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Installation of two chapters Page 28

A glimpse into the Sorority’s past

2016 EBI ASSESSMENT RESULTS

Learning and growing in Alpha Sigma Alpha

Page 20


Did you know that 63% of Alpha Sigma Alpha alumnae are missing a piece of contact information that is critical to staying connected with the Sorority? Missing information could be a phone number, email address or mailing address. Chapters with the most missing alumnae:

Beta Pi Chapter, Concord University, WV (72.69%)

Beta Mu Chapter, Henderson State University, AR (70.15%)

Alpha Gamma Chapter, Indiana University of Pennsylvania (74.69%)

Beta Rho Chapter, Northern Illinois University (70.70%)

Zeta Zeta Chapter, University of Central Missouri (69.35%)

Beta Kappa Chapter, Western Illinois University (74.51%)

Eta Eta Chapter, Pittsburg State University, KS (69.17%)

Beta Beta Chapter, University of Northern Colorado (70.65%)

Gamma Gamma Chapter, Northwestern Oklahoma State University (73.05%)

We encourage all sisters to visit www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org/MissingSisters to view the missing sister list and help us locate our missing sisters.


W I N T E R 2 0 1 7 C O NT ENTS

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FEATURES Cover story, Page 20:

2016 EBI Assessment results 10 Iota Beta Chapter installation 12 Iota Gamma Chapter installation 14 A glimpse into the past: The Alpha Sigma Alpha O.D. program 38 The Academy 2017-18

D E PA R T ME N T S 4 Editor’s desk 5 From the president 6 News & updates

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28 Chapter news 34 Foundation 36 ASA Palms 39 From the archives 40 Woman of poise and purpose

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www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

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Volume 103, Number 1

Dear readers,

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha (USPS 430-640) is published quarterly by Alpha Sigma Alpha, 9002 Vincennes Circle, Indianapolis, IN 46268-3018. Periodicals postage paid at Indianapolis, IN, and additional mailing offices. Produced by Shelle Design Inc., www.shelledesign.com. ©Alpha Sigma Alpha Send address changes, death notices and business correspondence to the national headquarters. Address all editorial correspondence to the editor. POSTMASTER: Send address changes (Form 3579) to

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha, 9002 Vincennes Circle, Indianapolis, IN 46268-3018. Printed in the USA.

DEADLINES Winter

Sept. 10

Spring

Dec. 10

Summer March 10 Fall

E DI T O R ’ S D E S K

June 10

EDITOR Kelsey Turner, DK

I have always found personality assessments to be energizing and exciting. I love learning more about myself, how my brain works and the ways it affects my decisions and social interactions. For example, last year when I completed Clifton StrengthsFinder, I learned one of my top five strengths is Maximizer. People who are especially talented in the Maximizer theme seek to transform something strong into something superb. Before the assessment, I had never considered this idea. Now this has been pointed out to me, I see this theme in the work I find most energizing and in many of my personal endeavors. Knowing this tidbit about myself has given me action items that lead to my best work. It has also made me selfaware of potential downfalls of overusing my strength. For example, if I am not cautious I can sometimes spend much more time on a project than I intended to because I keep seeing something about it I can improve. The bottom line is learning about myself through assessment has made me self-aware of what I do well, areas I need to improve and areas to maintain. The Educational Benchmarking Inc. (EBI) assessment does the exact same thing for the Sorority. The information learned through the EBI assessment acts as a guide to our leaders at all levels which, is why it is important we share the findings with all of our members.

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS 9002 Vincennes Circle Indianapolis, IN 46268-3018 Phone: (317) 871-2920 Fax: (317) 871-2924

Also in this issue, we will recap D.O.T. Days and the installations of the Iota Beta Chapter and the Iota Gamma Chapter. Furthermore, we will take a look into the Sorority’s history at the 1944 O.D. program started by Wilma Wilson Sharp. Happy reading!

Email: asa@AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

STAY CONNECTED www.facebook.com/AlphaSigmaAlphaSorority

Mizpah,

www.twitter.com/asaHQ www.youtube.com/user/AlphaSigmaAlphaNHQ www.pinterest.com/AlphaSigmaAlpha

Kelsey Turner Director of Communications & Marketing

www.instagram.com/AlphaSigmaAlpha

S HA R E Y O U R T HO U G HT S We always welcome your comments – both

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criticism and praise – about this publication. Email asa@AlphaSigmaAlpha.org or send mail to: Editor, Alpha Sigma Alpha 9002 Vincennes Circle Indianapolis, IN 46268-3018

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page 18

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA | 2015-2016

ANNUAL REPORT p. 8 p. 28

#Imagine2016 highlights Meet the 2016-17 consultants

Fall 2016 | Volume 102

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F R O M T HE P R E S I D ENT

BY M E L I SSA KOC H M E R R I A M, E E | N AT I ON AL P RES I D EN T

The Educational Benchmarking Inc. (EBI) assessment provides Alpha Sigma Alpha with specific results that help us identify opportunities to better serve our members. EBI feedback allows national council to pinpoint areas of need and make changes, develop initiative and revamp programs around these areas. We strive to make the experience of being an Alpha Sigma Alpha the very best it can be. This data helps provide direction and assists national council as we create strategic goals for our organization. One awesome finding from the 2016 assessment regarding leadership is: “Participants shared that they have developed more as a leader from Sorority than any other organization.” When I first saw this I immediately started thinking: What is leadership? How do we define leadership? What does it truly mean to be a leader? If you attended The Academy this past academic year, then you probably participated in a workshop that was created in direct response to the EBI findings. The workshop, The Courage To Follow, questioned the way we traditionally think about leadership and was based off the book by Ira Chaleff, The Courageous Follower: Standing Up To and For Our Leaders. Courageous followers assume responsibility, challenge, serve, participate in transformation and take moral action. This concept of courageous followers could change the way we think about members of our chapter, in our family or even in our workplace. Every woman who has taken the vow to be a sister of Alpha Sigma Alpha is a courageous follower. Every person on your team at work is a courageous follower. Basically, in any group that you are a part of, every committed member is a courageous follower. This concept changes the way that we think about leadership. Do you think leadership is about holding an elected position? Are you able to make an impact without having a title? I am sure many of you have been part of a Sorority event where the facilitator suggests that each woman shares her name, chapter, school and officer position. My heart always hurts a little when I hear this introduction, “Hi! My name is Suzy Sorority. I am a member of Mu Zeta Chapter at Alpha University and I am JUST a member.”

Suzy is more than just a member. She is a woman of poise and purpose. She is noted for her character and concern for others. She serves others and joyously lives. She is an energizing influence and makes a difference. She is an Alpha Sigma Alpha. She is a courageous follower. John Maxwell summed up leadership with this quote: “Leadership is influence – nothing more, nothing less.” Leadership defined this way shows me that the courageous follower is a leader. It does not matter if you have an elected position. It takes courage to follow. It also takes courage to lead. Think of the impact we can make on our chapters and our sisters if we consider every member a leader. How much better could we collectively be if we utilized the individual strengths of each woman? If you are elected to a position, how can you engage the courageous followers? If you do not have an officer role, how can you support and assist the elected officers? How can you make an impact? In your life, there will be many opportunities to be a courageous leader and a courageous follower. Both roles are not only important, but needed. Both roles are about influencing others and making an impact. These roles provide you the opportunity to be the best woman that you can be. It also gives you an opportunity to leave a lasting impact and legacy whether it be in your family, at your work place, in your church or even in Alpha Sigma Alpha. As you can tell from this one example, the information our members provide through the EBI assessment, does impact our programming and challenges us to continually improve what we do to make sure you are provided with the best experience as a member of Alpha Sigma Alpha. Joyously live,

Melissa Koch Merriam, EE National President @melissaamerriam

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

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NEWS & UP D AT E S

Save the Dates 2018 ADVISOR INSTITUTE APRIL 13-15, 2018 HILTON INDIANAPOLIS

EPSILON EPSILON CHAPTER 100TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION NOVEMBER 10-12, 2017 | EMPORIA, KS

Join us for a weekend of training that empowers advisors to drive toward success in their volunteer roles. Alpha Sigma Alpha will sponsor two advisors per chapter to attend.

Contact Julie Beard Quickel, alumnae chairman, or Elizabeth Grubaugh, collegian chairman, at asaee100@gmail.com for more information.

LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION

Do you know a woman who is headed to a college or university with an Alpha WOMEN’S ADVANCEMENT SERIES DEVELOPMENT EVENTS Alpha Sigma Alpha’s Women’s Advancement Series presents alumnae with the opportunity for personal and professional growth through development events. One day workshops will be held in the following cities:

Sigma Alpha chapter? Does this woman exude poise and purpose, committing herself to service, scholarship, leadership and friendship? Refer her to an Alpha Sigma Alpha chapter. Many Alpha Sigma Alpha chapters depend on recruitment referrals to get to know potential new members. As a collegiate or alumna member of Alpha Sigma Alpha, we need your help to find and refer a woman of poise and purpose.

DENVER | Sunday, Sept. 17, 2017

Visit our website at: KANSAS CITY, MO | Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017 PHILADELPHIA | Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018 CHICAGO | Sunday, March 18, 2018 SAN ANTONIO | Sunday, May 20, 2018

Learn more at: www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org/WAS

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www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org/Referral


N E W S & U P DAT ES

Call for Nominations The nominating committee requests your assistance in identifying qualified members to serve as the 2018-20 national council to be elected at the 2018 National Convention & Leadership Conference in Phoenix, AZ. The call for nominations is for the following national council positions:

PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS VICE PRESIDENT OF FINANCE VICE PRESIDENT OF COMMUNICATIONS THREE VICE PRESIDENTS OF MEMBERSHIP The national council develops the Sorority’s strategic plan based on research and its view for the future, and sets priorities for the biennium. The national council is also responsible for financial oversight, setting policies and procedures and engaging with the membership.

The nominating committee is directed to interview and select candidates for national council. The committee members bring a wide range of Alpha Sigma Alpha experience having served as collegiate/alumnae chapter officers, advisors and volunteers. The 2018 nominating committee: KIM BENSON, DN-B, CHAIRMAN JAIME VILSACK MCCASLIN, GY GRACE MOODY, DH JORDAN HUNTZE WALKER, BL COLLEGIATE CHAPTER REPRESENTATIVE: ANNA CHORAZYCZEWSKI, ZF

Ideal candidates will have demonstrated enthusiastic commitment to the organization, creativity, vision and strong interpersonal skills. The ability to motivate and communicate through written correspondence and public speaking is essential. Experience or skills in mentoring is helpful. Potential candidates should have a broad perspective of the Sorority, including operations as well as strategic direction. It is recommended that a candidate for national council have prior experience serving as an Alpha Sigma Alpha volunteer. Experience in board service and leadership in other organizations is also desirable. An electronic nomination form is available at: www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org/Nominations Nominations must be submitted by Aug. 15, 2017. All nominees will be asked to provide an application, resume and endorsement letter. Questions? Call national headquarters at (317) 871-2920.

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

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NEWS & UP D AT E S

THREE EMERGING CHAPTERS TO BE ESTABLISHED IN FALL 2017 The University of Arizona in Tucson, AZ is a public, comprehensive university where teaching, research, service and innovation merge to improve lives in Arizona and beyond. This will be the only active collegiate chapter in Arizona, and the first in the Pacific 12 Conference. Alpha Sigma Alpha will be the thirteenth NPC organization on campus. Recruitment for the emerging chapter will begin in fall 2017.

Cleveland State University in Cleveland, OH is a public, comprehensive university that encourages excellence, diversity and engaged learning. This will be the third active collegiate chapter to be established in Ohio. Alpha Sigma Alpha will be the fourth NPC organization on campus, joining Delta Zeta, Theta Phi Alpha and Phi Mu. Recruitment for the emerging chapter will begin in fall 2017.

Alpha Sigma Alpha will reestablish the Tau Tau Chapter at Fort Hays State University (FHSU) in Hays, KS. FHSU is a public, comprehensive university that aims to develop engaged global citizen-leaders. This will be the third active collegiate chapter to be established in Kansas. Alpha Sigma Alpha will be the fourth NPC organization on campus, joining Alpha Gamma Delta, Delta Zeta and Sigma Sigma Sigma. Recruitment for the emerging chapter will begin in fall 2017.

CLOSEST COLLEGIATE CHAPTERS

CLOSEST COLLEGIATE CHAPTERS

CLOSEST COLLEGIATE CHAPTERS

Theta Xi Chapter, University of Texas at El Paso

Gamma Psi Chapter, Edinboro University of Pennsylvania

Epsilon Epsilon Chapter, Emporia State University, KS

QUICK FACTS

Epsilon Theta Chapter, The Penn State University at Erie-Behrend College, PA

Gamma Gamma Chapter, Northwestern Oklahoma State University

Zeta Gamma Chapter, Gannon University, PA

Zeta Mu Chapter, Missouri Western State University

QUICK FACTS

QUICK FACTS

Founded in 1929

Founded in 1902

Enrollment: 17,000 students

Enrollment: 14,000 students

Student/faculty ratio: 18 to 1

Student/faculty ratio: 16 to 1

Mascot: Vikings

Mascot: Tigers

Founded 1885 Enrollment: 34,000 undergraduates Student/faculty ratio: 23 to 1 Mascot: Wildcats ASAatUofA @ASA_UofA @ASA_UofA

ASACLEState

ASAatFHSU

@ASA_CLEState

@ASA_FHSU

@ASA_CLEState

@ASA_FHSU

INTERESTED IN GETTING INVOLVED WITH AN EMERGING CHAPTER? CONTACT US AT EXTENSION@ALPHASIGMAALPHA.ORG OR (317) 871-2920.

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TO OUR 775 VOLUNTEERS, the key to our success rests in people like you.

THANK YOU for your generosity, dedication LEADERSHIP AND SERVICE. YOU EMBODY THAT LIFE IS NOT TAKING IN ONLY; IT IS GIVING OUT TOO.

You are our advisors,

region volunteers, facilitators, national teams

and task forces, Foundation volunteers. WE SEND OUR SINCEREST GRATITUDE FOR THOSE WHO HAVE SERVED AND CONTINUE TO SERVE IN THEIR VOLUNTEER ROLES.

Thank you for all that you do.


T EXAS C H APTER A& M IN S I NSTA TAL LLAT L AT IOIN ON

BY JEN AKRIGHT, HH

Iota Beta Chapter at Texas A&M University-Texarkana

In October 2016, Alpha Sigma Alpha installed the

Installation Weekend Iota Beta Chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha was installed on Oct. 29, 2016 at Texas A&M University - Texarkana. The weekend celebration took place at the Northridge Country Club in Texarkana, TX. Nearby collegiate and alumnae members came to celebrate the newest chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha, including members of the Gamma Zeta Chapter, University of Arkansas - Monticello and the Epsilon Alpha Chapter, Southern Arkansas University.

Meet the chapter During the colonization process, the university celebrated its twenty year anniversary with the Texas A&M system. The milestone helped start a period of rapid growth for the university, and Alpha Sigma Alpha has been at the forefront. With rising enrollment numbers and new buildings being erected, the Iota Beta Chapter will continue to lead Texas A&M University Texarkana into the future.

At the installation banquet, University President Emily Cutrer, Ph.D. delivered a keynote address to the attendees. Dr. Cutrer is the author of The Art of the Woman: The Life and Work of Elisabet Ney. She entwined her advice on being a woman in power with the open motto of Alpha Sigma Alpha, “Aspire, Seek, Attain.”

“We started as a small group of women who wanted to create a legacy on our campus,” Samantha Armstrong, charter member, said. “We spent many nights learning about Alpha Sigma Alpha, what made it different from all other sororities and what made it special to us, and then we put in hard work. As we shaped the chapter into being, the process truly shaped us into women of poise and purpose. The experience brought the members of Iota Beta so much closer together and tested us in ways we did not know were possible. It truly exemplified what it is to be a member of a great Sorority.”

Iota Beta Chapter installation team Melissa Koch Merriam, EE, national president Mac Mackenzie, DS, Region 2 facilitator Abby Somers, QZ, membership growth coordinator Jen Akright, HH, leadership consultant

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Charter members Leah Alfaro Neha Amberkar Leslie Arietta Samantha Armstrong Brenda Awuah Melanie Boyle Ashleigh Bridges Andrea Corbell Kara Crane Shakebria Cridell Jane Ellis Kacie Gray Courtney Harris Samantha Hughes Sharda James Laikyn Jean Alexandra Jenkins Tatyana Johnigan

Chapter advisors Morgan Bush, ZΊ Jennifer Lancaster, EA



Brittany Jones Talore Jordan Eleanor Kemins Maria Elizabeth Lopez Bridget Michelle Madrid Jennifer Marsh Ashley Maya Roya Morakabian Vaishnavi Ramachar Emily Rankin Alisa Robinson Alexandria Smith Sydney Steed Stephanie Trujillo Annette Villagran Darykca Yun Alumnae Initiate Pearlena Warren

Heather McKnight, EA Aimee Mullins, EA

Installation gifts and donations sponsored by: Aimee Mullins, EA, Suzanne Hebert, BZ, Region 2 team and Mac MacKenzie, DS

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

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C H APTER IN S TAL L AT IO N

BY TESS TEDRICK, QG

Iota Gamma Chapter at Ramapo College of New Jersey

In November 2016, Alpha Sigma Alpha installed the

On Nov. 12, 2016, the Iota Gamma Chapter was installed at Ramapo College of New Jersey in Mahwah, NJ as 45 women were initiated in Alpha Sigma Alpha. Members from the Zeta Lambda Chapter at Rowan University, the Zeta Theta Chapter at Wagner College, the Gamma Phi Chapter at St. John’s University, the Theta Sigma Chapter at Southern Connecticut State University and local alumnae were in attendance and served as sponsors during the Sanctuary Degree Service. The installation festivities began with a sisterhood breakfast, where the communications committee read congratulatory notes from sisters across the country. The Sanctuary Degree Service and the Service for the Installation of a New Chapter were held following breakfast. That evening, chapter members and their guests gathered at a formal banquet held at the Ramapo College of New Jersey’s Trustee’s Pavilion. Social Committee Chairman Emily O’Donnell and Communication Committee Chairman Samantha Mundy opened congratulatory gifts including a chapter flag, an engraved silver platter, chapter stationery, a ritual trunk and wireless speakers.

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Iota Gamma Chapter installation team Melissa Koch Merriam, EE, national president Nikki Kawalec, ZU, Region 11 facilitator Christine Strapac Thomas, AG, Foundation chairman Abby Somers, QZ, membership growth coordinator Tess Tedrick, QG, leadership consultant Christine Thomas, Foundation chairman, was the keynote speaker. Christine spoke on the celebration of Alpha Sigma Alpha’s 115th Founder’s Day and the continuation of the legacy through living it, talking it, dreaming it and working for it. “Live it and become the best version of yourself through these opportunities,” Christine said during her keynote. “Talk it: speak and act with integrity. Dream to leave your chapter better than it is today. By working for it, others, particularly those who wear no Greek letter badge, learn the power and greatness of fraternity and sorority life.” To conclude the celebration, members received their membership certificates; Rick Brown, Ramapo College of New Jersey director of the Center for Student Involvement, accepted the fraternal enhancement grant; and the chapter was presented with their charter.


“My goal for the Iota Gamma Chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha is to create a loving and uplifting community of women who build each other up and are supportive of one another in their personal, professional and academic pursuits,” Leah Schwebel, charter member, said. “I hope that this chapter will serve as a role model to the entire Ramapo community and to other fraternal organizations. My goal for Iota Gamma is to foster close relationships among sisters while also having consistent encouragement to each other to work for our dreams in other areas of life, such as through personal or professional development.” Alpha Sigma Alpha joined five other National Panhellenic sororities including Alpha Omicron Pi, Delta Phi Epsilon, Sigma Delta Tau, Sigma Sigma Sigma and Theta Phi Alpha. The chapter earned the title of “Top Fundraiser” at the college’s dance marathon to support the local Children’s Miracle Network Hospital.

Colony advisors

One colony advisor had a unique perspective Patti Latin was a founding colony member at SUNYCourtland which became the Gamma Clio Chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha. “Being a former colony member has helped me guide

Charter members Ana Alpizar Jenny Barone Ahlam Basha Ariana Bernardo Sarah Berndt Cassandra Bernyk Rebecca Binnig Angel Bonanno Kathryn Brennan Sarah Brown Akira Burgos Savannah Carson Sydney Casale Katherine Coughlin Dariana Doughty Kathryn Duca Brianna Dunn Caroline Earl Judy Errichetti Christina Fallon Carolyn Field Ariana Focaraccio Rya Freij

Melissa Garcia Christina Geiger Christine Guerra Carolyn Guggino Kelly Hafemeister Brianna Himpele Colleen Kelly Shuci Lim Cheyenne Locklear Deidra Lohwin Maria Luciano Karissa Mata Melissa Mitariten Samantha Mundy Ashley Nichols Emily O’Donnell Alison Pham Gabrielle Rosenblum Leah Schwebel Lizzet Soto Sarah Stacey Mattison Stewart Brianna Weissman

and relate to the women of Iota Gamma through some of the emotions and hurdles they have experienced,” Patti said. “Throughout the colonization process and becoming the Iota Gamma Chapter, the women were full of questions and wonder as to what was going to happen next. Having been through the process helped me reassure and explain to the women that this was going to be an amazing experience to be a part of. The journey from colony to chapter of Iota Gamma was exciting and full of hope. The women have incredible personalities and values, and seeing what they were able to accomplish throughout the installation process has left me hopeful and excited for their very bright and successful future.”

Chapter advisors Leigh Couture, QB Dana Fjermestad, G Clio Megan Kearney, ZL Patti Latin, G Clio

 . Heather McLean, GI B Kristen Verti SanFilippo, BE Stephanie Vogel, QB

Installation gifts and donations were sponsored by: Suzanne Hebert, BZ, and B. Heather McLean, GI. All photos taken by Chayna Wilson, ΕΜ.

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

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FEATURE

A glimpse into the past: The Alpha Sigma Alpha O.D. Program 14

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BY JENNIFER MCNABB, PH.D., ΓΜ, NATIONAL HISTORIAN

I I In a letter written in 1944 that still

exudes

her

trademark

energy and vision, then-National President Wilma Wilson Sharp

enthusiastically announced the launch of a new Alpha Sigma

Alpha alumnae visitor plan, a

project that would come to be known as the “O.D. Program.”

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

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FEATURE

I

n the midst of World War II, the “O.D.” abbreviation was easily and widely recognizable: it was the U.S. Army’s shorthand for “Officer of the Day,” an officer whose assigned daily duty involved various administrative and supervisory tasks at a military installation. For Alpha Sigma Alpha’s collegiate and alumnae members, though, O.D. also came to stand for “Older Daughters,” recent alumnae who returned to visit their collegiate chapters in an administrative and supervisory capacity.

The Alpha Sigma Alpha national archives at national headquarters houses dozens of documents that allow us a glimpse into the O.D. initiative and to gain a better understanding of how the Second World War impacted Alpha Sigma Alpha and its members.

To those women selected to participate, Mrs. Sharp wrote, “You have been honored! You have been selected as the alumna visitor to your college chapter!” After outlining what she described as a “pleasant and responsible assignment,” Mrs. Sharp closed with a plea for a speedy reply to her offer of service to the Sorority: “May I hear from you immediately?”

About the program The program’s structure was simple: “Older Daughters” were to visit their college chapter for a maximum of two days (Mrs. Sharp advised that “train or bus schedules will likely determine length of stay”), with the Sorority to pay all visitor expenses. Documented reimbursement records for ten of the completed visits totaled $95.92; an investment of just over $1,317.68 in 2017 dollars, according to the United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Prospective O.D.s The prospective O.D.s to which Mrs. Sharp wrote in 1944 were well positioned to offer useful suggestions, both to the national president and to their former collegiate chapters. Most were recent graduates, and many were former chapter presidents. They were a distinguished group. For example, Evelyn Merrifield, who visited Beta Zeta Chapter at Southwestern Louisiana Institute (University of Southwestern Louisiana), had been the winner of the Elizabeth Bird Small Award the year before. Edith Gaupp, who visited Pi Pi at New York State College for Teachers (Buffalo State University), had just been named Alpha Sigma Alpha national art editor.

Chapter alumnae visitors were sent a report form by Mrs. Sharp to guide their assessments, and the template provided a good sense of the visits’ structure and intent. Older Daughters were to comment on the following: their chapter’s relationship with the local Panhellenic and campus administrators, to be gained by meetings with the president and dean of women at each institution; whether or not the chapter was in “good health” in general and financial terms as well as its strengths and weaknesses; the results of 1944 recruitment; and the quality of the current chapter leadership. As a group, the alumnae sent a steady stream of thoughtful assessments of their former chapters in the spring of 1945, writing about their visits and the collegians with whom they interacted in vibrant terms. Both their official reports and their personal letters to Mrs. Sharp are punctuated with descriptors such as “charming,” “grand,” “wonderful” and “lovely.”

Challenges of the war The “grand” and “lovely” collegians the O.D.s visited were, however, seeking to complete their education in extraordinary times for American colleges and universities. Sally Hawkins of Alpha Gamma Chapter, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, wrote that “on the whole the school is maintaining as normal a life as

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’’ You have

been honored!! You have been selected as the alumna visitor to your college chapter!’’!”

From top to bottom: Evelyn Merrifield, BZ, Ruth Stone Martin, BD, and Viola Caraway, YY.

possible under the wartime conditions,” a theme present in many other reports and letters. Edith Gaupp, Pi Pi, noted, “As on all campuses the war has curtailed activities,” and fellow Pi Pi O.D. Marjorie Frisbee wrote, “State Teachers is realizing again this year the curtailment of activities due to the war.” Mary Weinberg, who visited the Beta Kappa Chapter, Western Illinois State (Western Illinois University), observed the gender disparity on campus occasioned by the war. “Women’s clubs are very active, but there are so few men on campus that dances and mixed affairs are out.” In summarizing her visit to the Beta Delta Chapter, Mississippi Southern College (University of Southern Mississippi), Ruth Stone Martin wrote, “The girls’ chief cause of annoyance is the 25 boys on the campus ([a female-male ratio of] 10 to 1)!” Frances Camden

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

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FEATURE

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Waddell, who visited the Beta Epsilon Chapter, Madison College (James Madison University), reported an imbalance of the opposite sort, praising the chapter’s perseverance as the only sorority on a campus with a women’s enrollment totaling 38. At the same time that the war provided considerable challenges, it also allowed opportunities for members to become meaningfully involved in service activities to benefit their campus, communities and nation. For example, Kitty Karnes who visited the Beta Iota Chapter, Radford College (Radford University) stated proudly, “We are also the only sorority on campus knitting afghans for the Red Cross.” A fuller account of the Alpha Sigma Alphas war effort can be found in the May 1943 Phoenix.

FURTHER READING “Alpha Sigs in Military Service,” “Alpha Sigma Alumnae in the War Program,” “War Service of College Alpha Sigs,” “Status of Women in War Time,” and “The Place of Sororities in A Nation at War,” The Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha 28, no. 4 (May 1943): 11-16. Available online

The Sorority’s commitment

at www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org/

The aims of the O.D. program demonstrate the Sorority’s commitment to securing continued involvement with and dedication to the Sorority from its growing alumnae base and to connecting collegiate and alumnae members. The stated purpose of the alumnae visits of 1945 was “to extend our ASA leadership program to include recent graduates, to coordinate college and alumnae activities, to stimulate ASA growth and unity, [and] to promote college loyalty on the part of our ASA alumnae.”

May1943 “Alpha Sigma Alphas Salute Their O.D.,” The Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha 30, no. 4 (May 1945): 13. Available online at www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org/ May1945

There is a timelessness in the sentiments of the archival material documenting the O.D. project of 1944-45. The sense of devotion the visitors and collegians demonstrated toward the Sorority, even during a year of intense national crisis, is still inspiring today. I hope it serves as a reminder of how much we owe to the women who came before us and how much we owe to the women who will follow us as stewards of our Sorority’s values and traditions.

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

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EBI ASSE S S M E N T

Critical Insights Learning from the results of Alpha Sigma Alpha’s 2016 EBI assessment

BY LEAH DOOLEY EICKOFF, AB, PROGRAM COORDINATOR

I

N JANUARY 2016, Alpha Sigma Alpha collegiate members were invited to participate in an ongoing effort to assess the collegiate member experience. The Educational Benchmarking Inc. (EBI) assessment, offered biennially, allows the Sorority to understand the demographics of members and identify the ways we are achieving our mission, purpose and vision.

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About EBI

RESPONSE

3,076

The EBI assessment provides recommendations for the national organization to consider. This information is used by national council as a part of the strategic planning process. National programming including workshops at The Academy and the 2016 National Convention & Leadership Conference were aligned with the information gained in the 2016 EBI assessment. This programming included workshops on followership, effective chapter leadership, conflict management and taking advantage of the opportunities offered to Alpha Sigma Alpha members. Data collected from EBI also helped guide curriculum associated with membership education and the 2017 Emma Coleman Frost Leadership Development Institute.

total responses (2,403 total responses in 2014)

48.9%

Information related to the national EBI data has been provided to volunteers at the Region Volunteer Development Weekend and Advisor Institute. In addition, collegiate chapters who had at least 25 percent of members complete the assessment were provided a chapter-specific report. The report can aid chapters as they determine educational programming and chapter culture shifts to improve the member experience. Chapters who received a visit from an education consultant in 2016-17 have been offered personalized workshops based on the EBI data.

of the 6,285 members invited completed the assessment (44% of the 5,480 members invited completed the assessment in 2014)

48 CHAPTER RESPONSE RATE 75%+ MEMBERS PARTICIPATED • 2014 – 10 chapters • 2016 – 5 chapters

34

36 32

50%-74% OF MEMBERS PARTICIPATED • 2014 – 34 chapters • 2016 – 48 chapters 25%-49% OF MEMBERS PARTICIPATED • 2014 – 36 chapters • 2016 – 32 chapters < 25% OF MEMBERS PARTICIPATED • 2014 – 10 chapters • 2016 – 7 chapters

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AB OUT OUR ME MB E R S

EBI ASSE S S M E N T

About Our Members

(Demographics of members who completed the assessment)

YEAR IN SCHOOL

RESIDENCE

AFFILIATED WITH ASA

19.4% FIRST YEAR FRESHMEN

16.5% LIVE IN CHAPTER FACILITY

66.1% FRESHMAN YEAR

27.6% SOPHOMORE

41.4% LIVE ON CAMPUS; NOT IN CHAPTER FACILITY

25.3% SOPHOMORE YEAR

42.1% LIVE OFF CAMPUS; NOT IN CHAPTER FACILITY

1.4% SENIOR YEAR

29% JUNIOR 23.8% SENIOR

7.2% JUNIOR YEAR

AREAS OF STUDY 21.5% HEALTH PROFESSIONS 17.0% OTHER 13.9% BUSINESS

71.9% 22

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha | Winter 2017

13.4% EDUCATION

6.5% BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

9.7% SOCIAL SCIENCES

2.6% ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY

7.2% COMMUNICATIONS/ JOURNALISM

 .6% 2 HUMANITIES

of members are involved in at least one additional student organization


The data shows in 2016, members continued to find balance between academics, chapter expectations, employment, service opportunities and involvement in other organizations. AVERAGE HOURS PER WEEK SPENT IN A PAID JOB/WORK STUDY:

30+ 21-30 11-20 1-10 NONE

4.7% 9.5%

24.8%

DEATH IN FAMILY

25.3% NEGATIVE

35.8%

BODY IMAGE MENTAL HEALTH DISORDER DIAGNOSIS

2.8% SEXUAL ASSAULT

7.7%

SUBSTANCE ABUSE (PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS)

12.8%

24.6%

37.8% 14.4%

AVERAGE HOURS PER WEEK SPENT ON CHAPTER-RELATED ACTIVITIES:

15+ 11-15 6-10 <5

PERSONAL ADVERSITIES FACED IN 2015: (Personally Faced

TOPIC

AVERAGE HOURS PER WEEK SPENT STUDYING OR DOING OUT-OF-CLASS SCHOOL WORK:

30+ 21-30 16-20 11-15 6-10 <5

Current events surrounding higher education have continued to demonstrate the need for education related to adversities that college students may face. Gathering data linked specifically to Alpha Sigma Alpha members, better positions the national organization to offer support and resources to collegiate chapters in the areas most critical to member success and matriculation.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE (DRUGS)

SUBSTANCE ABUSE (ALCOHOL)

2.7% 5.6%

HAZING

(Know Someone)

the Adversity)

1,615 1,051 1,552 637 168 229 644 84

440 436 647 133 32 30 98 23

AB OUT OUR M E M B E R S

USE OF TIME

29.2%

62.5%

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

23


LE AR NI NG & GR OWI NG

EBI ASSE S S M E N T

Learning & Growing through Alpha Sigma Alpha

94.5% 96.7% 95.9% 97.2% 97.6%

of members moderately or extremely believe Alpha Sigma Alpha has contributed to their academic success of members moderately or extremely believe Alpha Sigma Alpha has contributed to understanding their personal values of members moderately or extremely believe Alpha Sigma Alpha has contributed to their self-discipline of members moderately or extremely believe Alpha Sigma Alpha has contributed to their commitment to community service of members moderately or extremely believe Alpha Sigma Alpha has contributed to their ability to work effectively with others

CHAPTER ACTIVITY SATISFACTION In 2016, collegiate members expressed satisfaction with the following types of chapter activities: SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 54.9% Extremely 40.8% Moderately 4.3% Not at all SERVICE & CHARITABLE GIVING ACTIVITIES 60.8% Extremely 35.6% Moderately 3.7% Not at all EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES 49.2% Extremely 45.5% Moderately 5.2% Not at all

24

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha | Winter 2017

ALUMNAE ACTIVITIES 31.7% Extremely 52.7% Moderately 15.6% Not at all VARIETY OF PROGRAMS 47.8% Extremely 47% Moderately 5.2% Not at all QUALITY OF PROGRAMS 52.8% Extremely 43.3% Moderately 3.9% Not at all

Alpha Sigma Alphas pride themselves on being inclusive of members and those who wear no Greek letter badge. Members shared the following information related to their interactions with, value of and ability to work with diverse populations:

DIVERSE POPULATIONS

97.4%

of members believe involvement in Alpha Sigma Alpha has moderately or significantly enhanced their ability to interact with people who are different from them

98.3%

of members believe involvement in Alpha Sigma Alpha has moderately or significantly enhanced their ability to value and respect people who are different from them

96.2%

of members believe involvement in Alpha Sigma Alpha has moderately or significantly enhanced their ability to work with diverse populations (i.e. cultural, ethnic, political)


DEVELOPMENT AS WOMAN OF POISE AND PURPOSE

CORE VALUES

When asked what has contributed to development as a woman of poise and purpose, women indicated the following:

Chapter social events Relationship w/ older member Participation in Ritual Community service Reflection on Ritual Holding a chapter officer position Charitable giving

12.3% 12.2% 11.4% 10.8% 9.3% 9% 8.9%

When asked to select the three Alpha Sigma Alpha core values that are most frequently applied to make life decisions, members selected the following:

Learning Generosity Integrity Enjoyment Growth Responsibility Balance Relationships

SATISFACTION WITH ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA EXPERIENCE Some of the most satisfied populations in Alpha Sigma Alpha include: Members who cite that involvement in Alpha Sigma Alpha has caused their GPA to significantly or slightly improve. M  embers who indicate that they will definitely be involved in Alpha Sigma Alpha after graduation.  embers who have developed M more as a leader from Alpha Sigma Alpha than any other organization.

Some of the least satisfied populations in Alpha Sigma Alpha include: Members who have been hazed or have personally abused prescription medication in the past year.  embers who identify as M bisexual, gay or lesbian.  embers who indicate M sorority membership has caused their GPA to significantly decline.

LE AR NI NG & GR OWI NG

97%

of members indicate they have moderately or significantly developed as women of poise and purpose due to membership in Alpha Sigma Alpha

8% 9% 10% 11.2% 13.3% 15.9% 16% 16.7%

96% of members are moderately or significantly satisfied with their Alpha Sigma Alpha experience

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

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C H APTER N E W S

1

5

2

6

7

8

3

4

26

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha | Winter 2017

5,168


9

10 1. Beta Kappa Chapter, Western Illinois University 2. Delta Nu-B Chapter, Kettering University, MI 3. Gamma Omega Chapter, Eastern Illinois University 4. Gamma Zeta Chapter, University of Arkansas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Monticello 5. Theta Eta Chapter, Roger State University, OK 6. Theta Kappa Chapter, Texas A&M University-Kingsville 7. Theta Omega Chapter, University of New Haven, CT 8. Theta Phi Chapter, University of North Carolina at Pembroke 9. Theta Tau Chapter, Capital University, OH 10. Theta Upsilon, Boise State University, ID 11. Zeta Kappa Chapter, Minnesota State University, Mankato

11

service hours reported on MobileServe during D.O.T Days www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

27


C H APTER N E W S

2

1

3 1. Beta Theta Chapter, Central Michigan University Surrounded by sisters, Stephani Taymond, sips on apple cider at a sisterhood event held at Uncle Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cider Mill.

4 2. Theta Kappa Chapter, Texas A&M University â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kingsville Chapter members Valeria Marquez and Destiny Russell promote safe driving. The chapter partnered with the campus police department to hand out Smarties candy to students wearing seatbelts.

3. Alpha Beta Chapter, Truman State University, MO Nicole Lauritsen, Camden Woods, Anna Buchheit and Lauren Thiery competed in the inaugural Guardian of the Flame 5k in Kirksville, MO to support Special Olympics. 4. Beta Iota Chapter, Radford University, VA Chapter members pose after spending the day playing life size jenga, bubble wars and corn hole at a campus event.

28

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha | Winter 2017


5

7 5. Delta Gamma Chapter, West Chester University, PA Chapter members Abriana Nolan, Amanda Caffrey, Carolyn McCarron, Evie Burt and Kristen Kaelin pose after plunging at Villanova Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Polar Plunge. 6. Delta Sigma Chapter, Saginaw Valley State University, MI Overfilled with excitement, Natalie Janes jumps into the arms of Haley Gouine on bid day.

6

8 7. Chicago West Alumnae Chapter Members of the Chicago West Alumnae Chapter pose together after the Sanctuary Degree Service to initiate Mary Lynn Fischer as an alumna. Pictured front row: Maria Vasos, Susan Huggins, Joan Grabarek, Mary Lynn Fischer, Val Husak and Sandra Ward; back row: Carole Dunbar, Joyce Shelton, Rose Peterson and Ellie Priebe.

8. Theta Psi Chapter, Colorado Mesa University Chapter members pose together after a day of volunteering at the Rim Rock Marathon. Members hiked up the Colorado National Monument to man wateraid stations and cheer on runners.

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

29


C H APTER N E W S

9

11 9. D  elta Iota Chapter, University of Delaware After being on their feet for a 12 hour dance marathon, Chapter members pose with their B+ Hero, Payton. The B+ Foundation helps kids fight cancer through assistance, research and advocacy. The Delta Iota Chapter charitably gave more than $80,000 to the B+ Foundation and hosted multiple events to show support and lift the spirit of Payton.

30

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha | Winter 2017

10

12 10. Delta Chi Chapter, Bloomsburg University, PA Dressed as Dot the Ladybug, Maddie Petrancuri is assisted by Wendy Serrano to lead the local Girls on the Run 5K race. 11. Buffalo Alumnae Chapter Marcia Goldstein, DT, and Donette Thurlow, PP, present a check to the owner of Wings Flights of Hope Buffalo Inc. The mission of Wings Flights of Hope Inc. is to help people in need of free air transportation for medical and humanitarian purposes.

12. Epsilon Alpha Chapter, Southern Arkansas University Chapter member Manisha GC, helps Special Olympian Gillian Hood put on a ribbon she just won. The Epsilon Alpha Chapter has formed a special bond with Gillian through their volunteer work with the local Special Olympics. Several members of the chapter take Gillian out for dinner regularly and offer to help her with things such as running errands.


13

14 13. Theta Tau Chapter, Capital University, OH Members of the Theta Tau Chapter volunteered at a special Olympics bowling tournament by awarding medals.

15 14. Zeta Eta Chapter, Rockhurst University, MO Chapter members Julia Faltin, Gabby Shannuth, Emily Fanslau, Kaylie Graef and Sarah Cook volunteered at the registration table for the Polycystic Kidney Disease Walk in Kansas City, MO.

15. Beta Sigma Chapter, Missouri State University Chapter member Melissa Stallbaumer receives hugs from the girls she coached through Girls on the Run. Melissa has served as a Girls on the Run coach for five seasons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today I am thankful for five seasons of hugs, love and lessons learned from the incredible girls I have had the fortune of working with for the past two and half years,â&#x20AC;? Melissa said.

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

31


C H APTER N E W S

17

16 16. D  elta Nu–B Chapter, Kettering University, MI Members of the Delta Nu–B Chapter took an instructional painting class as a sisterhood event.

32

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha | Winter 2017

18 17. Epsilon Upsilon Chapter, California University of Pennsylvania Eight members of the Epsilon Upsilon Chapter pose together before running at the local Girls on the Run 5K. Other chapter members volunteered at the race at water stations, handing out medals and working raffle booths.

18. Gamma Clio Chapter, State University of New York – Cortland The Gamma Clio Chapter participated in the annual Cortland CROP Hunger Walk. CROP Hunger Walks help to provide food, water and resources to help end hunger in the community.


19

21 19. N  u Nu Chapter, Drexel University, PA Members of the NuNu Chapter participated in the Philadelphia Phillies "Phillies Red Goes Green" Day. During the baseball game, sisters walked up and down the aisles of seats to collect recyclables from fans.

20

22 20. Theta Epsilon Chapter, Schreiner University, TX The Theta Epsilon Chapter hosted a charitable giving event to benefit Special Olympics. The event was a lip sync battle.

22. Beta Rho Chapter, Northern Illinois University Chapter members Abbey Rasmussen and Maddie Kowitzke pose with Special Olympic athletesat a bowling tournament.

21. Theta Nu Chapter, Knox College, IL Members of the Theta Nu Chapter participated in their collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual event Pumphandle. The event consists of participants lining up and shaking each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hands.

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

33


ASA FOU N D AT IO N N E W S These words from our sisters show the impact your donations are making:

We believe we impact future generations, change lives and influence the world. Help the Foundation continue to provide educational opportunities for growth with your gift. Set a fiscal year goal to reach the next lifetime giving roll or to join a Heritage Society circle. HERITAGE SOCIETY The Heritage Society honors donors who make an annual contribution of $250 or more each fiscal year (June 1 – May 31). Donors who wish to join elite giving circles within the Heritage Society may do so by reaching the following giving amounts on a fiscal year basis: Pearl Circle ($250) Ruby Circle ($500) Diamond Circle ($1,000) Achievement Circle ($2,500) Devotion Circle ($5,000) Legacy Circle ($10,000) LIFETIME GIVING ROLLS The Alpha Sigma Alpha Foundation has several lifetime giving rolls that recognize outstanding cumulative giving to the Foundation. $1,901 1901 Honor Roll $5,000 Inspire Honor Roll $10,000 Crimson Honor Roll $25,000 Narcissus Honor Roll $50,000 Four Points Honor Roll $100,000 Chairmans’ Honor Roll $250,000 Aster Honor Roll $500,000 Founders’ Honor Roll $1,000,000 Mizpah Honor Roll MAKE A GIFT TODAY AT: WWW.ALPHASIGMAALPHA.ORG/ ASA-FOUNDATION

34

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha | Winter 2017

‘‘

I thoroughly enjoyed this workshop, and I think that this will definitely be helpful for all college students in all phases of their lives, whether it is a freshman who is beginning to develop a resume, whether it is a sophomore or junior trying to get an internship, or actually applying for those full time positions as seniors preparing for life outside of college.” –T  HE ACADEMY: PHILADELPHIA ATTENDEE ON THE CAREER TRACK

‘‘ ‘‘ ‘‘

The alumnae pre-conference was complex, fascinating and will make a positive difference in my life. It has become my favorite workshop aspect of the conference.” – ALUMNA MEMBER ON THE ALUMNAE PRE-CONFERENCE AT THE 2016 NATIONAL CONVENTION & LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

The program was very educational and something I will use in my everyday life and will not forget about.” – THE ACADEMY: CHICAGO ATTENDEE ON THE KEYNOTE

I learned so much from this workshop. Being a junior and starting to apply for jobs soon, this resume workshop benefitted me completely!” –THE ACADEMY: ST. LOUIS ATTENDEE ON THE CAREER TRACK


ASA PA L M S

ASA Palms The word palm means tribute, honor or praise. Alpha Sigma Alpha gives palms to alumnae and collegians for their successes and milestones. Celebrating a personal, professional or volunteer success? Tell us about it! Send your success stories to the editor at kturner@AlphaSigmaAlpha.org.

Delta Nu – A, Kettering University, MI Kayla Petrach McDonell, DN-A, was named on 2017 Forbes 30 under 30 – Manufacturing & Industry. At age 26, Kayla made the list for her work on GM’s top-selling car, the Chevrolet Cruze. Kayla had global responsibility for all exterior lighting on the Cruze; she worked with designers, suppliers and factories worldwide on 46 separate lighting parts to meet quality, function and safety regulations in multiple countries.

Zeta Mu Chapter, Missouri Western State University Amanda Geno, ZM, was recognized by Special Olympics Missouri with the John Michael Letz Award. This award was established in December 1994 for the purpose of recognizing an individual whose unselfish efforts and contributions are directly responsible for the success of the Law Enforcement Torch Run® for Special Olympics Missouri. The John Michael Letz award is unofficially known as the “Unsung Hero” Award. Amanda has been involved in the Torch Run for seven years and organizes a Torch Run with local school field day events. Amanda also serves Special Olympics Missouri in various other capacities including volunteering as an events manger, serving on the local Polar Plunge committee and serving as a Unified Partner and athlete mentor.

36

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha | Winter 2017


Delta Iota, University of Delaware Dana Karas, DI, was selected as the New Jersey state representative for the 2017 School Counselor of the Year program by the American School Counselor Association (ASCA). The School Counselor of the Year program honors the professionals who devote their careers to serving as advocates for the nation’s students, helping them achieve success in school and in life. Dana traveled to Washington, D.C. in January to be honored in a ceremony at the White House and be formally recognized at a black-tie gala at historic Union Station.

Theta Lambda, Frostburg State University, MD

Epsilon Epsilon, Emporia State University, KS

April Paul Baer, ΘΛ, was recognized in East Carolina University 40 Under 40 Leadership Awards. This award was created in an effort to recognize emerging leaders who received their start at East Carolina University, as well as those who have used their ECU experiences to make significant impacts in their respective professions, local communities and in the world.

Sara Jo Smith Heath, EE, was recognized by SHAPE America as a 2017 District Teacher of the Year for adapted physical education. SHAPE America – Society of Health and Physical Educators is committed to ensuring all children have the opportunity to lead healthy, physically active lives. Sara was honored during the 2017 SHAPE America National Convention & Expo in Boston.

www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

37


SAVE TH E D AT E

T H E ACA DEM Y 2017-1 8

SAVE THE DATE THE ACADEMY IS ALPHA SIGMA ALPHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S REGIONAL LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE DEDICATED TO PROVIDING COLLEGIATE MEMBERS WITH OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT AND LEADERSHIP TRAINING.

THE ACADEMY: HARTFORD, CT

OCT. 21, 2017

THE ACADEMY: ST. LOUIS

OCT. 28, 2017

THE ACADEMY: CHICAGO

NOV. 11, 2017

THE ACADEMY: PHILADELPHIA

NOV. 18, 2017

THE ACADEMY: RICHMOND, VA

JAN. 27, 2018

THE ACADEMY: KANSAS CITY, MO THE ACADEMY: CLEVELAND THE ACADEMY: DALLAS THE ACADEMY: DENVER

FEB. 3, 2018

FEB. 17, 2018

FEB. 24, 2018 MARCH 3, 2018

WWW.ALPHASIGMAALPHA.ORG/THEACADEMY


archives

from the

Four of the Founders—Juliette Hundley Gilliam, Mary Williamson Hundley, Louise Cox Carper and Virginia Boyd Noell—attended the Golden Convention in Roanoke in 1952 (notice Juliette Hundley Gilliam donning the official Golden Anniversary Convention name tag). They prepared a statement to express their appreciation to the Sorority and their enthusiasm for its continued development: “The four Founders of Alpha Sigma Alpha who have the joy of being present at this GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY are devoutly thankful for the great accomplishments that have been achieved by those who are carrying on the purpose of FRIENDSHIP for which we banded ourselves together in that year of long ago. They have broadened our outlook into wide fields of service.... To the leaders of the Sorority, from our gracious Wilma Sharp, down through the list of those who have worked long and joyously to make pleasant our stay at this conventions, we are eternally grateful. And to the many young creatures who are in themselves visions of loveliness, we say that their sweetness to us, and their loyalty to Alpha Sigma Alpha have given us an experience that will be cherished eternally down deep in our hearts.” www.AlphaSigmaAlpha.org

39


9002 Vincennes Circle | Indianapolis, IN 46268-3018

WOMAN OF

Poise and Purpose â&#x20AC;?

Joining Alpha Sigma Alpha in college was a bigger influence than I ever dreamed. Our motto of "Aspire, Seek, Attain" was a beacon for me. I majored in physical education and became a teacher and coach. While I was teaching, Title IX was passed, so I was able to start several girls' sports teams at my school. Most exciting to me was marrying my wonderful husband and starting a family - first a foster son, age 13, then a boy and girl. While at home with the children, I felt called to change careers to medicine. Remembering our motto was helpful as God directed our paths. More than 30 years have passed and after retirement from a satisfying career, my husband and I looked at another opportunity. Once again I felt called to buy a house, renovate it and make it available for the homeless. The first house is up and running and we are looking for a second house to prepare. We continue to "Aspire, Seek, Attain".

Barbara Thrush Lester, BI

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha I Winter 2017  

Volume 103 I Number 1

Phoenix of Alpha Sigma Alpha I Winter 2017  

Volume 103 I Number 1

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