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THE PHOENIX OF ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA

AEGIS EDITION . VoLUMB

XX

NOVEMBER , 1933

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Published in November, J a nuary, March and May of each year at No . 30 North Ninth Street, Richmond, Indiana, by the Nicholson Printing Compa ny, for the Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority having headquarters at Wellesley Farms, Mass. Business correspondence may be addressed to either offi ce, but matter for publicati on and correspondence concerning the same should be addressed to Julia Lancaster, Welles 路 ley Farms, Ma ss. Entered as second-class matter September 4, 1923, at the post office at Richmond, Ind., under the Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription price one dollar per year.


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PROCLAMATION

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WHEREAS, Alpha Sigma Alpha was founded the fifteenth day of November, Nineteen hundred one, at the Farmville Female Institute,

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Farmville Virginia;

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AND WHEREAS, during its thirty-two years our beloved sorority has been securely guided by the noble ideals upon which it was established, and strengthened by the devoted loyalty and faithfulness of its early initiates;

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THEREFORE, be it known that I, Wilma Wilson Sharp, President of Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority do now proclaim that the fifteenth day of November, Nineteen hundred thirty-three shall be observed as Founders' Day-to honor our respected Founders and with them our esteemed early members of Alpha Sigma Alpha. Given under my hand and seal this twentythird of September, Nineteen hundred thirtythree.

Wilma Wilson Sharp,

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THE PHOENIX OF ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA

AEGIS EDITION THE SPIRIT OF ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA Louise Cox Carper

My first thought upon being informed that this year Alpha Sigma Alpha will celebrate its thirty-second birthday was "Heavens! I'm getting old!" I hadn't thought about that! But upon reflection I decided that thirty-two years is not a frightfully long time in the life of an individual, and it is a ~horter time in the life of an organization. Though the past thirty-two years have witnessed changes so great that previous centuries are relatively no longer, some things remain untouched by time. The world, and I mean the collegiate world, of 1933 is a different world from that of 1901. For this reason it is not easy for a collegiate of 1901 to comprehend fully the problems of the modern society. The difficulty is solved in some degree for me by the fact that I have two children who have just emerged from college sorority and fraternity life. From them I have been able to learn that the college today is not exactly like the college I enjoyed. Nor is it so entirely different as they in their enthusiasm sometimes think it. Human nature has not become an entirely different stuff these past thirty-two years, and my guess is that it will not change very much in the next thirtytwo. I can see myself in many of my daughter's ideas, and my son is not completely different from the boys who came to Farmville from H ampden-Sidney when I was an undergradu-


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ate. I sometimes feel, therefore, that I have enjoyed two college careers, even though the second is a sort of vicarious experience, and when I write these words to my own sorority, I feel that they come from a double experience of college chastened by the richer experience of life. Ignoring, then, the obvious changes in college life between 1901 and today-for what are they other than fashions of dre , speech, and incidental actions ?-1 believe that the fundamental objects of a sorority remain the same. It is still, or should be the purpose of a sorority to cultivate those qualities which will help its members to meet more happily and more successfully the events of life which in their implications remain pretty much the same through the years. I do not refer particularly to those virtues of industry and adaptability which however necessary for a happy life remain secondary. I mean directly the cultivation of the art of living in harmony with other people. The sorority is the training ground for this capacity. If it is to function well, the group spirit, the cooperative spirit must guide individual actions, and this lesson learned once will carry on through life, to the happier life of the individual and of those with whom she is thrown. This spirit is the leaven of society, and the girl who can assimilate it will have the best the sorority can give her. Cooperation cannot be had where affection, trust, and respect are not. The first duty of the sorority is, then, the nurture of this atmosphere of mutual love and fellowship in a common venture. This I confess is an ideal, but it is emphatically an attainable ideal. In so far as Alpha Sigma Alpha attains it, to that degree will it be a true sorority, working toward the betterment of society. I conceive that a sorority is more than a collegiate boarding house. It has a definite work to perform throughout the lives of its members and through them a beneficient influence upon society at large.


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I should like to develop these thoughts at greater length, but lack of space forbids. I hope I have said enough to suggest what to me seems to be the proper spirit of Alpha Sigma Alpha, or of any collegiate organization. It is my devout hope that the sorority which I had the honor to help organize will take the lead in this great work, the cultivation of the happy life.

E il een B rown, XX.


THE PHOE IX


THE PHOENIX

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A TRIP DOWN MEMORIES' LANE Hattie Kelly Thomas _ (Ed ito r's Note: Mrs. Th omas is prepar i r.g th e Hi s t ory of Alph a Sigma Alpha. l路 rom the mate n a l a lready co ll ected sh e gives us this vivid picture of our Foun ders.)

Dear Girls of Alpha Sigma Alpha: Come take a trip with me-no not an expensive one into foreign lands-just a trip down memories' lane! Imagine yourselves in the small town of Farmville, Virginia, in the fall of 1902. Between four and five hundred students arriving via the town's one railroad! A real "home coming" for most of us! We are "Old Girls!" Mary Williamson Hundley, Virgina Lee Boyd (both of whom were students at what was then State Normal School during the entire previous year) and Hattie Jake Virginia Kelly (a student for four and a half months of the preceding year) had elected to room together in the "old building"-the rooms in the newer buildings accommodating only two persons and incidentally being much more modern! Picture these girls-May (as we call Mary) is rather a fine looking girl, with light hair and eyes and has a keen sense of humor! Virginia (whom we call "Jinks") is a smaller girl, with pretty blue eyes and wavy hair. She has a lovely soprano voice. "Jakesy/ as Hattie Kelly is popularly known, is a wee bit smaller yet and also has light hair and eyes. Now comes Juliette Jefferson Hundley-a first cousin of Virginia Boyd, and the daughter of Judge and Mrs. George Jefferson Hundley-who lives just a few miles from Farmville. Juliette is a "Day Student" during sessions 1901-2 and 'o2-'o3. She is a real personality, with black hair and brown eyes. One of the greatest joys of our group are week-end house-parties in Juliette's most delightful home-and we cannot fail to mention that the ever present Hampden-Sydney students lend added zest. Next in the picture we have Louise Burks Cox-a perfect dear-full of pep-small, with very dark brown hair and dancing brown eyes-who is also a "Day Student"-electing to "live" across the street from the institution. Last but by no


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means least-Calva Hamlet Watson-a most intellectual, attractive personality, who "lives" one block away from the institution. This group of girls being delightfully congenial were drawn together by that indescribable something-"Blest Be the Tie That Binds!" During the session 190I-02, and in the early fall of 1902-03, five of this group (the exception being Hattie Kelly) were planning, and held frequent conferences with Judge Hundley. At intervals Virginia would confide in Hattie-making things sound most mysterious and frequently whispering-"Jakesy, this may affect your whole life!" On November 15, 1902, the establishment of Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority was announced to the public. Judge Hundley played a large part in writing the Constitution and By-Laws. Hattie Kelly was actually the very first "pledge," followed by the pledging of Louise Baskerville and Louise Price. Would you like a peek into our meetings ? They are held in our rooms, where two or three Alpha Sigs occupy the same one. The walls of each are entirely covered with photographs, kodak pictures and pennants-the less space left bare, the more attractive the room! A "Frat House" or "Fraternity Room," being a very vague dream! Virginia Boyd as president, who presides with charm, is probably a little more sophisticated than most of the group. She it is who conducts our simple ritual and she it is who so sweetly leads our singing of "Blest Be the Tie That Binds." Often the meetings are closed with the singing of "Now the Day Is Over." Juliette is vice-president while May is treasurer. Louise as secretary and Calva as historian are already at work. In February, 'o3, Edna Venable Elcan, Lucy Hannah Daniel, Margaret Anthony Palmer and Angela Carroll Tinsley were added. Now we are twelve! Edna's eldest sister is a Zeta Tau Alpha and Lucy's eldest sister is a Kappa Delta. Due to their personal charm and sterling worth, Margaret and Angela had quite a popular following also. On March 20, 1903, Katherine Earl Boyd-a cousin of Virginia's, and Grace Macon Wilson, were initiated. On May r2, 1903, Mary Elizabeth Moore was initiated. Now we are fifteen! By this time Alpha Si2: is rea)ly making itself felt-it


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THE PHOENIX is losing its swaddling clothes! We were chartered at Farmville on February 12, 1903. In the session of 1903-04 both Beta and Gamma Chapters were established. Beta was established through Louise Burks Cox at Lewisburg Female Institute, Lewisburg, W. Va., and Gamma through Grace Wilson, at College for Women, Columbia, S. C. Edna Venable Elcan was elected our first "Grand" President! We hope you have enjoyed this informal trip. If so, shall we continue it at some future time?

"ALWAYS STAND FOR WHAT IS BEST" A letter from Virginia Boyd Noell, Founder 609 Allison Avenue, S. W ., Roanoke, Virginia May 13, 1933

My dear Mrs. Sharp: I certainly owe you and the chapters of Alpha Sigma Alpha an apology for my "long silence." I received your letters and the many cards of greetings for which I wish to thank each of you. It is hard to realize that the A. S. A. that I knew has grown to such an organization as it has. I trust that it may always stand for what is best-and to carefully avoid, if I may say so, seclusiveness, which I think has done much harm in sororities. It would give me great pleasure to be with you at Farmville, May 19th. But I am not feeling well so think it is very doubtful, about my coming. With best wishes I am sincerely V zrgzma 路 路 路 B oy d N oell . yours, in Alpha Sigma Alpha.

"ASPIRE, SEEK, ATTAIN!" A Message from a Founder, Mary W. Hundley

Dear Alpha Sigma Alphas: I must admit that I had almost forgotten "we" ever existed, but the noble thought upon which our sorority was founded has remained with me these past thirty-two years. I can attribute to that thought, Aspire, Seek, Attain, my success in work and every day happiness.


THE PHOENIX It has been a great plea ure to receive o many pi ndid letters from the girls of our different chapters. If I failed to an wer any one of you, plea e know that it wa not due to any lack of appreciation of your thought of me. THE PHoE IX you publish is excellent evidence of the fa t that our girls stand for the things that are mo t worthwhile in life. May we continue to grow and develop and have 'Th sen e to value riches with the art to enjoy them and th virtue to impart' is my wish to all. Mary W. Hundley.

BLEST BE THE TIE THAT BIND Bessie Ferguson Cary Note: T he author of this a r ticle was the .rand ecreta r y-Treasurer of A lpha igma A lpha 1908- 10. The fo ll ow i ng tribute to her i rep r inteJ i n pan f r m The Aegis of Augu t. 1909: ""ince shor tl y a ft er t he founding of t he fra terni t y when B ess ie Ferguson ary was i ni ti a ted i nto A lpha Chapter, he h as been a guid i ng spirit. and perhaps t here is no one gi rl i n th e Fra te rni ty to whom we owe our remarkable progre s more th:ul we do to her . he i s an unfail i ng re or t when tnat ters of imp rt ance ari e . . . . T he t ire so me rou ti ne of her office wor k-a ll of the littl e things-are attended to hy her with a conscien ti ousne s a nd cheerfu l ness which make her the admi ration of h e r sister . and r ea ll y the 路Treasu r e路 of the Fr a terni t y t hat he is sometimes affect iona te l y ca ll ed.'' Du r ing her attendance a t t he las t Na ti ona l Democra tic onvention. Mr . ary w rote feature s tor ie for t he new papers of her coun t y and adjacent ones.

The nineteenth of May, 1933, found me at a pot which I had loved long since but lost awhile. For twenty-six year I had been away from the Virginia State Normal School-now called "State Teachers' College of Farmville," and thanks to a kind F ate I was back again. I don't know why I tayed away so long. For after being there a little while, I realized th at I loved the old place as well a of old. There have been man change all of which are for the better but they are on\ urface changes. Under it all is the same pirit that enwrapped the place a quarter of a century ago. I am thanking Margaret Patterson Martz for my return becau e it wa he who wrote to me and a ked me to come to Harri onburg and go with her to Farm ille for the re-in tatement of Alpha Chapter Alpha Sigma Alpha. When he mentioned e eral of the old girls who woull be there I couldn't re 1 t. Margaret Mr. Martz, and I with an excell ent colored dri er


THE PHOENIX at the wheel, started out from Harrisonburg soon after lunch, and drove over the beautiful Spottswood Trail to Farmville. I was amazed at the many changes in the town. The handsome new Weyanoke Hotel is directly opposite the school, and so both buildings have a pleasant outlook. The College has had its face lifted till it looks almost new. The picket fence that used to hem in the campus is no longer there. How well do I remember how we girls used to walk as close to that fence as possible and get in a few words on the sly with some handsome or homely swain passing on the outside. But we didn't dare stop and talk to him! How all of that is changed! The boys walk right in now, and sit on one of the garden seats with the girl, and talk to their hearts' content. There are many lovely trees and shrubs on the campus which were not there in our day. Landscaping is a much more important matter now than it was then. There have been several new buildings erected, all handsome and impressive. But the main building with its dome ceiling and circular balustrades beneath, around which balustrades we gathered on Friday and Sunday nights to see the girls' "dates" come and go, looks just the same. It felt very natural to be going into the old dining-room. Many a meal have I eaten there, and I must have enjoyed them, as I weighed more then than at any time in my girlhood. But I couldn't eat much on this visit. The food was above reproach, but I was too excited to eat. How could I help being excited? Right at that table with me sat dear old Hattie Kelly-now Mrs. Thomas, Louise Cox-now Mrs. Carper, and Margaret Patterson- Mrs. Martz. Margaret Palmer and Louise Price, two Alpha Sigma Alphas who were there at school before I was, were also at our table. I had to pinch myself to make sure I wasn't dreaming. After my first meal in the old familiar dining-room, we went around to see those of the household staff who were there in 1906. Miss Mary White Cox, who became Matron that year on the resignation of Mrs. Cochran, is still on the job, looks no older, and is as calm and sweet in her manner as of old. Mrs. Jamison, housekeeper, is still there, though I was so unfortunate as not to find her in. Miss Jennie Tabb, Secre-


THE PHOENIX tary to the Pre ident these many years till goma tron , and was delighted to ee us again. I started out alone to the Pre ident office hardly darin to hope to find him disengaged. He i one of the bu ie t men ever. But what wa my surpri e when I entered hi attracti office to find him entirely alone, and day-dreamina! The year have dealt kindly with Dr. Joseph L. Jarman. He i very handsome and di tingui hed-looking with hi whit hair. Always perfectly groomed, and charming in hi manner he seemed even more o to me as I at and talked to him that day. We had both attended the never-to-be-forgotten Democratic Convention in Chicago last year, o we had mar than enough to talk about. We discussed political and world conditions generally, to ay nothing of the thing neare t hi heart, "State Teacher ' College of Farmville.' I realized more fully than ever before why there i uch mutual kindly feeling between the President and the student body of that school. Dr. Jarman lives for the College, and the girls are after all the foundation and heart of the institution. I have never seen or heard of a more delightful comradery than exists betwe n the two. Hattie Kelly Thomas, Louise Cox Carper Margaret Patterson Martz, and I, who were Alpha Sigma Alphas together went up to Hattie's room for a grand and gloriou talk. And we had it. Hattie has changed very little. She still ha the lovely trim figure and looks very little older. Louise i running. Her beautifully bobbed silvery gray hair with her gorgeou brown eyes, make her even more lovely than when he was younger. Margaret is the Ia t word in a dignified, elegant matron. Not at all on the urface-like the cute little frolicing youngster I once knew. We sat and talked and talked of day gone by. We planned a house party at my place, "Ivy Lodge" in October, when w II try to have at lea t eight of our crowd together again. Hattie went out of the room and when he returned he brou ht with her Alpha Sigma Alpha National Pre identMr . Wilma Wilson Sharp of Independence Mi ouri. Hattie ha known her through corre pondence for ometime. The


THE PHOENIX other three of us fell in love with her at once, and realized how fortunate the Sorority is in having her at the helm. After dinner that evening, we went to Delta Sigma Chi Chapter room. I never before saw as many sweet and beautiful girls in one room. Twenty-seven of Virginia's choicest young girls were in readiness to take the vows of Alpha Sigma Alpha, and lay aside their own local sorority, thus restoring the Alpha Chapter at Farmville. I am sure that the other members of the organization, of my generation who were there, felt as I did-thankful that our Alma Mater would see our beloved Alpha Sigma Alpha carry on through these twentyseven charming girls. One of these girls, Nancy Burgwyn, daughter of Louise Baskerville, made a tremendous appeal to me through her marvelous beauty and gracious manners. She was thrilled over meeting us-her mother's Sorority mates of long ago, and looked after us with every consideration during our stay. Mary Berkeley Nelson, the President, won our hearts completely. Cornelia Quarles, niece of my dear friend, now deceased, Cathrine Taylor Goffigon, was particularly lovely to me. In fact, the whole list of girls was remarkable for charming personality and kindness to us,-their elders in Alpha Sigma Alpha. I shall never forget the installation ceremony. It took place in the Recreation Hall on Saturday afternoon, May twentieth. The National President and National Registrar conducted the ceremony most impressively. The light in the hall, furnished entirely by the candles used in the ritual, spread a soft glow over us all, and helped us to realize the serious of the vows taken. As I sat and watched and listened, I was filled anew with the real spirit and sacred meaning of Alpha Sigma Alpha, and felt that it had been one of the biggest things in my life. That evening we went to "Longwood," a typical old Virginia country home, which once belonged to Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, and now is owned by State Teachers' College, and used as a Country Club by faculty and students. How fortunate is the present generation of students to have such a lovely retreat! We never dreamed of such a thing in our school days. The lovely Boxwood on the lawn speaks a welcome on the outside. The whole interior speaks hospitality plus. The


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lovely tairway, fireplace , huge window hand om door and exquisite wood trim ever where in the building brin<r delight to all who recognize good architecture and in it one to linger and drink in the classic beauty. We were conducted to the lovely dining-room eated at the banquet table, and served delicious food. Mary Berkele Nelson was toa tmistre s to the theme- 'Star . There wer short peeches by Dr. Jarman, Loui e Cox Carp r Mr . Martha Well Catlin, Ruth Ford and the last and be t by Wilma Wilon Sharp her theme being "Guiding Star ." In looking back over the occasion of my visit to Farm ille I feel a sense of deep gratitude to the twenty-seve n lo ely girl who ha e taken upon themselves the vow of Alpha Sigm a Alpha, and re-in tated the sorority at my Alma Mater. I know that the strength and happiness they will derive from uch fel lowship will follow them all through life and make of th m much finer characters than they would have been without it. Hattie, Louise, Margaret, and I can testify to the truth of thi tatement. For has not the bond held us together through \on year of separation? Our meeting again at Farmville in May 1933, will always be trea ured a one of the brighte t pot in our lives. I am sitting in my garden writing thi . Overhead an airplane is humming. Many of them fly over my garden. But omehow, today, they make me think-think of the man changes that have taken place since I left school in 1906. And then-! try to enumerate the things that haven t changed. The fir t one I think of is God 's eternal love. An outgrowth of thi Divine love i my love for the girls who were so clo e to me in the bond of Alpha Sigma Alpha during the e ion of 1904-'os 1905-'06. I know deep down in my heart th at my love or them i also eternal. ' I y Lodge" Front Royal eptemb r 19 It ar u well for the lo alty of Alpha alumna:: that the aroup pre ent for the re-in tatement of the chapter repre ented the chapt r member hip from Founder t initiate f r ÂŁ5.


THE PHOENIX The names of the early Alphas present appear efsewhere. Other Alphas added the inspiration of their presence, also. Each one in her particular manner emphasized the importance of individual loyalty and service. Lillian Minor, 'o8, was there. Aside from her personal attractiveness, her vivacity and her spirited conversation would make her sought after in any group. Lillian knows her Alpha history. She has been a frequent visitor at Farmville since her college days before the reorganization of Alpha Sigma. She retained her interest in the Delta Sigma Chi girls and believes in the present Alpha chapter. She says that they are "a grand group of girls and Miss Moran is a peach." Lillian is Supervisor of the Norfolk County Public Schools. She holds an important position but her professional success finds her none the less interested in A. S. A. Mildred Booker Dillard, 'I3 drove up from her home in Draper, North Carolina. She brought with her Gordon Seamon Chalmers, 'IS, of Phenix, Virginia. Both of these charming and gracious young matrons left husbands and children to spend the week-end in Alpha Sigma Alpha fellowship. Mildred had long dreamed of the re-instatement of her chapter. She gave her helpful cooperation to that end, just as she has served the sorority in other effectual ways since her initiation. Both girls have been loyal Alpha Sigs down the years. Their family obligations and their prominent affiliation with club and civic life in their communities have in no degree replaced Alpha Sigma interests. Katherine Walkins, 'Is, of Farmville assisted with the initiation services. To the Alpha college girls it seemed proper that Kitty should have her quiet and efficient part in their reinstatement ceremonies. Kitty, winsome and capable, has always manifested her sorority loyalty in service. After the discontinuance of Alpha in I9I9, she retained her interest in Delta Sigma Chi. In times of discouragement and emergency, she never failed the girls. During the interim when D. S. C. carried on the traditions of the sorority she carried on with themuntil the happy day when she ably assisted with the re-instatement of Alpha of Alpha Sigma Alpha.


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A Message from Our First National President Greetings to all the members of A . S. A.:

It is far cry from an organization of fi e girls at Farmville, Va., to our present that includes twenty-four chapter and four th usand members. But that little band of o-irls in 1904 were bound by no stronger tie . impelled by no deeper loyalty nor actuated by no greater faithfulness than is manifested by those of the Fraternity at large of today. The fact that we are scattered from coast to coast and yet working with a common purpose does in reality bind us closer together. May we ever live in such a mann er that A . S. A . will be proud of us and rna our influence e\ er be uch that th e girl who will further our purpose may be attracted to us.

Edna ELcan Jones, First

ational Pre ident.

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FOUNDERS' DAY 1933 An Appreciation Founders' Day last year was memorable in our sorority for upon that day, Alpha Sigma Alpha girl were privileged to respectfully call our five Founders by their names. So long Founders Day had been only the occasion for tribute to remote and unknown personalities. To have the actual fact of the founding of the sorority and to be introduced to our Founders, even through the printed page, brought to the entire sorority membership much joy and gratification. Founders' Day, 1933 will be of greater significance. One of our Founders, several of our charter and early member have forever implanted the charm and graciousness of their personalities upon the memory of those Alpha Sigma who have been honored by fellowship with them. The re-instatement of Alpha Chapter was deeply meaningful to the installing officers. It was a beautiful experience to know and to initiate into our sorority the very lovely college girls who will again wear the Shield of A. S. A. on the Farmville campus. It was an inspiration of the rarest nature to read our initiation service in the presence of a Founder, Charter members, and others of our early initiates. It is impossible to justly describe them, our older i ter who came back to their college to recall other glorious day in Alpha Sigma Alpha, and to repledge their loyalty. Their very presence, their genuine joy upon reunion, their happy recital of events in their college sorority-life, formed a potent argument for sorority affiliation-and proved the joy of membership in Alpha Sigma Alpha. There was Louise Cox Carper, perfectly beautiful and absolutely satisfying, like a lovely dream come true. Our Hattie Kelly Thomas Charter member, whose name ha been dearly and familiarly spoken since our last convention came from Baltimore, Maryland. Ye Hattie Jake Vir inia Kelly charming youthful, dynamic to whom Alpha Sigma i o deeply indebted for her fruitful efforts in the "restoration ' of our Founder and Alpha alumn::e. There wa Margaret Patte r on


THE PHOENIX Martz, delightful in appearance and manner and charmingly gracious; and Bessie Ferguson Cary, magnetic and stimulating with her brilliant and witty conversation. Marguerite Palmer and Louise Price, Charter members, added the appeal of their sweet dignity, the charm of their genteelness and cordial interest. To know these early Alphas is to feel a richer pride in Alpha Sigma Alpha. It is a challenge, a command to Give Full Measure that we may be worthy of our kinship with them. Year after year Alpha Sigma Alpha girls have observed Founders' Day. There has been beauty in that mystic, remarkable bond which has held us to their ideals and bade us honor our unknown Founders. But Founders' Day, 1933 has a greater significance. For now we know the glory of our heritage in Alpha Sigma Alpha-the wealth of comradeship with our older sisters. Wilma Wilson Sharp.

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GAMMA LIVES ON! N T E: Thi in teres t ing his tory of our early amma hapte r of o ll ege for W omen, Co lumbia . outh aro lina is to ld by J e ie cot t Arnold . Pa t Edi tor路in 路 nief 11 of "The Aeg i . It was Je ie cott who gave the early maga7ine the name, Aegi . and who did o much to pu t it in t he fr a terna l magazine world .

When Martha Wil on came to colleae I was alreJd a sophomore. But Martha was not a freshman She wa a pecial student. She specialized in Political Science, Sociology. Economics-things like that. I thought she wa the mo t sophisticated girl I had ever met. The other girls in college rather deferred to the opinions of the teachers. We were eve- n at times, influenced by them. But Martha approached a teacher as an intellectual equal. She not only dared to have a different opinion, but when she deemed the faculty to be in error, she gently but firmly set it right. Like most girls, ranging in age from seventeen to twenty Martha's schoolmates had few interests outside of their personal affairs. But Martha already haJ a mature civic consciousness. She was interested in the burning que tions of the day, and she knew all about public officials and their policies. She was probably the only girl in college who ub cribed to her own daily paper. I can see her now peering through eyeglasses attached to a flowing black ribbon, ab orbed in Editorials or (believe it or not) the stock market, and quite obli iou to the chattering groups about her. She was, of course, a born organizer. And soon after she came to college she began to look around for something upon which to exercise this undoubted talent. There were no sororities. Presto, Martha changed all that. I do not know how he got around the faculty and the trustees whom I suspect were none too receptive. I do not know either, how he came to select Alpha Sigma Alpha. She must have had that in tinct to do the right thing which i genius. There are supposed to be six charter member of Gamma. But five of us were invited to become charter member . To Martha Wil on alone must go the credit of having establi hed the chapter. The other five were Helen Scott (no relation to the great regret of both of u ), Violet Officer Julia Brown Fredree Ansel and my elf. We were alread friend . But


THE PHOENIX we discovered in the few months that remained in that year how close is the tie that binds in A. S. A.* We all returned to college the next year except Jeanne, who had graduated. Ours was still the only sorority. So we had the entire student body from which to choose our new members. That we did not waste this opportunity is attested by the fact that we soon pledged and initiated Wakefield Mattison, Juanita Hewitt, Hallie Covington, Elizabeth Gueinzius, Nancy Clarke, and Mary Wilson. In the spring of that year a Kappa Delta chapter was organized. And the splendid group of girls who became its members in no way lowered the high standard of Hellenic sisterhood that had been established by A. S. A. So in the following fall we had competition in pledging for the first time. I do not remember whom we lost. How could I when we won Blanche and Catherine Thomson, Sarah Graves, Eugenia Childs, Marion Haight and Clara Sarratt. What could be better evidence of the quality of these associations than the fact that the friendships which came into being then are still the source of a lasting and living joy. This was my senior year in college. One of the events which made it memorable was the A. S. A. national convention in Richmond, Virginia. Martha Wilson and I represented Gamma. We met for the first time nearly all of the members of the Mother chapter, and representatives from other chapters too. I remember especially our chaperon, Miss Annie Thraves, her sister Alma, lovely Hontas Tinsley, Hattie Kelly and Bessie Ferguson. I also attended the national convention of the next year in Charleston, S. C. It was at this convention that The Aegis came into existence with Martha Wilson as the first Editor. It was here also that Gamma made its greatest contribution to A. S. A. For it was here that Lina Wakefield Mattison became Grand President. No organization has ever had a more devoted, intelligent, loyal, and able executive. She worked for A. S. A. eight hours a day and when that was not enough, eight hours a night as well. She visited every chapter-the first *A sh ort tim e before Co mm e n ce me nt we initi a t ed M a r y F ox, A n ni e R od ger a nd J eann e Pe lh a m.


THE PHOE

IX

rand Pre ident I think who did . Under her uper i ion the work of the chapters was co-ordinated. Never had the ororit been o well organized. Wakefield made it truly national.' At that time the fund of A. S. A. could carcel be di nifiecJ by the name 'Treasury. ' When they were in ufficient to arr out Wakefield s plan he u ed her own money-and then forgot about it. Even though her work later eemed to be fru trated for a time, the spark was never entirely extin ui h d. And the flame which burns with uch a teady li ht today wa largely of her kindling. During the next ummer Wakefield Kate McSween and I represented Gamma (I, as an alumna) at the con ention at Natural Bridge. Here again I met Hattie Kelly Be ie Ferguson, Charlie Jones, and such new girls a Madeleine Rollwage of Ward-Belmont and Mary Shuford from St. Mar ' . Madeleine Rollwage became the visiting d legate. She topped with me in Atlanta during the next winter and we were both guests of the Brenau chapter at Gaine ville Georgia. As usual A. S. A. had captured the outstanding girls of the college. I particularly remember Lesli Harrell who wa president of the tudent body. Souri Glo er who wa aid to be the mo t popular girl in college and the brilliant Elizabeth Alexander who was even then a successful writer. The irl lived in their own chapter hou e on the campus. The top floor wa a ballroom, and Madeleine and I were entertained there with a Panhellenic tea dance. By thi time Gamma chapter was five or ix year old. I was often a vi itor in Columbia and, of cour e, I alway met the new members. I may have been prejudiced in their favor but at any rate I never met one who wa not attracti t m . I think thi feeling prevailed throughout th member hip. I have never known any group of a imilar ize in which the a ociation were o completely characterized by harmon and mutual re pect. And then one day there wa a notice on the Bulletin B ard and a imply a that all that we had worked for and cheri hed became inacti e. But only inacti e. Though amma h pter n I nger tak e an part in A. . A. affair 路 thou h e en th colle e which


THE PHOENIX harbored it is no more, its spirit lives. Ask any woman whose privilege it was to have been a member, what is the richest heritage of her college life, and she will answer, the ideals, and friendships which came to her through her sorority. It is this living, though unofficial chapter that brings its affectionate greetings and sincere good wishes to the present great organization of A. S. A. And with these greetings, may I commend to you, our-dream-come-true, a worthy ancestor : Sisters, I give you Gamma of Alpha Sigma Alpha! JessÂŁe Scott Arnold. (Mrs. John Knox Arnold), 283r Twenty-eighth St., N. W.,

Washington, D. C.

ROLL CALL OF GAMMA CHAPTER COLLEGE FOR WOMEN COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA Martha Wilson (Mrs. Robert Graham), Sumter, S. C. Helen Scott (Mrs. Willi a Willis Boddie), 35 Bee Street, C harleston, S. C. Violet Officer (Mrs. James Saye Dusenbury), U. S. Army. Julia Klin Brown (deceased). Fredree Ansel (Mrs. George H . Bunch), 1404 Laurel St., Columbia, S. C. Jessie Scott (Mrs. John Knox Arnold), 283r Twenty-eighth St., N. W ., Washington, D. C. Mary Fox (Mrs. Henry Tillman), Tampa, Florida. Annie Rodger, 1450 Thorndale Ave., Chicago, Ill. Jeanne Pelham (Mrs. Thos. Johnstone), Newberry. . Lina Wakefield Mattison (Mrs. Douglas Gray Mahon), Calh oun Falls, S.C. Juanita Hewitt (deceased). Nancy Clarke (Mrs. H enry Carrier), Brevard, N.C. Elizabeth Gueinzius (Mrs. Charles T . Simpson), 416 Lawe St., Green Bay, Wis. Hallie Covington (Foreign Missionary), Home Address, Marion S. C. Sarah Graves (Mrs. John B. Reeves), Avondale Estates, Atlanta, Ga. Blanche Thomson (Mrs. Perrin Kennedy) , Herndon Terrace, Union ,

s. c . Catherine Thomson, Herndon Terrace, Union, S. C. Clara Saratt (Mrs. Jesse C. Drain) , U. S. Army. Mary Wilson (Mrs. Garnett Peatress), Sumter, S.C .


THE PHOENIX

2

Eugenia Childs (Mr . J. R. Westmoreland) Pacelet Marion Haight ew York City (Present addre not known). Josephine ullivan (Mrs. Wm. H. Whitely), lbermarle . C. Sadie Sullivan (Mr . lice Lee-decea ed). Etta Brand (Mrs. Lawrence dams), Wilmington, Corinne Barfield (Mrs. Julian Schwartz), Sumter, . Mary she (Mrs. Spencer McFee), Brevard Sue Flinn (Mrs. Kenneth James), Darlington S. Minnie Blaleck (Mrs. W. J. !urray, Jr.), Columbia, Kate McSween, (Mrs. Ralph K. Foster) 1616 ollege t. Columbia,

s. c.

rney Robinson (Mrs. David Childs, Jr.), Columbia, S.C. nnie Lee Me eill (Mrs. M. R. Mobley), Florence . C. Caroline Dow Moore, Columbia, S. C.


MR . 'v ILM WIL 0 H RP Zeta Zeta For three years National President of Alpha igma

lpha


THE PHOENIX

29

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"I feel as if I know you" is the way the

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majority of Alpha Sigma Alpha's acknowledge

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an introduction to Wilma Wilson Sharp. And

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that stimulates groups.

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increasing prestige of our sorority.

Her un-

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three years.

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understanding of and concern for each individual and group together with her matchless

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loyalty and labors for the promotion of Alpha

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Sigma Alpha and its ideas-such are only a few of the praiseworthy characteristics that

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come to mind when we point with pride to

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our National President, Wilma Wilson Sharp.

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THE PHOENIX

T R

YMBOL OF ALPH \ Wilma Wilson (Pre ented

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I am glad that the tar i one of the emblem of Alpha Siuma Alpha. The symboli m built around it contain nothing new but it holds the very e ence of succe ful li ing. Let u consider orne literal facts about star and read our A. . A. interpretation. STARS, the mass of them are een at night. Wh n the closer and resplendent sun is no longer visible-when th me n that "lovely lady of the sky" does not hed her romantic lighttar then the star fill the heaven with their my tic ray . of the summer's night"-not in the midday of things but in the night when hour seem dark-when the encouragement of some high noon are absent. Our friend hips within our orority-and without-must be of that rare, trength gi ing quality that lights the pathway of others in the long nig ht hours of di couragement and distres -and in thi day in this troubled world of our -let us keep in our hearts faith and hope, steadfastness to high principle-which will guide u to a happier time. Arent you surprised and a bit awed by the fact that the stars are uch an appalling distance from u . A tronomy t II. us that the nearest star of all i twenty-six billion mile away. Such inaccessability and yet the gleam come down to u through all that distance. That I beli ve is comparable and symbolic of our a~pirations. I trust that every A. . A. will always find her attainments-great I would ha e them be-a long, long way from her a piration . Otherwi e life would I e it zest. That i what Erner on meant I think when h erie I ' Hitch your wagon to a star." Dreaming and tri ing an I pre ing on with a courageou happy ou l to orne lovely eli tant star. Important to u and happily applicable to our i terh d i the fact that tar are a sociated in con t llation or roup . And more than that within th group are mall r warm f tar each groupinu ha ing it own elocity and it own direction of motion. Lik group of people knitted b comm n


THE PHOENIX bonds and interest-like unto us in A. S. A.,-having our own friendships and our common aims and shared attainments. But the glow of all the constellations mingle to make the heavens lovely. It is as we approach the ideals of our own small group, vital as it is to us that we become more appreciative of the efforts and achievements of others. Alpha Sigma girls must profit by the beauty of cooperation, the breadth of a fellowship that stretches far beyond our own boundaries. We are a little dubious to learn that the number of stars visible at any one time to the unaided eye never exceeds three thousand. Yet, with the aid of huge telescopes, astronomers have discovered that there are hundreds of millions-upon hundreds of millions of stars. I love the big stars but ah the mystic, marvellous alluring light of the Milky Way. H aven't you felt the thrill of it as you have gazed upon it, alone, or escorted on a fine night? That beautiful light made by myriads of invisible stars. There is symbolism a plenty in that. It does not matter so much the position we hold or the outward aspects of the lives we live; it is the influence we shed. I dream that every Alpha Sigma Alpha will "give a lovely light"-living life to its fullest, shining above its pettiness and disappointments, remembered for the mystic light of an every day achievement. It will take the light of every A. S. A. to make a Milky Way on the horizon of our world. Some shall shine in boldness, and others will be hidden by their own lovely illumination. Who shall say which light is the best? There is infinitely much for Alpha Sigma Alpha to learn from her symbol the Star-rich and beautiful in tradition and dreams and yet richer and more beautiful in actual fact and established knowledge. The longer study, the more hours of perseverence the astronomers have given to stars-the greater the glory and wonder that has been revealed to them. My dear ones, look to the stars: For courage, for inspiration, for dreams. Look to the stars when you feel the threat of a stifling self-satisfaction. Look to them for zest of living, for proof of God's handiwork, for power to develop each day a light that dispels the shadows of things not good.


THE PHOENIX Look to the tars for these le on . Kindle our heart with the literal and figurativ e beauty of th ir light it will not fail you. Perhaps it may be in orne hard, weary hour or in one rare moment of rapture 'that from th du t of the da ' lon road you may leap to a laughing tar.'

RETROSPECT I enjoy retro pection, and occasionally when time an I circumstances permit me to indulge in this favorite pa time I find myself pondering over the beginning of our orority and it growth and development. I try to analyze and interpret the motives and aspirations of that ardent group who were th founders of Alpha Sigma Alpha and I wonder what impul influenced them to dedicate themselves to the ta k of founding a sorority. It is easy to imagine the earnest and serious effort the di cussions and decisions that went into those fir t m etina . It must have been no simple matter to organize a orority. In every new endeavor there are impre ion to create prejudice to overcome, jealousies to allay, etc. All of the e ob tacle were no doubt, encountered by that first group of Alpha Sia ma and all of them were overcome; for the sorority survived and xpanded. How satisfying it must have bee n to ee their organization grow but could they in their moment of highe t enthu ia m visualize Alpha Sigma Alpha as it exi ts today! However, the young sorority was destined to have th u ual number of difficulties. No sooner wa it thoroughly organized than it found itself re tricted and its progres hampered by the ruling of N ational Panhellenic and ho tile Legi lat ure . I firmly believe that even in those early day th pirit of ood King A a wa guiding the destinie of hi child and that it wa hi wi dom that influenc d the group to choo e the fi eld f Education for it own . Thi important dec i ion brou ht the oipri ilege of orority member hip to tudent of T eacher l ge and School of Education everywhere. Wh en a few ear later the ororit trength ned it po ition by unitin with thre oth r group 1t ucce wa a ured and Alpha 1 rna


THE PHOENIX

33

Alpha found itself firmly established as a National Educational sorority with a constitution, ritual and symbolism second to none. It is with pleasure that I recall the following years of rapid expansion and progress and the joy in the hearts of the college students when they wore the white and gold in honor of a new chapter. As each successive unit was added, it became more and more evident that the early standards of quality and the early ideals were being strictly maintained. Every chapter in the national group has proved itself a credit to the sorority and has added much to its strength and prestige. In reviewing the history of Alpha Sigma Alpha, I am always filled with a sense of gratitude to those who, through the years, have directed its course so wisely and fought its battles so courageously. They must be very happy, for they have brought happiness to so many. Elizabeth U. Fuller.

FOUNDERS' DAY, 1933 Our Founders' Day takes on new and vivid meaning this year, through the issue of this Aegis. For the first time we are presenting in concise form the story and pictures of our early years. It is most appropriate that it is associated with the 路 re-instatement of Alpha Chapter. It is as if a veil had been torn from the past and we can see clearly the whole happy history of our sorority. We can justly be proud of our beginnings. We must pledge ourselves to continue the life of Alpha Sigma Alpha in a way to make our founders proud and happy to have had the inspiration to share with future generations the joys of organized sisterhood. If at any time we face trials and difficulties in maintaining our chapters at their best, a glance at the early history shows that our Founders had their struggles, too, and we cannot do less than they to carry on courageous! y. The study of history should always be a challenge. As the years enrich our heritage we must give greater measure of service. We move on and up in a spiral, never quite return-


34

THE PHOENIX

ing to the tarting point, but often coming back to learn from the pa t how to meet old problem in new setting . In coil g today we are finding Alpha Sigma Alpha a source of enri hment, ju t a did our Founder . The quality of life run de p and true today as then, with at it heart, friend hip and gro ing personalities; growing by friendship and through friendhip. Let this vision of the past stimulate u to keep faith with our Founders. Julia E. Lancaster, ational Editor.

FROM A PAST GRAND PRESIDENT OF A. S. To Alpha Sigma Alpha: It gives me real pleasure to send you a word of greeting through The Aegis. What happy memorie the nam bring to my mind! As ociations that ha e ripened, as the year have gone by, into loyal and rare friendships! For seven year I worked diligently under the banner of Alpha Sigma Alpha. Sometimes on the heights of hope and achievement and ornetimes deep in trials and discouragement . Through the year however, I have had a deep and abiding faith in the ultimate success of this group because of the principles upon which it wa founded. That you have caught thi spirit and carried our aims and ideals far forward is compen ation indeed to all of Alpha Sigma Alpha but to tho e few of us who bore the brunt of the burden of failure and loss it i twofold. We are proud of the splendid Sorority of today. With renewed mterest and love we will watch you go forward. Sincerely yours in A. S. A.

Wakefield Mattison Mahon, (Mrs. Douglas Gray Mahon) Calhoun F all

outh

arolina.


THE PHOENIX

35

THE FIRST EDITOR OF THE AEGIS SENDS GREETINGS I am delighted, after a silence of a quarter of a Century, to hear that Alpha Sigma Alpha yet lives and is again to become active in the South. How memories come back to me of our old Sorority days and the friends of girlhood and how I would like to know just where each one is and what they are doing. I am frank to say that I have been so very busy with my own adorable family that I have neglected the friends of my youth. How enthusiastic I was over the first copy of our magazine and how pleased with the result. I often think of the pleasure the club brought to me; especially do I recall these times when I listen to the chatter of college life as brought to me by my own daughters and son; who too have fallen under the lure of the Greek letter groups. I hope that all the "old girls" are going to awake and take renewed interest and help to make Alpha Sigma Alpha the very best in our colleges. My very best wishes to the Editor and all who come after, Martha Wilson Graham, (Mrs. Robert Graham), Sumter, South Carolina.

ALPHA ALUMNAE SEND GREETINGS My heart is filled with joy and praise at the restoration of Alpha Chapter of dear old A. S. A.! Edna Elcan Jones, A'o3, Sheppards, Virginia. (Note-Mrs. Jones was the first Grand President of A. S. A.)

* * * * I am so glad to know that Alpha Chapter is to be reestablished at Farmville. I would like so much to be present on May nineteenth-for I know I would enjoy it all. However, I hope to visit the school at some future date.


THE PHOENIX It ha been year ince I have heard any news about the growth and development of Alpha Sigma Alpha. The sorority has my interest and best wishes alway . Grace Wilson Bosworth, A'o3 (Mrs. Jame E. Bo worth) Brownsburg Virginia. I am so glad to get in touch again with Alpha Sigma Alpha. Life has been so full of so many things, that I have been obli d to just carry on from day to day and allow many thing to lay dormant. I am delighted to learn our next convention will be in Virginia. I hope to be there. I knew most of our charter members. I still have my fir t ring and pin. All good wishes to Alpha Sigma Alpha. Margaret Patterson Martz , A'os (Mrs. Edward C. Martz) 228 Franklin Street Harri onburg, Virginia.

* * * * May Nineteenth, 1933-Surely thi i a proud day for Alphas and for Alpha Sigma Alpha. Susie Cox Cromwell, A'o6 3712 Belle A venue, Baltimore, Maryland. The installation of Alpha Chapter wa mo t impre ive and there is such a feeling of security in having it safely launched at Farmville once again. We are all o appreciative of the lovely courtesies so kindly bestowed upon Alpha Chapter. If I can only rear my two intere ting daughter to be worthy of member hip in uch a splendid organization I will ha e felt that I ha e contributed omething to Alpha Sigma Alpha. Mildred Booker Dillard, A 14 (Mr . George P. Dillard) Draper North Carolina.


THE PHOENIX

37

So long I have wished to have even a bit of news from Alpha Sigma Alpha. Having been in such close touch with our sorority at one time, it seems as if a very old and dear friend has come back to me. I should like to do something for our sorority, again,-so I shall put forth my best effort through the alumn::e organization, I am working on in this section. Dorothy B. Kitchin, A'14, 308 Bosley Street, Suffolk, Virginai. (Mrs. Kitchin was a delegate at the Miami Convention, 1914)

* * * * Words fail to express my delight at the re-instatement of our Mother Chapter. I wish Alpha Sigma Alpha all the success in the world. Gordon Seamon Chalmers, A'15, (Mrs. Henry Chalmers), Phenix, Virginia.

* * * * I am delighted to hear some word from Alpha Sigma Alpha once more. It will be splendid to have our chapter again at Farmville. Best wishes to Alpha Sigma Alpha. Marie Mapp Rippetoe, A'16, (Mrs. David E. Rippetoe), 768 West 51st Street, Norfolk, Virginia.


3

THE PHOENIX

PRESENTING In this historical i sue of the Aegis we would pecially pay tribute to Hattie Kelly Thomas not merely because she has the di tinction of being the fir t initiate of our orority but because through thirty-two years she has maintained her loyalty, intere t and enthusiasm for Alpha Sigma Alpha. It wa Mrs. Thoma who provided the thrilling detail of the original chapter that formed the basis of the tory of our sorority's founding told at the 1932 convention. Mrs. Hattie Kelly Thomas It is Mrs. Thoma who furnished pictures of our Founders, the interesting articles of early conventions initiation mementoes, and copies of our first ASA publication, the Aegis. And it is Mrs. Thomas who has provided our National Council with the name of other early member of Alpha Sigma Alpha whom we hope to pre ent in subsequent i ue and round out our sorority roster. But it is the spirit of thi first initiate that o impre e all who meet her for in spirit and in truth Hattie Kelly Thoma exemplifies a true 'follower of the tar" and one ev r prepar d to give full measure for Alpha Sioma Alpha.


THE PHOENIX

39

THE CHARTER OF ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA A dearly valued possession held in the National files of Alpha Sigma Alpha is a certified copy of the charter of the sorority. This copy, bearing the seal of the Circuit Court, Prince Edward County, Virginia, is the gift of Mrs. Hattie Kelly Thomas and Mrs. Margaret Patterson Martz, (A'os). Presentation of certified copies of the charter to National and to Alpha Chapter was made by Mrs. Thomas during the Alpha Re-instatement ceremonies. Alpha Sigma Alpha is deeply grateful to Mrs. Thomas and Mrs. Martz whose gracious act places this historical document in the files of the sorority. In order that our entire membership may share in this gift, a copy of the charter follows. ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA SORORITY To The Honorable Geo. J. Hundley, Judge of the Circuit Court of Prince Edward County, Va., The undersigned Virginia Lee Boyd, Juliette Jefferson Hundley, May Williamson Hundley, Louise Burks Cox, Calva Hamlet Watson, Lucy Hannah Daniel, Louise Pettigrew Price, Angela Carroll Tinsley, Hattie Virginia Kelly, Louise Gordon Baskerville, Edna Venable Elcan, and Marguerite Anthony Palmer, and such other persons as are now or may hereafter be associated with us desire to form a body corporate by the name, style and title of the "Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority" for the purpose of promoting friendship and social intercourse among its members, do make, sign, seal and acknowledge the following certificate. First: The name of the association shall be "Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority." Second: The purpose of the association shall be to cultivate friendship among its members, and in every way to create pure and elevating sentiments, to perform such deeds and to mould such opinions as will tend to elevate and enoble womanhood in the world. Third: The association being a social body will have no capital stock and no charter tax will be required of it. Fourth: The members of the association shall have power to make and adopt a constitution and by-laws and to determine who shall become members thereof, and from time to time to alter and amend the said constitution and by-laws, provided that the same be not inconsistent with the constitution and by-laws of the United States and of the State of Virginia.


THE PHOENIX Fifth: The amount of real estate to be held by the a so iation hall not exceed five acres. Sixth: The officers of the as ociation shall consist of a Pre id nt and such other officers as may be necessary, and they shall be elected in such manner at at such time as the constitution and b -laws rna prescribe. Seventh: The principal office of the association shall be at Farm ille Va., with authority to establish subordinate association at any other female colleges and schools in the State of Virginia. Eighth: The chief business of the association shall be to hold meetings at such stated intervals as shall be prescribed by its by-law for the purpose of arranging and maintaining plans for the promotion of the objects of the association heretofore stated. Ninth: The officers for the first year, and the residences are: President . . . .......................... Virginia Lee Boyd Vice-President ............. . ...... ... Juliette Jefferson Hundley Treasurer .. . .................. May Williamson Hundley Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......... . .. . ... Calva Hamlet Wat on Corresponding Secretary ................... Lucy Hannah Daniel WITNESS our hands and seals on this 13th day of February 1903 Virginia Lee Boyd Juliette Jefferson Hundley May Williamson Hundley Louise Burks Cox Calva Hamlet Watson Lucy Hannah Daniel Louise Pettigrew Price Angela Carroll Tinsley Hattie Virginia Kelly Louise Gordon Baskerville Ed na Venable Elcan Marguerite nthony Palmer

( EAL) ( E L) ( E L) ( E L) ( EAL) ( EAL) (sEAL) ( EAL) ( EAL) ( E. L) ( E L) ( EAL)

T TE OF VIRGI I , COU TY OF PRI CE EDWARD, to-w it: I, . B. rmstrong a otary Public in and for the County of Prince Edward in the State of Virginia, do certify that Virginia Lee Boyd, Juliette Jefferson Hundley May Williamson Hundley Loui e Burks Cox Calva Hamlet Watson Lucy Hannah Daniel Louise Pettigrew Pri ce ngela Carroll Tinsley Hattie irginia Kelly, Louise ordon Baskerville Edna enable Elcan and arguerite nthony Palmer whose names are igned to the fo regoing writing bearing date on the


THE PHOENIX

41

13th of February, 1903, have acknowledged the same before me in my county aforesaid. Given under my hand this the 13th day of February, 1903. A. B. Armstrong, Notary Public. My Commission expires May 4th, 1903. IN VACATION AT FARMVILLE, VA., February 13, 1903. In the Circuit Court for the County of Prince Edward, Virginia. It appearing that Virginia Lee Boyd, Juliette Jefferson Hundley, May Williamson Hundley, Louise Burks Cox, Calva Hamlet Watson, Lucy Hannah Daniel, Louise Pettigrew Price, Angela Carroll Tinsley, Hattie Virginia Kelly, Louise Gordon Baskerville, Edna Venable Elcan, and Marguerite Anthony Palmer have made, signed and acknowledged according to law, a certificate in writing having for its object the formation of a fraternal society, for the purpose set forth in said certificate, the Court! doth grant unto them and such others as may be associated with them, a Charter upon the terms set forth in said certificate, and it is ordered that they and their associates be, and they are hereby made and created a body politic and corporate, under the name and style of "Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority" with all the rights and powers and privileges conferred and subject to all the provisions and restrictions imposed by the laws of Virginia, as they may apply to corporations of this character. And the said corporation being for benevolent purposes, no tax is imposed or is to be paid on this charter, and the said charter is ordered to be recorded and certified according to law. GEORGE J. HUNDLEY' Judge of the Ci1路cuit Court of Prince Edward. To the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Prince Edward County . In the Clerk's office of the Circuit Court of the County of Prince Edward, February 13th, 1903. The foregoing order of incorporation of "Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority" was this day presented in said office and entered of record, and the same is hereby certified to the Secretary of the Commonwealth. Teste: E. J. WHITEHEAD, Clerk. A COPY-TESTE: (Signed) HoRACE ADAMS, Clerk.


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ALPHA CH APTER, ALPHA STGMA ALPHA, FARMVTLLE Delta Sigma C1ti, loca l so.路ori ty a t Farmville Sta te Teachers' Coll ege, whic h was reinstated as Alpha chapter of Alpha ~igma .\ lpha yc> tcrday. Fmnt row: Ruth Ford, Lynchburg; Nancy Bu rgw yn, Hi chmond; Eli zabe th Steptoe, Lynchburg; Lou ise \V almslcy, Farmville; Dori' El~y . ;\/orfolk: Mnudc Deekens, S taunton; Ca ro line B y"d. vVan11 Springs. Sccontl row: Eliznhe th Billups, :'\'orfolk; Sa ll ie Perrow, L ynchburg; Id a M. 'M ill er, l\'ewport; Mary Eas ley lrill, P earisburg ; Susie \\'ebb. Ri chmond; Louise Potter, Pe t ersburg; H arri et M oomaw, Roanoke. Third row : Doro thy Legare. Lynchburg: D oro thy Glover, A rvon ia; M ary Berke ley l\'elson, Richm ond; M iss Grace lll oran, Afl 路 visor, \\'a~h ingt on ; ~ l argare t E ley . :"\orfolk; Cornelia Quarle ~. Staunton; Sarah H yde Thomas, Staunton . Fuurth ruw: Virginia Guy. :'\orfo lk ; Ma rga ret llu rtt, :'\assa wadox ; M ildred Polter, P cte.-.hurg; <:ertrudc Sugd~n. llampt<m; Mar}' Eh1ahrth ,\ le .< nndcr, Staunton.


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43

THE REINSTATEMENT OF ALPHA CHAPTER OF ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA May 19th, 2oth, and 21st, 1933 marked the reinstatement of the Alpha chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha on the campus of the State Teachers College at Farmville, Virginia, where it had been founded, thirty-two years previously, on November 15, 1901.

Delta Sigma Chi, a local sorority at the State Teachers College, Farmville, Virginia, which was an outgrowth of the Alpha chapter in 1919, at this time went back into Alpha Sigma Alpha as the Alpha chapter. A number of members of Alpha Sigma Alpha came back to Farmville for the reinstatement. The installing officers were Mrs. Fred M. Sharp, National President, from Independence, Missouri; Miss Evelyn G. Bell, National Registrar, from Buffalo, New York; Miss Jean Richmond, Adviser of the Nu Nu chapter at Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Miss Emeline Putnam, President, Nu Nu chapter at Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Alpha Sigma Alpha alumna: who were also present were: Mrs. Louise Cox Carper, a Founder of Alpha Sigma Alpha, from Charleston, West Virginia; Mrs. Hattie Kelly Thomas, an initiate at the first Alpha Sigma Alpha ceremonial, and, at present, National Historian, from Baltimore, Maryland; Mrs. Margaret R. Martz, from Harrisonburg, Virginia; Mrs. Edna Elcan Jones, from Sheppards, Virginia; Mrs. Gordon Seamon Chalmers, from Phenix, Virginia; Mrs. Mildred Booker Dillard, from Draper, North Carolina; Miss Lillian Minor, from Norfolk, Virginia; Mrs. Louise Price Koiner, from Richmond, Virginia; Mrs. Bessie Ferguson Carey, from Front Royal, Virginia; Mrs. Lucy Dunnington Shields, from Farmville, Virginia; and Miss Katherine Watkins, from Farmville, Virginia. The following Delta Sigma Chi alumna: returned and were reinstated with the active Delta Sigma Chi members: Mrs. Mattie Rodgers Sydnor, Farmville, Virginia; Mrs. Martha Wells Catlin, Farmville, Virginia; Misses Lucille Norman, Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Sara McCorkle, Winston-


44

THE PHOENIX

Salem, North Carolina; Elizabeth Brockenbrough, Staunton Virginia; Burnely Brockenbrough, Green boro North Carolina; Virginia Fox, Richmond, Virginia路 Katherine Wayt Staunton, Virginia, and Mrs. Lucille Wright Eberwine Suffolk, Virginia. Friday night, May 19, 1933, the lovely pledge service of Alpha Sigma Alpha was held in the recreation hall of the college. Thirty-three members of Delta Sigma Chi in a large circle formed an impressive picture in the candle light. Thirty-four members of Delta Sigma Chi in three group were duly initiated with impressive solemnity on Saturday afternoon, May 29, 1933-an occasion which the present members of Alpha will never forget. Saturday evening, the reinstatement banquet of the Alpha chapter was held at "Longwood," an old historical home owned by the college. The President of Alpha, Mary Berkeley Nelson, presided, and the guests, inclusive of the Alpha Sigma Alpha visitors, were Dr. Joseph L. Jarman, President of the College; Miss Mary White Cox, Head of the Home; Miss Grace E. Mix, local Panhellenic adviser; Miss Mary E. Peck, a former Alpha Sigma Alpha adviser at Farmville, and Mis Grace B. Moran, the present adviser of Alpha chapter. After the banquet, a very ple:i!.sant hour was occupied with the reading of congratulations from the other Alpha Sigma Alpha chapters, and the presentation of a copy of the original charter, drawn up at the founding of Alpha Sigma Alpha, by Mr . Hattie Kelly Thomas in behalf of the Founders. On Sunday morning, May 21, 1933, the new initiate were formally installed as the Alpha chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha, and the charter, tied with the original color , was presented to the chapter President by Mrs. Sharp. Thus the Alpha chapter was once more added to the Alpha Sigma Alpha roll. A wonderful week-end had pa t but the memory of this reinstatement will always linger in the minds of the members of Alpha and of all others who were pre ent. Mary Berkeley Nelson, President Alpha

hapter.


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45

OUR VISITORS Probably no other chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha will ever be able to boast of an installation with Founders and members who had been affiliated with the sorority for twenty-five ye~rs and more. Nothing contributed more to the interest and pleasure of the installation of Alpha than having ten of the original Alphas present. And such charm, such grace, such inspiration, and such enthusiasm as they evinced! One had only to sit in the chapter room with both groups-the old and the new-to realize what their presence meant. Experiences were exchanged, valued snapshots were viewed, and souvenirs with memories of early Alpha Sigma Alpha days were examined. The spirit of loyalty which permeated from this group will remain with our girls in the years to come and to them will become a treasured memory. Alpha may well be proud that it was the first chapter installed by Mrs. Sharp since she became the President of Alpha Sigma Alpha. The girls were thrilled by her presence as well as by the two other National officers, Miss Evelyn G. Bell, Registrar, and Mrs. Hattie Kelly Thomas, Historian. Miss Jean Richmond, Adviser for Nu Nu, and Emeline Putnam, the President of Nu Nu, also participated in the installation and added much to its success. Therefore, we feel that our visitors will have a new and dearer interest in our college, and the college will ever feel the inspiration of their visit. School spirit was enriched, sororities were stimulated, and the hearts of twenty-five young girls imbibed much more of the true spirit of Alpha Sigma Alpha. Grace B. Moran, Adviser, Alpha Chapter.


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STATE TE CHER COLLEGE F RMVILLE VIR I IA The fir t teacher-training in titution in the state and one of the fir t of its kind in the South, was e tablished at Farm ille Virginia by an act of the State Legislature on March 7 r 4路 This institution was called the State Female Normal School and was opened in October of the same year with one hundred and ten students enrolled; the buildings for the chool having been pre ented by the town of Farmville. The first President of the school was Dr. William Henry Ruffn er who had been Superintendent of Public In truction since the organization of the public school system in the state in 1870. Dr. John A. Cunningham a relative of General Joseph E. Johnston whose home, 'Longwood,' i a recreation center for the college, was the second head of the school. Dr. Cunningham was followed by Dr. Robert Frazer who resigned in 1902 to become the Field Agent of the General Education Board. The fourth, and present, Pre ident of the college is Dr. Joseph L. Jarman, and under his wi e leader hip the institution has grown, expanded, and developed until today, it is recognized as one of the twelve outstanding Teachers College in the United States. Among the many changes that have taken place during ~he administration of Dr. Jarman, we may note that the name of the institution has been changed twice. The old State Female Normal School existed as such from r884 to 1914 when the Virginia Legislature changed it to State Normal School .for Women. In 1916, the privilege of conferring degrees wa granted, and, in 1924 it became the pre ent State Teachers College. From a modest beginning of several building donated by the town, has risen the splendid college of today with its beautiful buildings, its standard college course , it up-to-date Campus Training School and six Rural Trainina School it able Faculty and it thou ands of loyal alumna: cattered over the nation. An excellent de cription of the plant of the State Teachers


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47

College, Farmville, Virginia, was given recently in the Norfolk and Western Magazine as follows: "The college plant consists of a group of connecting buildings. The Main Building occupies the central place in the frontage. This building, with its Ionic columns, its old-fashioned doorway, and its graceful rotunda, is a charming example of colonial architecture. Upon entering, a beautiful reception hall greets one; above are the balcony and the dome with its magnificent paintings. Here the artist, the late E. Monfalconi of Richmond, Virginia, has placed the portraits of Thomas Jefferson, Horace Mann, J. L. M. Curry, and Dr. W . H. Ruffner. Between each of these portraits is a symbolic picture in rich colors, representing the four purposes of the institution: Study, Meditation, Recreation, and Rest. In this painting, we have the heart of a school which gathers her daughters about her, shares with them her knowledge, inspires them with her spirit, and sends them forth to train growing minds and growing ideals. Farmville, the oldest of all normals; the great Mother Teacher." The development of a student at Farmville is not considered as complete with classroom instruction alone; an all-sided development is the aim of the administration-development along the special line of teaching, development for citizenship, for the moulding and strengthening of character, for community work, and a development of the spiritual side. The various student organizations and extra curricular activities which aid in this development of the student are: the Student Government Association; the Young Women's Christian Association; the Athletic Association; the Honor Societies (Alpha Kappa Gamma, Pi Gamma Mu, Kappa Delta Pi, Alpha Phi Sigma, Pi Kappa Delta, Beta Pi Theta and Sigma Pi Rho) representing a high order of scholarship and good citizenship; many clubs and societies as the outlets for the various talents and abilities of the student; and six sororities, three national and three local : Sigma Sigma Sigma, founded at State Teachers College, Farmville, Virginia, 1898; Alpha Sigma Alpha, founded at Farmville, 1901-reinstated, 1933; Phi Kappa Sigma, established at Farmville, 1928; Gamma Theta, founded, 1911; Mu Omega, founded, 1911; and Zeta Tau, founded, 1920.


4

THE PHOENIX

In r934, the college celebrates its fiftieth anniversary and during its exi renee, has sent out 5,500 graduates nearly all of whom are, or have been teachers of the public school of the state. There have been approximately r6 ooo matriculate . And so the work goes on from year to year bringing in e er increased numbers, the daughters and pupils of Farmville alumn:e who send them to the college with the oft expre ed wish that they may have the same guidance, the same love and inspiration which was given to them in their own girlhood days. N.B.-The assistance of Miss Jennie Masters Tabb, Registrar, tate Teach ers College, Farmville, Virginia, is gratefully acknowledged.

ALPHA ALPHA Alpha Sigma Alphas everywhere-your Alpha chapter! You have, no doubt, been wondering for sometime ju t what kind of a group is the one from Farmville that you ve heard not a little about. We feel that we know you quite well especially after receiving all of your nice letters and telegram thank you very much! Perhaps, however, we'd better introduce ourselves more informally. But, first, before we become too absorbed in "blowing our own horns," we would like to present Mi s Moran. In one sense of the word, Miss Moran is to us the "ideal adviser." But we are putting it that way because she is more than that to us. An outsider would probably observe that he goes through her advisory duties with keen fore ight intermingled with much tendernes and kindness. We observe in Miss Moran those qualities of true friendhip and devotion, and at times when some of us feel a though we were in the deepest of depths, she has that knack of drawing us out of ourselves and placing us on top of the worl . ' Small wonder that Mis Moran remain for the group a great friend a wonderful companion, and its beloved ad vi er! And now,-the rest of us: Mary Berkeley elson: ur pride and joy, because she holds each of us up to our be t. he can do this by ju t being "Berk '-for you see that's what she i the very best of all. H er merit are o many and so va ried that there are not enough ' ords to de cribe them nor enough ways to reward


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49

them. Just to prove her versatility, look at her honors-Pi Gamma Mu, Alpha Phi Sigma, Vice-President of the Athletic Association, Secretary of the Senior Class, Student Standards Committee, and the Freshman Advisory Board. And in spite of all this, she finds time to love and listen to us all.

M a1路garet Eley: Most descriptions, somehow, are really very vague. One could describe "Eley" as a small, vivacious, and exceedingly attractive individual, or she could be introduced through one of her mediums of expressiondancing-as President of the Cotillion Club and the Artists Dance Group, and as Chairman of dances for our next May Day festival. However, to make this description even more vague, her qualities of leadership, her outstanding popularity and, above all, her lovable dispositionall are found in the very center of the chapter's activities. Cornelia Quades: It's absolutely impossible to make this girl stop talking, but when one talks with sparkling eyes, flashing dimples, and animated hands, one enjoys listening and wondering why she never gets tired. "Connie's" pet loves are children, poetry, and Alpha Sig. Does that not prove her worth? Sarah Hyde Thomas: One points to "Sallie" and says, "Now there goes a girl who is living her life." And she is, because she has character, determination, and love of all to aid her. People know it, and that's why she has served on the Student Council for two years, the Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, and is Secretary of the College Choir. Margaret Hurtt: Here is a girl who works just as hard in class and organizations as she does on any athletic team. No wonder her first year has brought her much. We are proud of her because she is pretty, attractive, and so very energetic. There is no stopping this girl. Mildr路ed Potter: True as steel, sincere, and independent, tell volumes about Mildred. She came to us to be friends and who could have accomplished it better with such fine points in her favor? Gertrude Sugden: "Suggie" is a "red-head" with all that goes with it, and still that doesn't describe this young lady. For she will be Art Editor of our annual next year, is on the Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, and is an all-round athlete. Mary Elizabeth Alexander: She laughs and all laugh with her, because she has the ability to make all around her to be filled with fun and laughter. Mary "Liz" writes poetry and draws beautifully. It only took one year for her to become a member of the Rotunda staff.


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THE PHOENIX

Ruth Ford: May we present one of our most gracious personalities? Her versati1ity of talents has been shown through her work in the rt lub, the Dramatic Club, and as President of the College Choir. To quote from the college newspaper: "With her wit, charm, poise, dependability willingness, and inspirational leadership, Ruth Ford is a girl of whom the college may be justly proud." Virginia Guy: Here is a big girl with a big heart in which you'll find room for love, room for work, and room for play-with a joyful interest in it all. Nancy Burgwyrz: Nancy lends beauty, poise, and talent to our chapter. he has very outstanding dramatic ability and is a leader in student activities. !though she leaves us often for other college dances, she finds time to take the lead in every Dramatic Club play, to be President of the Junior Class, and to even appear in the May Court. Elizabeth Billups: Blonde, intelligent, and athletic are the words which best describe "Liz." It has taken her only one year to establish her niche in school activities as a member of the Athletic Council and the Rotunda staff. Sallie Perrow: She is an all-round college girl with the lady-bke traits of bea uty and artistic tendencies. Her picture may be seen in the annual in the beauty section, Dramatic Club, and Art Club. She also help to keep our memory book looking nice. Ida Mason Miller: H ere is a girl we all envy for she's fun to play with, fun to talk to, and you just can't make her lose her temper. If you want real results, put her on any committee and she'll prove her worthines . Mary Easley Hill: Mary Easley is an artist in many ways. She has been Pre ident of the Art Fraternity fo r two years and is a super-artist when it come to acquiring and keeping friends. This is the result of a talent fo r one and a love fo r the other. Susie Webb: Loveliness, dignity and graciousness with a sweet, steady per onality have ecured fo r Su ie a special place in our group. Though only a Freshman she has her place out ide the group a Pre idem of the hora1 lub. Lucy Potter: n angelic face with the personality to go with it ha made Lucy admi red by every one in one year. Who could be better uited for the out tanding Y. W. C. . work he ha done?


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Harriet Moomaw: No wonder "Moo" is so hard to wake up in the morning for every day is a long, well-spent one fo r her. She also has her serious moments on the Y. W. C. A. Cabinet and the Student Council. Dorothy Legare: "Dot" is one of those slow, easy-going girls who gets there anway because she is so attractive and has that determination to do it. She was another member of our group to be in the May Court and being very beautiful, knows how to dress. With all her unconsciousness "Dot" came through with a diploma this year. Dorothy Glover: Our third "Dot" is a girl who is happy only when making others happy-which is most of the time. She is a fine student, a fine worker in the chapter, and in fact an all-round fine girl. Elizabeth Steptoe: "Liz" manages to retain the very enviable reputation as the best dressed girl on the campus. Don't let this lead you to think, however, that her interests lie only in keeping ahead of the latest fashions, for she has substantial qualities which make her an asset to any group. Louise Walmsley: Although a Freshman and very tiny, Louise may be found on any varsity athletic team and as Secretary of the Athletic Association. Her activities are not confined to athletics alone, for she is on the Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, the Rotunda staff, and is an outstanding member of her class. Doris Eley: Doris exemplifies the fact that personality, plus energy, will do wonders for the individual as well as the group. She helps to keep Alpha before the eyes of the student body by being Vice-President of the Sophomore Class and a member of the May Court. Maude Deekeus: We call her the "baby" of our chapter, but she often makes the older members feel ill at ease with her bits of wisdom. Maude was selected from her class to serve on the Student Standards Committee, and there is no limit to the work she can do. We predict a bright future for this child! Caroline By1路d: In her unassuming way, "Bug" manages to accomplish a lot of work which has not been awarded by glory, but always by appreciation. She is a happy combination of scholar and wit, with an excellent disposition thrown in.


Vl N

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~ ......

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\LPHA CHAPTER 1904-s-Roorn of Angela Finsley and H aui e Kelly I. 2.

Loui'e Cux (:'"econd Prc,idcnt) \ ' trginia :Royd (Ftrst Prc,ident)

3. Angela Finsley 4. H auic Kelly (''Jakesy")

5. Jll attie Thomas ("Patsy") 6. A memher of the " fl ume Department."


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HISTORY OF ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA (Reprinted f rom T he Aegis of May, 1911)

To all Alpha Sigma Alphas: We are publishing in this issue of the Aegis the history of Alpha Sigma Alpha in a very condensed form. As this is the first publication of our history you may find that some statements need to be corrected. If you find this to be the case, and should you be able to furnish us with the desired information, please let us hear from you on the subject as soon as possible. Besides, if any of you girls know, will you please let us have the names of the girls elected to fill the offices of Grand Historian, and first, second, and third Grand Vice-Presidents, at the Charleston Convention in 1906. Yours in A. S. A., Charley Jones, Grand Historian.

Hampden-Sidney, Va. On the 16th day of November, 1907, a local sorority was founded at the State Normal School, Farmville, Virginia, by five Virginia girls-Virginia Lee Boyd, Bryant, Va.; J uli~tte Jefferson Hundley, Farmville, Va.; Calva Hamlet Watson, Jenning's Ordinary, Va.; Louise Burks Cox, Iron Gate, Va., and Mary Williamson Hundley, Clover, Va. This organization was chartered as a national Sorority on February 13th, 1902. It was called, Alpha Sigma Alpha. The charter provided that A. ~. A. should have the power to establish similar branches of the order in schools and colleges of Virginia, and other States of the Union. The first step taken towards the founding of other chapters was in 1903, when the Beta Chapter of A. ~. A. was established, in November of that year, at Lewisburg Institute, Lewisburg, W. Va., by the following girls: Marguerite Beirne, Lewisburg, W. V a.; Effie Mealy, Oakland, Md.; Annie Brown, Lawton, W.Va.; Evelyn Dixon, MacDonald, W. Va., and Prue Colcord, St. Albans, W.Va. (1904) On May 9th, 1903, the Gamma Chapter was char-


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tered at College for Women, Columbu S. C. The charter member were: Fredree An el Greenville S. C.· Julia Brown Brunswick, Ga.; Violet Officer Eddy Lake S. C.· Helen cott, Kingstree, S.C.· Jessie Scott Claxton Ga. and Martha Wil on Charleston, S. C. A. :E. A. was the fir t Sorority to place a chapter in this institution. The following year, 1905, four new chapter were added to the "roll call" of Alpha Sigma Alpha. In February, Delta Chapter was established at Mary Baldwin Seminary, Staunton, Va. with the following charter members: Caroline Clay, Savannah, Ga.; Margaret Cunningham Yazoo City, Miss., Mary Rose Finn, Elizabethtown Ky., and Julia Williams, Yazoo City, Miss. In March, Epsilon Chapter was founded at Fauquier Institute, Warrenton, Va., with the following members: Suzanne Bandell, Baltimore, Md.; Jessie Baugh, Lafayette Ind.· Katherine Ferguson, La Plata, Md.; Jane Grave, Hancock Md. · Mary and Margaret Humes, Altoona, Pa., and Marguerite Kemper, Moorman's River, Va. On the 28th of October, Zeta Chapter was chartered at Fairmount Seminary, Washington, D. C., with the followin members: Mary Alley, Forest City, Ark.; Caroline Jordan, West Point, Miss.; Bappie Hill, Orange, Tex.· Louise Henderson, Greenville, S. C.; Erma McClung, Marleton Ark.· Mary Poling, Lynchburg, Va.; Lena Reinhardt, Lincolnton, N. C. and Annie Sumpter, Dallas, Texa . Owing to faculty ruling Zeta Chapter wa ub ro a. In October, Eta Chapter was established at Ward Seminary Nashville, Tenn., by Annie and Jency Hawkin Fayetteville W. Va.; Elizabeth Herring, Natural Bridge, Va. · Cathryn Pinkerton, Lexington, Miss. and Sophia Price Collier ville Tenn. The first convention of Alpha Sigma Alpha wa held in I905· The meeting place was the Richmond Hotel, Richmond Va. The chapters represented were: Alpha Beta, and amma. The other chapters were prevented from ending repre entative by the school authorities. Up to the time of the Richmond convention no officer had been elected to the rand CounciJ except Edna Elcan, from Alpha who wa cho en


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Grand President. She not being present at the convention, Alma Thraves, from Alpha Chapter, was made presiding officer. The most important subject discussed at this convention was that of beginning the publication of a magazine. It was decided to issue a publication three times yearly. The staff was elected as follows: Editor-in-Chief, Martha Wilson; Assistant Editor, Violet Officer; Art Editor, Marguerite Beirne; Assistant Art Editor, Prue Colcord; Business Manager, Alma Thraves. The following officers were elected to the Grand Council: Grand President, Edna Elcan; Grand Vice-President, Jeanne Pelham; Grand Secretary, Effie Mealy; Grand Historian, Lucy Daniel; Grand Priestess, Annie Thraves. Many important by-laws were passed. The time for annual conventions were .fixed upon-Thanksgiving of each year. (1906) The second annual convention of Alpha Sigma Alpha was held on Thanksgiving Day, at the Charleston Hotel, Charleston, S. C. Alpha and Gamma were the only chapters represented. Edna Elcan was re-elected Grand President; Fredree Ansel, from Gamma Chapter, was made Grand Secretary and Treasurer. The offices of First, Second, and Third Grand Vice-Presidents were established. Zeta Chapter, Fairmount Seminary, Washington, D. C., was disbanded in 1906, owing to nonsorority laws of the school. (1907) No annual convention was held in 1907. Several attempts were made to establish new chapters, but every attempt failed. Beta Chapter, Lewisburg, W. Va., was disbanded early in the year. (1908) In May, of the following year, Iota Chapter was installed at Randolph-Macon Woman's College, Lynchburg, Va. The charter members were: Clara Barton, Calvert, Texas; Georgia Foster, Navasota, Texas; Lucetta Badgett, San Sabo, Texas; Kathryn Nowlin, lola, Texas, and Ferdie Orr, Pennington Gap, Va. On June 18, 1908, the Grand President had a call meeting of Alpha Sigma Alphas at Lynchburg. The object of the


THE PHOENIX meeting was to revive intere t and enthusia m among the chapters, there having been no conventions during the ars 1907 and 1908. The meeting wa fairly well attended. In 1908, Delta Chapter, Mary Baldwin Seminary wa ruled out by the faculty. On the 2nd of January, 1909 the third annual convention was held at the Manor, Asheville N. C. All the active chapters of the A. ~- . were represented. On account of the absence of the president, Bessie Cary, of Alpha, pre idee!. An entire! y new council was elected and the offices of Second and Third Vice-Presidents were abolished. The following members were elected to the council: President, Wakefield Mattison, Gamma· Vice-President, Mary Ashe, Gamma; Secretary and Treasurer, Bessie Cary, Alpha. The magazine staff chosen was as follows: Editor-in-Chief, Martha Wilson; Co-Editors} Jessie Scott and Beverly Andrews; Business Manager, Nancy Clarke. Many by-laws were passed at this convention. An inner motto was adopted, and the emblems of the organization were changed. The time of holding the conventions was changed from January to June. The next meeting place decided upon was Natural Bridge, Va. On the 28th of February, 1909, the local orority, 1 <I> E was chartered as ~ WE Chapter of A. S. A., at Brenau College, Gainesville, Ga. The following were charter members: Elizabeth Alexander, Athens, Go.; Myra Fallon, Dallas, Texas· Sourie Glo er, Macon, Ga.; Leslie Harrel, Bainbridge, Ga.; Julia Jone Cartersville, Ga.; Fay Logan, Gainesville, Ga.; Eliza Mitchell, Nashville Tenn.; Lucy Turner Gainesville, Ga.· Marjorie Wood , Meridian, Mis . ; Kate Thompson, Madi on Ga.; Julia Fuller, Columbus, Ga. In May Gamma Beta Sigma, a local sorority at St. Mary School, Raleigh N. C. applied to . ~- \. for a charter. Thi local wa chartered as B Chapter of A. "'-'· A. with the following member : Mary Parker Bourne Tarboro, . C.· Sallie Haywood Battle Rocky Mount N. C.· Mary Shuford


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Hickory, N. C.; Annie and Rebecca Wood, Edenton, N. C.; Mary Rawls Gilliam, Tarboro, N.C.; Ida Jean Rogerson, Edenton, N. C.; Fanny Lamb Haughton, Washington, N. C., and Lizzie Hinton Lee, Raleigh, N. C. In June, Kappa Phi Chapter was installed at Mt. Union College, Alliance, Ohio, with the following members: Charlotte Battles, Chardon, Ohio; Ruth Butcher, Barnesville, Ohio ; Ruby Culp, Cleveland, Ohio; Corinne Harris, Martha Henry, Mary Henry, Lois Hull, Alliance, Ohio. ( 1909) The fourth annual convention of Alpha Sigma Alpha was held the 1oth, nth and 12th of June, 1909, at Natural Bridge, Va. All the active chapters were represented except :E W E and K W. The convention was splendidly attended, and accomplished great things for A. ~- A. The following members were elected to the Grand Council: Grand President, Lina Wakefield Mattison; Grand VicePresident, Mary Rose Finn; Grand Secretary-Treasurer, Mrs. Frank H. Cary. Two new offices were created-that of "Inspector" and "Custodian of the Badge." Madeleine Rollwage, from Eta, was elected to the first, and Suzanne Bandell, from Epsilon, was made "Custodian of the Badge." The name of the "Alpha Sigma Alpha" Magazine was changed to the Aegis some little time prior to this convention. The Board of Editors of the Aegis was elected as follows: Editor-in-Chief, Jessie Scott; Business Manager, Julia Jones; Alumna: Editor, Hattie Kelly; Beverley Andrews, Mary Shuford, Co-Editors. Certificate cards were issued to all Alpha Sigma Alphas. It was agreed that the next convention was to be held at Baltimore, June, 1910. ( 1910) The fifth annual convention of A. ~- A. was held at the Stafford Hotel, Baltimore, Md., June 9th, 1oth, and nth, 1910. All the active chapters were represented except Eta. The following Grand Council was elected : Grand President, Wakefield Mattison; Grand Vice-President, Hattie Kelly; Grand Secretary and Treasurer, Mrs.


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ALPHA CHAPTER, ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA FOL' XD E RS L Cah路n ll am le t W ntsnn 2. )J ary \\' llliam>nn ll untl lcr .l. \' irginia Lee Boyd 4. Lnui'e Burks Cox 5. juliette jefferson l! undley

F IR ST 1:\'TTTATES Lou ise Gordon Baske rvi ll e, J a n . '03. 7. Louise P e tt igrew Pr ice . J an. '03 . 8. Ha tt ie ] . \ '. Ke ll y, ) an. '03.

These 8 being the "01arter M embe rs."

9. 10. 11. 12.

13. 14.

A nge la Carro ll F ins ler. Feb. '03. Edna \' enab le Elcan, Feb. 'OJ. l\l argue rite A n thony P a lme r , J>ciJ. 'OJ. Lucy ll annah Dan te !, Feb. '03. Ka therine Earle Boy d. M c h. '03. Grace M acon Wilson, Mch. '03.


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59

Frank H. Cary; Inspector, Madeline Roll wage; Grand Historian, Charley Jones. The Board of Editors for the Aegis were: Mary Shuford, Editor-in-Chief; Nannie Lee, Business Manager; Hattie Kelly, Alumna: Editor; Charley Jones, CoEditor. In September, 1910, Eta Chapter was disbanded, as only one girl returned to school. On the 24th of November, Nu Chapter was installed, at Shorter College, Rome, Ga., with the following members: Martha Hunter, Madison, Ga.; Grace Harris, Griffin, Ga. ; Sarah Holt, Columbus, Ga.; Inez Parker, Madison, Ga.; Fannie Pendley, Paducah, Ky. The first part of the session of 1910 and 19II was spent in debate as to whether A ~ A should unite with <P M r, under a new name. The idea was abandoned, owing to the objection of K <P r, Iota, and r B ~. In April, Bessie Cary resigned her position as Grand Secretary and Treasurer on account of ill health. Gamma Chapter, College for Women, Columbia, S. C., was disbanded on account of nonsorority laws passed by the school. The sixth annual convention of A~ A will be held on 21st, 22nd and 23rd of June, 19II, at Lake Toxaway, N. C.

THE PUBLICATIONS OF ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA This number of The Aegis replaces one of the regular quarterly issues of THE PHOENIX, dated November, January, March, and May. The annual subscription runs from November to May and costs one dollar. Subscriptions should be sent to the National Treasurer, Mrs. James G. Haworth, 24II Barrington Drive, Toledo, Ohio. Back Numbers cannot be guaranteed to late subscribers, nor later issues always supplied to make four numbers of other months. A Life Subscription of twenty-five dollars ($25.00) not only provides a permanent subscription but helps finance the publication of other sorority material. The purpose of THE PHoENIX is fourfold: to make the Na-


6o

THE PHOENIX

tiona! Organization function in chapter life路 to pro ide a mean of stimulating the literary and arti tic talent of each member路 to keep alumna:: in touch with orority growth路 and develop and maintain high standards of chapter development. THE PHoE rx can only function ucce fully throuo-h the cooperation of every member, active and alumn<e. We olicit your interest both by contribution and ub cription . Will you put it on your Chri tmas list this year? In 1930 it became necessary to develop a wholly new mail. ing list. It has been very difficult to keep it correct. We ar printing a list of missing addresses. Plea e help us to fin error and make our list correct. La t year Alpha Sigma Alpha prepared a Pledge Manual of 32 pages. Copies may be secured for fifteen cents from the National President. It contains our creed, reprinted in the Aegis, guides to sorority etiquette, and the information a pledge should have about A ~ A before initiation. One of our most important publications is the Revi ed Constitution adopted at the 1932 Convention. It i not only our own working basis but an excellent example of constitutional technique. Copies are ten cents each, supplied by the National Registrar, Evelyn Bell, 8 E. Depew Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. Our Ritual is in press. It is loose-lea拢, and pre ent in permanent form, assuring uniform usage, the setting, word , and all details for our beautiful ceremonies. Louise Stewart National Chaplain, will have charge of distributing the Ritual. We look forward to the publication of a new song book. The Chairman of the committee i Miss Ethel Tobin, 20 S. New Hampshire Ave. Los Angeles, California. She will be grateful for any uggestions or material regarding word mu ic, or format.

THE SYMBOLISM OF THE AEGI The Aegis wa part of the original ymboli m of Alpha Sigma Alpha and in retaining the title for our ecret rna azine we are pre erving the continuity of our orority hi t ry. It wa the name of the regular orority magazine previou to the adoption of the Phoenix a the title. The u e of the Ae i in Greek mytholo y i attributed to


THE PHOENIX Athene, the goddess of Wisdom, and hence is appropriate for an education sorority. It is a shield or buckler, usually represented as bearing the head of the Gorgon, or as being the skm of the fabled aegis, a fire-breathing monster, slain by Athene herself. We can read into this symbolism our own conquest of the demon Ignorance during our school years, and the protection of Wisdom through all our after life.

LOOK AT THE RECORD! Statistics have been known to be boring but the fact remains none the less that they are definitely enlightening. Since 1929 college fraternities and sororities have encountered the serious problem of declining college membership. As alumna: and college members you will be interested in the following statistics. Year

Total Number of Initiates

1931-32

230 203

1~~TI

~4

Prior to 1930 the average number initiated annually by A. S. A. was 300. During the past few years, with fewer students financially able to consider sororities, it is obvious that Alpha Sigma Alpha ÂŁaired exceptionally well. Note during the year 1932-33, agreed by fraternity leaders to be the most difficult for college students, A. S. A.'s membership showed an increase. The relative merits of quality and quantity are not to be questioned. We naturally emphasize the first and yet as individuals and as a group we cannot overlook the fact that a chapter likewise needs strength of numbers to keep it consistently alive. Last year our chapters set as their aim ten initiates and nine chapters attained the desired goal, and with few exceptions all others showed a gain over the previous two years in the number of pledges and initiates. We point with pride to these statistics. We consider them tangible evidence of Alpha Sigma Alpha's increasing strength and position on our various campuses. Evelyn G. Bell, National Registrar.


THE PHOENIX

WE ARE THE MATCHLESS A. S. A.'s Adap ted from " \ e're the Coll ege for \Vomcn Girl " T une: o lomon Lev i (Prin ted in The Aeg is, A ugus t, l <l09)

We're the matchless A. S. A. s, We're known from shore to shore A more bewitching set of girls Was never seen before. We stand for truth and loyalty, In classroom we are sharks We like a merry song and dance And all such harmless larks. CHORUS

Alpha Sigma Alpha, tra la la la Ia Ia la Alpha Sigma Alpha, tra Ia la la Ia la la la la la We're the matchless A. S. A.'s, We're known from shore to shore A more bewitching set of girls Was never seen before. We stand for truth and loyalty, In classroom we are sharks, We like a merry song and dance And all such harmless larks. In old Virginia we were born, We are an F. F. V. The State is very proud of us And George and Robert E. Our kingdom is a gentle mind Our throne a loyal heart Whatever noble is and good Of that we are a part. CHOR


THE PHOENIX

THE AEGIS OF ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA The Aegis is the secret magazine of Alpha Sigma Alpha. It is to be kept with your constitution, pledge manual and private records of the sorority. It is not, however, to be hastily hurried away into some safe, dark, but forgotten corner, for it is a vital, living, record of Alpha Sigma Alpha, linking the past with the present. The present would never have attained its richness without this past here recorded. It should become part of your life just as it is a part of the sorority life. The facts presented should become familiar to you so that you may justify your pride both to yourself and others in being a wearer of our badge. The material of this Aegis will be useful to you in rushing and in pledge training. It will help you to answer questions intelligently. The study of the past is always rich in reward; when it is a past like ours, about young women like us, facing the same problems and enjoying the same triumphs, it is doubly a treasure trove of inspiration.


THE PHOENIX

PRESENTING To conclude a very successful college cour e and to start Alumn<e membership with highest honor i th achievement of Marjorie Moreland, P~ Pi chapter. As a freshman Marjorie gained recognition a an outstanding student and her name held a coveted place each semester on the State Teachers College honor roll. It was not surpri ing when Marjorie was elected to membership in Kappa Delta Pi National Honorary, and was Marjorie Moreland chosen from the eighteen pledges to give a toa t at the banquet. At commencement honor was again brought to ASA when Marjorie was recognized as one of the ten honor students in the graduating class. According to tradition the Buffalo Alumn<e Chapter of ASA presented Marjorie with the Scholarship award of $5 toward Life Membership for her scholastic record in college. To add to all these honors-in the competitive Teachers' Examinations in Buffalo thi June this Alpha Sig rated second in the Intermediate group of se enty-five candidates who passed and thereby will be one of the fir t to be appointed to Buffalo chao! thi year. The los of the College Chapter is the Alumn;e' gain. For 'Marge as he is familiarly known has brought untold honor and prestige to ASA as a capable and out tanding cla officer and student repre entative. Notwith tanding all her general colle e acti itie Marge alway had plenty of time for Alpha Sigma Alpha and capably filled the office of Panhellenic Repreentati e in 1931-32 and Chapter Trea urer in 1932-33.


THE PHOENIX

OUR ALUMNAE DUTIES ! R epri n ted f rom T h e A egi s of M a y, 1910)

When one leaves the arental home for one of her own, her duties toward the former are changed. Instead of being obliged to help with whatever domestic tasks there are, she must then write numerous letters to the family group and visit them as often as possible-in short, see that they are not lonesome without her. When the girl leaves her college and sorority chapter on the last commencement day, it is much the same as leaving home on her wedding day. The feeling that she is through with the college makes her forget that her connection with her chapter is not over, but should grow stronger as the years go by. Her duties, too, are merely changed, not from more responsible ones or less responsible ones, but to those equally important. Just as the duty of writing letters home or making visits there is a pleasure, so are the duties of the alumna:. Let us think of these, then, in the same way and we are sure to benefit both ourselves and the chapter just as we help the home people and ourselves when we look on letter writing to them as a pleasure. But just as some women are not obliged to live far from the home of their parents, so some are so fortunate as to live near the chapter of their college days. For these there are many duties. Entertaining the chapter is the duty most appreciated by the girls. Only hard-worked sorority girls know what it means to have alumna: who can entertain them and help plan a party when they are trying to uphold the ideals of an alumna: who desire them to be the "bright, particular stars" of their Alma Mater's social firmament. To invite a girl for dinner and spend the evening in conversation, while "rushing" season is taking its course. Oh! that has established a bond of sympathy between the active girls and an alumna: many times. Another way in which the alumna: should help, is to keep informed on local college and chapter conditions. Thus the older heads will be more able to give good counsel where many


66

THE PHOENIX

time the action of the chapter might be mi under tood and unjust critici m given where hearty commendation wa de erved. Encouraging the girls in the acquiring of cholar hip i another duty. In the majority of cases it i safe to say the mo t cholarly girls make the best sorority girls. Those ideal while we should not make all others subservient to themought to be placed very high. Girls are eager to uphold the traditions of their sorority. They make it, to a great extent what those who have gone before have shown that they wished it to be. They should know that we believe in a "broad mindedness" that frowns on all snobbery and the spirit of clannishness. No sorority which permits such an attitude toward other sororities or toward non-fraternity people can expect the respect of a college community. Not only does it make enemie but it is narrowing in its effect upon its members. A body of alumn<e who are popular with the students and faculty i certainly a valuable asset to any chapter in a college. Participation in all lines of college interest ought to b urged. But the alumn<e should insist that the girls use fair means to get honors in them. We should never expect them to get laurels in any contest in which the temptation to win might cause them to overlook a question of justice in the wmnmg. To visit the girls at the chapter house and become really acquainted with them is another duty, which is not a dutyit is a pleasure, as we all know. But weighed down as we are, by the cares of this life, it is one in which we indulge far too eldom. When one goes back to hear the laughter, to hear the tales of difficulties with chemistry and "Trig," to become a breathle s listener to an account of a struggle in cla politic it eems that the old college day have really come back. How it helps the girls to know that the alumn~ do care! They are warmed by the hearty handshake and encouraging mile. But if one i far away? There are always letter . What a good cheme it might be if each of the alumn~ write a brio-ht letter to her chapter each ear. Of cour e, there are reunion


THE PHOENIX letters, but they always seem more particularly for the alumnce than the actives. Finally, anything which will help the local chapter and in turn the general sorority, is the duty of the alumna: of Alpha Sigma Alpha. Its reward is to live in the memory of your chapter as long as your college stands, to know that you have a part in supporting and building up the sorority which you love most of all-Alpha Sigma Alpha.

SORORITY STUDY AND TESTING Progressive education has decreed that the rightful place of testing is to discover what content has not been mastered that it may point to re-teaching or show the need for other teaching methods. Thus testing shifts from emphasizing what grade the examinee shall receive to a measure of teaching success and so becomes a teaching and learning tool. How can Alpha Sigma Alpha apply this theory to sorority study and examination? The cooperative project in curriculum revision carried out last year, was an attempt to incite research and study of sorority material for a real purpose other than a mere "preparation for a test." It was proposed that more real value would be obtained from such a challenging opportunity for a creative piece of work than would be gained in cramming for a test. As is true, in almost every phase of sorority life, individual chapters determined their own values. Many chapters answered the challenge with real contributions showing thought, careful preparation and organization of material. To these chapters Alpha Sigma Alpha owes the-"Study Book" which has been placed in the custody of the chapter secretaries to be used during the weeks preceding November rsth which has been authorized as the last date to take the annual examinations. Again, each chapter must determine its own coursewhether the graded content for each year, now on hand, will be an interesting and worth while aid to discovering the fascinating information members of Alpha Sigma Alpha are privi-


6

THE PHOENIX

leged to peru e, or whether it will be a mere mechanical m morization of data outlined. The contribution in curriculum revision agreed a to rhe general content of examination material for each year.-That the fir t year or Initiation examination hould be the important and most inclu ive one. It hould te t general ororit and Greek letter information. The second year examination houll emphasize ymbolism and the financial organization of Alpha Sigma Alpha. The third year examination hould be brief and a general survey of campus and sorority life, demandin little preparation, as these members should be well ver ed on sorority matters and are probably busy with campu activitie and thus contribute to their chapter in other ways. It wa al o generally agreed that the objective test "easy to give easy to take and easy to score" was preferable. Typical te t w re not included in the "Study Book" as most objective test ar omewhat similar and it wa desirable to avoid any po sibility of memorizing a test example. A tabulation sheet showing the frequency of content material listed by various chapters for each year gave an intere ting curve of distribution. The learning of the chapter roll and information about due was listed as "taboo" by one or two chapters, but it was generally conceded that in order to t:.tlk intelligently about Alpha Sigma Alpha it was neces ary to know where other chapters were located and how fund are protected and administered. In justice to the orority any girl should be able to discu s our financial requirement with clarity and conviction. Our ultimate goal in all orority tudy and te ting program is a sorority membership well versed in Alpha Sigma Alpha history law ideali m and ymbolism. Will your chapter meet this aim?

S. June Smith, ational Examination

hairman.


THE PHOENIX

WHAT PRICE SORORITY MEMBERSHIP? What is the cost of becoming a member of a national sorority, and how do Alpha Sigma Alpha costs compare with those of other national groups? How often have we thought of this question if we have not dared to ask it! Undoubtedly if we could have at hand a survey chart on the cost of sorority life in all national organizations we should find Alpha Sigma Alpha operating at a really minimum cost. In return for this small cost do we seriously think about the many valuable experiences gained through membership in Alpha Sigma Alpha? There are the happy, over-flowing days of college life when our sorority is one of our major interests. These days are followed by "the higher and broader demands of mature life" which are greatly developed through interesting and valuable alumna: contacts. It is because of these unlimited opportunities enjoyed by her members that Alpha Sigma Alpha takes much pride in making known the outstanding values received in return for a small financial investment. Pledge days mean a deposit of $5.00 in the national treasury. We ask, what is to be gained through this deposit? The pledge receives a total credit of the amount toward her alumna: (life membership) dues, in addition to a Pledge Manual and other material issued by the national organization. Next comes the Initiation period with its small fee of $13.00 or $22.50, according to the kind of badge purchased. Again we ask the question, how is this money used? Of this amount paid $4.00 is credited to the Convention Fund, thus relieving all chapters from large assessments to meet Convention expenses; $r.oo is credited to the Publication Fund to help defray the cost of the official magazine and other publications; $4.00 is credited to the General Fund to care for necessary national expenses, including the certificate of membership; while $4.00 or $13.50 covers the purchase price of the plain or jeweled badge of the sorority. A member who returns to college after initiation pays national annual dues amounting to $8.oo per year. This money is credited to the Convention Fund ($4.00), Publica-


THE PHOENIX tion Fund ( r.oo) and General Fund ( 3.00) covering national expen e as quoted in the Initiation Fee. Thu we ha e a v r ' definite co t of national college member hip. Dues

First Year Second Year Third Year Fourth Year

Pledge

initiation

$5.oo

$13.00- $22.50

Total

Returning 1

.00 .00 .00

.oo or 27-50 .00 .00 .00

5!.5째 What a favorable comparison we make with other national sororities whose initiation fees alone are often double the co t of our four-year college membership! While we are "budget consciou " we must not forget our alumna:: who are asked to pay dues for the fir t four year after leaving college at $5.00 a year. What becomes of thi long row of numerals paid into the national treasury? Surely we have not forgotten our splendid Endowment Fund which is invested in the safest manner possible! Yes, the e alumna:: payments are credited to the Endowment Fund the intere t from which fund makes our general expense allowance ecure and our magazine issues possible. To our loyal and devoted alumna:: must go the great responsibility of the actual sorority wealth . Before leaving this all important subject of the value of sorority membership at such a low cost we must not o erlook our Fellowship Loan Fund. This is the only fund maintained through an assessment. All college and alumna:: chapter contribute $10.00 yearly to this fund. And what a wonderful benefit it has been for our college member who have found it impossible to continue college work, owing to depleted financial allowance. May the national influence and support of thi far-reaching and useful fund grow from year to year. "In unity there is strength,' so likewise in Alpha Sigma Alpha membership there is ever a trengthening of our indiidual position in life, whether we hould be affiliated with our orority a an enthu ia tic college tudent or a a loyal alumna:: member. Grace Fultz Haworth.


THE PHOENIX

71

FINANCIAL REPORT 193 2

-

1933

All books and records of the National Treasurer having been inspected and checked by the official public accountant firm of Konopak, Hurst and Dalton of Toledo, Ohio; I herewith submit the following financial report of Alpha Sigma Alpha for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1933. CONDENSED STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS Balance in the Treasury, July, I932 .. . ........ . ...... $8o,214.4I Receipts for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1933 . $rr,338.96 Disbursements for the fiscal year ended June 30, I933 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · I 1>543·7 2 Excess of Disbursements over Receipts . Balance in the Treasury, June 30, 1933 .

. .... $80,009.65

CASH, BONDS AND NOTES RECEIVABLE As of June 30, I933 Cash Cash on Hand . U ndeposited . . . .. $ I 54.08 Cash in Bank, The Rushville Banking Company, Rushville, Ohio, Checking Account . . 9,965.54 Liberty Bonds

Fourth 4~ %, Par Value $62,350.00-At cost (Registered in name of Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority, Grace Fultz Haworth, National Treasurer, and held in safe-keeping by the M. & T. Trust Company, Buffalo, N. Y.) . . .. 64,328.98 Note Receivable fmm Zeta Zeta Chapter

Signed by Maude C. Nattinger and Julia Hatz, Trustees of Zeta Zeta Chapter, and secured by Trust Deed covering chapter's property . . . . ..................

2,85o.oo


THE PHOENIX Fellowship Loan Fund ash in Bank, The Rushville Banking ompany, Rushville, Ohio-Saving ccount Notes Receivable-Members ............... . 2,

Total Cash, Bonds and Notes Receivable, representing balance in Treasury at June 30, 1935 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

[

r.os

o OOQ.65

STATEME T OF RECEIPTS ND Df BUR EME T For the fiscal year ended June 30 1933 EndoiiJment Fellofllship Fund Loan Fund Balance in Treasury July 1, 1932 .............. 67369.17 22 . o dd: Receipts ................................. . Transfer from other Fund ................. .

3 1 ·5° 44· 2 5 $67,9J2.17 $ 2 71!.05

Balance in Treasury, July

1,

Convention Publication Fund Fund 1932 ........... . $ 3 -145· 500.03

dd: Receipts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transfer from other Fund ................ .

1,624 .oo

Deduct: Disbursements Transportation ......................... . Hotel ............................... . Stationery and upplies .................. . wards ............................... . Miscellaneous Expense .................. . Printing ............................... . Postage ................................ .

3>740.06 I,I 3.67 67·95 30.25 50-41

Total Di bursement Tran fer to other Fund ...................... . Total

Balance in Trea ury July r 1932 ............. .

1, 2 57·75


THE PHOENIX

73

Add: Receipts .......... . Transfer from other Fund .... ... . . . .. .... .

Deduct: Disbursements Badges and Jewelry .... .. . . ...... . . .$ I,892.02 Inspection Expense .. .... . . . . .. .... . 58.oo Certificates . .. ........ . .. .. ... . I8I .42 Installation Expense ... . . . . . ... ... . 215.11 Paraphernalia . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 43·28 Official Supplies .. ... . . . ...... . . . . . I47·98 Miscellaneous Supplies .. .. . . .... ....... . . 72 ·55 Postage . . . . . . . . . . .......... ... .... . . 295·36 Association Dues and Expense . ...... .. ... . 6o.87 Surety Bond Expense . ......... . .. . .. . . . . . 56.25 Trust Company Fees . . . ....... . .. . . 30.00 Legal and Professional Fees . . . .. . .. . . . 147·40 Secretarial Allowances 1,475·00 Miscellaneous Expense I4I.83 Total Disbursements Transfer to other Fund . . . Totals . . Balance of Funds, July I, I933 Endowment . . .... . . ... . .. . . .. $67,932.1 7 Fellowship Loan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,7r r.o5 Convention 2.46 Publication . . . . . . ......... . I03 ·47 General 9,265.42 Balance in Treasury, July I, I932 . .. . . .. . . . . .. $8o,2I4.41 Add: Receipts .. . . .. .. .. ... . .. .. . ...... ..... . . . ..... . ... .... . . Transfer from other Fund .

Deduct: Disbursements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I I ,587 ·97 Balance in Treasury, June 30, 1933 Represented by Cash, Bonds and Notes Receivable .

. .. . . $8o,oo9 .65

Grace Fultz Haworth, National Secretary.


74

THE PHOENIX

AFETY FIRST! For the information of alumn~ and other who have not fully understood and appreciated our exceptional financial ecurity in the difficult times we are printing a ection of the report of the Board of Trustees from the minutes of the 19 2 Convention of Alpha Sigma Alpha. The Investments made since the 1930 Convention-De cription of the Investments: United States Government 4th Liberty Loan Bonds registered in the name of Alpha Sigma Alpha Grace G . Haworth, National Treasurer. 1. Date of Purchase, October, 1930. Par Value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1o,ooo.oo Appreciation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 350.00 Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 15.00 Total Investment ........... . 2.

Date of Purchase, November 7, 1931. Par Value ................ $ 5,ooo.oo Appreciation ................. II7.19 Accrued Interest ............... . 13.00 Commission .................... . 6.25 Total Investment Grand Total These investment were approved by the Board of Tru tee .


THE PHOENIX

75

BOND GIVEN BY THE NATIONAL TREASURER The bond given by the National Treasurer and in the Auditor's statement for the year ending June was approved by the Board of Trustees and is held keeping by its chairman. The bond was renewed for November 30, 1931, on the approval of the Board.

reported 30, 19~1 , for safeone year,

THE PROFESSIONAL AUDITORS The selection of Konopoe, Hurst, and Dalton, certified public accountants to audit the accounts of the National Treasurer was approved by the Board of Trustees upon the receipt of a favorable report from theM. & T. Trust Company, Buffalo, New York, as to the reliability of the firm.

THE ENDOWMENT FUND United States Government 4th Liberty Loan Bonds registered in the name of Alpha Sigma Alpha, Grace G. Haworth, National Treasurer, to the amount of $62,350.00 par value are held by the M. & T. Trust Company, Buffalo, New Yark, as safekeeping agent, to be delivered only on the joint signature of the National President, Wilma Wilson Sharp, and Elizabeth Bird Small, Chairman of the Board of Trustees. The Endowment Fund passed into the custody of the Chairman of the Board of Trustees November 10, 1931 by the expressed will of the National Council. A notice of the reception of the Endowment Fund by theM. & T. Trust Company, as safekeeping agent was sent to each member of the National Council, to each member of the Board, and to each chapter. Respectfully submitted, THE BoARD OF TRUSTEES, (SIGNED)

Elizabeth Bird Small, Chairman. Maude C. Nattinger, Estelle Bauch.


THE PHOENIX

LIST OF MIS ING

DDRE

E

Following is the li t of addre e from which THE PHoE IX ha been returned. If you know of any correction plea e end them to the National Editor. Mis Margaret J. Putnam r61 r niversity ve. Tuscaldo a Ia. Mi s Helen D. Gracey 509 Yz . 4th t. Tu on ri z . Miss Frances E. dams, 1059 E . First St., Long Beach, alit. _ fiss Maude E. Barrigar, University of California Calif. 1 frs. R. . Dalton, r 143 Magnolia, Long Beach Calif. rs. W. R. Elam, 142 Robinson St., Los Angele , Calif. Miss Martha Rogers, 409 Hillcrest Drive, San Diego, alif. Miss Mattie . Van Heukelom 102 . Manhattan t., Los \ngeles Calif. Miss Lottie ehlow Murphy Memorial Hospital, Whittier alif. Mrs. G. C . Alexander II40 Elizabeth t., Denver, Colo. r frs. H. E. Dove, Lake Arrowhead, Calif. Miss D. Fern Fender, 902 San Miguel St. Colorado pring olo. Mrs. R. D. Jenkins, Crook, Colo. Miss E. Joan Linderholm, 120 Denni St., fonta i ta, Miss Dorothy V. Masters, I 120 S. evada ve., Col.orado Colo. Miss V . Virginia Wood, Alamo, Colo. Mrs. David E. Jones, 280 Whalley ve . pt. 5 ew Ha en onn. Miss Ruth I. Buswell 1326 Columbia Rd., . W., Wa hington, D. Miss F. Evelyn Schrack, 30 Pennsylvania Ave. Coatesville Fla. Mrs. Harold W. Barth 975 W. Main St., Decatur, Ill. Mrs. L. G. Millard R. r 504, r r r W. Monroe St., Chicago, Ill. Miss Margaret Dow 2439 . Alabama St., Indianapolis, Ind . frs. Lloyd E. Arnold, 2909 Lincoln Way, mes, Iowa. Miss Louise F. Buffington, Corwville, La. Miss Marjorie Carpenter 1005 Indiana St., Lawrence, Kans. Miss Margie M . Goodwin, 631 . Topeka St. pt. 3 Wichita Kan . frs. Carleton E. Hamilton, 309 E. r rth, Hutchin on, Kans. fiss M. Imogene imp on r ror Union St. Emporia, Kan a . fi ss Mildred C . ngle, Children's Hasp. chool, Green pring Ave., and 4 r st t. Baltimore, Md. rs. R. E . orey 70 Pinckney t., Bo ton Mr . W. K. Gardner outh Middleboro Ma Mi s farion G. Lantz 2 Kendall quare, Worce ter, Ma fr. W. J. Died rich Jack on, Mich. Mi Donalda Morri on, Helen e\ berry Hall, nn rbor fi ch. fr . Gl n D. ali sbury 120 Glynn t., Apt. 505, D etroit, Mich. Mr . J. E. eelinger, r206 feadowbrook Fair Detr it, fich. Mr 路. Everett trout, r667 Randolph t., t. Paul, Minn.


THE PHOENIX Mrs. Maurice Owen Barr, Nevada, Mo. Miss Elizabeth S. Coffey, 211 Oak St., Nevada, Mo. Mrs. Albert A . Cooke, Kirksville, Mo. Miss May E. Freund, Smithville, Mo. Miss Mary R. Grubbs, 1015 E. Armour Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. Miss Ruth Harding, High School, Maryville, Mo. Mrs. John Wesley Harvey, Jr., Smithville, Mo. Miss Fern E. Lowman, Smithville, Mo. Mrs. Charles F. Mann, 1305 Armour St., Kansas City, Mo. Mrs. Wm. B. Patterson, Newtonia, Mo. Miss Betty Ray Phillips, Linneus, Mo. Mrs. Paul C. Smith, 306 E. High St., Kansas City, Mo. Miss Ruth V. Belknap, 200 Pleasant St., Clairmont, N. H. Mrs. W. L. Duffy, 407 Highland Ave., Palisades Park, N . J. Mrs. Chester Hanson, 683 Broadway, Apt. 202, Newark, N. J. Mrs. John E . Montescent, Box 379, Fairlawn, N. J. Miss Louise Carlton, Patagonia, New Mexico. Miss Lorna C . MacGinnis, Roswell, N . M. Miss Laura H. Buerger, 155 Northampton St., Buffalo, N. Y. Miss Marjorie A. Bull, 155 E. 8oth St., New York, N . Y. Mrs. H. 0 . Eddy, 3564 89th St., Jackson Heights, New York, N.Y. Mrs. Walter Gallows, Schenectady, N. Y. Mrs. G. H. Hodenpyl, Jr., 324 E. 41st St., New York, N.Y. Mrs. K . M. McCoy, 435! W . 119th St., New York, N.Y. Mrs. Elwood R. Schmidt, 340 Coleridge Ave., Syracuse, N . Y. Mrs. Harold M. Brucken, 413 Wildwood Ave., Akron, Ohio. Miss Mary Agnes Cole, 1932 E. 97th St., Suite 314, Cleveland, Ohio. Miss Carlotta Corpron, 23 Roanoke Apts., Clifton, Cincinnati, Ohio. Mrs. Royal V. Crist, 216 Maple Ave., Frankli n, Ohio. Miss Bernice M. Faucett, 440 Warren Ave., Youngstown, Ohio. Miss Ruth E. Felt, 6910 Hampstead Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. Miss Henrietta M. Haas, South Solon, Ohio. Mrs. Norman A. Kirdner, 92 Ellenwood Ave., Youngstown, Ohio. Mrs. Phillip McDonald, Warren, Ohio. Mrs. John A. Swart, Springfield, Ohio. Mrs. Harley Goodwin, Box 382, Slick, Oklahoma. Mrs. Albert W . Magers, 3111 E . 5, Tulsa, Okla. Mrs. Floyd Pennington, Buffalo, Oklahoma. Miss Faye Ward, Yukon, Okla. Mrs. George Brown, 535 West End Ave., Lancaster, Pa. Miss Carolyn Dickson, 3911 Grener St., Pittsburgh, Pa. Mrs. William Hunsberger, Valley Green Inn, Slatington, Pa . Miss Ruth E . Huppman, 401 W. Market St., York, Pa. Mrs. Wm. Rogers, 1486 Kaigy Ave., Camden, Pa. Miss Viola M. Sullivan, 9 N. Jared St., Boise, Pa. Mrs. Alton Wentzel, 3 Park Ave., Riverside, Pa.

77


7

THE PHOENIX

Mr. Wm. Fick, 1273 M. H. Del Pilar, Manila, Philippine I . Mrs. George Deegan, 101 I Summitt t., an ntonio, Texa . Mr . James H. Stokes, I r6 Fairview ve., Houston Texa . [rs. LeRoy Cole, 212 S. 13th East, New Univ. pts. I alt Lake Utah. Mrs. G. C. lexander, sor E. 47th t., Seattle Wash. Mrs. Lloyd E. Harold, 135 23rd St., Apt. 101, Milwaukee Wi . Mrs. J. . Stewart Hyattville Wyo.

it .

ADDRESS CORRECTION The correct address of............................................................................................................... Formerly: Is now: ..................................................................................................................................................


THE JOY OF F.. RATERNITY LIFE WELL LIVED

• FRATERNITY JEWELRY ADDS AN INDISPENSABLE TOUCH OF GLAMOUR

• By Appointment Sole Official Jeweler to Alpha Sigma Alpha

I L

ET your fraternity jeweler help you to enjoy fraternity life to the full- the thrill of campus achievements, college social affairs, fraternity dances, and the many chapter activities. In the 1934 edition of the Balfour Blue Book will be found a choice selection of fine gifts-from a bright and gay little remembrance to the more elaborate and sophisticated gift.

• AND MAY WE SUGGEST: Cat Book Ends . Fraternity Officer's Charms Silver Locket Ensemble .

Page 29 Page 16 Page 13

35 Branch Offices 70 Representatives to serve you

• FOR YOUR COMPLIMENTARY COPY OF THE

BALFOUR BLUE BOOK MAIL SLIP BELOW L. G. BALFOUR CO. Attleboro, Mass. Gentlemen: Kindly send copy of Balfour Blue Book to:

L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY ATTLEBORO, MASSACHUSETTS

Nome ... .... ......... ........ ... ... ... .. ........ ... . Street ... .. .... ........ ... .. .. .. .................. .. City & State .... ... ..................... ...... .. .. Fraternity.. ........................ .............. .

Profile for Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority

Asa phoenix vol 20 no 1 nov 1933  

Asa phoenix vol 20 no 1 nov 1933