more than the children . It gave us a good chance to show off our own offspring and sec wh a t everyone el e had been brarrg ing abo ut. e\路era l of our m embers have new babies incc the last issu e of the ANCHOR. Girls were born to Karen Hansen Mahan, Carla Almquist Young and J ane Goetz Bommarito, and boys to Marlene Michalski Luplow and M a-xine erchyl Conley. Awaiting add ition in mid-winter and earl y spring a re Margaret Bueker C lark, Linda LaFave, Dorothy Soltysiak MacCrae and Jane D elanty Robinson . We're looking forward to our spring a lumnae activities whi ch will include a visit to our new ch ild guidance clinic. - JAN E DELA TV R OBINS ON

WASHINGTON , D. C.

Has An Enthusiastic Metropolitan Group ;\; WHEN Washington, D. C., alumnae met in September with Jo Ann Solomon and M eda Ray Sewell as co路hostesses, there ' a much chit-chat among those who hadn't een each other for a few months. Since the girl are cattered throughout the metropolitan area, a monthly meetino- i welcomed with enthusiasm . Plans for the Founders' Da Banqu t and the a nnual Chri tma proje t of o-ift and

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food for a fami ly whose mother is a multiple sclerosis victim, were the features of the October meeting. Dorothy Gates and J ean Seleno were hostesses. The Little Tea House of Alexandria was chosen for the Founders' Day Banquet on November 7. The small private dining room seemed especially cozy when the candlelighting service conducted by President Martha Jones climaxed a delightful evening which began with cocktails at the home of Dorothy Gates. An outstanding d emonstration of the art of gift wrapping and Christmas decorations, by one of Washington's own m embers, June R eynolds, highlighted the J?ecember meeting. Hostesses for this occasion were Margaret Bowers and Barbara Livesay. One of the winter's worst snow storms was cause for canceling the January meeting, scheduled to be held at the home of H elen Sours, with Edith Monk as co-hostess. Thus ends th e story of the first half of this year with the girls of Washington. They are looking forward to the activities of the late winter and spring months.- EDITH ELLIOTT

years a nd has don a commendab le job. She now is working hard as Publicity Chairman for the comi ng Panhellenic Scholarship Lunch eon and Style Show, which this year will be held at Inn s. In October, Louise Davies was elected as our new President. Our Founders' Day Dinner, held on November 20 at the Hickory House was a huge success with the unbeli evable number of 27 present. We a ll enjoyed the impressive cand lelighting ceremony and singing of Yellow Rose under the leadership of Sally Jo Curry. In December, our annual Christmas party was held at the home of Carolyn Dawson. This was a covered dish supper with our husbands our guests. A most enjoyable even ing was had by all 18 coup les present. We feel we have had a good tart this year and are looking forward to our remaining meetings, held on the third Wednesday evenings of each month.- ALBERTA KROEKER

YPSILANTI -ANN ARBOR WICHITA

路Hosts the Wichita City Panhellenic Tea ;\; AT OUR last meeting in the spring of 1963, our group which had averaged six members, with a limited treasury, could not foresee how we could possibly hostess the Wichita City Panhellenic T ea in September 1963. Under the diligent perseverance of our President, Sue Willcut, Alpha Sigma Tau came through with a lovely tea given: at the Ramada Inn of which we could all be proud. Billie Atkinson was President of the Wichita City Panhellenic, affiliated with National Panhellenic Conference last year, and she now serves on the Scholarship Committee. Pat Levi has represented our group at City Panhellenic Conference for the past two ANCHOR

Visits the Ann Arbor Gas Company ;\; YPSILANTI-ANN ARBOR Alumnae members began the year with the following officers: President, Sally Pearson ; Vice Pre ident, Martha Belknap; Recording Secretary, Donna Stevens ; Corresponding Secretary, Lurlene Weinberg; Treasurer, Tracy Snaden: Editor, J oyce Jubenville ; Historian, Joan Carpenter; Chaplain, Dottie Neimann. The September meeting was held at Fay Mitchell's home. It was a real "gab fast," with summer vacation talk and discussion of plans for the coming year. October found us at President Sally Pearson's home. During the evening we had a second-hand book sale to help our treasury. This is the second year we've done this, and members find it an easy way to discard unwanted books and find new readinu material.

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The Ann Arbor Gas Company was the scene for our November meeting. Alumnae and guests enjoyed a demonstration of "Fall Foods" cooked with gas. Names were drawn for winners of the delicious dishes prepared during the evening and our lucky president won a most appetizing pork roast. Our annual Christmas party for the collegiates was given in D ecember. J oyce Nesbit graciously opened her house to us for the

evening's festivities. After a wonderful dinner of ham, and pretty salads and desserts (furnish ed by the alumnae ) we enjoyed listening to the collegiates sing. January's "Husband-Wife'' skating party had to be can celed. A regular business meeting was held at Marty Belknap's. We are looking forward to an equally busy spring.- J OYCE J UBENVlLLE

S1 UDENTS TEN COMMANDMENTS 1

A new T en Commandments for 20th century youth by D ean Harry ]. Carman of Columbia University has been advocated by Dean Carl E. Seashore of the Graduate College of the Univ ersity of I owa . Th e commandments are taken from the Association of American Colleges Bulletin. In reference to the commandments, Dean S eashore said, " I hope the students will clip this statem ent and pin it up in their room as a daily reminder of the things they plan to do ."

1. KNOW YOURSELF ; substitute positive for negative a ttitudes. 2. BE I N FORMED ; avoid ignorance and superstition. 3. CULTIVATE a sense of responsibility for your thoughts, words and actions ; remember that freedom and privilege always entail responsibility. 4. DISTINGUISH between right and wrong in terms of human welfare and always champion the right. 5. ALWAYS speak the truth, be honest with yourself and with others ; acquire a reputation for integrity and trustworthiness ; avoid having a negative and gloomy conscience. 6. A V OID the habit of being a parasite, mentally and physically ; do not try to get something for nothing. 7. ALWAYS be courageous and fearless. D on't be hypersensitive, jealous and touchy; learn to cooperate effectively. 8. LEARN to think clearly, to interpret wisely a nd to act with maturity. 9. AVOID fear and anxiety; have faith in your elf and in other human being 路 be tolerant, sympathetic and understanding. 10. USE all your talents to good purposes; don' t be bounded on the north outh east and west by yourself ; don 't be egocentric ; cultivate largene of vi ion and the habit of serving others. - From the TRIAD of D elta Phi Ep ilon, Spring- umm er 1963

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Directory:

Colle9iale

1963-1964 Alpha (1899)-Eastem Michigan University, Ypsilanti, Mich. President- Helen Collins, 219 Goddard Advisers-Mrs. R. B. Bates, 20 S. Normal, Ypsilanti, Mich. Alumnae Representatives-Mrs. John Howe, 42248 Hammil Lane, Plymouth, Mich.; Mrs. J. B. Carpenter, 1032 Evelyn, Ypsilanti, Mich.

President- Karen Hind, 1006 Constitution, Emporia, Kans. Adviser- Miss Mary Cravens, 1337 Grand, Emporia, Kans. 6680 1 Alumnae Representatives- Mrs. Thos. E. Curry, 9228 Shade, Wichita, Kans. 67212 ; Mrs. Richard Stauffer, 2018 Lincoln, Emporia, K ans.

Beta (1905-1917; 1940)-Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Mich. President- Lynette Lucas, 906 S. M a in, Mt. Pleasant, Mich. Adviser-Miss Charlotte Denman, 3562 S. Franklin, Mt. Pleasant, Mich. Alumnae Representative-Mrs. Russell Clark, 5039 E. Coldwater Rd., Flint, Mich . 48506

Kappa (1924-1929)-Miami U., Oxford, Ohio Alumnae Representative-Mrs. R . M . Reinert, 136 M avern Ave., H ami lton, Ohio 45013

Gamma (1900-1913)-Wisconsin State College, Milwaukee, Wis. Alumnae Representative-Mrs. Grant Hinkarnp, 659 Lark Street, Marion, Ohio Delta ( 1916)-Indiana State College, Indiana, Pa. President- Paula Miller, 235 John Sutton Hall Adviser-Mrs. Donald B. Shank, 197 Philadelphia St., Indiana, Pa. Alumnae Representative-Miss Sylvia Kattouf, 1901 16th St., Altoona, Pa. Epsilon (1919-1923; reorganized as Lambda, 1926)-Temple University, Philadelphia, Pa. Alumnae Representative-See Lambda Chapter. Zeta ( 1921-1948; 1949)-Lock Haven State College, Lock Haven, Pa. President- Elea nor Kiessling, Woolridge H all Adviser-Mrs. I. 0. Fleming, 108 Riverside Ter., Lock Haven, Pa. Alumnae Representative- Miss Theresa Howberg, 661 W. 3rd St., Lock Haven, Pa. Eta (1927-1939)-Kent State University, Kent, Ohio Alumnae Representative-Mrs. Bernard McBee, 1183 Avon St., Akron 0. 443 10 Theta (1923)-Wayne State University, Detroit, Mich. President-Mrs . Howard D . H ard y, 19750 Seminole Detroit, Mich. 48240 Advise;-Mrs. Dan Harrington, 10072 Balfour Rd . 48224 Alumnae Representative-Mrs. Donald Bouffard , 15504 Eastburn, D etroit, Mich. 48205 Iota

( 1923 )-Kansas State Teachers Emporia, Kans.

ANCHOR

College,

Lambda (1926-1961 )-Temple University, Philadelphia Alumnae Representative-Mabel Schreiber, 511 Chestnut, Leba non, Pa. 17042 Nu ( 1928-1940; 1948)-Colorado State College, Greeley, Colo. President-Esther Jan e Miller, 1715 l Oth Ave., Greeley, Colo. 8063 1 Advisers- Or. Juanita Lewis, 1632-27th St., Greeley, Colo. ; Mrs. J ohn Hickman, 2409 W. 20 St. Road, Greeley, Colo. Alumnae Representatives-Mrs. Fred Trimmer, Box 85, Kersey, Colo.; Mrs. Norman Page, 803 So. Flamingo Ct. , D enver, Colo. 80222 Xi

( 1929-1933 )-Western State Teachers College, Gunnison, Colo. Alumnae Representative-Miss Grace Quinby, 309 South Sherwood St., Fort Collins, Colo.

Omicron (1930)-Concord College, Athens, W. Va. President- Cathie Patterson, Box I 0 I Adviser- Miss Mildred D ransfield, Box 307, Athens, W. Va. Alumnae R epresentati ves-Miss Mona Craghead, Box 553, Athens, W. Va. 247 12; Miss Mary Catherine Bones, 1007 Walker St., Princeton, W. Va. 24740 Pi {1930)-Harris Teachers College, St. Louis President- Sharon H oppe, 5416 Queens, St. Louis, Mo. 63 115 Advisers-Miss Julia Kohl, 5816 Jamieson, St. Louis, Mo. 63109 ; Miss J ulia K. Murray, 3506 Hawthorne, St. Louis, Mo . 63104 Alumnae Representatives-Miss Elizabeth Alles, 669 Bellsworth, Lemay, Mo. 63125 ; Miss J acqueline Hudson, 15 46 Wellston Ave., St. St. Louis, Mo. 63 133. Rho (1932-1948; 1949)--Southeastem State College, Durant, Okla. President-Linda Fellows, Box 63, Sta. A Adviser-Mrs. Hercel H arris, 1248 Waco1 Durant, Okla. Alumnae R ep resentative-Miss Sue D y on, 3 15 North Walnut, Pauls Valley, Okla .

99


Sigma ( 1925-1954 )-State University College for Teachers, Buffalo, N. Y. Alumnae Representative-Mrs. Douglas Bolton, 60 Briarhurst, Williamsville, N . Y. 1422 1 Zeta Tau (1935)-Longwood College, Farmville, Va. President- Marjorie Ann Twilley, Box 468 Adviser- Mrs. Richard Brooks, 303 Pine St., Farmville, Va. Alumnae R epresentatives-Miss C a rol N ye, 11 7 62nd St., Virginia Beach , V a .; Miss J anice B. H arris, 703 F . N . H am ilton St., Richmond, V a. Upsilon (1935)-Arkansas State Teachers College, Conway, Ark. President- Julia Ann Ba iley, Box 570 Advisers-Mrs. David Ritter, Business Office, A.S.T.C ., Conway, Ark.; Mrs. Bet ty Young, 81 4 Watkins, Conway, Ark. Alumnae Representatives- Mrs. Kenneth Snow, 6606 Bluebird Dr., Little Rock, Ark . 72205 ; Mrs. Carl Emerick, 2 10 St. M adelene Lane, Florissa nt, Mo. 63031 Phi

( 1940) -Southeastern Louisiana College, Hammond, La. President- Sa ra Sims, Box 195, College Sta. , Hammond, La. Advisers-Miss Margaret Lowe, College Sta., Hammond, La. ; Mrs. 0 . Moore, Coli. Sta. , Hammond, La. Alumnae Representatives-Miss Joann Brauner, 5518 C amp, New Orleans, La. 70115 ; Mrs. J . F . Zaleski, 141 N . 7â&#x20AC;˘th St., Ponchatoula, La .

Chi ( 1940-1948; 1950)--Shepherd College, Shepherdstown, W. Va. President- Barbara Puckett, Box 111 , Turner Hall Adviser-Dr. Sara Helen Cree, Shepherdstown , W. Va. Alumnae Representative-Mrs. Stephen Sinnett, 1004 W. John St. Martinsburg, W . Va. Psi (1944}-Madison College, Harrisonburg, Va. President- Jill Ann Myers, Box 332 Advise r- Dr. Marilyn Crawford, Box 171 , M adison College, Harrisonburg, V a . Alumnae R epresentatives-Mrs. T . .T. King, Jr., 1845 Lakeridge Rd ., Birmingham , Ala. 35 216 ; Mrs. Robert Ritchie, Box 73, D ayton , V a. 22821 Omega (1945-1954)-Minot State Teachers College, Minot, N. D. Alpha Alpha (1945)-Ball State College, Muncie, Ind. President- Sh aron D rill , C rosley Hall B.S.C ., Muncie, Ind. Advisers- Miss R eth a Lozi er, 222Yo South Dill, Muncie, Ind.; Miss Peggy Lou Holman, 1725 W. Washington, Muncie, Ind. Alumna e Representative-Mrs. Robert E. Smith, 2105 Belmont Dr., Mun cie, Ind. 47304 Alpha Beta ( 1946-59)-Marshall College, Huntington, W. Va. Alumn ae Representative-Mrs. Spencer A. Gillette, 396 Forest Rd ., Huntington, W . V a. 25705

100

Alpha Gamma ( 1946) -Henderson State Teachers College, Arkadelphia, Ark. President- Sa ndra Gaines, Box 230 Ad visers-Miss Mae Whipple, Box 644, H.S .. T .C., Mrs. Don Pennington, 9 Country Club Dr., Arkadelphia, Ark. Alumnae R epresenta tive-Miss Vi cki M cDonald, 1206 Pa rk er St., No rth Little Rock, Ark . Alpha Delta (1948)--Southwestern Missouri State College, Springfield, Mo. President- .J ulia Ann e Ellis, 2228 E . La toka. Springfi eld, M o. Adviser- Mrs. Glenn Downing, 436 Belcrest, Rt. 9, Springfi eld, M o. Alumnae R epresenta tives- M iss D oris Sheppa rd , 620 . Belview, Springfi eld, Mo. 65802 ; Mrs. Ca rl H . Ni em an, 19 18 Ron Avenu e, Sp ringfi eld, M o. Alpha Epsilon (1948)-Westem Illinois University, Macomb. Ill. President-M a rjorie H a ber, 308 W . Adams, M acomb, Ill . Advise rs- Miss H elen Buckley, 523 N. McArthur; Dr. H arri et Stull, 635 N. M cArthur Alumnae Representatives-Mrs. W . D . Baughman, 1734 Stevens Dr., Gl enview, Ill. ; Mrs. Vern on F. Brem er, 2336 R ai nwa ter Dr. , D eca tur, Ill. Alpha Zeta (1958)-Queens College, Flushing, N.Y. Presiden t -D olo res Casa l, 88-33 54th Ave. , Elmhurst 73, N . Y. Ad viser- M iss M a rga ret Kin gsto n, 116-18 233 St. , Cambria H eig hts, N . Y. Alum nae R epresentative-Miss Elaine Backe, 249 K enn ed y Ave., H empstead, L . 1., N . Y . Alpha Eta (1959)-Alma ColJege, Alma, Michigan P res ident- K aren Roehl, ewber ry H all Ad viser- Mrs. L e ter E. Eyer, 5 15 College, Alm a . M ich . Alumnae R epresenta tive-Mrs. Fred H owes, 4 206 G ree nbrook, Flint, Mich . Alpha Theta (1959)-University of Detroit, Detroit, Michigan President- Car ol H arris, 1754 7 Freela nd D etroit, Mich . 48 235 ' Adviser- Mrs. Jose Espinosa, 18660 Washburn Detroit, M ich. ' Alumnae R epresentative-Mrs. William A. Monti cello, 19546 Dalby, D etroit Mi ch . 482 40 ' Alpha Iota (1960)--Syracuse University, Syracuse, N. Y. President- Le ley Greenfield, 760 C om stock Ave. 132 10 Adviser- Mrs. Jacob Benderson, 301 Hurlbert Rd., Sy racuse, N . Y. Alumnae R epresenta tive-Mrs. H elma n Rubinson, 180 1 J am es St., Syracuse, . Y . 13206 Alpha Kappa {1961 )-Marietta College, Marietta, Ohio Presiden t- Ca rl ene R ace, 2 15 4th t. dvise rs- Mrs. C a th erine M . Dra per , 51 3 White' s Rd ., M ari etta. Oh io. M rs. Paul J. Hutt, 5 23 Second St. , M a rietta , Ohio Alumnae R epre enta tive-Mrs. Echols J effri e , 10 7 Kibler La ne,\- illiam sto' n , W . V a .

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Alpha Lambda ford, "a.

( 1963) -Radford College

R ad'

President- R oberta A. Smith, Box I 079 Adviser-Miss Evelyn Fitzpa trick, 1030 Calhoun St. , Radford, "a. Alumnae R epresen tative- Mrs. W. H. Crabtree, R .R . 1, Blackburg, " a.

Alpha Mu (1962)-Arkansas A&M College College Heights, Ark. ' President- Bobbie Faye Gammel College Hts. Ark. ' ' Adviser-Mrs. Earl Willis Rt. 4 ' Monticello Ark. ' ' ' Alumnae R epresen ta tive- Mrs. Wesley M cCoy , College H eights, Ark.

Alpha Nu (1962 )-Central Missouri State College, Warrensburg, Mo. President- Carol Webster, Yeat r H all , I 74 CMSC, Warrensb urg, Mo. Advisers-D r. Hattie Ewald, 401 S. Mitchell, Warrensbu rg, Mo.; Mrs. W . H . Hopkins, R oute I A, Warrensburg, M o. ; Mrs. D oris Brooksh ier, R.R. 2, Warrensburg, Mo. Alumn ae R epresentatives- Mrs. Albert .T. Gerha rdt, 11 307 E. 15th St. , l ndepend n e, Mo.; Mrs. Fred Griffit h, 406 E. M ark et, Warrensburg, M o. Alpha Omega ( 1960) - Brooklyn College, Brooklyn, N .Y. Presiden t- Irene Cohen , 475 Ocean Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. Adviser- Mrs. I rvin Fishberg, 125 E. 86th St. , Brooklyn, N . Y. Alumnae R eprese ntative- Miss Linda Bussell, 180 E. 17 th St., Brook lyn, N. Y.

ALPHA SIGMA TAU RECOMMENDATIONS CHAIRMAN (Continued from Page 57)

WEST VIRGINIA Annandale Arlington

Mrs. G. M. Jones, Jr. (Psi) Mrs. John L. Bowers (Z T)

Fairfax

Miss Charlotte Douglas (Psi)

Falls Church Harrisonburg

Mrs. Justin G. Doyle (Theta) Mrs. Wm. J. Bowman (Psi)

Rt. L Box 10-A

Roanoke

Mrs. John S. Crute. Jr. (A L)

Route 10. Box 276

Athens

Mrs. Meade McNeill (Om)

Box 171

Beckley

Mrs. H. Jack Hutchens (Om)

119 Dorcas Avenue

Huntington

Mrs. Glen Buchanan (Om) Miss Clara Closterman (A B)

1025 9th Ave.

Logan

Mrs. Harold 路Browning (Om)

573

Martinsburg

Mrs. Stephen Sinnitt (Chi)

1004 W. John St.

7269 Lincolnshire St. 5924 N. 15th St. 132 Richard Ave. 408 Patrick Henry Dr.

VIRGINIA

Bluefield Va. and W.Va.

103 Doak St. (Bluefield, Virginia) Str~tton

St.

Oak Hill

Mr's. J, A. Baumgartner (Om)

331 Jones Ave.

Parkersburg

Mrs. E. C. Phipps (Om)

2611 Harrison Ave.

Princeton

Miss Mary Catherine Bones (Om)

1007 N. Walker

Shepherdstown

Mrs. Howard Carper (Chi)

P.O. Box 544

Weich

Mrs. Lena Caporossi (Om)

Box 607

ANCHOR

101


_Alumnae (froupJ *Chartered "Akron-Canton, Ohio Mrs . George Halas, 1219 Garman Rd., Akron, Ohio 4431 3 Albuquerque, New Mexico Mrs. L. ] . Paddison, 911 Parkland Circle *Baton Rouge, Louisiana Miss Camille Gennaro, 3638 North Blvd. Beckley, West Virginia Mrs. Harvey Cook, 329 Westwood Drive *Bluefield, West Virginia Miss Marcella D . Whitlock, 1905 D ea rborn, Apt. 11 *Buffalo, New York Miss Evelyn Grampp, 686 Richmond Ave., 14222 Charleston, West Virginia Chicago, Suburbia, Illinois Miss Linda Petersen, 1301 Northwest Hwy., D es Pla ines, Ill. Cleveland, Ohio Mrs. Andrew C. Soeder, 335 E. 2 15 St. (23) Columbus, Ohio Conway, Arkansas Mrs. John M cH enry, 600 Wes tern Dallas, Texas Mrs. W. D . White, 4224 Hawthorne Ave. *Denver, Colorado Mrs. Carol Lowe, 781 0 Grove, Wes tminster, Colo. *Detroit I, Michigan Mrs. Harold Jennett, 23648 Glenita, Warren, Mich. Detroit II, Michigan Mrs. Ray M cFee, 149 25 Rosemont Rd ., Detroit 23, Mich . Durant, Oklahoma

Joliet, Illinois Mrs. Patricia H orton, 834 So. Madison, Hi nsdaltt, Ill . Huntington, West Virginia Miss Clara Closterman, 1025 9th Ave. *Kansas City, Missouri Mrs. Willard Steinkuhler, 101 E. 25th St., North K a nsas City 16, Mo. Kewanee, Illinois Mrs. H a rry Lehning, Sheffield, Ill. "Lansing, Michigan Mrs. Cecil H . Springer, 33 19 Washington *Little Rock, Arkansas Mrs. Ed Shehane, 300 Wes t " ]" St., North Little Rock Lock Haven, Pa. *Los Angeles, California Mrs. Lorraine Yeiser, 842 1 Kitty Hawk " Macomb-Carthage, Illinois Mrs. Richard Frowein, 314 W. Adams, M acomb, Ill. Marietta, Ohio Mrs. Sidney Z. Kl eima n, 105 R a thbone Miami, Florida Mt. Clemens, Michigan M rs. D onald Sorense n, 23 846 Woodland C t. Mt. Pleasant, Michigan *Muncie, Indiana M rs. Robert E. Blake, 1 712 Riley Rd. *New Orleans, Louisiana Mrs. Dian ne W. H owell, 291 W. R obe rt E. Lee New York, N. Y. Miss Elaine Bache, 249 Kennedy, Hempstead, L. 1., N.Y. Norfolk, Virginia

*Emporia, Kansas Mrs. Jim Burch, 15 26 Luther

Oak Hill, W. Va.

"Flint, Michigan Mrs. Rob ert Van D ette, 2731 Sloan, Flint 4, Mich.

Peoria, Illinois Mrs. Elmo Haney, 317 Brookview Rd., E. Peoria, Ill.

Grand Rapids, Michigan

*Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Mrs. James Brown, 1981 Corint hia n Ave., Abington, Pa.

*Greeley, Colorado Mrs. Fred Trimmer, Box 85, Kersey, Colo. Harrisonburg, Virginia Mrs. Wm. ] . Bowman, Route 1, Box 10 A Indianapolis, Indiana Miss Grace Hood, 608 2 Garver Rd.

102

Phoenix, Arizona Miss Joan Schipper, 6516

. 12th St., Apt. 6

Port Huron路, Michigan Mrs. D . N . Bantien, 1626 Pennsylvania, Marysville, Mich.

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*Princeton-Athens, West Virginia Miss Betti Sue Hedrick, Box 355, Athens Star Route, Princeton, W. Va.

St. Petersburg, Florida Miss Ellen H. Smith, 2327 Second Ave., North, St. Petersburg

Pueblo, Colorado

*Tri-City Mrs. Dale Hanson, 2846 Hardin, Saginaw Mich .

*Richmond-Petersburg, Virginia Mrs. H. ]. Lowenthal, Jr., 302 Hummingbird Rd., Richmond, Va. *Roanoke, Virginia Mrs. R an dolph Hodges, 2224 Pelham Dr. San Diego, Calif. Miss Karen Chamberlain, 715 Cohasset Ct., Apt. 4, San Diego, Calif. 92109 *Shepherdstown, West Virginia Miss JoAnn Mentzer, Baldwin Apt. 7, 126 S. Church St., Martinsburg, W. Va. Springfield, Illinois Mrs. Richard Doedtman, P.O. Box 1526, 1918 Lee St.

War, West Virginia *Washington, District of Columbia Mrs. Guy M . Jones, 7269 Lincolnshire St., Annandale, Va. Welch, West Virginia Mrs. Lena Caporossi, Box 607 *Wichita, Kansas Mrs. J ohn C. Davies, 6415 Scottsville Dr. 672路19 *Williamsport, Pennsylvania Mrs. Edward Szybist, 312 Sherman St.

*Springfield, Missouri Mrs. Pat Strothkarnp, RFD 9, Box 338

Youngstown, Ohio Mrs. Keith McGowen, 5 Apache Lane, Poland, Ohio

*St. Louis, Missouri Miss Jewel Stephensmeier, 135 E. Washington, Kirkwood, Mo. 63122

*Ypsilanti-Ann Arbor, Michigan Mrs. Gilbert Pearson, 15600 Lakes路i de, Plymouth, Mich.

District 1-Mich., Ill, Ind., Ohio, WJS. President-Mrs. R. B. Cross, 207 Winthrop Rd., Muncie, Ind. 47304 District II-N. Y., Penn, N. ]., Me., N. H., Vt., Mass., Conn, R. I. Area Supervisor for New York-Mrs. Joseph Steen, 147 N. Union Rd., Williamsville, N. Y.

District IV-Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, California, Missouri, Kansas, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and all other states north of these and west of the Mississippi River President-Mrs. John Simpson, 6535 D evonshire, St. Louis, Mo. 63109

District III-D. C., Va., W. Va., Ky., Md., Dela., Tenn., N.C., Miss., Ala., Ga., Fla., and S.C. President-Mrs. Justin G. Doyle, 408 Patrick Henry Dr., Falls Church, Va. 22044

Area Supervisor for Missouri (except St. Louis), Kansas and Colorado--Mrs. J . Waldo Hinshaw , 27 Hardith Hill Ct., St. Louis, M o. 63119

_Attention _Alumnae If you are interested in forming an alumnae chapter or club, please write to Miss Elizabeth

Wilson, National Alumnae Chairman, 6200 Hoffman Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri 63139, for particula rs. Central Office has available a limited number of state directories for organizing purposes. These will be sent upon request.

ANCHOR

103


Mrs. E. A. Lyman* H elene M. Rice* May Gephart* Mavene Tracy* Mable Chase* Adriance Rice* Ruth Dutcher*

Eva O 'Keefe* Harriet Marx (Mrs. C. F. Pfeiffer) 239 Columbia, Berkeley 8, Calif. *deceased.

President-Mrs. Earl F. Peterson {Iota), Rou te 1, Crawfordsville, Ind. 47933. Vice Presidents-Mrs. R . B. Cross (A lpha Alpha ), 207 Winthrop Rd. , Muncie. Ind. 47304 ; Mrs. Justin G. Doyle (Theta ) , 408 Patrick Henry Dr., Falls Church , Va. 22044; Mrs. John Simpson ( Pi ), 6535 Devonshire, St. Louis, Mo. 63109 National Expansion Director-Mrs . Parry Schippers ( Pi ), 5300 Sutherland, St. Louis, Mo 63109 NPC Representative-Mrs. Earl F. Peterson (Iota), R oute 1, Crawfordsville, Ind. 47933 National Secretary-Miss Ethel Himelick (Alpha Alpha ), 2300 White River Blvd., Apt. 16, Muncie, Ind . 47303 Treasurer- Miss Margaret Macdonald {Sigma ) , 673 Richmond Ave., Buffalo, N . Y. 14222 Editor-Mrs . Bernard McBee {Eta), 1183 Avon Street, Akron, Ohio 44310 Chaplain-Mrs. Justin G. Doyle (Theta ) , 408 Patrick Henry Dr., Falls Church , Va. 22044 Executive Secretary-Mrs. James Alexander ( Pi ), 6328 Potomac, St. Louis, Mo. 63139

6200 Hoffman Avenue St. Louis, Missouri 63139 Mrs. James Alexander, Exec. Sec'y Central Office Assistant-Miss J acqueline Hudson ( Pi ) .

_A-rea Supervi:Jor:J Ne w York State- Mrs. J oseph Steen (Sigma ) , 147 N . Union Rd ., Williamsville, N . Y. Missouri {except St. Louis) , Kan sas and Colorado - Mrs. J. Waldo Hinshaw {Io ta) , 27 Hardith Hill Ct., St. Louis, Mo. 63119

11/aliona/ Committee Chairmen Alumnae- Miss Elizabeth Wilson (Pi) , 124 Elm Ave., Glendale, Mo. 63122

104

Collegiate Records Secretary-Mrs. E. E . Marshall ( Pi ), 5935 Bishops Pl., St. Louis, Mo. 63109 Constitution and Public Relations-Mrs. Haswell E. Staehle (Alpha ), 481 Torrence Rd., Columbus, Ohio 43214 Con vention-Miss Rose Marie Schmidt (Theta), 5106 Harvard Rd., Detroit, Mich. 48224 Endowme nt-Miss June McCarthy ( Pi) , Central Office Examinations- Mrs. Arthur V. Schopp, Jr., {Lambda ), 145 Spruce Dr., Shrewsbury, New Jersey 0 7 704 Historian- Mrs . I. Newton Miller ( Pi ), 1131 Ralph T err., St. Louis, Mo. 63117 Housing-Mrs. E. C. Phipps (Omicron ), 2611 Harrison Ave., Parkersburg, W. Va. 26 102 Life Memb ership- Miss June M cCarthy ( Pi ), 4602 W. Florissant, St. Louis, Mo. 63115 Memorial Loan Fund-Miss Kathleen Kelchner (Rho ), 43 A Laurel Pl ., Eatontown, N . J. 07724 Music- Mrs. George Halas (Delta ), 1219 Garman Rd ., Akron, Ohio 44313 Nominations- Miss Kathleen Kelchner (Rho), 43 A Laurel Pl., Eatontown, N. J. 07724 Parliamentarian- Mrs . Arthur V . Schopp, Jr. (Lambda ), 145 Spruce Dr., Shrewsbury, ew Jersey 07704 Pledge-Miss Rose Marie Schmidt (Theta ), 5106 Harvard Rd ., Detroit, Mich . 48224 Program-De. Ada Jane Harvey (Upsilon), 703 D onaghey, Conway, Ark. 72032 Rush- Mrs . T. R eed Maxson ( Iota ) , Arilen Acres, Warrensburg, Mo. 64093 Scholarship _Awards-Mrs. J. 1378 Wyhe Way, San Jose, Social Service-Mrs. George Ambush Dr., St. Louis, M o.

E . Gaughan ( Psi ), Calif. 95130 Black (Nu ) 10934 63 123

Standards-Mrs. Vernon Fox (Alpha Alpha) 610 路 W. Cent ennial, Muncie, Ind . '

11/aliona/ Panhe//enic Con/erence Chairman- Miss Elizabeth Dyer ( Chi Omega ), 2245 Grandin Rd. , Cincinnati 8, Ohio Secretary-Mrs. Karl Miller (Sigma Kappa ), 6311 Leo nardo, Coral Gables, Fla. Treasurer- Mrs . Geo rge Roll er (Alpha Omicron Pi ), 4261 Palm Lane, Bay Point Miami Fla. 33037 ' ' College Panh ellenics Committee- Mrs . James W . Hofstead (Kappa Alpha Theta ) Deer Park Circle, Nashville 5, Tenn. ' City Panh ellenics Committee-Mrs. Robertson Page (Sigma Sigma Sigma ), 200 Park Lane, Douglaston 63, N . Y. Alpha Sigma Tau Alternate-Mrs. Haswell E . Staehle (Alpha ), 481 Torrence Rd. Columbus Ohio 43214 ' '

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Mary Sue Roulo, top left, wear a paisley print which is idea l for luncheon . A . weater over her shoulders will be enough for a cool building or an early mornina breeze \\"h n ig htseeini!:. Mari e Gra y, top righ t. will wear a long formal at th e banquet, but you may find a . hort one more to you r liking. M a ril yn J ohnson's white dress , bottom lrft. is perfect for th e ceremonies . Carol H arris, bottom right, like uit for mee tings. She can remoYe the jacket for a dded comfort. P .S . A p la in co lo red taffeta raincoat i enough protection in rase e\路enmgs are cool. \\' e EVEH ha,路e ram m twu t- if you ha,路e your raincoat!


ltetum ulldell짜-llle ~

to AI111Nt SltiH Tn, 681 HoffiiWin Aft., St. ~ 19, Mo.

Dedicated in 1958. the McGREGOR MEMORIAL CONFERENCE CENTER of Wayne State University has been bailed as ODe of the most beautiful building'll in the nation. .A reOec:tin9 pool and sculpture court adjoin the building-. It bouee1 ciYic. cultural and professional conferences and qroup di1cuuions. The McGreg-or Memorial was desiqned by Minoru Yamasaki. one of the many nationally famous Detroit arcbitect1.


1964 Spring ANCHOR