Page 1

v OLUMB XVIII

MAY, 1932

NuMBBR

4

Published in November, January, March and May of each year at No. 30 North Ninth Street, Richmond, Indiana, by the Nicholson Printing Company, for the Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority having headquarters at Wellesley Farms, Mass. Business correspondence may be addressed to either office, but matter for publication and correspondence concerning the same should be addre路ssed to Julia Lancaster, Wellesley Farms, Mass. Entered as second-class matter September 4, 1923, at the post office at Richmond, Ind., under the Act of March 3, 1879.

Subscription price one dollar per year.


NATIONAL COUNCIL President-Mrs. Fred M. Sharp, ZZ, 1405 Hardy St., Independence, Mo. Vice-President-Miss Mary A. Wagner, KK, 206 E. Bloomington Ave., Iowa City, Iowa. Secretary-Miss Leona Wilcox, II, 1916 44th St., Des Moines, Iowa. Treasurer-Mrs. James G. Haworth, aa, 2411 Barrington Drive, Toledo, Ohio. Registrar-Miss Evelyn G. Bell II II, 8 East Depew Ave., Apt. 5, Buffalo, N.Y. Chaplain-Miss Louise N. Stewart, YY, 1330 Blue Ave., Zanesville, Ohio. · • Alumna: Officer-Miss Doris L. Feeley, PP, 2547 3rd Ave., Huntington, W.Va. Editor-Miss Julia E. Lancaster, ®®, 7 Spring St., Amherst, Mass. A. E. S. Representative-Miss Minnie M. Shockley, rr, Alva, Okla.

BOARD OF ADVISERS Alpha Alpha-Miss Amy M. Swisher, "The Tallawanda," Oxford, Ohio. Alpha Beta-Miss Ethel Hook, 202 Conner Apts., Kirksville, Missouri. Alpha Gamma-Miss Ethel A. aelden, State Teachers College, Indiana, Pennsylvania. Beta Beta-Miss Elizabeth Luzmoor, State Teachers College, Greeley, Colorado. Gamma Gamma-Miss Ollie Shattuck, Alva, Oklahoma. Delta Delta-Nrrs. Howard L. Goodwin, 30 Franklin Ave., Athens, Ohio. Epsilon Epsilon-Miss Edna McCullough, 1017 Rural St., Emporia, Kansas. Zeta Zeta-Mrs. Orlo R. Nattinger, 108 South St., Warrensburg, Mo. Eta Eta-Miss Pauline Potter, Pittsburg, Kansas. Theta Theta-Miss Mabel C. Bragg, So Madison Ave., Newtonville, Mass. Iota Iota-Mrs. W. F. Barr, 2482 Rutland Ave., Des Moines, Iowa. Kappa Kappa-Miss Laura W. Drummond, 2729 N. 12th St., Philadelphia, Pa. Lambda Lambda-Mrs. Ralph Stodgill, 1115 W. 2nd Ave., Columbus, Ohio. Mu Mu-Miss Estelle Bauch, 408 Emmet St., Ypsilanti, Mich.


Nu Nu-Miss Jean M. Richmond, 1411 S. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. Xi Xi-Miss Ruth Baugh, 1912 Selby Ave., West Los Angeles, Calif. Omicron Omicron-Miss Ada Hyatt, 325 E. Main St., Kent, Ohio. Pi Pi-Miss Elizabeth B. Small, 196 North St., Buffalo, N . Y. Rho Rho-Miss Mary J. Alexander, 166 Woodland Drive, Huntington, W.Va. Sigma Sigma-Miss Lucy E. Spicer, Western State Colleg~, Gunnison, Colo. Tau Tau-Miss Mae Paul, Lamer Hotel, Hays, Kans. Phi Phi-Miss Nell Martindale, Missouri State Teachers College, Maryville, Mo. Chi Chi-Miss Anne Fern, 1959 Central Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. Psi Psi-Mrs. Albert A. Fredericks, Box 1316, Normal Station, Natchitoches, La. Omega Omega-Mrs. Gertrude Bell, San Diego State College, San Diego, Calif.

ROLL OF COLLEGE CHAPTERS Alpha Alpha-Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. Alpha Beta-State Teachers College, Kirksville, Mo. Alpha Gamma-State Teachers College, Indiana, Pa. Beta Beta-State.Teachers College, Greeley, Colo. Gamma Gamma-State Teachers College, Alva, Okla. Delta Delta-Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Epsilon Epsilon-State Teachers College, Emporia, Kansas. Zeta Zeta-State Teachers College, Warrensburg, Mo. Eta Eta-State Teachers College, Pittsburg, Kansas. 路 Theta Theta-Boston University, Boston, Mass. Iota Iota-Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa. Kappa Kappa-Temple University, Philadelphia, Pa. Lambda Lambda-Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Mu Mu-State Normal College, Ypsilanti, Mich. Nu Nu-Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. Xi Xi-University of California, Los Angeles, Calif. Omicron Omicron-State Teachers College, Kent, Ohio. Pi Pi-State Teachers College, Buffalo, N. Y. Rho Rho-Marshall College, Huntington, W. Va. _ Sigma Sigma-Western State College, Gunnison, Colo. Tau Tau-Fort Hays Kansas State College, Hays, Kansas. Phi Phi-State Teachers College, Maryville, Mo. Chi Chi-Butler University, Indianapolis, Ind. Psi Psi-State Teachers College, Natchitoches, La. Omega Omego-San Diego State College, San Diego, California.

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ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL SORORITIES Chairman-Mrs. Orley See,-DSE, 48 Wildwood Ave., Piedmont, Calif. Secretary-Miss Carrie Walters, TSU, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Treasurer-Miss Ada Norton, AST, 510 Pearl St., Ypsilanti, Michigan. Director of Local Panhellenics-Miss Mabel Lee Walton, SSS, Woodstock, Virginia. Director of City Panhellenics-Miss Minnie Shockley, ASA, Alva, Okla. Chairman of Eligibility and Nationalization-Mrs. C. P. Neidig, 2033 Hewitt Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio .

.

EDITORIAL STAFF National Editor Julia E. Lancaster, 7 Spring St., Amherst, Mass. Chapter Editors Alpha Alpha-Genevieve Snedaker, 7 Wells Hall, Oxford, Ohio. Alpha Beta-Emily Smith, rrr E. Patterson St., Kirksville, Mo. Alpha Gamma-Kathryn Meiser, John Sutton Hall, S. T. C., Indiana, Pa. Beta Beta-Marian Behrens, La Salle, Colorado. Gamma Gamma-Frieda Shirley, 709 Flynn St., Alva, Okla. Delta Delta-Lillian Goff, 127 E. State St., Athens, Ohio. Epsilon Epsilon-Juanita Nicholson, Emporia, Kansas. Zeta Zeta-Doris E. Johnson, 304 Culton St., Warrensburg, Mo. Eta Eta:-Helen Lortz, Pittsburg, Kansas. Theta Theta-Katharine M. Hale, 393 Randolph St., South Weymouth, Massachusetts. Iota Iota-Georgia Barton, 1350 24th St., Des Moines, Iowa. Kappa Kappa-Norma Rebecca Nyce, 219 Mather Rd., Jenkintown, Pa. Lambda Lambda-Margaret G. De Witt, 70 15th Ave., Columbus, Ohio. Mu Mu-Phyllis Powers, 722 Lowell St., Ypsilanti, Mich. Nu Nu-Virginia Moore, 3320 Powelton Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. Xi Xi-Margaret Knapp, 1265 W. 83rd Place, Los Angeles, Calif. Omicron Omicron-Betty Moore, 1723 Cleveland Ave., N. Canton, Ohio. Pi Pi-Alwilda McCumber, Darien, N. Y. Rho Rho-Virginia Shewey, 1726 Fifth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. Sigma Sigma-Allyne Fryberger, Gunnison, Colo. Tau Tau-Evelyn Pauley, Custer Hall, Hays, Kansas. -Chi Chi-La Vaune Rutherford, r6o3 Central Ave., Apt 315, Indianapolis, Ind. Phi Phi-Grace Goodson, Residence Hall, Maryville, Mo. Psi Psi-Lilburne Middleton, Natchitoches, La. Omega Omega-Ann Powell, 3560 Front St., San Diego, Calif.


EX-COLLEGIO SECRETARIES Alpha Alpha-Mihicent Bender. Alpha Beta-Mrs. Elizabeth R. Woody, St. Louis, Mo. Alpha Gamma-Virginia Karlen, 105 N. John Sutton Hall, State Teachers' College, Indiana, Pa. Beta Beta-No ex-collegio secretary. Gamma GammaDelta Delta-Eleanor Lloyd, Utica, Ohio. Epsilon Epsilon-Mrs. Claire K. Turner, 1516 West, Emporia, Kans. Zeta Zeta-Mrs. Lillian McMeekin. Theta ThetaIota Iota-Edith T. Burr, 1014 26th St. Kappa Kappa-S. June Smith, Millersville S. T. C., Millersville, Pa. Lamda LambdaNu Nu-Miss Dorothy Williamson, Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, Pa. Phi Phi-Irene Smith. Pi PiPsi Psi-Dolly Mayes, Oakdale, Ia. Rho RhoSigma Sigma-Ellen Trevarthen, Gunnison, Colo. Tau TauC?mega Omega-Audrey B. Petersen, r835 Meade Ave., San Diego, Cal.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Miss Elizabeth B. Small, 196 North St., Buffalo, N. Y. Mrs. Orlo R. Nattinger, 108 South St., Warrensburg, Mo. Miss Estelle Bauch, 408 Emmet St., Ypsilanti, Mich.


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WILMA WILSO

SHARP


THE PHOENIX . "TO A BROADER VIEW" In August Alpha Sigma Alphas will go to the mountains. It is my belief that the magnificent setting of our 1932 National Convention will be symbolic of the inspiration and accomplishments of our meeting together. In the midst of marvelous mountain scenery we shall know anew the breadth and beauty of friendship. the glory and good of our ideals. With our minds atune to the spiritual Voice of a glorious out-of-doors, we cannot but act wisely for the future of Alpha Sigma Alpha. With our bodies refreshed by a purer air, we shall play and laugh and love in an invigorating relaxation. Come to our 1932 Convention! It will lead you up pleasant mountain trails "to a br~ader view". WILMA WILSON SHARP,

National President.


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THE PHOENIX

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THE PHOENIX

II

WHAT SHALL .I TAKE TO CONVENTION? LEONA

WILcox, National Sec1路etary

No one cares to be inconvenienced with too much luggage when on a trip, whether it be for business, or pleasure, or the combination. What shall I take to Convention is a question to be settled by every delegate and visitor. A few suggestions to those who have never been in Colorado and who are not familiar with the climate of the Rockies may be helpful. Imagine ourselves being a mile higher than the locations of most of our Alpha Sigma chapters. A mile straight up is quite a distance. The long, gradual climb over the mid-western plains will bring us, at Denver, to an altitude of a mile above sea level. The journey to the village of Estes Park will carry us another four thousand feet nearer "heaven." To be prepared for the sudden changes of temperature common to the higher altitudes one should be provided with a warm coat. Late August in the Rockies usually brings frosty weather so that warm clothes will be essential. Sport clothes will be quite appropriate; a woolen suit, or dress, very suitable. A comfortable pair of walking shoes, or boots, will be necessary for hiking, and those of equestrian inclinations will need a riding outfit. An afternoon dress, or two, for Convention meetings, a formal evening dress for the banquet, a white dress for the initiation services and accessories to suit one's taste will complete the wardrobe. 路 Be prepared to be sunburned, windburned, and tanned. Tinted glasses will protect the eyes. Don't forget the camera if you want to take pictures of the trip. Field glasses will be found useful if you have them. The mountain dweller may suit his methods to his means, his program to his bent, and miss naught. Mountain life is not all in climbing some peak or "doing" some scene or catching some trout; but the quiet lounger amidst the pines, the peaceful gazer from the sunny crag, the slow loiterer in the flowery meadow, realizes that he also is feasting to the full his soul, mind and bodily vigor. Thus may each Alpha Sigma attending Convention suit her desires to her means and to her program. The joy of being at Convention will be her reward.


12

THE PHOENIX

THE CONVENTION FLAME DoRIS FEELEY,

National Alumnae Officer

Long ago there dwelt in the city of Florence a Nobleman. Being very brave, he fought side by side with the knights of his city. His bravery and love of adventure drove him into the same warfare which the others pursued for the love of God, their goal being to free Jerusalem from the Turks and give it back to Christianity again. He was the .first to pledge himself in a crusade which was being formed. Before starting on this great quest he vowed to bring back to Florence the most precious thing he found in Jerusalem. Through the journey and the .fighting he bore himself courageously and when the city fell before the Christian Knights he was one of the .first to enter it. The triumphant knights gathered in the cathedral to ofler thanks to God for giving them so great a victory. They .filed in to the great church where high on the altar burned the sacred light which had been brought from the tomb of Christ. Each one of them was to light his 路taper at this sacred flame. As the No~leman moved toward it a strange conviction came to him. It was the light from this flame that he would take back to Florence, as the most precious gift Jerusalem could bestow upon his city. With a bunch of tapers to feed the flame, he started back at once for Florence. He had not gone far, however, when he began to see the difficulties of his journey. He had to travel slowly and shelter the flame under his cloak. He now found his whole life centered around this little flame and his duty of protecting it. He had many difficulties and hardships along the way, but at one time was able to save the lives of a woman and her children, by giving them a light from his candle to make a .fire. As he rode along new thoughts, new dreams, new ideals came to him. He longed that the hearts of his townspeople might be lifted up as his had been.


THE PHOENIX His dreams were realized. The people came to the church where the sacred flame was placed on the altar, to light their tapers and go forth again to carry its light into their hearts and homes. We too have a sacred flame which we should relight at each convention time. Besides all the fun we have and the joy of being together there is that serious "something" we gain-the "something" which is hard to describe but which we feel we must shelter in our hearts and carry back to our sisters-the desire "to have their hearts lifted up as ours have been." In our alumna: groups it isn't always easy to keep this flame of ASA burning. Distance, our every day work and the many things which take our attention are the winds which extinguish this flame. Let's not miss the opportunity which we have of attending convention. Let us have our alumna: group represented from every chapter and路 the light of ASA revived in every heart.

A Mountain Guest Ranch


THE PHOENIX

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Alpha Sigma, Alpha Sigma We greet you. Out in Colorado Under skies of blue, Here our sacred bonds of friendship We renew. Alpha Sigma, Alpha Sigma We love you.

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CONVENTION 1932

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"When It's Springtime in the Rockies")

From the east and west we've traveled To these Rockies for away Where convention days will bring us Friendships that will last for aye. Here amid these snow capped mountains We will seek, aspire, attain The ideals, the dreams, the visions Of our glorious ASA. -Composed by Denver City Association of ASA.

Let us all learn these to sing at路 Convention.

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15

THE PHOENIX

ALPHA SIGMA AlF~\A

CONVENTION ESTES PARK COLORADO ~~

OM E AND SEE W\-lAT

OTI- ER Cf-IAPTERS Of

ALA AR.E DOING

AUGUST

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THE PHOENIX

16

WELCOME Dear Alpha Sigs: Sigma Sigma chapter is glad to have the opportunity to welcome all Alpha Sigma Alpha chapters to the National Convention at Estes Park, Colorado. We are very proud of our state, and are pleased to have the chance of entertaining the Convention here-we promise a wonderful time. Colorado Mountains are always lovely, so come prepared to play in them, as well as gather knowledge. Conventionally yours, SIGMA SIGMA CHAPTER.

Indian Pueblo, on the Indian Detour


THE PHOENIX

17

ESTES PARK AND CONVENTION Estes Park is the rustic village nestled in the Rockies that has been chosen as the scene of the Alpha Sigma Alpha Convention. As we all know it is situated in Rocky Mountain National Park in a state famous for its scenery. COLORADO! full of towering mountain peaks, terraces, gorges, fertile valleys, and upland forest, it gives a majority of impressive scenery. Compared to Colorado, Switzerland is a more mere sugges- â&#x20AC;˘ tion. The air is bracing and unsurpassed, whether for pleasure or health. The mountains of Colorado are now the greatest inland resorts in the world. Leaving Denver, we travel to the northwest, up through the world-famous Big Thompson Canyon. All day we go through this narrow gorge, with its sheer precipices rising abrutly on both sides, and when we dizzily look up, we find only a small patch of blue sky above us. The beauty of this canyon is breath-taking; the colorings of the granite walls are red, gold, and coppery and the zigzaging stratas of the rocks put us in mind of an old mosaic design. A trout st.~eam runs along the road all the way through the canyon and the road crosses and recrosses this stream dozens of time~ . First we are on one side, and then the other. As we cross these bridges we see fishermen up to their knees in the icy water, reeling in the world-famous, speckled trout, a dish more than fit, "to set before a king!" We arrive in Estes in the late evening and find before us an old-fashioned charming rustic village, with its Swiss "chalets," innumerable small shops, and cozy tea rooms. The post office is an odd sight, built entirely of logs to represent an old log cabin. One of the famous sights of this beautiful spot is Long's Peak, within sight of Estes. One does not leave Estes without making this famous climb. The peak rises into the clouds some 14,000 feet. We leave Estes by another route, through the Fall River Road, and one of the highest automobile highways in the country, over 12,000 feet high. On my trip to Estes some years ago, ¡ the road was covered with snow in August and snowplows had cut through a narrow file for cars to pass through. Imagine in


18

THE PHOENIX

the middle of summer to drive through a road lined with twelve foot snow banks on either side. Alpha Sigma Alpha could have looked the world over and never found a more suitable spot for Convention than Estes Park. Our aim is to "establish a sisterhood that shall have for its fourfold object the physical, intellectual, social and spiritual development of its members." Physically-Estes is a famous health resort. Intellectually-At Estes we shall put our famous sorority "brains" to work for the good of ASA. Socially-What good times we are going to have at Estes! Spiritually-Only God could have made for our enjoyment, these marvelous mountains and trees so close to Him that we feel we can almost touch His Heaven. Now do you think you can wait for August? Let's go! On to Estes ! 路 Rubye Bellmard, 33 Ex-collegia. Dear ASA: Convention time is drawing near and it is high time we begin to think of "Ways and Means" of getting to Estes Park this summer. The 1932 Convention is going to be the biggest and best that Alpha Sigma Alpha has ever held and we want 路 everyone to be there. In order that you may all get acquainted before Convention plans have been laid for girls from the many chapters to meet at central points and travel to Estes Park together. The greatest gathering will be in Chicago on Wednesday, August 24th, when all delegates and members from the chapters east of Chicago will embark on one of the famous trains of the Santa Fe railroad and travel for two days together to Denver, gathering up other members at Kansas City and Denver. Special Pullman cars or a special train will be run, depending upon how many join the party. Will you plan to be there? 路 If there are enough girls travelling from the West we will run special Pullmans on a convenient train from there, giving


THE PHOENIX members an equal opportunity with those in the east to aet acquainted enroute. In order to arrange definitely for th~se two movements, however, it is vital that we know if you are going, wher{ you are going and how you are going. In the March PHoENIX we gave you blanks to fill out and send in. We are sorry to say no one wrote us. It is two months later, now, and perhaps you have more definite ideas about your summer and the Convention. Won't you write us about it? Some of you will want to spend the summer in the West, going out either by boat, rail or motor and visiting friends, the National Parks and other important points along the way. We made suggestions as to routing in the last PHoENIX and shall be glad to make up special itineraries and quote costs for any trip you may want. If you plan to visit the Parks reservations should be made well in advance, otherwise you may be disappointed in your accommodations. Some of you will motor, perhaps. You, too, we will be glad to assist in the matter of routing, accommodations, sightseeing and costs. Motor travel for long distances should be considered carefully before undertaken. There are a few points which we should like to point out to you for consideration, if you are planning the trip to the Convention by motor. Added to the tediousness of driving from rso to 400 miles a day in order to cover a large territory, there is the possibility of engine and tire trouble, and even running out of gas, the problem of getting clean, comfortable and inexpensive accommodations for the night and the question of getting good meals when you want them. Experience of many drivers has proven that oftentimes you can drive for hours in the less populated sections and find no restaurants. We estimate that at least $so a week per person should be allowed for motor travel, which, in the l9ng run, will be as expensive as travel by train with our special party. This is the last edition of the PHOENIX for the year and we are giving you as much information as possible about the Convention. Now, before you start on your vacation, is the time to plan to go to it. Won't each and everyone of you think about it, talk it over with your friends, decide what you want to do


THE PHOENIX

20

then write to us giving us your idea and telling us whether you expect to join the groups on the special tains or are going some other way? If you all do this, we can tell you in a short time who else is going from your district and you can arrange for meeting and travelling together. Won't you write us at once? Fraternally yours, CAROL D. PIERCE, GG. Allen Tours, Inc. s8o Fifth A venue New York City.

ROUNDTRIP RAIL FARES TO DENVER Summer Tourist

路 Alva, Oklahoma .... ...... . . ..... . . .. ....... . . . ' .. $ 32.25 Athens, Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64.93 Boston, Massachusetts ............. . ..... . ......... 102.66 Buffalo, New York .. .. . . . . ............ . . . ...... .". . 68.70 Chicago, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43.05 Columbus, Ohio ...... ..... . . : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59.00 Des Moines, Iowa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.10 Emporia, Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27.85 Greeley, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.84 Gunnison, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23.96 Hayes, Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20.24 Huntington, West Virginia ..... .. .... . . ~ . . ........ 64.70 Indiana, Pennsylvania . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87.64 Indianapolis, Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.20 Kent, Ohio ..... . .. . . . ... .. .... . . . .. ... ...... -: . . . . . 61.50 Kirksville, Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32.35 Los Angeles, California....... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67.20 Maryville, Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.10 Natchitoches, Louisiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55.45 New York, New York........ . ... . ... ..... ... ..... 93.32 Oxford, Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55.89 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88.14 Pittsburgh, Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34.40 San Diego, California ............................ . Warrensburg, Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.25 Ypsilanti, Michigan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55.74 Note:

Short Limit Thirty Days

$ .... 55.89 87.80 61.70 52.90

55.70 77.91 45.76 55.37

77.00 49.13 73.50

50.50

Add $8.00 for bus transportation from Denver to Estes Park and return.

NOTES The Summer Tourist Tickets are good from May 1st until October 31st and stopovers may be made at any point for any length of time. The Short Limit Thirty Day Tickets are good for stopovers at any point, however, passenger must be back at starting point on the thirtieth day. Thirty-day tickets are not in effect between points if not shown above. Itineraries will be furnishe.d on request.


THE PHOENIX

2!

ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 路PRECONVENTION SUGGESTIONS AANDB July 23. NEW YORK

Embark and sail : Tour A. SS. VIRGINIA, Tourist Class. Panama Pacific Line.

July 26. . HAVANA

Six hours in the "Paris of the Western Hemisphere." Sightseeing tour to all points of interest in the city.

July 29.

Arrive at CHRISTOBAL in the morning. Through the Canal with six hours in BALBOA for shopping if desired.

Aug.

PANAMA CANAL

S. SAN DIEGO

Arrive about noon. Afternoon sightseeing tour of the city, to Mission Hills, Balboa Park, Old Town, Ramona's Marriage Place, Airports, Point Lorna, Old Spanish Lighthouse, Sunset Cliffs and Ocean Beach. Return to the ship.

Indian Pueblo, near Santa Fe


THE PHOENIX

22

Aug. 6.

LOS ANGELES

Arrive in the morning. Transfer to: HOTEL HAYWARD, where room with bath is provided for stay. Join Tour B, which arrives 11 :30 a.m.

July 31.

NEW YORK

Leave Grand Central 2 p.m. Lower berth or chair provided for entire trip. Tour B. Change to SANTA FE STATION and !路eave orr the GRAND CANYON LIMITED. Leave the train at Lamy, and leave by motor for eighteen miles drive to SANTA FE. Room with bath anjd meals provided at LA FONDA HOTEL. In the morning motor tour to Palace of the Governors, Cathedral路, Chapel of San Miguel, Old Native Quarters, Tesuque Indian Pueblo and return to Santa Fe. L~ave by train at 6 p. m.

Aug. 1. CHICAGO

Aug. 3. LAMY

Aug. 4.

LAMY

On the Rim of the Grand Canyon


THE PHOENIX Aug. 5.

GRAND CANYON

Arrive in the morning. Hermit Rim Drive by motor. Leave in the evening.

Aug. 6.

LOS ANGELES

Arrive at 11 :20 a. m. Transfer to: HOTEL HAYWARD, where room with bath is provided for stay. Join To~w A for remainder of trip.

Aug. 6.

LOS ANGELES

Afternoon motor tour of the city, to Hollywood, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica and Ocean Park.

Aug. 7.

LOS ANGELES

Free day for visiting the OLYMPIC GAMES. Tickets not provided, but may be secured for special events desired.

Aug. 8.

LOS ANGELES

Boat trip to CATALINA ISLAND, with visit to the Bird Park, New Casino, and trip in the glass-bottom boat to the Submarine Gardens.

Aug. 9.

SANTA BARBARA

Leave Los Angeles in the morning by motor through Hollywood, new Roosevelt Highway, Ventura, the "Poinsetta City," to Santa Barbara for 1uncheon, dinner and the night.

Aug. 10.

DEL MONTE

Leave by motor via Gaviota P ass, Santa Maria, Cuesta Grade, Atascadero for luncheon, San Miguel, Soledad, Old Monterey, to Del Monte, where room and meals are provided.

Aug. 11.

SAN FRANCISCO

Leave by motor via Santa Cruz, where stop is made for luncheon, via the Giant Redwoods, Palo Alto, Burlingame to San Francisct>. Leave by sleeper for Yosemite.

Aug. 12. YOSEMITE VALLEY

Arrive in the morning. Twenty-mile motor tour of the Floor of the Yosemite Valley. Room and meals provided in the Lodges for entire trip.

Aug. 13. YOSEMITE VALLEY

Motor tour to Inspiration Point, Mariposa Grove of Big Trees and other points of interest. Leave by sleeper for San Francisco.


THE PHOENIX Aug.14.

SAN FRANCISCO

Aug. 15.

SAN FRANCISCO

Aug. 16. Aug.17. • Aug.18. Aug.19. Aug. 20. Aug. 21.

OGDEN YELLOWSTONE YELLOWSTONE YELLOWSTONE YELLOWSTONE YELLOWSTONE

PARK PARK PARK PARK PARK

Aug. 22.

SALT LAKE CITY

Aug. 23.

COLORADO SPRINGS

Aug. 24.

COLORADO SPRINGS

Arrive in the morning. Transfer to WILLIAM TAYLOR HOTEL, where room with bath is provided for entire stay. Thirty-mile drive of the city, Mission Dol'ores, Golden Gate Park, Ocean Bea·ch, Sea Cliff, etc. Motor tour to Oakland, Berkeley, and the University of California. Leave in the evening by train. Few hours stop. Four and a half days by motor in the park with room and meals provided in the Lodges. Visiting Old Faithful, Grand Canyon, Mammoth Hot Springs, Gia'n t Geyser, Lone Star Geyser, and all other _points of interest in the Park. Leave West Yellowstone 7:30 p.- m. Arrive in the morning. • Motor tour to Saltair Beach and Great Salt Lake with time for a swim if desired. Leave in the early afternoon by train. Arrive at noon. Afte-rnoon motor trip to High Mesa, Garden of the Gods, Cathedral Spire Rocks, Soda Springs, Temple Drive, Cave of the Winds, Ute Pass Canyon, Manitou, Pillars of Hercules, and Seven Falls. Motor tour to Pike's Peak. We suggest the tour leaving at 2 a. m., which arrives on the peak at Sunrise. Room and bath provided at HOTEL ' ANTLERS for entire stay.

Aug. 25. COLORADO SPRINGS and DENVER

Morning free for leisure. Leave by train at 12 :20 p. m. Arrive Denver at 2 :30 p. m. Transfer to: HOTEL BROWN PALACE, where room with bath are provided. Afternoon motor tour to Lookout Mountain, Grave of Buffal·o Bill, and Mount Vernon Canyon.

Aug. 26.

Leave in the morning with party from East by motor for Estes Park.

ESTES PARK and CONVENTION


THE PHOENIX The CHALETS will be used for housing the Convention, but board and room are not included in the cost of this itinerary. Aug. 27. CONVENTION Aug. 28. CONVENTION Aug. 29. CONVENTION to DENVER Aug. 31. CHICAGO Sept. 1. NEW YORK

After Convention Closing, leave by motor for Denver. Leave Denver at 8 :20 p. m., by sleeper. Few hours here. Arrive in the afternoon.

COST OF TOUR Tour A-Home Town to Home Town ... ... . .. . . . . ... .. .. .. .. ... . .... $510 Tour B-New York to New York . .. . .. . .. . . .. . .. ... . .... . . . ....... .$485 Tour B-Chicago to Chicago .... . . .. . . . ... . ... ... . . ... . . .. ..... . . . .. $425 Exact quotations will be given from any points. NOTES 1. Cost of Tour does not include meals except as indicated on itinerary. 2. Tour A includes meals and berth on ship at minimum rate. Other rooms at slightly higher rates. 3. All transportation, hotels, and sightseeing provided for entire trip. 4. On Tour A, meals will cost approximately $40, Tour B $60, for entire trip.

View from Glacier Point, Yosemite National Park


THE PHOENIX

c Aug. 14.

NEW YORK

Leave Grand Central 2 p. m. Lower berth or chair provided for entire trip.

Aug. 15. CHICAGO

Arrive in the evening and change to the SANTA FE STATION. Leave by sleeper.

Aug. 17.

Arrive in the morning. Morning motor tour to the High Mesa, Garden of the Gods, Cathedral Spire Rocks, Soda Springs, Cave of the Winds, Ute Pass Canyon, Manitou, Pillars of Hercurles, Seven Fall~. Afternoon or Sunrise trip to Pikes Peak by motor. We suggest the Sunrise trip, leaving at 2 a. m., arriving at the peak at Sunrise. Room and bath at HOTEL ANTLERS.

COLORADO SPRINGS

At the bottom of the Grand Canyon


THE PHOENIX

27

Aug. 18. COLORADO SPRINGS

Leave at 10 :30 a. m.

Aug.19. SALT LAKE CITY

Arrive at 8:15a.m. Motor tour of the city covering all poit;ts of interest in the city and environs. Afternoon motor tour to Saltair Beach and Great Salt Lake, with time for swimming if desired. Leave at 8 :30 p. m. Four and a half days by motor in the Park with room and meals provided in the Lodges. Visit Old Faithful, Grand Canyon, Mammoth Hot Springs, Giant Geyser, Lone Star Geyser, and all other points of interest in the Park Hotel accommodations provided in Cody for one night.

Aug. 20. Aug. 21. Aug. 22. Aug. 23. Aug. 24.

YELLOWSTONE YELLOWSTONE YELLOWSTONE YELLOWSTONE YELLOWSTONE

PARK PARK PARK PARK PARK

Aug. 25.

CODY

Leave Cody at 7 :30 a. m.

Aug.26.

DENVER to ESTES PARK

Arrive 8 :20 a. m. Join party from the East for motor to ESTES PARK.

Aug.26. ESTES PARK (Cont.) ESTES P ARK 路 Aug. 27. ESTES PARK Aug. 28. ESTES PARK

The CHALETS will be used for housing the CONVENTION, but board and room are not included in the cost of this itinerary.

Aug. 29. ESTES PARK to DENVER

After the Convention Closing, leave by motor for Denver. Leave Denver at 8:20 p. m. by sleeper.

Aug. 31. CHICAGO Sept. 1. NEW YORK

Few hours here. Arrive in the afternoon. COST OF TOUR

New York to New York . . ....... . .... . . ... .... . . .. ................. $240 Boston to Boston ..... . .. . . .. ....... . . .. . . .. . . .. .... . ..... .... . . .. .. $245 Philadelphia to Philadelphia . .... .. .. . . ... ... . . . . .... . .. . . . .. ...... . . $238 Chicago to Chicago . . . . .. . .... . .. .. . . .. .. .. . . ... . . . . .. . . . . . . ..... . . . $190 Exact quotations given fr om other points. NOTES 1. Cost of tour does not include meals except as indicated on itinerary. 2. All transportation, hotels and sightseeing pr路ovided for entire trip. 3. Cost of meals will be approximately $25.


THE PHOENIX A SUGGESTED EXTENSION FOR ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA CONVENTION (All Expenses Are Included) Aug.30. ESTES PARK to DENVER

Leave ESTES PARK at 9 a. m. Arrive DENVER at 12 (noon). Leave DENVER at 2 p. m.

Aug. 31.

SALT LAKE CITY

Arrive SALT LAKE at 1 :30 p. m. Sightseeing tour of the city provided. Leave SALT LAKE at 8 :30 p. m.

Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.

WEST YELLOWSTONE Arrive WEST YELLOWSTONE at 7:30a. m. YELLOWSTONE Ih the Park. Accommodations in YELLOWSTONE Log Cabins provided. YELLOWSTONE YELLOWSTONE Sightseeing included.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1

Sept. 6.

CODY

Leave CODY (the exit to Yellowstone) at 7 :30 a. m.

Sept. 7.

DENVER

Arrive DENVER at 7 :25 a. m. Leave for CHICAGO by any line.

Sept. 8: CHICAGO

Arrive.

COST OF POST-CONVENTION TOUR New York to New York ......................... . .. . ....... .. . .. .. . $240 Boston to Boston ......... . .......... ...... ... . ......... . . . ........ . $245 Philadelphia to Philadelphia . . . . .. .. ........ .... .... . ........... . .... $238 Chicago to Chicago .... ... . .. . . . .. ............ . .... . ... ..... ..... . .. $190 Rates from other points will be quoted upon a路pplication.


THE PHOENIX PRE- AND POST-CONVENTION ITINERARIES A number of requests have already come in for Pre- and P ost-Convention itineraries, therefore we have made up several suggestions for consideration. These are routed from the East. However, members in the W estern Chapters may join any tour at a convenient point. Rates will be furnished on request. If you would like a tour either before or after the Convention but do not want any of the routings here given, we shall be glad to make up special itineraries if you will give us brief information on the attached slip. It is important that we know at once how many girls plan to attend the Convention and how many want tours before and after the meeting. Therefore, whether you like one of the trips outlined or prefer a special itinerary, we should like to know at once about it. We request that you fill in the slip attached and return it immediately to :

Mrss CAROL D. PIERCE Allen Tours, Inc. 580 Fifth Ave. New York City

I AM INTERESTED IN-Tour A ....... , Tour B . . . .. . . ,

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Name . .... ... ... . .. . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . .. . .. . .. .. ..... .. . . . . . . . . . . ....... . . . Address . . . : . .. ... .... . ............... . . .. . .. ... . . .... . . . . . .. . .... . .. . . I W ish Rates Quoted From . .. . . .... . ... . . ..... ....... . . . .. . .. . ... . . . . . . Name and Addresses of the Others In My Party-

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THE PHOENIX RETURN SLIP Itineraries and prices, starting and terminating anywhere will gladly be made out. Name .......... .. .. . .. . ....... . .... . . .. .... .. .... . . . .... . ............. . Address .............. . ............................ . . . .. .. .. . .. . . . . .... . Party Consists of . .. . .. .... . ...... . ......... . ............... . ...... . .. . . (Number of Persons)

To Start . ..... . ......... .. . . ......... . .. ... ....... ....... . .. . ...... . .. . (Da te)

From.. .... .. .. . . .... .. . .... . .. . .. .. . . . . .

Number of Days .. . ..... .. . .

(Pla·ce)

PLACES TO BE VISITED Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Days ... . ........· .. ... .

Place. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Place . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Place. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Place. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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ROUTE PREFERRED •••••••••••••

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THE PHOENIX

31

WHY I WOULB LIKE TO GO TO CONVENTION I am . only a pledge and as yet know very little about the Alpha Sigs as a national group. However, I do know that the Rho Rho girls at Marshall are a lovely group and I would like to meet and really know other Alpha Sigs from different schools in other parts of the country. Think of the many girls one would meet and the friendships that would be formed if one went to the National Convention in Colorado. Much could be learned about ASA through prominent lecturers, round table discussions and the like. Consider also, the inspiration and the new ideas to be obtained from other groups, and of the help all this would be to one's own chapter. Of course, there will be teas, receptions, banquets and many other social functions to attend that would interest any girl. Then too, who wouldn't want to travel west, see the remarkable beauties 路of nature, the large cities, other colleges and universities and many other things of interest, especially if they have spent most of their life in West Virginia. . I think, for these reasons, if for no others, that the most ideal vacation any Alpha Sig could have would b~ to attend our National Convention. 路 Hilda O'Dell, PP.

MY IDEA OF THE ASA CONVENTION Everyone has childish dreams and mine were many. Among them was the desire 路to, travel. To travel and see the beautiful scenery, other than our own, to make new acquaintances, to move from my known environment into an entirely different realm, always held some sort of appealing mystery and a deep fascination for me. Interrupting these dreams came my college life and SOO!f I found myself joining a sorority. As I sat in pledge meeting listening to the chapter president telling us of the ASA convention to be held in Colorado, I thought "What a chance for me." A chance to have some of my dreams come true. Beautiful scenery, cities and many new friends and sisters


THE PHOENIX in ASA. How I would like to meet the girls from other chapters in different parts of the United States and learn about their sorority life and colleges. Think of the friendships formed, of the many enjoyable times one might have. To go to the convention, I know would thrill the very heart of any Alpha Sig. Can't you imagine yourself being at a dance in Estes Park, hearing the music, seeing the new scenes and faces and having the most wonderful time that any girl could ever have. One would really get the true convention spirit of companionship and love thus becoming an Alpha Sig in the true sense. Julia Botkin, PP.


THE PHOENIX

33

THEN AND NOW

I

This is the tale of an Alpha Sig who had the good fortune of attending the National Convention two years ago at Boston, and who is going to have the great misfortune of not attending the National Convention this summer at Estes Park. Anyone might say, "Well, you're not the only one who has to stay home." Quite right, but if anyone has had the "taste" of her sorority convention and then has to stay home-ohwhat a price to pay! To tell you all the good times I had at the Boston convention would be well nigh to the impossible-all I can say is that even though I can't go bodily to the Convention this summermy heart will be in Estes Park-1'11 be thinking of our National officers who, just two years ago, so nobly picked up the reins when things looked a little dark for us, and pulled us through with flying colors. I'll be thinking of all the delegates as they meet to discuss the great future of Alpha Sigma Alpha and to raise our sorority to the ranks of the highest and best. "Jimmie" Cockill, KK.

SPRING Spring; why spring? Dull winter's gone away I hear his heavy thud And he is gone. And heralds all in bright array, With teasing wi'nds bring spring. Snow runs away in fright, And grass peeps out. The fragrant air Blows apple blossoms pink In happy rythmn. The warm rain comes And chilly memories Are washed awayFor to my soul The morning sun Brings Spring. M. W. K urtz, ,30~

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THE PHOENIX

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Mother Patroness Convention Will Have a Special Welcome for You Business and pleasure will be combined dur, ing convention week.

We hope you will join us at

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August 26 to 29 1932

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M~il Reservations before July first

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THE PHOENIX

35

LOS ANGELES, THE OLYMPIC CITY The Games of the Tenth Olympiad will open in the Los Angeles Coliseum, newly christened "Olympic Stadium," on Saturday, July 30, 1932, and will continue for sixteen days and nights, closing the afternoon of August 14路 f During the time the Games are in progress, ~ore than one hundred and thirty-five distinct programs of competition from fifteen branches of sports will be held in nine different stadiums, auditoriums, and water courses. All track and field events will be held at Olympic Auditorium, which has a seating capacity of 125,000 persons. Olympic Auditorium, with a seating capacity of w,ooo, will be the scene of boxing, wrestling, and weight-lifting events. World-famous men and women athletes will occupy the limelight in the swimming, diving, and water polo events to be held in the new Los Angeles Swimming Stadium. Rowing events will be held on one of the finest courses in the world, that of the Olympic Rowing Stadium, situated on a quiet arm of Alamitos Bay, at Long Beach, only forty miles from Los Angeles. Track Cycling will be held at the world-famous Rose Bowl at Pasadena, home of the Tournament of Roses. Yatching will be held over a selected course at Los Angeles Harbor. Fine Arts competitions will be held in the Los Angeles County Museum, and each country will present its best living talent in competition along lines of architecture, music, painting, and sculpture. A Village of All Nations is being built for the entertainment and comfort of the athletes. It consists of one thousand or more tidy, two-roorri houses, where the athletes will eat, sleep, enterta,n, and be entertained in a moderate way in strict conformance with their training rules. The prevailing architecture of each nation is represented; the Pueblo, the English, the Norman, the Mexican, etc. Los Angeles, the Olympic City of 1932, is centrally located with reference to the rest of the world and offers varied vacation attractions. This all year 'round playground, only two and a half days from most of America, brims full of sunshine, health, vigor, and new ideas. From its mountains to its ocean it offers every possible diversion and has provided every facility Rubye Bellmard 33 Ex-collegia. for hospitality. 1


THE PHOENIX ==~~~~~~~~~~~==

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THE CONVENTION COMMITTEE When the National Council officially appointed Mary Wagner, Kappa Kappa Chapter, as Convention Manager they empowered her to select as Committee Chairmen the members who could contribute me ~t to making convention mean much to Alpha Sig Jas everywhere. The following persons were chosen to fill those requirements and it is to them, and their assistants, that the success of the 1932 Con路;ention will be due.

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AWARDS-DoRIS FEELEY, Rho Rho, 2547 Third Ave., Huntington, W.Va. BANQUET-PoLLY ScHLOSSER, Beta Beta, 1126 Josephine, Denver, Colo. CHAPTER EXHIBITS-GRAcE FuLTZ HAWORTH, Delta Delta, 2411 Barrington Drive, Toledo, Ohio. HOSPITALITY-MINNIE SHoCKLEY, Gamma Gamma, Alva, Okla. MUSIC-HELEN HARvAT, Beta Beta, 1050 Sherman, Apt. 214, Denver, Colo. PUBLICITY-JuLIA LANCASTER, Theta Theta, 7 Spring St., Amherst, Mass. RECREATION-LEONA WrLcox, Iota Iota, 1916 44th St., Des Moines, Iowa. REGISTRATION-EVELYN BELL, Pi Pi, 8 E. Depew, Buffalo, N.Y. RITUAL-LoUisE STEWART, Upsilon Upsilon, 1330 Blue Ave., Zanesville, Ohio. 路 TRANSPORTATION- CARoL PIERCE, Gamma Gamma, 58o Fifth Ave., N.Y. ( o/o Allen Tours Inc.).

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These chairmen wiiJ be glad to answer any questions pertaining to their work. Matters of ge nera l intereest may be addressed to Mary A. Wagner, 206 Bloomington, Iowa City, Iowa .

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THE PHOENIX

37

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CONVENTION PROGRAM Friday, August 26th 12:30 1:30 2:30 3:oo 6:30 8: oo

Arrival and Hotel Registration Luncheon Presentation of Credentials Opening Session Dinner Informal Reception

Saturday, August 27th 9:oo 12:30 2:oo 6:oo

Business Session Luncheon Business Session Outdoor Steak Fry and Song Fest

Sunday, August 28th 6:oo 8 :oo 9:30 12:30 2:oo 6:30 8:30

Sunrise Pledging Service Breakfast Round Tables Luncheon Walks, Riding, Park Excursions Dinner (Musical Program) Model Initiation Ceremony

Monday, August 29th 9:00 12:30 2:oo s :oo

Business Session Luncheon ' Business Session Installation of Officers 7=30 Formal Banquet

Tuesday, August 3oth 7:30 Farewell Breakfast 路9:oo Bus leaves for Denver Th is progra m is te nta t ive. It is subj ect to minor ch ange s that w ill ma ke it b est suited to the del egates prese nt. Events w ithin the sessions above wi ll be pl a nned t o fi t the current n eeds of convention .

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THE PHOENIX

BETA BETA TELLS ABOUT CONVENTION TRIPS When you are planning this summer ' vacation, why not plan to spend the summer in Estes Park? Even if you come only a week early or plan to stay a week after convention, you could see many of the beauties for which Colorado is so famous. If you like thrilling automobile rides, why not cross the Continental Divide by way of Fall River Pass and then spend a day of two at Grand Lake. This lake, headwaters of the Colorado River, is the scene of many yacht races every year. The drive to Grand Lake and return may even be made in one day. Do you like to ride horseback? There are beautiful trails through the pines to many interesting places. But if you prefer to hike, there are plenty of places to which one may hike, and there are certainly enough mountains to climb. If you like to climb mountains very, very much, you might even try to climb Longs Peak. Just remember, girls, to bring mountain clothes as there will be plenty of activities in which they will be needed. A few of the necessities will be hiking trousers, boots, and warm sweaters. Marian Behrens.

DEPARTURE When joy was most it hurt me, And now that it is gone, The pain that it brought with it Still seems to linger on. But even pain is precious, I'll cherish it today For soon it will 'not matter What you do or think or say. Dorothy Marley,

II II.


THE PHOENIX

39

CONVENTION ALBUM

Alpha Alpha Frances Heuer, known to us all as Fran, is our delegate to the National Convention. She is a sophomore in the School of Education and is majoring in Mathematics. Although she does excellent work in Math she has recently received distinction in French, having been elected to Beta Pi Theta, French honorary fraternity. Fran is now president of Alpha Alpha, having acted in this capacity since semesters. She served as vice-president the first semester. Although she makes very good grades she does not spend all of her time with her books, for she has many friends and has entered into many activities on the campus. We are all very proud to say that she was our representative in Cwen last year. She enj_oys working with other girls, and was very active in directing Freshmen Y. W. C. A. work this fall. She has many grand ideas for the convention, and we know that she will be very responsible, and we know that she will be able to bring some real ideas back to us.

Miriam Hershey was chosen as alternate delegate for Alpha Alpha. Mims is a junior in. the School of Education and is majoring in art. She is a very jolly girl and one that you like to have around. She has a very sweet voice, and is a member of Madrigal, the campus glee club.


THE PHOENIX CONVENTION ALBUM

Alpha Beta Alpha Beta's delegate to the convention this year is to be Nadine Bondurant. We are proud that she will represent us, not only because she is to be our president next year, but also because she is one of the most generally liked girls in路 the chapter. She is a junior in K. S. T. C., majoring in social science. She is a member of Alpha Phi Sigma, the junior college honorary organization. Besides her other extracurricular activities, she has been president of the girls' pep squad and sorority treasurer for the past year. For these and many other reasons, we are glad to know that representatives of other chapters will meet Nadine as Alpha Beta's delegate.

Juanita Jacobs is Alpha Beta's alternate delegate.


THE PHOENIX CONVENTION ALBUM

Alpha Gamma Alpha Gamma's alternate to.\the ASA convention is LaRue Graden. Although this is only LaRue'~' .second year in Alpha Gamma Chapter, she has already made an enviable reputation for herself. She has been elected vice-president for next year, and has been a most efficient chairman of the Social Service Committee for the past year. LaRue has a charming personality. She is a Sophomore in the Secondary Education Department, majoring in Geography and Social Studies. During her two years in school she has made many friends. She is about five feet five inches tall, has red-brown hair, and sparkling brown eyes. She is always well poised and has a certain dignity, but with plenty of pep and vivacity. One can always expect to have a good time when LaRue is around. Alta L. Welch.

Alta Welch, Delegate


, THE PHOENIX CONVENTION ALBUM

路 Beta Beta

Jean Nicholson, Delegate

Marian Behrens, Alternate


THE PHOENIX

43

CONVENTION ALBUM

Gamma Gamma We have chosen for our convention delegate our loyal president, Thelma Karrle. We chose her because. Thelma has worked so hard in making our chapter so much of a success this year. Thelma is a decided brunette and willing to help everybody she can. She especially delights in picking up girls for Sorority meetings. Thelma is a Senior in college, getting her B.S. degree. She has chosen for her major, Commerce Gnd Economics. In the mornings, Thelma works in the A. H. S. School office and goes to school in the afternoon. So you can see how very busy she is and what a delightful trip we wish her to Estes Park this summer. For our Alternate or Substitute we selected our treasurer, Vera Leeper. She al~o has worked especially hard in keeping ASA up to minute in her debts. Vera is the decided "redhaired" girl in our sorority. Besides Vera everyone else is a brunette, so naturally we think lots of our Vera. Vera is also receiving her B.S. degree this Spring in Commerce. She is teaching inN. W. S. T. C. Commercial courses this winter and expects to teach a full course during summer school. We are planning on many other girls also attending this delightful convention-so here's wishing you lots of luck until Convention time. Frieda Shirley.


44

THE PHOENIX

路 CONVENTION ALBUM

Delta Delta Delta Delta always selects the person capable of his task, and this year she has elected Martha Kaiser to represent her at the convention. Martha has won favor by her diligent work, not only in the sorority but in other organizations on the campus as well. She is a Junior in college, is on the Sub-Cabinet of Y. W. C. A., and was elected president of the sorority for next year. She stands out in a crowd for two reasons: the first is height and the second personality. Her poise is that of dignity but she is always willing to participate in the fun the girls are having. Martha is an all-around capable girl, for she can do anything from cooking to painting. She is majoring in Home Economics but loves 路 to draw and paint and spends her leisure time doing so. Oh yes, Martha talks also. She was one of our girls that helped win the cup this year for debating. We feel sure she is the girl that can be depended upon to well represent the chapter.


THE PHOENIX

45

CONVENTION ALBUM

Epsilon Epsilon Epsilon Epsilon girls have chosen Celia O'Connor of Chapman, Kansas, to represent them at convention in Estes Park. She is a Junior, and is majoring in Primary-Kindergarten work. The two years she has attended K. S. T. C. she has been on the college Honor Roll, and is also prominent at Various campus activities, including the Gilson Players, a dramatic organization, and the Rhythmic Circle dancing group. Celia has a charming personality and has a host of friends. She wins everyone with her pep, smile, and ready "Irish wit." Carlene Gufler is the alternate delegate of Epsilon Epsilan chapter. She is our President this year and deserves much credit for her work in the chapter. She is a Junior and is majoring in Commerce. Xi Phi, leadership fraternity, recently elected her to its membership. Carlene has the requirements of a tru,e convention delegate. She is charming and . gracious m manner, full of poise and dignity.


THE PHOENIX CONVENTION ALBUM

Zeta Zeta Zeta Zeta chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha is to be repre~ sented at the Convention by Alice Broyles, of Odessa, Mis~ souri. Alice is a junior in col~ lege, and she has been actively associated with Alpha Sigma Alpha for two years. We want Zeta Zeta to know its sister chapters, and, in turn, we want them to know us. We feel that Alice will be a charm~ ing and attractive representa~ tive of our chapter. She is a little brunette with plenty of pep, and personality plus. Kathryn Van Meter, also of Odessa, Missouri, has been chos~ en by Zeta Zeta chapter as alternate to the Alpha Sigma Alpha Convention. Kathryn is a lovely blonde, and a girl whom you will en~ joy knowing. She has worked hard to put our sorority on the map of Central Missouri State Teachers College, and her ef~ forts have not been in vain. We feel that both our delegate and alternate a r e representatives who will bring us closer to our sister chapters. Doris E. Johnson.


THE PHOENIX

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CONVENTION ALBUM

Theta Theta Should you run across a chubby little brown-eyed maiden with the rosiest cheeks and the most perfect of Boston accents you must feel at liberty to rush forward and say, "Well this must be Emily Hall, President of Theta Theta chapter of Boston University." 路 She will feel relieved that you made the advance for Our Emily besides being one of the sweetest, most magnanimous girls in the world is a modest little violet. Having once met Emily just stick around and you'll find her one of the best little sports. Just ask her to go for a swim and you'll see she's not only in perfect form (in her suit) but is as aquatic as a .duck. You can count on Emily for bridge and does she like to dance? At the University Emily is classed as a Senior for next year. Biology is her major subject. She is a very busy girl, being assistant "Hub" Editor for the School of Education and much in demand on numerous school committees. I'll let you in on a secret-when Emily is asked, ' ~What do you love most?" She tosses her head and with a very knowing gleam in her eyes replies, "Dogs and cats." But I can prove that she does not dislike the boys. Evelyn Brooks.


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Iota Iota Leona Gabrielson, of Dayton, Iowa, is our newly elected President and official delegate to Convention. She is tall, blonde, and beautiful, and will graduate in 1933 from the Fine Arts college where she studies music. She has been both Chapter Secretary and Treasurer and lives at the house. And she was recently elected Historian of Mu Phi Epsilon, national honorary music fraternity. Harriet Larsen, of Council Bluffs will be "alternate" but plans to attend anyway. She is a linguist, since she studies both Frenth and Spanish, not to mention English. She lives at the new Women's Dormitory, and has the honor of being a member of the governing council. She plays golf and tennis, and has travelled almost anywhere you could name. From the ex-collegio chapter, Edith Burr is being sent. Edith is a physical education teacher in the Des Moines schools, and is one of the "reasons why" a party is a success. Her hair, which is long and braided around her head, is her distinguishing feature. And of cou.rse, our own Mrs. Barr, mother adviser, will attend. She is the wife of Dean W. F. Barr, dean of the college of education, and she always is planning for our comfort and success.


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CONVENTION ALBUM

Omicron Omicron To all active and alumna: chapters of Alpha Sigma Alpha, Omicron Omicron chapter wishes to introduce Miss . Betty Anderson, newly elected president of our chapter, most beautiful woman student of Kent State College, and the Omicron Omicron representative to the national convention of Alpha 5igma Alpha. Miss .Anderson, accompanied by Miss Ada Hyatt, advisor of our chapter, expects to attend the convention this summer, and is looking fot ward with much pleasure and anticipation .to meeting all the other chapter representatives. She is a student, a good sport, and a lot of fun ; capable and reliable. Although very popular and therefore busy with many campus affairs, she always has time to attend every sorority meeting and fulfill to her best ability the office of treasurer of our chapter. We all like and enjoy Miss Anderson very much. We know that you will too.


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CONVENTION ALBUM

Pi Pi Vim, vigor and vitality! That, in brief, is Vernabelle "Benny" Bartlett, Pi Pi's new prexy and convention delegate. She may be small, but Benny has a string of activities and achievements that would make even Eddie Cantor hang his head in shame. Benny's sense of humor, her liveliness, personality and efficiency have carried her through the offices of vice-president of the freshman class and president of the sophomore group. In addition she is an active member of the dramatic club, a member of the school basketball team, and for the past year Pi Pi's efficient registrar. Convention goers will find in Benny an interested, loyal and personable Alpha Sig.

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CONVENTION ALBUM

Sigma Sigma Audre Peck, Sigma Sigma's President-elect, has been selected as delegate to the National Convention at Estes Park. Audre is a Junior, a Home Economics major, and is Recording Secretary for Sigma Sigma chapter this year. A very popular girl on Western's campus, it is no wonder that she receives as many honors as she does-and you should see her act, she really is a marvelous actress. She is a sweet, peppy, slender, all-most blonde girl with a charming personality. 路 Another nice thing about Audre is her intelligence, I don't believe she has ever even considered "flunking" a course. Ellen Trevarthen ("Doods" we all call her) was chosen alternate delegate, though I'm certain I don't see how "Doods" could ever reach Estes Park without Audre, or vice-versa, they are such close friends. "Doods" is a Junior, a Music major, Alumna:: Secretary for this year, and our Vice-President-elect for next year. Everyone likes "Doods"; she's clever, 路 mischievous, tall, slender, and has a rather dark complexion.


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CONVENTION ALBUM

Tau Tau

Shirley Baird Tau Tau Convention Delegate

Miss Mary May Paul Tau Tau Faculty Adviser


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CONVENTION ALBUM

Kappa Kappa Who would we send to convention? Why, no one else but our beloved Mildred Cramer, Kappa Kappa's newly elected president for next year. Mildred's calm, sweet personality is a ballast for our chapter, yet you would be surprised how light-hearted and gay she usually is. She has a very tantalizing and contagious laugh which keeps us all in good spirits. Mildred is taking Home Economics and is going to make an extremely capable teacher, but I fear her children will not be able to enjoy her for very long, for Mildred is not planning to 路 teach for many years. But in teaching or homemaking she'll be a success, for her smile and her angel food cakes will carry her many a mile. 'Mildred attended the convention held in Boston two years ago and from her reports she must have had a simply marvelous time. Now that she knows the ropes, we're certain she'll come back overflowing with suggestions to boost our chapter. And anything she says goes, for we all trust her implicitly. Betty Schlice, Kappa Kappa's alternate delegate to the Convention, is the kind of girl who starts with a murmur and ends with a bang! Very quietly she goes about Temple University and the Alpha Sig house, but there are none who do not feel her presence and everyone. misses her when she is not there. It has gotten to be a maxim at Kappa Kappa that if you want something done well and promptly, get Betty to do it. Surely enough, Betty will do it, not only well, but gladly and willingly. Now as to her credentials, she is a Junior in Teachers' College, major in English, and is at present the newly elected Vice-President of our chapter.


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A GIRL'S EYE VIEW OF ESTES PARK Did you ever have a perfectly impossible job assigned to you! Of course you have, and somehow you wangled out of it, or waded through it. Well, extend sympathies to a sister in distress. My assignment is to tell you of the Alpha Sigma Alpha what there is to see and do in and about Denver-in 500 路 words. With so,ooo, I might begin to give you a girl's eyeview of Colorado, but with only soo, let's just make it a preface. You're going to Estes Park for your convention! Well, I hope and pray that you'll be able to keep your mind on your work when you're in session, for Estes Park and all it contains in those encircling hills is better than a three-ring circus. If I were doing it, I would wear my riding clothes to meeting, and be ready between acts to dash out, mount a horse, and gallop oft on any one of the hundreds of gorgeous trails that lead on up into tree-clad canyons and snow-spattered mountain crests. There's Lily Mountain, Deer Trail Park, Wind River, Flat Top, Gem Lake, Twin Sisters, Black Canyon, Chasm Lake, et cetera, et cetera. And don't let that word "gallop" scare you in case you haven't been on a horse since you gave up your Shetland. These deep Western saddles have a good horn to hang onto if you're scared, and there's generally a handsome dude wrangler around to look after your interests. In case you're a golf qddict, bring along the clubs. It may be a bit difficult to keep your eye on the ball, with the "Snowy Range" in competition, but you'll have a chance to try it on the .18-hole course in Estes Park. And while we're on the subject of golf, Denver has some wonderful courses. Then, too, up at Evergreen in the Denver Mountain Parks there's a course that appeals to those who think as much of an esthetic background as they do of their score. When the gavel sounds for the last time and convention sessions are a thing of the past, what are you going to do then? It may be路 you'll want to stay right on at the Estes Park Chalet in Estes Park and do as many of those horseback and motor trails as you can. Maybe you'll want to climb Longs Peak; 14,255 feet high! And without a doubt you'll explore at least


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a part o拢 the 378 square miles of the front range of the Rockies 'which makes up Rocky Mountain National Park, to which Estes Park is the eastern entrance. The 240-mile Circle Tour takes路 you tl)rough the Park, and you're about a third of the way around the Circle when you get to Estes Park from Denver through that spectacular gorge, Big Thompson Canyon. Don't miss the other two-thirds. With its I4 peaks over 13,ooo


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feet and 56 over ro,ooo feet, Rocky Mountain National Park is very good for any slight inclination toward a double chin. You'll have your chin up all the time trying to spot a band of big horned mountain sheep precarious! y perched on some high peak. That's where they like to hide out, but sometimes they do come down to the roadway to satisfy their insatiable curiosity concerning Park visitors. . Much of the country through which you pass on the Circle Tour abounds in reminiscences of the mining days of '59路 Pia, neering days have gone, yet you can see unchanged many of the sights which thrilled the pioneers who conquered these mighty Rockies, and widened the trails first broken by the Indians. Then when you get back to Denver, your sight-seeing begins anew. There are 6o planned trips out of Denver. Pay your money and take your choice! Right here let me ask you a question. Do you like parks? 0, I don't mean the city kind with grass, benches, trees and flowers! I mean the Denver kind. When it comes to parks, Denver is different. There isn't a city in the world that has parks comparable to Denver's Municipal Mountain Parks-forty-four of them in all-and all of them a mile or more above sea level. The parks begin with the city parks at an elevation of a mile or more above sea level. They continue, rising to majestic heights in the Mt. Evans, Echo Lake and Summit Lake region, 55 miles from Denver. The trip to Mt. Evans, the great peak that stands 14,259 feet above sea level, is over the highest, scenic mountain drive in North America. It traverses a part of the Denver Mountain Parks with their ro,240 acres of peaks, streams, forests, and canyons. There's enough to keep you busy for several summers right in these mountain parks, to say nothing of running down to the Colorado Springs territory which is only 75 miles from Denver! And don't for a minute think you're going to develop a case of ennui from an overdose of scenery. There's plenty to do as well as see! Along with your golf clubs and riding clothes tuck in your favorite fishing tackle, hip boots, hiking boots, swimming suit, paint brushes, or whatever it is you need for a good time.


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CONVENTION Wouldn't it be wonderful if our big sorority family could be all together next August? However, for numerous reasons it is impossible for each of us to attend and therefore it is necessary to choose a delegate. I wonder if we realize the big responsibility that our delegate carries with her both the convention and then back to the girls. There are all of the chapter questions and problems which we wish her to find answers for us. Then, there are all the thoughts, ideas, enthusiasms, plans from each chapter present which are to be brought back to her own chapter. The chapter's convention delegate is one way in . which the stay-at-home may share the convention. Beth Harkness.

Suggestions for Round Table Discussion The Organization of Ex-Collegio chapters. How to become Convention minded. Life Membership-what it means. Louie Platts Freeman.

QUALITIES OF A DELEGATE The Convention is a meeting of representative Alpha Sigma Alphas. Each chapter wants its group well represented, so they selece accordingly. The delegate should be friendly and congenial to all. She is one who is vitally interested in Sorority problems. She is a girl with Personality spelled with capital letters. She has culture, being a leader in scholastic affairs as well as Sorority affairs. Our delegate portrays a remarkable character, one who is independent, but a pal to her sorority sisters. The girl is desirable who is able to adapt herself in various positions with poise and charm. The delegate not only brings new ideas and aspirations to those she meets, but brings to her home chapter a new enthusiasm and zeal. She returns with new plans and programs and instills them into her own chapter. The Convention delegate is one who represents fully the ideals of womanhood which in turn are those of Alpha Sigma Alpha. Velma Jordan, II.


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TOPICS FOR ROUND TABLE DISCUSSION What can we do to make Alpha Sigma Alpha a powerful factor in the life of our college and our community? Doesn't every chapter face that question at some time during the year? Why not get together at the Convention and discuss the most successful ways and means of putting Alpha Sigma Alpha in her rightful place-at the top. Just think, one suggestion from each chapter wopld give us twenty-six possibilities for improvement! Heigh-ho, you rush captains, can't we talk it over? Do you ever feel that you are at your wits end and just can't think of any new ideas for a party? Misery loves company, so 'tis said, so why not forgenhe parties you can't plan and list all of the ones that have been a success and pass the good news along? Don't you think it would be interesting to discuss the different rules for rushing carried out at each particulat; school. We're all just one big family of "in-laws" and our chief concern is in out-lawing everything that keeps us from developing to our fullest capacity. Someone has said that there is nothing new under the sun, but surely there are new ways of carrying out old ideas. For instance, what new suggestions can you offer for swelling a convention fund, or a furniture fund. Some of the good old stand-bys are paper drives, rummage sales, benefit bridge parties. Does anyone have any thing to offer that could be Classed as a good new stand-by? . In our spare ( ?) moments let's be thinking about suitable programs for our educational meetings. We don't want Alpha Sigma Alpha: to neglect the intellectual goal she has established, do we? Let's strive to make our educational program as vital to ourselves and others as our social program is. After such an exchange of ideas and suggestions from so many sources, each chapter in Alpha Sigma Alpha should be able to attain within a few years many of the things for which she has been aspiring and seeking. Maybe all of the suggestions won't work the wonders of Aladdin's lamp, but with all of us working together for the good of Alpha Sigma Alpha we can't fail. 0. K. Convention at Estes Park!! Here's wishFaye Lee, II. ing you success!!


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COME BACK TO SCHOOL It is only a few weeks until the end of the present school year. A few weeks more of joy and effort will bring to a close for many of you your college days. Your course will be completed. The goal you set out some years ago to attain will have been achieved. Your efforts will have been crowned with success. You will leave the campus of your Alma Mater with mingled joy and regret,-joy that the work has been completed, and the aim has been attained, that success has been achieved, and that your college days have brought you richer experiences than you had even dared hope might be yours. There will be a regret also as you realize that these happy days with their choice associations have come to a close, that those who have been so closely associated with you in classrooms, dormitories, and campus activities must scatter and never again will you be the same joyous group you have been. You will see numerous ways in which you will feel you could have made these years better but on the whole there will be much more of joy than sadness in your recollections. For many more of you, however, this will mean just the end of another school year. Your course will not yet be completed. The objectives you set out to attain will not have been reached. You have been succeeding but the goal is not yet. The year has passed successfully but more remains to be done. It is to you who will be completing the first year of a two year curriculum or the first or second year of a three year curriculum or the first, second, or third year of a four year curriculum that I wish to issue a call. Come back to school! This has been a hard year. Throughout it we have been seemingly sinking deeper and deeper into what the world calls an economic depression. While each month the prophets of optimism have declared prosperity just around the corner, the bottom reached, the turn made, the flight upward begun, yet for most of us a dollar has remained as hard if not harder to get, and the future is by no means rosy. FactOr-ies have remained closed, unemployment has increased, wages of those employed have been reduced, family reserves have been dwin-


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路 dling, banks have failed or refused to permit withdrawals except in small sums at infrequent intervals, dividends have not been paid by many corporations. All of these things have resulted in lowered incomes, poorer financial circumstances in the homes, and has lessened the resources of our students. It has been a hard year but I repeat, Come back to school! Some of our members who last June stood where you will stand next June did not return this year. They did not find the way to meet the expenses necessary for their return. You who were more fortunate than they, (though in many cases this was not greater fortune路 but greater determination and willingness to sacrifice) you did return and have stayed throughout the year. This perhaps meant a party gown less than you ordinarily would have had, a longer wearing of shoes and hats and school clothes, and less money for incidentals. Perhaps you have refused some social engagements because you thought the old gown would not do. Sometimes this has been foolish pride which ought not to have interfered with your happiness. All of us like pretty clothes and each girl owes it to herself and to those about her to look as well groomed and attractive as possible but your education, both intellectual and social, is worth more than foolish pride. "Not what is worn but who wears it" is most significant to people of true worth so whatever may have been the restrictions on your wardrobe during the past year, do not let that interfere in the future but-Come back to school! Some of you borrow money this last year until you feel that you are about as deep in debt as you dare to go. Some of you worked many hours earning your board or 'room or both. Many of you saved money here and there where nobody knew anything about it. This practice of economy or thrift may have been inconvenient but it was not a real hardship unless your intensive hours of work or your economy on food had resulted in ill health or a lowering of the quality of your work. Health should be carefully safeguarded at all times. It is all too easily lost, and is regained with great diffic~lty. High Scholarship standards must be maintained for your own pride of achievement and for what they represent to others. Economies or privations, however, which do not affect health and


THE PHOENIX scholarship are of no practical significance. So again I sayCome back to school! Some of you perhaps, at the suggestion of a kind hearted but unwise superintendent, are considering teaching next year on the minimum requirements for a certificate, though your college course has not been completed. Let me ask you to consider two facts most carefully before you reach an unwise decision. First, I am sure .you will readily admit that each child has a right to a fully qualified teacher. That there are many unqualified teachers now in our schools is to be admitted with regret, but there will be next summer more than enough fully qualified teachers to take up all the vacancies caused by resignations and normal transfer. There will be no necessity for any board of education to hire an unqualified teacher because there will be plenty of qualified ones available. If some board, through a mistaken notion of ki~dness to you should employ you to teach next year; two injustices would be done. A qualified teacher would not be placed and the children would have a teacher who is only partly trained. From the standpoint of the children it is exceedingly unfortunate that in most of our states laws which were passed in times of scarcity of trained teachers still permit those with very meager training to secure a teaching certificate. I hope that none of you will lend yourselves to bring this injustice upon the children in any community. Come back to school! The second point I wish to present is the fact that you are doing an injustice to yourself in attempting so important an undertaking as teaching with only partial preparation. You have had some courses in psychology and methods and perhaps some in professionalized subject matter but almost without ex~eption you will not have had practice teaching which is the most significant of all the courses in the training of a teacher. It will be in your practice teaching that you will develop the skills and techniques of a good teacher and your critic will carefully safeguard you from forming habits which are incorrect and ineffective. If you undertake to do your first teaching with partial training, in the kind of school which ordinarily employs inexperienced teachers, you will have practically no supervision and consequently no safeguard against the -formation of incorrect habits. Your chance of becoming a truly


THE PHOENIX expert teacher is greatly jeopardized since when you return for the completion of your training you will not only have correct skills and habits to form but also incorrect ones to break down and eliminate. Therefore, from a very personal standpoint you should finish your training before you attempt the very im~ portant work of teaching. In other words-Come back to 路 school! I recognize that for some of you this will mean the exer~ cising of the l.ltmost ingenuity in finding ways to finance your~ self. It may look simply impossible. Your father and mother have done all that they can. A younger sister is graduating from high school and deserves her opportunity. I know all the arguments. I have heard them over and over again and yet I am not convinced that coming back next year is an im~ possibility for either one of you. Thirty years ago I heard a commencement speaker say, "The price of an education in this, the beginning of the twentieth century, is the desire for it." There was a financial depression then and the words are as true or truer today than they were a generation ago. A real genuine desire which means determination to exhaust every possibility before admitting defeat will find the way in prac~ tically every case. Many of us do not desire to finish this course as greatly as we should. We do not see it as an absolute essen~ tial in our scheme of life. It is a pleasant thing, a desirable 路thing, a thing which we would like to have if it does not mean too much effort or sacrifice but we do not desire it with a burn~ ing intensity which will not brook denial. One of our boys of this year, after carefully figuring, decided he must have sixty dollars in order to return for the second semester. He went home to look for it and when he returned, someone said to him, "So you found someone who would lend you sixty dollars?" The reply was, "No, but I found two who would lend me ten dollars each, four who would lend me five dollars each, and enough others who would lend me smaller amounts until I secured the sixty dollars and I am back." That is the spirit w~ich I want you to have ~ext summer and the coming year. Make your return and completion of your college course the sin'e qua non of your existence. Impress upon everyone that this just must be true and that you .are willing to do any~ thing honorable to bring it to pass. Let it be your morning


THE PHOENIX and your evening prayer but keep your days full of initiative and effort. Come back to school! E. J. AsHBAUGH, Dean, School of Education, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio.

THE AMERICAN SCHOLAR Phi Beta Kappa, the college honor society, parent of all Greek-letter societies, founded in 1776 at the College of William and Mary in Virginia and now having chapters in one hundred and twenty-six American colleges and a living membership of over 63,ooo, announces the appearance in January, 1932, of a new quarterly, The American Scholar. This periodical is designed not only for members of Phi Beta Kappa but for all who have general scholarly interests. It will be a non-technical journal of intellectual life. Among its objectives are listed the following: The promotion in America of liberal scholarship. A medium for scholars and all persons who are interested in intellectual pursuits, higher learning, and the cultural development of America. A synthesis of the arts and sciences essential to liberal education and a guiding philosophy of life. An esprit de corps 'among the educated. The scholar's responsibility for major social tendencies. A whole diet for the whole mind. The contents are described as including articles scholarly but nontechnical by eminent leaders of thought and action at home and abroad; introducing creative minds to the intellectual world; carefully selected from the work of young scholars, even undergraduates; and interpreting literature to non-critics, physics to non-physicists, and economics to non-economics, for example; and education, art, philosophy, and religion not merely to the professionally interested but to the intellectual generally. 路 The American Scholar will consist of at least 128 seven by ten inch pages, about 100 of which will be general articles and poems in twelve point old style Caslon type. This will be fol-


THE PHOENIX lowed by about twenty-five pages of double column ten point for items of news from the realm of scholarship. The quarterly will be printed by The Scribner Press, edited in the offices of The United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa, 145 West 55th Street, New York, and distributed at two dollars a year. The Editor is William Allison Shimer, Ph.D., formerly a professor of philosophy at the Ohio State University: the Consulting Editor, Clark Sutherland¡Northup, professor of English at Cornell University; and the Editorial Board consists of Ada Louise Comstock, John Erskine, John Huston Finley, Christian Gauss, Will David Howe, Adam Leroy Jones, William Allan Neilson, Harry Allen Overstreet, J. Herman Randall, Jr., and Frederick J. E. Woodbridge. This journal is a distinct contribution to the intellectual life of America. Every person interested in the American college and the finer elements of American civilization should read The American Scholar.

â&#x20AC;˘ COLLEGE Webster defines college as a society of men possessing cer,tain powers and rights, and engaged in some common pursuit, especially literary studies. To me, college is more than that. It is true that college students are in pursuit of knowledge in regard to 'many different subjects but that is not all that is gain~d while at college. After the first few weeks of college life, when you are but a freshman, you learn to take a different and broader view of the things that happen around you every day. You become interested in things that bored you before. In fact a different , view of life is taken. Some of the best friendships are started while in college. Every day you meet new people and they are usually different from anyone you ever knew before. To me, my college days, will be a golden memory because of the things college has done for me. I am glad I was allowed the privilege of going to college and I think it is one thing which parents should never deny their children. Dorothy Hull} II.


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WHAT. COLLEGE MEANS TO ME Night football! There's something rather thrilling in the very name. Close your eyes and pic~ure a stadium bright as daylight with huge arc lights throwing off their glare. Picture a riotous crowd of yelling, cheering students. The players take their positions. One figure grabs the ball and, twisting, and dodging, he starts for the goal line. He crosses the forty yard line, the thirty yard line, the twenty yard line. By this time the crowd has turned to a wild mass of demons, crying for that familiar term of the gridiron, "a touchdown!" The runner is gaining the final line; he's gotten there! No, he's been tackled and brought back. The referee places the ball but a few feet from the line. The ball flashes from the hands of the center to a field player, and he's over the line for a touchdown! The place kick is won, and the game goes on.

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he rotunda at school is by far the most popular "hangout" on the campus. I remember the first time I ever stood in the rotunda and watched the people as they passed by me. One girl entered the door, and looked around as if expecting to meet some one. 路 She was not disappointed. There came a sharp whistle from above, and she looked up to see a masculine figure draped over the balcony. After a few minutes of wordless signals he disappeared, only to reappear in the rotunda beside the girl. They walked off to class arm-in-arm. Over in one corner there appeared to be a meeting of theY. M. C. A., but I learned later that it was only a group of fraternity boys. I felt sorry for one girl whom I saw walking around. She must have been a freshman, for she wore the most disconsolate look upon her face that I have ever seen. She glanced at her watch a great deal, as if she were going to miss an important engagement. She walked out of the rotunda at last, with a manner that was a pitiful imitation of a senior's nonchalance.路 I soon grew tired of this pastime, and walked away. Rain always makes me homesick. I can only sit here at my desk, look out into the darkening afternoon with its gray, dreary, dismal, rainy-look, and wish I were home. Mother


THE PHOENIX is probably getting supper ready, while Father sits in his ' Morris chair reading a newspaper and smoking his Meerschaum.--The rain has stopped, and I must finish that theme that I was writing.

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It was a perfect night. The moonlight was so white that it was almost ghostly. It was a thriiling night, and I was thrilled! This was to be my first, mid-night serenade. All the girls in the house were huddled together in the big bay window, waiting and watching. Several cars drove up in front of the house, and the boys started to unload. They had an orchestra too. In just a few minutes I heard "My Sorority Sweetheart" and "Betty Co-ed" sung as only college boys affected by the moonlight and a window full of girls could sing it.

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What college means to me. Is there any definite way to answer such a question? It means so many different things, like those I have mentioned above, and too, the scholastic development that I must have. Interwoven with this study is the feeling of attainment. While I am in college I want to feel that I have gained intellectual, social and spiritual power in the fullest measure. M ary Gene p ey, EE .

THE MOON The moon in all his splendor lies In peaceful, tranquil summer skies. He keepeth watch o'er all below, The great, the proud, the high, the low. He seeth all the wrong, the right, And vieweth every gruesome fight; And yet he never speaketh word To any man, or beast, or bird. He guideth all who live below Along the paths they wish to go. Doris E. Johnson, ZZ.


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SPORTSMANSHIP

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"The spirit of sportsmanship is as old as the Sermon on the Mount but the vehicle in which it is enshrined today is entirely new to us," declares Matthew Wohl, former vice-president of American Federation of Labor. The spirit of play, the spirit of truthfulness, the spirit of courage and faith, spirit of endurance, spirit of self-control and self-respect, spirit of playing the game is sportsmanship. From the time we enter the world until the time we leave the world we play a game. Though we do not realize it when young nevertheless in the games our mothers taught us, in the games our teachers showed us, in the games our coaches drilled us we participated for the welfare of others. We spin the top, we play ball, we work in the store, we go to college, we take our life work BUT we must play the game. A hero, a martyr, a humorist with sense of justice 路acknowledging rights of others, a bankrupt who retrieves and repays, a farmer who replants in face of nature's constant scourging all show sportsmanship. A really good sport carries on uncomplainingly through all difficulties and spreads sunshine on others' paths. We can not always路 have the things we want when we want them neither in sports, in business, nor in the great game of life. Especially we should be good losers; we should yield cheerfully to a victor who has played the game, omitting quarreling, envying, and rangling. We should be willing to lose a thousand games than to win by poor sportsmanship. In athletic contests a smile when defeat is certain, a good word when your foe is discouraged: and so through life a smile for defeat, a good word for the unfriendly soul, this is sportsmanship. So there grows in us in our play that great character-building .for fair play and sportsmanship. The game of life is lost when we seek our own glory. "Take sweet and bitter as sweet and bitter come, and always play the game." This is true in sportsmanship. Theta Theta.


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THE PARABLE OF THE TREE There was once a Tree growing quietly in an Orchard among many other trees of its kind. It was a pleasant Tree to look at with its green leaves and golden fruit. One day the Specialist, as he passed through the Orchard stopped and looked carefully at the Tree. "H-m-m-m," he said. "That Tree looks good." And the sap began racing through its veins quite merrily at the compliment. "But," the Specialist continued, "so good a Tree should be putting forth larger, finer fruit. I will prune it a little and see what happens." And the pruning shears lopped off a branch here ' and , a twig there. The Tree winced. It hurt! But it was a brave Tree and so it went on growing, replacing the lost parts with better ones. When next the Specialist came he saw how well the Tree had recovered and he said, "There is great material in this Tree. Its roots are strong and healthy. It could become the finest Tree in the Orchard. I think I will cut it well back and next year it will be wonderful." So the pruning knife cut and clipped again and again till the poor Tree felt as if life itself was almost gone. It faded and drooped. But the fine roots sent up a message. "We are all right! Do not give up! The Specialist understands what he is doing even though you do not. If you were not so brave and 路 fine a Tree he would not bother with you so. But he knows what you can become. And so he cuts you back and hurts you, for he knows what he is doing and that only so can you become the finest kind of a Tree and bear the most perfect fruit." And the Tree roused itself and said, "I will trust the Specialist although I cannot understand." And amidst its pain a~d seeming setbacks the Tree kept on growing until it became the most beautiful Tree in all the region round about and its fruit was so perfect that it found its way into sickrooms and gave health, and into beautiful homes and added beauty.


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And best of all, the trees all thr.ough the Orchard saw what this Tree had become through suffering and they took courage when they were pruned and grew more fine and perfect until the whole Orchard was known throughout all the land for its perfect fruit and its beautiful trees. Ernestine Peloubet Swallow. No te- This was w ri tten last week by our ass ist a nt ma tron her e. It was wri tten to her 路son w ho was di scouraged. I think tha t it is v er y beau t iful , so a m con t r ibut i ng it as my sha r e to t he " Phoeni x."-L oui se Mu sgr ave (Theta The ta).

Tune:

I'll Always Be in Love With You.

May we be ever true to dear old ASA Through all the many years to come, And tho' we drift apart, we'll ne'er forget the days, We spent with our sorority. We'll hold our colors high, and guard her secrets well, We'll challenge other girls to keep these self-same vows. Oh ASA the best of all sororities, We'll always be in love with you. Gwen Tackaberry.

Tune:

When the World Is Waiting for the Sunrise

The wisest girls that you'll find on the campus Are those who are one of our throng, The girls who_win in spite of every hindrance, Start the task while singing a song. We'll e'er be true to Alpha Sigma Alpha, Strive each day her merits to show. And so thru life we'll cherish all her standards Hoping thus we better will grow. Marion Haven, II.


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"CLASSIFICATION DAY" For the benefit of those who think that their particular college or university has all the problems of classification day, let me tell you of the troubles, heart-breaking moments, embarrassing situations, and nerve-racking experiences that the students of Michigan State Normal College must endure each term. We have a-hunt and punch system in typewriting; so have we a duck and dodge system in classification. We duck or dodge the professors who have been "put on the spot" by older and would-be wiser students. Such expressions heard around the study table as the following are quite typical: "Don't take that History course. You are simply swamped with work, have to write a term thesis in it, must needs go to the library every night for at least an hour, and besides, he favors the boys." "Yes, but Betty, I have to take that course, and he is the only 'prof' who teaches it. Why couldn't that young, goodlooking one give it this term? And they say that he never gives an 'A'. Oh dea路r, I'll probably pull a 'D'." "Well, you should worry," from another. "If you could see the perfectly inhuman program that I am literally forced to take, you would stop 'sobbing' over one professor. And imagine! An eight o'clock in the winter. Who ever started the idea of going to a class before daylight anyway? And I never get a chance to take that Astronomy course. They say that you actually get two o'clock permits for it." And so this goes on. Usually two hours a day is the limit for any human being. The best thing to do after such an ordeal is sleep for at least eight hours. This torrent usually breaks forth the night before the fatal day. About twenty minutes before you are due at the classification building, proceed to rise and make a rush for your destination. Of course you must get as close to the door as possible. In this gathering will be found college folk equipped with elbows of varying degrees of sharpness. Do not mind. What is a broken rib or two on classification day? Also, prepare yourself for rain while you are herded in front of the building;


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it never fails. When the summons comes to enter, pay no attention to the plea for less pushing. The object is to gain entrance. After reliving the battle of Waterloo, you will find yourself in a room where professors are congregated to tell you that your ' schedule conflicts. Do not be discouraged. An hour more or less is nothing in there. It will probably be dreadfully hot and noisy, but that will only add to the confusion and is really quite necessary to the general atmosphere. By this time you should have a perfect schedule consisting of nothing that you want. Now fill out a card with said schedule on it, your history, father's birthplace, and whether or not your grandmother was left handed or epileptic. This is all very necessary. If you are left handed or epileptic, it can be traced directly to your ancestors, and thus another striking example of heredity is brought to light. After you are out of there, you must dig into your pockets and proceed to find some "pecunia." Hand this over in exchange for a card marked PAID, which also belongs to them,if you don't believe it just try to keep it-and be satisfied. You have been only eight hours in the scramble. A good sport will not proceed to tell how tired he is, that it is about time he was out, or that his feet are about crushed. That is nothing. Think what you feel like after coming from a hosiery sale in some bargain basement. Bernice Cooper, M M.

MOTHER The house was still Her brood had strayed, By little things She had been delayedA chill cold wind Snipped her candle's burning; Who will leave a light For those returning?


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SIGNS OF SPRING ON THE CAMPUS With the coming of Spring to our campus, school life seems to have taken on a new atmosphere. Everyone has been smitten with the most dangerous but delightfui disease-"Spring Fever." As the old saying goes-"In Spring a young man's fancy--" (Oh well, you know the rest). Anyhow everyone seems to be living up to that saying. Now, more than ever, couples can be seen promenading about the campus, arm in arm. Here in our own sorority house the girls find enjoyment in leaning out of the windows trying to get a breath of refreshing air. It's so much handier to get it that way than to have to turn on the electric fan (cheaper, too)! We have across from our house something which not many sorority houses can boast of having-a cemetery! Up to this time we haven't taken much notice of the gruesome spot, but now that the green grass can be seen shooting up around the stones, and flowers have begun to peep through the ground, it is, indeed, interesting to observe. It is not necessary these days to wear heavy wraps to and from school and the cafeteria, since our house is only a block from the school and two doors from the cafeteria. Sad but true, too, classes are beginning to become very irksome. No one likes to study this kind of weather, but would rather be out somewhere playing tennis or walking in Fairmount Park. At this time of the year most of the Spring activities are in full swing around Temple. There are athletic and swimming meets here, Spring formals there, and teas 1 and parties everywhere. Kappa Kappa is planning to have a card party sometime during the month of April to make additional money for 路 the house fund, and a dance later in the Spring. In the meantime we will be occupied in attending the. other affairs around the campus. . ' Take a t~p-don't let the "Spring Bug" get the best of you, so that you have to neglect your classes, for once it stings, the infection will be hard to heal! .-. Evelyn Hartman, K.K.


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KAPPA KAPPA COOKS "Mmmm! Just smell that roast beef! Doesn't that smell delicious?" "Who's cooking tonight?" "May I eat in?" "Did you count on me?" "What are you having?" These are some of the various exclamations that issue from the mouths of Kappa Kappa girls upon entering the Alpha Sig house after a long, hard day assimilating knowledge. Other sounds from the kitchen where the cooks reign supreme sound something like this: "Helen, for goodness sakes, you have too much water on those potatoes! They'll take all night to cook." "Margy, stop nursing that roast every minute; give it a chance to cook." "Are the tables set? Let's see how many of us are there? Kay, Margy, Helen, Ruth, Betty, Peg, Billy, Jean, and Jimmie. -n1ne." "Kay, will you fix the coffee? Quick! Quick! Water, water! Oh, hurry up, the gravy is getting too thick. Stir it faster so it won't get lumpy." Everything, after much chaos, is finally assembled, and the girls are called to eat. "Mm-mm!" "Mm-mm!" "Gee! Isn't this swell?" "Mmm, who cooked the tomatoes? Mmm, aren't they good?" "How much is all this stuff anyway? What, only $ .22! "Who's the cashier?" "What's the dessert?" "Strawberry short-cake with whipped cream! Ooh !" Now we will leave the KK girls while they are eating their strawberry short-cake, and spare you the gruesome argument, the eternal question-"Who's going to wash the dishes?" Helen Poser, KK.


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VARSITY HOUSE MINSTREL SHOW When the curtain rose on the First Annual Varsity Minstrel, two score of black face comedians presented a production on March r6th in our own Mitten Hall equal to anything ever before staged at Temple University by student actors. The sho~ was a complete old time minstrel show with a snappy e~change of jokes among the various comedians, and with several selections by the chorus. The end men, "Bull" Lipski, Bill Holland, "Pie" Sadler and Lome Johnson-all of whom had the audience on the edge of their seats, awaiting with excitement the next snappy exchange of repartee. The "Rhumba" dance was the main feature of the second act. Due to the odd nature of the selection of the dancers, the "Rhumba" number was extremely funny. Included in the dance chorus was a .husky fellow, weighing about 250 pounds> who shivered and shook in true Hawaiian style. The audience enjoyed watching him in preference to the other tall, lanky youchs. The student body after seeing this production were convinced that the varsity men could do as well on the stage as they could on the athletic field. Kathryn Hastings, KK.

WAKE UP Spring's here! I felt the brushing of her wings, I smelled the sweet aroma That her youthful presence brings, And all her little Elf men Have touched the dozing things And whispered Words of Welcome, Wake up it's spring! Lucina Hulet,

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"WHAT IS IT?" Smaltz House, Germantown, Thursday, Feb. 18, 1932 Alpha Sigma Alpha Presents

WHAT IS IT? Some Kind of a Show by A. S. Alpha Production Staged and Directed by Kappa Kappa Dances by Ia Zilda-Settings by Joe Stagehands Orchestra Under Direction of Somegirlski Costumes by Almost Anyone Lighting by E. Lectricity PLAYERS (In Order of Their Appearance) You'll Know 'Em When You See 'Em SYNOPSIS路 ACT 1-The Lily Maid of Laughedalot Scene-The House ACT II-The Merchant of V ~nus Scene-Same House

"

ACT III-Save the Last Dance For Me, Colonial Dame Scene-The Same House ACT IV-Plenty of Seats Available Scene-Still the Same House

This was the Program of Kappa Kappa's first rush party which was a theatre party at the home of one of our patrons, Mrs. Smaltz. Act 1-The Lily Maid of Laughedalot was a pathetic bit of drama in which "Jimmie" Cockill dashingly portrayed the immortal lover Launcelot who succumbed to the wiles of Ruth Stewart, the blase Lily Maid. Grace Blahos, who played the part of a Guinevere quite enraptured bv the


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77

arduous Launcelot, was charming as well as tempting in her Queenly garb and very nonchalantly but "dutifully" returned to her husband the King, when Launcelot deserted her for the Lily Maid of Laughedalot. Act li-The Merchant of Venus. We have here a story of a modern Shylock whose price for creating beauty was tremendous-ten pounds of human flesh . The victim was none other than Mary Cockill, who unflinchingly paid ten pounds of her well-nourished body for the beauty of a good figure: None other than our gentle "Kewpie" Eves portrayed the notorious Shylock and without mercy took the price he demanded-but he got what he wanted-and his patient got what she wanted-so why worry. Act III-Save the Last Dance For Me, Colonial Dame, was a very clever as well as delightful Minuet performed by six Alpha Sigs from the Physical Ed Department. Ruth Mercer, Zilda Messenger, Evelyn Hartman, Elizabeth Held, Mary Co,ckill and Kitty Hastings. Act IV-Plenty of Seats Available was a satire on "Scores and Encores" 1932 Musical Comedy "Standing Room Only." Charlotte Hartman very pathetically played the part of "Jake," youthful owner of a music store, and desperately in love with "Pally" portrayed by Marge Hoover. "Pally," unconScious of Jake's &votion, becomes fascinated by an Italian nobleman, "Carbona," (played by Helen Poser) , and only through the advise of her best friend "Flue" (Zil Messenger), realizes that her love belongs to "Jake." So everything ended happily and they all lived in peace and quiet ever after. Marge Hoover, K.K.


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THE LUCKY "THIRTEEN" On the afternoon of March 15 about five o'clock all the girls had gathered in the clubroom anxiously awaiting the return of the bids. It wasn't long before two of the girls came running into the house waving a white envelope. Our president, "Kewpie" Eves, opened the letter hurriedly and read the names of thirteen girls who had accepted our bid to join Alpha 路sigma Alpha. We were delighted and happy to think that so many girls were anxious to join us. Our pledgees are: Thelma Stortz, Emaus, Pa., Home Economics Department. Mary Kirlin, Allentown, Kindergarten Department. Annie Ruppin, Akron, Music Department. Jean Wolf, Newport, Music Department. Jane Farwell, Westfield, Physical Education Department. Jean Kerr, Doylestown, Music Department. Alma Sheely, New Oxford, Secondary Education Dept. Louise Stryker, Williamsport, Music Department. Mary Simmington, Philadelphia, Secondary Education Department. Betty Twining, Doylestown, Music Department. Mildred Locke, Philadelphia, Secondary Education Dept. Ruth Mac Menamin, Philadelphia, Secondary Education Department. Nancy Walker, Philadelphia, Kindergarten Department. The many talents of the new girls were displayed at one of our Sunday afternoon parties not long ago, which was held for the purpose of "getting together" and becoming better acquainted with our new "sisters-to-be." Several of the girls played the violin, some the piano, and still others sang. Sunday afternoon, April 3, we held the ribbon service for the pledgees at our sorority house. We are very happy to welcome these new girls into our sorority and know that they will be a big asset to our group. Elizabeth Held, KK.


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79

ON GREETING THE RUSHEES On Sunday afternoon, March 20, Kappa Kappa Chapter entertained her pledges at an informal tea. Since this was the first time the girls had been entertained in the house, the earlier part of the afternoon was spent in getting acquainted with the comforts afforded by the lounging chairs and deep davenports of which we are already so fond, not to mention our newest and perhaps most loved acquisition, a radio. We eagerly took advantage of the opportunity of becoming better acquainted with our members-to-be, and as is the way of women, the conversation flowed freely. Our President, Kewpie Eves, officially greeted the new girls, although you may be sure that we had done our share of welcoming them before. She told them a little about the sorority and especially about the financial obligations involved in joining ASA, and in her soft voice the figures which during these times seem so exorbitant, were put gently. Food was the next consideration to be put before the group and needless to say, was received gratefully on all sides. Our culinary artistry is well fortified by the number of Home Economic girls in our chapter, and the refreshments spoke well of their efforts. After tea the usual order of things was reversed and the guests entertained the hostesses. The program, extemporaneous though it was presented by the pledges, proved to be a revelation to us since we were ignorant of the fact that so many of the girls were talented. Many of these girls are students in the Music Department, and their abilities ran from the piano to violin and voice. We have always prided ourselves on the musical talent of our members and it was indeed a pleasure to find that the places of the graduating seniors will be so capably filled. The afternoon, so pleasurably and profitably spent, was now drawing to a close; and as we said good-bye to our newly acquired pledges we felt fortunate in having our chapter enlarged by such a fine group of girls. Jean MacDonald, KK.


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OUR FIRST RUSH PARTY The "Where" and "How" of our first rush party was settled by a gracious invitation from Mrs. Smaltz to entertain at her home. Consequently, the night of the party we proceeded to literally "pack" ourselves in a bus and speed to the place which was to be our "Little Theatre" for the night. And it truly was a theatre party for the girls had planned it to represent just that. First we were greeted by a doorman who formally directed us to the second floor where we checked our things in a genuine way. Strange as it seemed, that grinning countenance decked by maid's cap caused us to wonder if this 路 were a real theatre after all for that doorman had a vaguely familiar look too and extremely feminine features:-Ah! But our suspicions were justified for we were 路ushered to our seats by two more familiar looking individuals attired in stiff white shirt front and cravat collar. We sat and tried to be patient until the Overture started. And really, it did seem that we had heard that same orchestra practicing in the club room at some previous time. After much music the curtain was drawn and with keen appreciation we watched and listened to the plays, dances, drills and songs. When the "show" was over, we had the additional delight of a delicious supper arranged for us by our hostess. Like all good theatre parties the time passed very quickly and soon we were again bound for 1917 North Broad Street, each a trifle less hilarious, but impressed by a novel sort of party planned and executed by just "the girls."

Eleanor Smith, KK, '33路


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HOW TO MAKE MONEY GRACEFULLY The Alpha Sig House and proud residents were feeling positively expansive. The house (if it could have) would have made profound bows to anyone passing by. Two-thirty, brass knocker shining expectantly, windows fairly winking at the sun, shades carefully adjusted and inside, twenty-four bustling, excited and proud Alpha Sigs-the house was to make its first bow to the campus-public by way of a subscription card party.

I

I

The first hesitant knock comes; everyone near the door resolves herself into a welcoming committee of one and finally the first comer does manage to wade her way through the throng. With every new arrival you could hear an appreciative mumur of surprise as each in turn first viewed the lovely Colonial interior of the house. Girls continued to arrive until all the places at the sixteen tables which had been provided were filled. Of course, all were pleased to note the presence of our Dean of Women, Miss Peabody. Playing rules differed from the usual in that a prize was given for the highest score at each table instead of using the progression method. Betty Janasky, who was chairman of the committee, showed good taste in choosing attractive boxes of writing paper. After all had reluctantly departed the Alpha Sigs realized not only the financial, but also the social success of their party. Ruth Stewart, KK, '34路

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MEMORIES OF THE JUNIOR PROM

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Am I dreaming or is this really the Auditorium of Mitten Hall, our very own Recreation Hall at Temple? I see a few familiar land marks and finally realize that- our Auditorium has been converted into a Chinese Garden. The Class of '33 certainly outdid everything else ever given on our campus. Who indeed will ever be able to convert our playhouse again into such a beautiful setting for an evening路 of dancing to a perfect orchestra. There were so many lovely decorations I really don't know where to begin. I guess the many flashing lights first caught my eye. Amber, blue, green, red, purple and white streams of light shot their rays over the swaying crowd to finally fasten themselves for a lingering moment on an immense crystal ball that was slowly revolving in the center of the ceiling. Directly under the ball was a veritable Garden of Eden. Huge palms, ferns, a gurgling fountain and tall vases sending forth fragrant fumes of Chinese insense gave one this sensation. In each archway around the balcony hung huge Chinese lanterns. From the ceiling were suspended numerous immense silk parasols. Winking and blinking at the merry throng from the end of each rib of these symbols of the Orient were small Chinese lanterns. Large, glittering, writhing, fire-spitting dragons on fantastic, colorful silk formed a graceful background for the orchestra. Surprise after surprise. All of Mitten Hall was open-Grill, Lounging rooms and the Great Court. The music from the Ballroom was being broadcast in each of these places. Could more be desired ? To keep the memory of this stupendous affair forever alive each couple received the most novel and original dance program of metal on which was embos~ed in red a large "T" the steam of which was formed by an Owl. On a chain around the neck of the Owl was a regular size key which could be detached and worn by the recipient. An evening never to be forgotten. Though all good things


THE PHOENIX must come to an end we were all reluctant to see one-thirty arrive. It was with sighs of regret that we left the Ballroom. Once again the Orient had scored-we had all succumbed to its spell. Evelyn Aiken, KK.

THE INTER-SORORITY BASKETBALL GAME 'Twas rumored that there'd be a basketball game between the Delta Psi Kappas and the Alpha Sigs that Thursday afternoon. Nobody believed it, but sure enough, when the appointed time came, there was the Alpha Sig aggregation right on the soot, ready for come what may. But the deplorable part of the situation was that the Psi Kaps is a one hundred per cent Health Education sorority. Need I add that all the members of the opposing team were real "snarky" players who came in tricky white uniforms as though to impress us even more with their presence? And they had two full teams, too, which enabled them to ke,ep fresh players on the floor at all times. The Alpha Sigs managed one substitute and when she was sent in there was much quick changing of sneakers, for we had but six pairs among us. Be all that as it may, everything was conducted in a very orderly manner. Betty and Jean played forward, Peg and Elizabeth, center, while Evelyn and Ruth started at guard. But oh, those poor guards-the ball was always in Psi Kap's scoring territory, and before five minutes time had elapsed, the guards were worn out. The Veteran guard (who hadn't played for two years) had to retire to the corner of the room in favor of Kitty Hastings. Picture us, with half of our team made up of seniors who hadn't played for a long time, rappling for the ball against a d,ashing, flashing, half dozen white figures. But we saw it thru to the bitter end, and when the final whistle blew, we were only something like thirty-two points behind! However, no one was much concerned since the main issue was to have an hour's fun and we certainly had that. Better luck next time when our opponents will be ' the Phi Sigs, and they aren't a Health Ed sorority, thank goodness! Ruth Mercer, KK, '32.


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FRIENDSHIP A new friend is an inspiration to his companion. He is a mystery and man is his discoverer. It is not the first "unusually pleasing" impression that holds the discoverer but it is that concealed self in the new friend which is begging for revelation and approval. Choosing friends is not a day's Work but the process of time and wise selection. We can never replace an old friend because everyone is different. A parting of friends is like dividing funds and placing the divisions in two huge vaults which cannot be opened because the 路friends have exchanged combinations. The fault of such a percept is the possibility of forgetting the numbers. As wine when rightly made is good new, it is much better when older, likewise old friends are always good and the new tGo, must be kept ot be more pleasingly accepted when older.

Mothers' Day, May 8th In a short while we will be reading more about Mother's Day. We shall have before us the date on advertisements and mention in articles as well as poems in tribute. Although in these last few years there has been an obvious tendency to commercialize this symbolic day, there is also obvious a more universal observance. Every year Mother's Day should be observed more and more widely until every mother is the recipient on that day of some token of affection froln her son or daughter. There are not many mothers entirely alone in the world, and because this was intended as an intimate day it should certainly not lose it's beauty by gift giving alone. There is no mother so poor that she would not feel rich if, when more fortunate mothers are receiving flowers and other gifts from their children, she could have a pleasant "Hello, Mother" from her own children or a card from one away. To those few mothers who are entirely alone we can certainly try to make a little happier on that day and somehow express how dear they are to us and how proud we are of them. One time a prophet said; "Gratitude is the highest command, no god will forgive the man who breaks the law of gratitude," surely


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'

Mother's Day, if no other, is the ideal day in which we can show gratitude. Of those few mothers who have been taken from us so early in life let us pay silent, prayerful tribute at their resting place. Would that I could write such explicit truth as this unknown writer has in these few lines,"When God made the stars and the sunshine, And the moon, and the flowers and the trees He also created a Mother, Because she was so like unto these."

Eleanor Winters.

At the Movie Great as is the "movie" a book of etiquette has never been written on "Conduct at the Movie.' Now that "talkies" are well established, the question of etiquette at the theatre is even more serious than fo~merly. There are a few general rules that must, under all conditions, be observed. Always before entering the theatre, buy a box of popcorn. If you don't like it to eat, buy a box anyway. One can make almost as much noise by dropping the kernels of corn on the floor and smashing them with the heel as by chewing them. By using this method you are, perhaps, furnishing work to some of the unemployed. If you like popcorn, place the kernels, one at a time, in your mouth. Then with a quick, decisive movement of the lower jaw, smash them between your teeth. Taking only one kernel at a time conserves the popcorn, and makes one box last during practically a whole show. There will be some people rude enough to turn and stare at you and perhaps make whispered comments to their neighbors. Don't let their admiration unduly disturb you. If you finish the popcorn before the show has ended, chew aum. The brand you use is immaterial. The only requirement that it pop well. If you are not proficient in the art of popping gum, practice in your room for an hour or so every day. When you have become expert, you are ready to exhibit your skill to the public.

fs

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Since the advent of the talkies, people do not have to be able to read. Always take it for granted that your neighbor has neglected his education, and read aloud all printed matter that happens to be flashed on the screen. The tone to be used is 't hat half-whisper, far-reaching, but indistinct. The great pleasure you give your neighbors by doing this is unmistakable. If you are seeing a show for a second time, keep all those near you posted on the "coming events." Go to as many shows as you possibly can. Go to the same show twice. The management of the theatre will be glad to reward you by furnishing you with board and lodging-in a hospital. Shirley Baird.

PRESENT YOUR MOTHER WITH THIS RECIPE If one good turn deserves another, your mother will surely reward you with some of these delicious cookies. The girls in our chapter think they are delicious and being very unselfish we are sending you the recipe. pkg. dates stoned and cut. 路 I tsp. soda sprinkled over dates. I c. hot water poured over dates and soda. I c. brown sugar. ~c. crisco. 2 eggs. ~ tsp. salt. 2 tsp. baking P?wder. I c. chopped nuts. ~ tsp. vanilla. I

With the flour, sift the baking powder and salt. Cream the sugar and crisco, and beaten eggs, then the first mixture 1 then nuts and vanilla. Add flour to make it stiff and roll out. Bake in moderate oven. K athryn Meiser, Ar.


THE PHOENIX

SPRING IN BOSTON Once more spring has returned to Old Boston. Early each morning the sun rises to shine down upon the velvet greet of the Public Gardens, the Common, and the beautiful Fenway. The song sparrow, perched on the topmost twig of the flowering forsythia is leading the morning chorus of robins, bluebirds, and meadowlarks, with his bursts of glorious song. The ducks and swans, who know they will be unmolested, are peacefully foraging- for their morning meal on the quiet ponds. The trees, too, have wakened from their long winter sleep and while the elm and maple show their delicate blossoms, the hazels, alders, poplars, and willows are shaking forth their furry catskins and the magnolias already show a burst of pink and green. The croecus, white, orange, and purple, have opened their cups to greet the morning sun. And last and surest sign of spring, the gleaming green and gold of jonquils and daffodils, the beautiful symbols of our own ASA are telling all who may care that Spring has come to stay. Alice T. Northrop, 88.

HAPPINESS Have you ever stopped to think what happiness . really means? Some people say it is unattainable while others think they can find it through their life. work or vocation. But happiness to me means something that is never quite reached. As we reach toward it, it seems to go one step more away from us just as the goal is in sight. Real lpppiness, I think, must come from love, self-sacrifice and service to others. The true pleasure comes from the joy in seeing some one else happy. Some people are always bemoaning their hard fortunes, but if they thought of other people more, they would realize that they were not so oppressed after all. We can always remember that there are some that suffer more than ourselves. This idea has impressed itself upon my mind. More and more, since I became a member of Alpha Sig. One main


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object of a sorority is the fact that we live as a part of a group,a group that is bound together by some inner tie. We are concerned with the welfare of all the girls, and therefore see the "other" side of life and not only our own viewpoint which might be prejudiced. I'll always remember Alpha Sig as one of the greatest influences of my life. Alice Greger, IT IT.

ORIGINAL CAMP SONG Tune: "My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean"

Last nite as I lay on my pillow With the tent flaps drawn gently aside I peered thru' the tall stalwart pine trees And the silvery moon I espied. And I tho't as I lay on my pillow, And heard the Whip-poor-Will Chant, that I was a lucky Camper, To be at Green Mountain Camp. G. M. C. G. M. C. that's the Camp for you and me G. M. C. G. M. C. that's the Camp for me. Have any of you been at Camp? If you have not, you don't know what you have missed. If you have, I hope you . enjoyed yourself as t:nuch as I have for the past four summers. Just think, you can earn money and at the same time have a perfectly delightful, next to nature, vacation. It is such fun to be with a group of eager young campers bubbling over with enthusiasm, full of pep, ready to charge at the first sign of go. A romping and rollicking bunch are they, playing from morning till night in the sunshine. They have gained weight by the minute, their skin is tanned, cheeks ,rosy and eyes sparkling bright. What a refreshing sight to behold! To review a group such as I have just described gives you a sense of pleasing satisfaction and a feeling of worthwhile accomplishment. I only wish that more children could have the advantage of such a wholesome summer outing. Lucina Hulet, 88.


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ALPHA ALPHA CHAPTER NEWS Spring vacation time is over, and Alpha Alpha girls are back at school again discussing the grand times enjoyed at home and the ones to come before the end of school. One of these anticipated events occurred Saturday afternoon, April 9th, in the form of a tea dance which proved to be a real success. Our spring formal will be the next big dance we will have and, of course, we are looking forward to that. We are initiating Ruth Steinbricker next Saturday. This initiation will follow the annual pledge week, at which time the actives have planned many good times where the pledges will be asked to entertain them. During this week our chapter spends a good deal of time together because we all make a special effort to see each other often, and, of course, we never miss the meetings at which the pledges are asked to furnish the programs. The sisters all gathered around The Student, our school paper, last night with much enthusiasm, for the scholastic record for sororities was published in it. The girls all rejoiced and breathed a sigh of relief when they found the Alpha Sigs sixth from the top. This record was made last semester, and we hope we shall be able to hold and improve it this time. We are thinking much of convention where we know Frances will enjoy meeting the other delegates and getting new ideas to bring back to us next year. We bought sorority stationery to sell to the girls in the chapter to make money to send another delegate. Selling this stationery is an easy way to make money, for all the girls use stationery and they prefer crested stationery to any other. The April showers are bringing out the beauty of our campus and making everyone reali ~e that spring is here again. A stroll down the slant walk or through lower campus in spring clothes would give any one an inspiration with its lovely new green leaves and little blossom s that are just beginning to appear. Genevieve Snedaker.

ALPHA BETA CHAPTER NEWS We members of Alpha Beta chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha who were in Kirksville over the holidays held a get-together at the sorority house the night bf December 29. We were glad to have two out-oftown alumn;e members, Mabel Norris and Margaret Johnson, with us.


THE PHOENIX Bridge was played at three tables; that is, we bridged between sessions of "holiday gossip." We girls appreciated so much the large box of salted nut meats our house mother, Mrs. Ward, gave us. About I I o'clock the salt on those nuts necessitated calls for "cokes"; so we all drove to the most popular fountain in town-"The Owl-and here our thirst was quenched. Margaret Guiles. On Ma;ch 13, Ruth Sherard of Texas entertained Alpha Beta active chapter and a few alumna: with four tables of bridge at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Gardner, Kirksville, Mo. Mrs. Dorothy Sens Lewis received high prize and Charlotte Jensen second. The color scheme of red and white was carried out in observance of St. Valentine's Day. Dorothy Ficke. One of the most outstanding social events on Alpha Beta's March calendar was the party of Saturday 17, when the fall and winter initiates entertained the active chapter with a court whist party at the home of Mildred Epperson in La Plata. The decorations, refreshments, and prizes were in keeping with the St. Pat's season, and the novelty of court whist was such that it provided an afternoon of merriment for everyone. The first, second and third prizes were awarded to Dorothea Grim, Emily Smith, and Dorothy Hutchison. Both the travel and consolation prizes were won by Marie Wheatcraft. Frances Watson. The fall and winter initiates gave a very lovely tea for the active chapter, patronesses and alumna: at the home of Margaret Guiles from 3 to 5 on March 18. Alpha Beta has won for the second consecutive time the scholarship cup offered each quarter by the local Panhellenic.

ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER NEWS Hello, everybody! Station ASA broadcasting on a frequency of good will from its studio at Indiana State Teachers' College. We arc about to present the eighth of a series of programs from Alpha Gamma chapter. In our last broadcast we promised to tell you about our second rush party which was a formal colo~al dinner-dance held at the Country Club the nineteenth of February. Eighteenth century ballroom atmosphere pervaded the hall. Sara Gracey, dressed in a beautiful old-fashioned gown, was hostess. Dinner was served at small tables, four or six at a table. Invitations, place cards, and dance programs were colonial in design. Beautiful corsages were given to the guests. Dancing, of course, had to include the Paul Jones and the Virginia Reel, and the


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last dance was a tag dance. Mrs. Neale, a patroness, and many of our alumna:: attended. T~ursday aft~rnoon, March II, the ribbon service was given to the followmg, who will become pledges, Thursday, April 15: Betty McCoy Kathryn Deis~er~ Louis~ Martin, Mary Menges, and Margaret Moore: After the service mstructwns for pledge week were given and we availed ourselves bountifully of their abilities when, we assigned tasks and duties. Much to our relief they all survived those grueling days and are now hopefully looking forward to becoming active members. The following Saturday evening a delicious dinner was prepared and served in the Candy Kitchen by our last semester's pledges, now members: Mildred Julius, Cathryn A. Dinsmore, Ruth C. Edwards, and Jane Stoltz, and this semester's pledges, Betty McCoy, Kathryn Deisher, Louise Martin, and Mary Menges. Miss Belden was guest of honor. ' Due homage was paid by all the pledges to the guest of honor and the sorority members. It was fun and we enjoyed it immensely. We elected officers for next year as follows: Alta Welch, president; La Rue Graden, vice-president; Kathryn Meiser, treasurer; Jane Stoltz, recording secretary; Phyllis Wright, corresponding secretary; Roberta Walt, registrar; Mildred Julius, chaplain; Betty McCoy, editor. Convention delegates to Estes Park this summer will be Alta Welch and Le Rue Graden. And now, dear sisters, our time is up. We wish you all a happy summer and will continue our broadcast next fall. Station ASA signing off from its Indiana Studio. Till then, our love and thoughts! Kathryn Meiser.

The Sensations of a Pledge If Abraham Lincoln, the emancipator of slave and drudges, could have sensed the rebellion in my heart and heard the anguished complaints which rose from my lips during pledge week, his heart would have immediately gone out to anyone so persecuted and imposed upon. From early morning until evening of that memorabl e week, I dutifully toiled for my dear tormentors. The slightest whim of my Sfl'>nsors was carried out with a brave smile which often changed into a pout after I turned a corner and was hidden from their sigh.t. An endless series of beds to be made, rooms to be cleaned, and articles to be bought downtown, caused me to go around with my tongue very nearly hanging out, much like a draft animal which has expended every ounce of its energy in service for others. 路 Most disgusting of all my duties was that of going to breakfast 1 every morning. I wanted very badly to r~duce, so I had been. heroic~lly abstaining from breakfasts, and I had fa~rly well succeeded m ~urbm.g my early morning pangs of hunger, when I was confronted with th~s new problem-to be a dutiful pled~ or to have a figu.re. I g~ve this question my consideration for some time and finally decided agamst the


THE PHOENIX figure. My sponsors can gaze upon me now and see the terrible results of my breakfasting during pledge week, and I hope that they will be remorseful and have heavily weighted consciences. After going through all this, I can only say that if ever a pledge is to be given duties by me, I will think of my own plight, and treat her with all the consideration in the world-A Pledge. Louise Martin. A delightful bridge-luncheon was given by the Pittsburgh Alumna: Chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha on Saturday, April 2nd, at the William Penn Hotel of Pittsburgh. Those able to attend from our chapter were ex-collegia members Mary Emerson, President of the Pittsburgh Alumna: chapter, and Peg Braddock, Treasurer of the Pittsburgh Alumna: chapter; and active members Helen Wirth, Alta Welch, Mary Cribbs, Jane Stoltz, and La Rue Graden. During the luncheon the general discussion pertained to our spring dinner-dance, which is to be in the near future. These vacation "get-togethers" are always enjoyed because we meet new friends and see our old friends. La Rue G1路aden.

Just a Word About Our Pledges Kay Deisher is our only pledge in the Art Department. Kay comes from Reading, Pa., a Pennsylvania Dutch section. She has made many friends with her winning smile and charming personality. Betty McCoy, a sophomore in the Secondary Education Course, has pep, vim, and vigor all in one. She .is our editor for next year, so you will probably hear plenty from her in the future. Marion Cox, is a girl from the town of Indiana. We didn't know they came so nice in Indiana. Marion sings in a church choir, but is registered in the Secondary Education Department, so you see she is very versatile. Margie Moore, a girl from Meadville, Pa., we are all pleased to have. I know ASA will mean a lot to her, and she to ASA. Mary Mengus, is a Home Economics freshman. She is veFy shy and demure but underneath it all there is a heart of gold. Dora Good is an Elementary Degree freshman from Wilkinsburg, Pa. I think perhaps the least said about her the better, because she comes from my home town and I might leave something out. Nevertheless, we are proud to have Dora as our sister. . Louise Martin is also a Home Economics freshman. Louise's personality radiates wherever she is and makes new friends for her continually and draws the old friends closer to her. "If she's happy, bright, and snappy, She's ASA." This bit of one of our songs describes our new president, Alta Welch, very well. Alta is one of those gifted people who can be serious


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on occasions ~nd give the suggestion that solves the problem and yet, on other 路occa~wns, put real pep _into the group with her likable temperament. Alta IS a dark, curley-haired girl whose happy smile makes loads of friends for her. ~Ita's charmin~ per~onality is only one her redeeming features. She IS also very gifted m her work in the Commercial Department. She is now a Junior and is Secretary to one of the busiest Commercial teachers. In addition to her duties in the department, Alta is a member of Kappa Delta Pi, honorary fraternity, and Pi Omega Pi, honorary Commercial fraternity. At our last meeting Alta was elected President for next year. We certainly are wishing her every success, for "such popularity must be deserved." Jane Stoltz.

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BETA BETA CHAPTER NEWS Let's see what Beta Beta has been doing lately. In March, we gave a most successful Winter Dance at the Fac.ulty Club. We entertained representatives and guests from the other sororities at the same time. The programs were silver with a silver crest on a red background. We were so glad many of the Alumns were here for the dance. During winter quarter Beta Beta entertained by a series of buffet supper for the various fraternities on the campus. Girls of Beta Beta have taken upon themselves a new project next year-that of renting and maintaining an entire house. It is ideally located and it faces the most beautiful part of the campus. Beta Beta girls are all looking forward to seeing Rose Lamme!, an Alumna, who has been teaching at Lincoln School, Columbia U., for the past year. She is returning to Greely this summer and will be at the college next year. At the same time we regret the fact that our Faculty Adviser, Miss Elizabeth Luzmoor, will not be with us next year, as she is planning to spend the year attending Leland Stanford University and traveling. She has been wonderful to us and we appreciate so much everything she has done for us. Beta Beta wishes her a most enjoyable year. Beta Beta wishes to announce the pledging of Helen Hargrove of Greeley, Colorado, and the initiation of Helen Walling of Ault, Colorado.

GAMMA GAMMA CHAPTER NEWS Alpha Sigma Alpha Valentine Party Every year a Valentine party is given to which the boy friends are invited. This year it appropriately took the form of a Leap Year Party. Much~ merriment was occasioned in the securing of dates for the party.


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The party was given in the Alpha Sig rooms and was a screaming success from the beginning. A radio was secured from a local dealer. Dancing was, of course, a big feature. Perhaps the most fun was playing Novelty Bridge. This was played as ordinary bridge except that envelopes were placed on each table at the beginning of each game. Sometimes these instructions read: "Losers play next game with lollypops in mouth," "Winners play this game with white cotton gloves on," "Bid, then pass hands over to right," "Add 250 to score if bid is made." At a late hour delicious refreshments were served. The party was declared a hilarious success. Ft路ieda Shirley. We are sorry to relate the sad news of our Adviser's mother, Mrs. W. A. Shattuck, who is seriously ill in Wichita Hospital. We held pledge services on April 12 for two very fine pledges this term-Miss Peggy Curtis and Miss Genevieve Gaston. After pledge service we adjourned to the Delta Sigma open house, where everyone had a grand time. We are especially proud of all of our new pledges and members this year.

DELTA DELTA CHAPTER NEWS The last two months have been busy ones for Delta Delta. We have not only taken part in most every activity on the campus but have been very successful in our undertakings. On March 4, the Delta Delta chapter had the honor of participating in the Prep Follies. This production is given annually for seven of the sororities offering the best skits. This year Alpha Sigma Alpha took .the ever famous moon as her theme and called the skit "Moon Melodies." The act was featured by an odd setting in that the entire action took place behind the silhouette of a large silver moon. Next came the debate between the sororities. Here Delta Delta "shined" once more. Winning for the second consecutive year in the inter-sorority debates, we gained permanent possession of the silver cup offered by the Women's Forensic Association. Special honors are due Dorothy Jefferson and Martha Kaiser for their splendid work. Patronesses sometimes feel they do very little for the sorority, but the Delta Delta girls think they are underestimating themselves. They do not realize how much it means for the girls to know some one has an interest in them. One of the loveliest dinners that we attended this year was given by our patronesses at the Eastwood. Our adviser, Mrs. H. L. Goodwin, also gave us a very nice evening's entertainment at her home and touched the girls' hearts by the delicious refreshments she served. Along with all these entertainments came the initiation of five brilliant girls and the pledging of Lucy Mathews, Hester McClafin, Beatrice


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Belt and Heleen Ernest. After initiation the actives held a formal banquet at the Colonial Inn. Now we come to the dance that the pledges gave the actives on April 8. Umbrellas and bright colored streamers hung from the walls and ceiling carried out the idea of April showers. Mother Nature was very kind to us and carried our idea still further by sending down small ' drops of rain. Alpha Sigma Alpha is still at work, for she is now preparing for the Skit Show to be given Mothers' week-end on the campus.

L illian Goff.

EPSILON EPSILON CHAPTER NEWS Five Alpha Sigs are members of the Teachers' College Dramatic Group, "The Gilson Players." In March, the players presented a clever three-act comedy, "Loose Ankles." Celia O'Connor, Verna Barrett, Crescentia Gufler, and Mary Gene Fey were all in the cast. A warm, moonlight evening in February, a beautifully lighted ballroom, delicate pastel shades in evening dresses, and music by the Gra-co Club orchestra, made the Alpha Sig Spring Formal one of the ,loveliest parties of the year. A -feature of the evening was a solo dance by Livonia Warren. Chaperones were: Miss Edna McCullough, Mrs. Lena McLain, and Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Phipps. In a recent po.pularity contest sponsored by Emporia Merchants and the Chamber of Commerce, two Alpha Sigs won prizes. Livonia Warren won the first place title of "Miss Emporia" and a delightful Southern cruise to Cuba and Panama. When Livonia returned to school after her trip, she was surrounded by curious and questioning Alpha Sigs who wanted to know all about how it felt to be asked to give a solo dance in a night club of Panama. That was just one of her thrilling experiences in the sunny South. , Virginia Bergerhouse won third place and a trip to Chicago. Her time was taken up in sight-seeing, theatres, and night clubs. We all wish we could have been with them, but perhaps that would be asking too much! Through graduation this year, we are to lose three of our most active members, Lucille Laughlin of Emporia, and Helen Loveless of Marion who are four year girls, and Nadine Peterson of Parsons, who has been with us two years. They will all receive B.S. degrees in Education. Lucile was our President last year. We have, many times in the past, depended upon her to help us in our difficulties, which she did. She is a most capable person and shoulders many responsibilities in the sorority and in school activities. She is now President of Xi Phi leadership fraternity, Panhellenic representative, member of the Sunflower


THE PHOENIX Staff, Alpha Sigma Alpha treasurer, and member of Kappa Delta Pi scholastic fraternity. Helen Loveless is a Physical Education major and is prominent in Athletics. She is President of the Women's Athletic Association and Sigma Pi Sigma pep sorority. Last year she was a delegate to the A. C. A. C. W. convention in Madison, Wisconsin. She is now corresponding secretary of Alpha Sigma Alpha. Nadine attended Parsons Junior College two years before coming here. Her major is Primary-Kindergarten work, and she is a member of the Primary-Kindergarten club. She was our Rush Captain this year and a most successful one. We would like to have many more like her. We have elected the following officers for next year: President, Celia O'Connor; Vice-President, Marion Perry; Recording Secretary, Verna Barrett; Corresponding Secretary, Virginia Tholen; Treasurer, Virginia Bergerhouse; Registrar, Juanita Nicholson; Chaplain, Virgil Ferrebee; and Editor, Margaret Widick. A large number of Alpha Sigs attended the annual Junior Prom held in the Student Union Ballroom, April 8. The Seniors were guests of the Junior class. Faculty members chaperoned the party. Milt Taggerts, "Vagabonds of the Air" played for the dancing. Juanita Nicholson.

ZETA ZETA CHAPTER NEWS Zeta Zeta chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha held its spring rush party at the sorority house on March 10, 1932. We were all Irish colleens, celebrating St. Patrick's Day. The games we played were quaint and very enjoyable. The decorations, too, carried out the St. Patrick's scheme. Blanche 1Schooley, who served as general chairman, presented the prize for winning the greatest number of games to Mildred Laughlin, one of our guests. The prize was lovely,-a new potato, prettily wrapped in green paper, tied with a beautiful green ribbon. We felt that our party was a success, for Mildred Laughlin, of Linn, Missouri, accepted the invitation to join Alpha Sigma Alpha. On April 6, 1932 formal pledge service was held for Mildred Laughlin. We are proud to have such a charming girl in our midst, and we know that we have a lovely girl who will be a real worker next year:

• • • • The five sororities on our campus, Pi Kappa Sigma, Sigma Sigma Sigma, Theta Sigma Upsilon, Delta Sigma Epsilon, and Alpha Sigma Alpha, gave a Panhellenic dance on April second in the college gymnasium. The gymnasium was decorated in a most beautiful fashion; the dancing floor being virtually walled in with blue, white, green, pink, purple, gold and red streamers extending from the floor upward


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about ten feet. On the east side of the floor, the wall of streamers was interrupted by the insertion of a beautiful old rose-covered well which added much to the ~uaintness of the scene. On the opposite side of the floor a little sequestered nook harbored a loveseat which was nearly always occupied, and on the far end of the floor, in front of a background showing a valley with a snow-capped mountain in the distance, sat the orchestra. The dancing floor was entirely roofed over with dark, semi-dark, and light blue streamers with Japanese lanterns hanging in profusion, greatly enhancing the lighting effects. Many colored balloons were loosed after the dance was well under way. The music for the dance was played by Al Moore's band from Sedalia, Missouri, and the applause they received after every piece they played was evidence enough that their playing was popular with the dancers. Special numbers were played by the orchestra and dedicated to each of the five sororities present. Zeta Zeta chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha has voted to have a social meet ing every other week. On March 30, a committee consisting of Rachel Brenneisen, Mildred Hanthorn, Alice Brayles, and Eugenia Land prepared for a bridge party held at the house. Prizes for high scores were won by Sophie Lee Husman, Alice Brayles, and Martha Mae Marquis. Vve all had such a good time that we have decided that social meetings should' become a custom of Zeta Zeta.

* * * * On April 13, 1932, Kathryn Van Meter, Kathryn Shortridge, D 'Arline Watts, and Virginia Susan Brown e'ntertafned Miss Hatz, Mrs. Nattinger, fo ur prospective rushees, and the chapter with a picnic at the city park. We had so much fun being "just kids"! Miss Hatz was the ring-leader of the gang, . and we played drop the handkerchief, bean-bag, and other grown-up games. After playing so hard, we needed replenishment, and the picnic lunch provided for us was delicious as well as substantial. .-\fter the picnic, we came back to the sorority house to dance. After dancing for ,awhile, we decided to do. somethiiJ-g "exciting," and, wh:u do you think? We had a mock weddmg! You should have seen rhe blushing bride! The minister was so formal and stern that he made the groom so nervous he forgot the ring. One of the bridesmai ds came to the rescue, however, and everything worked out per路 fectl y. Before we parted, we resolved to do our best to make the young couple happy. We have kept the resolution, for eac.h of ~s sent a penny post-card to Niagara Falls where they are spendmg tre1r honeymoon. Doris E. Johnson, ZZ.


THE PHOENIX ETA ETA CHAPTER NEWS Operator. This is Eta Eta chapter speaking from Pittsburg, Kan'sas. Will you please have charges reversed. Did you say they wouldn't accept the charges? Well I'm surprised. I didn't think the depression had hit ASA too. All right we'll pay for the call. Any way the depression has lifted from ASA house here since we've taken our sorority exam-at least for a little while. We have another member in Kappa Delta Pi. Lorene Bartlett, one of our second year actives was initiated into the fraternity Wednesday night, March 30. We're hoping to have two or three initiated next year. A few weeks ago the house girls decided to roll the rugs up in our long living-room and dining-room and have a very informal house dance . There were about ten couples present and since this was the first house dance we've had in our new house we felt it was quite a success. Our basketball team won the conference championship for another season so we had a holiday with a dance in the afternoon and a free show uptown that night. Well it's only a few more weeks until our spring formal which will be held the fourteenth of May. It will be a dinner dance with dinner at the Stillwell Hotel and a dance at Lincoln Park afterwards. We are expecting several of our alumn;.e back and hope we won't be disappointed. Eta Eta only has two seniors this year but several of our girls are taking out life certificates this spring and are expecting to teach next year. Our two seniors are A vys Rae Taylor and Helen Lortz. Everyone seems to be enthused about the convention and several of the girls are thinking of dri ving out to Estes Park in August in order to save expenses. It would be a grand trip and probably the first ASA convention for most of us. Well I'm afraid I've talked several minutes overtime and since the depression is on I think I had better hang up till next time. Perhaps I'll see you at the convention in August-who knows. Helen Lortz.

THETA THETA CHAPTER NEWS Theta Theta wishes to introduce their new pledge, Bernadettil .Carter. Bernadetta is a Junior this year and will be one of our leading actives next year. Emily Hall , our president, was unanimously elected the represe ntative from the School of Education on the Hub, the Boston University Yearbook, by the student body. This honor was given to her as a reward for the fine work she has done this year as one of the assistants. Dot Currier and Kitty Hale were selected by Miss Mabel Friswell,


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the director of the Glee Club, to sing at the annual luncheon of the School of Education, Saturday, April 9th. Miss Florence Hale, (Kitty doesn't claim any relationship to her), the President of the National Educational Association, was the speaker. ASA has charge of the candy that will be on sale at the Dramatic Club play Friday, April rsth. We hope to increase the Girls' Room Fund by a few more dollars this way. All the members of Theta Theta are contributing home made candy and Winona and Kitty are making little baskets out of paper napkins. The administrative staff of the School of Education are planning an "Open House" program, which will be held from April 21st to 23rd. All of the Alpha Sigs have offered their services. Some of them have been addressing the inyitations that are being sent to all the alumni and all of them are either going to be hostesses or assist in some other way at the Tea, which will open the program. Katharine Hale.

What the Coopf(rative House Saw By eight o'clock Saturday night, April 2nd, I, the Cooperative House, situated on the banks of that turbid Charles River, stood on tiptoe with expectation. ' In the reception hall of my three spacious rooms, which the Alpha Sigs had hired for the evening, was ensconced the orchestra already in full swing. The bright theatrical lights were dimmed by cellophane colored to add mystery to the atmosphere of my surroundings. Downstairs Lindy is pouring the scintillant punch into the crystal bowl. Hark! the discordant sound of the doorbell reverberates throughout my halls. I see Miss Bragg step in. She is the Faculty Adviser of Alpha Sigma Alpha at Boston University. She joins Mrs. Sleeper, my House Mother. Oh by the. way, I heard the girls saying that Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher were also going to be chaperons. And here they are, looking just as happy as the day they were married-or almost. I might add a word here to you young co-eds about to become teachers. If you desire popularity among your pupils you would do well to follow in the foot steps of these cheery chaperons. By aow the doorbell is ringing constantly. They come by twos, fours, and sixes. All joyous, happily anticipating the lively program about to commence. Now the pianist announces the first dance. The floor is thronged with couples. The room resoâ&#x20AC;˘mds with dancing feet and syncopated music. As the hour adva'nces I know by the clinking of glasses that many are drinking from the cup that cheers but not inebriates. Crash! Bang! Silence! Goodness me, what is the matter? Has somebody gone crazy? Oh! It is only the pianist announcing the Paul Jones.


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"Form a circle," he shouts. "Ladies face your partners. Grand right and left." There they go again. What is intermission for? Eat, drink, spoon? Take your choicethey did. The orchestra begins on the home stretch now. What is that I hear them saying? I prick up my ears and hold my breath. What Chinatown! Ohl girls, girls-But here my eavesdropping is interrupted by a masculine clamor for a slipper dance. And did they enjoy this dance. As the last half hour before midnight approaches, numbers are distributed among the dancers. Now what can this mean? Ohl the Elimination Dance with the coveted prize for the last couple remaining. And who is that couple? None other than that sweet little southern girl, Evelyq Brooks, and that tall Bob Carruthers. Oh, dear, I wish I could see that better. What is it? They both have a prize. Oh, she is holding it up. She has the daintiest little silver compact with ASA engraved on it and Bob has a cigarette case to match.:" As usual the last dance ends all too soon. Coats and wraps are sought. Car doors bang. Subdued mirth still I hear from without but gradually it fades as the cars drive away. Frances Clark. Constitution-Pledge Manual-Symbolism-these are the things in the minds of every ASA girl today because of sorority examinations which are now over, and because of convention which is still part of the future. I wonder if other chapters have had discussions and arguments pro and con on "suggested changes" that we have had, and if they have come out with a fuller understanding of what ASA is as well as what it stands for professionally. Such a discussion we all participated in this week led by Catharine Haight, President of the City Association. Each member had some worthwhile contribution in the form of a criticism or question. And as one of the members declared afterward, using the words of Emerson, "There is no knowledge that is not power." ASA needs no challenge as to its power, yet I'll add Convention is a perfect time to notice the Sorority knowledge we have amassed this year. Emily Hall.

IOTA IOTA CHAPTER NEWS Dear Sister Chapters Everywhere: Here it is, time again, to tell you all about what we've been doing. That Valentine's dance, that the pledges surprised us with, was perfectly marvelous. They had the cutest shiny red programs, tied with white cord. And ASA in gold on the front. Our "dates" being in many


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cases the same from dance to dance, everyone felt perfectly at home, and exchanged a lot of dances. Then February 24th, we entertained two rushees at a George Washington party, which Marian Haven planned. The prize stunts were very clever. We drew "George's" profile with our left hands, (or vice versa) and the results were astounding. And we tried to identify ten full page advertisements which had been pinned up, but which had no clew attached as to which product they advertised,-just the picture. The one which advised us to "smell it," was the stumbling block, and how humble we felt when Fels Naptha soap was mentioned! March 2, we had formal initiation for Harriet Larsen of Council Bluffs, and Mayme Callahan of Des Moines. The banquet was lovely. We ate by candlelight,-tall yellow candles, in green glass holders, and a bouquet of jonquils in the center. And instead of holding it at some hotel, we stayed right at home, and had our grate fire burning! Personality, Power, Poise, and Purpose were the subjects of the toasts. Of course, the to-be initiates performed for us, and a heated debate on the time-honored question on whether or not the egg preceded the hen, or the hen the egg, was quite the highlight of the evening. The . initiation service was, as always, beautiful. At one of our recent meetings, .we happened to discuss the meaning of our educational meetings, and decided that on the whole, they would be more successful if we were to follow a subject through several meetings. We voted on Poetry, Music, Art, Short Stories, etc., and the Short Story received the majority. So for our remaining meetings we are reading and discussing the different types. A committee is in char.ge, and each member is asked to do something toward ~he discussiOn. The recently organized Men's Professional Panhellenic and the Women's Pan-Hell, had a joint dance some time ago. It was a No-date affair, and terribly exciting. Then on April 2 we had a Treasure Hunt. It was a great thrill to decipher the clews and to get there first. But the committee in charge had more fun than anyone, I think, in hiding the clews. Of course, they were hidden all over the campus, and in most of the statutes in Des Moines-the soldiers' and sailors' monument on the State Capitol grounds was a choice spot! Then the trail led to a cemetery, and to Roosevelt high school, and the Drake Observatory, and numerous other places we all knew, but which were hard to recognize in code. Marian Haven and "Art" won first prize with seven clues, and they only won by one point. The "treasure" was a leather treasure chest with a box of candy, and underneath, stationery. After the search, we returned to the house, and ate hot dogs, and ice cream cones while perched around on radiators and the like, trying to look nonchalant. And there were a few minutes left for dancing, so the evening certainly had variety. April I I we elected officers for the coming year. They are, Leona


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Gabrielson, president; Georgia Barton, vice-president; Margaret Halverson, secretary; and Harriet Larsen, treasurer. Leona and Harriet will represent us officially at Convention, but several others of us hope to be there to swell our number. Then Thursday evening, April 14, we had our own Mary Wagner with us. Our alumni chapter entertained her, and we all had a wonderful informal discussion. Talking about the Convention has us all saving our pennies, and vowing that we'll get there if we have to walk. So,-here's wishing you luck-and we'll see you at Estes Park!

Georgia Barton.

KAPPA KAPPA CHAPTER NEWS Looking back over the past two months it seems to me that we Temple-ites are turning into social butterflies. "A well rounded college education" is our motto. Thus we plentifully mix our social and scholastic interests. One extremely interesting event was an exhibition of hair-dressing sponsored by the Home Economics Department. Several of our girls were models for the "hair sculptor" who came to us from New York. His ideas were extremely modern and many of the girls who went in with gorgeous flowing locks came out with a shorn yet very attractive appearance. We were told that only "flappers" now wear long hair. At the Panhellenic tea in February two of our girls, Helen Poser and Margaretta Hoover, supplied the entertainment by harmonizing a song _from each sorority. , February 18th was a big day at our house, in fact a red letter day, for we held our first rush party at the home of Mrs. Smaltz, one of our patronesses; and we received a gift of a radio for the house. This was a gift from the city association and our own seniors. Of course we started it the minute it was installed and it's hardly had one minute of rest since. May Day, although this year is only the third annual event, has come to be a much anticipated happening, and causes much excitement on the campus, especially at election time. This year three of our girls, Margaret Eves, Evelyn Aiken, and Hannah Dietrich, are on the May Court. Our second rush party, a dinner dance, must have been a great success for we are now pledging thirteen girls. The souvenirs. at the dinner were double compacts. The pledges are: Thelma Startz, Home Economics Department; Jean Kerr, Music Department; Jean Wolf, Music Department; Betty Twining, Music Department; Louise Stryker, Music Department; Anne Ruppin, Music Department; Nancy Walker, Kindergarten Department; Mary Kerlin, Kindergarten Department; Jane Farwell, Physical Education Depart-


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ment; Elma Sheeley, Secondary Education Department; Mildred Lock, Secondary Education Department; Mary Summington, Secondary Education Department; Ruth MacMenamin, Secondary Education Department. An excellent means of keeping in trim is to exercise. One way in which we do it is to dance. Three big formals such as the Junior Prom, Commerce Alumni Dance, and "Y" Formal, besides quite a few "informals" keep us all in "tip-top" condition. Now to go and study, for life is not all just a social whirl. No1路ma Rebecca Nyce.

NU NU CHAPTER NEWS

Dear Phoenix: I have so much to tell you-all about rushing season, with its general excitement and uncertain results. We had been waiting and planning for it from December 'til February. On Saturday evening, February 6th, we had our Panhellenic party in the living room of the dormitory where formal introductions were made. We danced, played bridge and ate our ice cream and cake, accompanied by an orchestra that wouldn't let us keep our feet still. Everything was .i n tune and we were all quite thrilled. We sent out the invitations to our inform~! party on Monday, and on Thursday, the eleventh, we "received" at the Drexel lodge. All the Nu Nu girls wore Dutch costumes and shoes added to the Hollandish atmosphere. Our buffet supper was Dutch, from liverwurst with Dutch potato salad to Dutch apple pie-with cheese! Then we gave the old tragedy, "The Fatal Quest" and made it a little more tragic by having "tl].e Kinr" drink his poison from a stein. A broom dance to mix us up, bridge and more dancing (to somewhat uncertain radio music) completed the evemng. On Saturday, February 2oth, we gave our formal rushing dance at the Chateau Crillon. There were eighteen rushees, as many Nu Nu girls and a few alumn~-whom we welcomed with open arms-to add pep to the party. The favors were silver link-bracelets with a hamhered silver plaque bearing the initials ASA. These were attached to shoulder corsages of sweet peas and roses. Dancing, and playing "Electricity" on the heavy carpets along the corridor added to the fun we had. Silence period began Sunday morning, February 21st, and ends Wednesday at twelve o'clock. (Meantime we shiver in our shoes.) Freddie finally had her rummage sale on Saturday, January 29th. There was quite a store, and quite a crowd; consequently the addition to the convention budget was more than we expected. There is to be another sale after Easter and we are all expecting to dig out the old clothes while we are home from Easter vacation. We have been talking convention quite enthusiastically-asking


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about the last one and suggesting things for. this one. Romayne Gregory, Chapter president last year and delegate to last convention suggests: "Informal discussions by groups of active chapter delegates, and more discussions from the floor in whicn girls and not advisors participate." Greg says "I liked the friendly atmosphere at the meetings, and the sisterly feeling that prevailed." The Chalets and Estes Park sound fascinating. We wish we all could go. But those of us who can't are doing our bit now. That seems to be all for this time until May.

* * * â&#x20AC;˘ After the flurry of rushing season and bidding was quiet, four new girls took their initial service. Peg Yarnell, Betty Allen, Alida Newcomb, and Emeline Putman took the Ribbon Service degree on March the third. Peg Yarnell and Emeline Putman were pledged on March the tenth, and Emeline was given final initiation service on March fifteenth. Nu Nu chapter took the sorority examinations on Wednesday, March the ninth and breathed a sigh of relief. Term examinations began on March eighteenth and continued through the twenty-fourth when we all trooped home to see the Easter bunny and collect our wellearned forty winks. After a delightful vacation, we returned to Drexel, eager for the next term's work (which statement you may read with such intonations as you see fit), and with us returned our long-absent president, Teddy Swartz, whom we had been missing for a term. On Saturday, April ninth, Nu Nu chapter again packed off to the Drexel Lodge for a happy week-end. This time for an informal dinner-dance. Dinner and the orchestra began at seven-thirty and we all had the time of our lives until curfew rang. Then, sitting around the fire, eating nuts, and "talking things over" we decided to "do this again." Sunday passed uneventfully except for a football game with a roll, (Blanche's new game). Then home for tea, with a delightful time to remember (in spite of the rain). Virginia Moore.

OMICRON OMICRON CHAPTER NEWS Omicron Omicron chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha was well represented in the beauty contest held recently at Kent State College. The contest was featured by the Chestnut Burr, the college annual, and judged by Zeigfield. Miss Anderson, the winner of the contest, is one of our most prominent members. Miss Louiane Schram and Miss Mary Dorze are also members of our chapter and entrants in the contest.

* * * *

Miss Frieda Sturgill, newly initiated member of Omicron Omicron chapter is \Very prominent in dramatic club work. Miss Sturgill had


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one of the leading roles in the play "Craig's Wife" and is now working on a role in the play "The Wooden Kimona" to be given a't Kent College soon. On April 23 Omicron Omicron chapter held their first closed dance of the season in Moulton Hall. Every one had a wonderful time . . On May 23 this chapter is giving a dance for all the Greek Letter sororities and fraternities on the campus. This dance is to be held at Meadowview Country Club, which is nothing but an old barn remodeled into a clever dance hall and club house. Decorated with college pennants and echoing college songs, the old barn, we hope, will be the stage of a picturesque and entertaining dance.

PI PI CHAPTER NEWS Another sorority year has ended, and Pi Pi is again congratulating those favored individuals whom we have chosen as our leaders in helping us to "Aspire, Seek, Attain." May I introduce them to you: President, Vernabelle Barlett; Vice-President, Virginia Donnigan; Recording Secretary, Alice Gregor; Treasurer, Elizabeth Lynch; Chaplain, Velma Heist; Corresponding Secretary, Orcada Sinclair; Registrar, Shirley Stowell; Editor, Maxine Nelso.n; Panhellenic Representatives, Marjorie Moreland and Doris Palmer; Alumn:e Officer, Orcada Sinclair. Don't you wish you could know them? We expect that you will see Vernabelle at convention-she is our chapter delegate, and please don't call her anything but "Benny," or I'm afraid she'll be homesick. Of course, we're hoping that Benny may be accompanied by a goodly number of Pi Pi sisters, but good intentions and desires do not entirely compensate for the fact that Estes Park and Buffalo are far apart. At any rate, we can assure you of the fact that you will meet at least one more Pi Pi girl before the end of another year-Maxine Nelson, our new chapter editor. I am sure that Maxine's charming manner and personality will be reflected in her PHoENIX contributions, and you will thoroughly enjoy them. We are very happy to say that our own Miss Small is able to be with us again. We have missed her presence and leadership. The campus of State Teacher's College at Buffalo is brimming over with activity. To give you a bird's eye view of it all , I'll start with the Senior Ball, to be held on April 15, in the Hotel Statler Ballroom, with Jack Valentine's Orchestra (perhaps you've heard him in the "Lucky Strike" radio programs). Margaret Daly is chairman of chaperones. The thrilling event of the Senior Ball is to be the culmination of an all-clay program which, it is hoped, will set a new precident on our campus, namely, Senior Day. The day is to be appropriately started by an assembly program consisting of an original musical


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comedy, all music for which was composed by a member of the Senior Class. The next important event will be "Moving Up Day," the day on which the illustrious Seniors proudly don their "mortar boards and tassels" for the first time, and the traditional green caps of the Freshmen are set afloat in a canoe on Delaware Park Lake, to be replaced by orange berets, signifying the presence of Sophomores. Each class goes through the "Arch of Progress," thus denoting the passing of a year of college life. Alberta Ottenot is very capably carrying out her responsibilities as chairman of this important affair. Can you not imagine how impressive and fu!l of sentiment and meaning such a program will be, especially so in that it takes place in lovely Delaware Park, just across from our own campus. Louise McCracken and Virginia Donnigan have brought honor to Pi Pi chapter by being members of State's champion basketball team. Ruth Brems has been elected secretary of the Senior Class. The activities of the year are to be concluded with the commencement exercises which will be held during the week of June 13. Pi Pi is losing several members this year, and although thoughts of commencement and entering the new life before us present a thrilling prospect, it is not without a pang of loneliness that we think of the friendships which we must leave behind, especially those made so dear by the bonds of love and fellowship in the sisterhood of Alpha S\gma Alpha. Good luck, everyone, in June finals, and may traditional Alpha Sig luck and success be yours. A/wilda McCumber.

RHO RHO CHAPTER NEWS Rho Rho has been very active socially during the past two months. Several of the most successful affairs to be given on the campus were sponsored by ASA. On Wednesday night, February ro, Mrs. W. J. Harvie, one of our patronesses invited all of us to go to the Presbyterian church 路with her to hear Gypsy Smith, famous evangelist. After hearing his interesting sermon we went to Mrs. Harvie's home, where we played bridge, danced and had delicious hot chocolate, sandwiches and cake. For our Valentine celebration we had a formal team at the chapter house for the mothers of all the actives and pledges and all the patronesses. We used the colors of crimson and white for the decorations and refreshments. The house mothers of all the fraternities, sororities and dormitories, and a representative from each sorority were included on the guest list. Due to the fact that we were in need of money for several small debts, Mrs. W. R. Keesee, another of our patronesses, gave a benefit


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bridge party for us at her home. A George Washington motif was carried out in the tallies, score cards, refreshments and prizes. Besides the funds collected, Mrs. Keesee presented us with an end table which we are using in our living room. February 26 marked the date of one of the most successful rush teas that Rho Rho has ever given. There were more than thirty rushees present. Crimson and white were the colors used and red roses were given to each of the rushees. Mrs. Vivian Richardson, house mother, poured tea. The receiving line was composed of the officers of the chapter, faculty advisor and patronesses. March 30 was the date of the annual Panhellenic assembly and ASA was in charge of the program. There were piano solos, readings, short talks, vocal music, a short play and several other numbers by the other sororities in the local Panhellenic council, and then came the Alpha Sig contribution to the program. We had discussed for a long time just what we would do and decided that we would have a novelty presentation of our Sweetheart Song. Mary Lillyan Gorsuch at the piano and Irene Simonton, violin, accompanied Pete Evans, Jesse Given and Marie Sammons who had a very good vocal arrangement of the song. It was far the most enjoyed number on the program and the chapter has received many compliments on the beauty of the song and its presentation. On Friday night, March 31, we had formal pledge service for seven girls at the chapter house. Those who were pledged were: Ann Baker, Julia Botkin, June Garrett, Jennie Cooksey, Marie Sammons, Hilda O'Dell, and Harriet Ketchum. In creating new friendships and strengthening old ones there are few methods more effective than visits of one chapter's members to another chapter. Even more effective is this when the occasion for the visit is some social function. Rho Rho received an invitation to the winter formal of Lambda Lambda chapter at Ohio State and five of our members were present at the dance, meeting the girls and the chaperones and having breakfast at the chapter house. It was a lovely dance and Rho Rho certainly enjoyed every minute of it and deeply appreciates the thought that prompted the invitation. Only recently has it become the custom to invite one orgamzation on Marshall's campus to spend an afternoon with another, especially among the Greek organizations. Therefore, we felt particularly honored when the Phi Tau Alpha fraternity invited our sorority to spend Sunday afternoon with them at their fraternity house on March 6. All of us went, taking our house mother as chaperone and we certainly enjoyed the afternoon very much, playing bridge, dancing, and meeting the whole group. On March 10 we held ribbon service at the chapter house for eleven pledges. After the service we had dinner at Kyoto Inn, one of the down town tearooms, for all the new pledges. There were after din-


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ner speeches from all the active members and we sang several of the sorority songs. Our house mother, Mrs. Vivian Richardson, chaperoned. Virginia Shewey. On Friday night, March 4, Rho Rho of Alpha Sigma Alpha entertained with a St. Patrick Bridge party. at the home of Virginia Jeffers. Green and gold were used in invitations, refreshments and in decoration. Bridge and dancing were enjoyed during the evening. Guests included fifteen rushees, Mrs. G. K. Jeffers, Mrs. Vivian Richardson, the house mother and the active members. Eloise Keller.

Through the Eyes of a Pledge "Well, Jerry, are you going to it?" asked Tony. "I'd really like to, myself, but I'm a little scared." "Yes, let's go, Tony. Let's see-you wear hat and gloves-oh Jyesyou take off one glove, don't you?" "Which one?" inquired Jerry. "Isn't it the right?" And thus the two freshmen began their life falteringly in the unknown world of sorority life. After the tea, the girls found that it really wasn't so bad after all. They only dropped their fork, spilled tea all over themselves, or stumbled over the Dean's foot, and none of those things were so terribly bad. "Gee! Aren't the girls lovely? Don't you like them? Wouldn't you love to join?"-and so on rambled the two girls. Time passes and we follow the girls farther on. In their dormitory room we again hear their conversation. "Aren't you scared and thrilled to death, Tony? I can hardly wait to get that ribbon. Won't you be proud to wear it?" "You bet," answered Jerry, "and to think, we'll soon be sorority girls." After the services that night the girls proudly walked home hand in hand, saying, "Wasn't that service pretty? And that song is darling. Let's see, it went like this, didn't it?" And she hummed the air of the Alpha Sig Sweetheart Song which the actives had been singing that evening. 路 "Didn't that quartet sound pretty? And that dinner was so delicious. It made me feel as if I had had a peek at New York and was dining with Joan Crawford or Clark Gable." And it was like this far into the night as the girls talked on about the sorority. Easter. And the pledges are all preparing to take their test and get their second degree and pledge pin. Jerry rushed in and cried out "Oh Tony, isn't it just too dear? The folks at home want me to take the sorority. Come on and let's go and tell-Why, what's the matter? ' "I'm so glad you can take it, but Dad is out of work and I'm afraid I can't," Tony answered, "I'm glad you can take it, tho."


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Everything was quiet that_evening. The girls were quite changed and very calm. "Oh Tony, honest I'm awfully sorry. I'll tell you what. I'llwhat? All right. Tony, you're wanted on the phone." Jerry was then on her way to the sorority house for her pledge service when she heard Tony call, "Jerry! Jerry! Wait! I'm going with you. Dad say~ it's all right." After the service the girls walked home, prouder of their pins than they had ever been of their ribbons. "Tony-Are you through sweeping the kitchen? I have to move this divan. Will you give me a hand?" This was a few days after pledge service and they were at the chapter house completing their house duties. "Surely, be there in a minute. I've found out that we have another pledge duty, too," she said, coming from the kitchen. "What's that? " asked Jerry. "Any more housecleaning?" "No, we have to write an. article for the .PHOENIX. I suppose I'd better get to work." And that is how I came to write this. Ann Baker.

SIGMA SIGMA SIGNAL Edited by Allyne Fryberger, Western State College Volume I.

GUNNISON, COLORADO

Number

1

EVENTS ON THE CAMPUS BREAKFAST Dormitory girls of Sigma Sigma Chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha entertained the sorority at a waffle breakfast in the dormitory sun porch Sunday morning, April 3路 The dormitory, Chipeta Hall, was just lately finished. The sun porch, which affords a view of the surrounding mountains, was a very lovely setting for the early morning gathering. Immediately after the breakfast, pledge services were held at the chapter house for L. Lois Smythe of Longmont, Colorado.

MOTHER'S DAY The one day when our hearts are filled to overflowing with emotion larger than ourselves-Mother's Day. Usually we take our Mothers more or less for granted, they are just there and they are ours, but this one day makes us stop and try to analyze our feelings toward them. Of course, we love Dad too, but somehow Mother has always been closer to us-we go to her with our heartaches and pains, and Mother always knows what to do, she is the


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one who waits and prays for our safekeeping-she is Mother. Sigma Sigma Chapter â&#x20AC;˘is trying to plan a Mother's Day that will help her to realize all over again just what she means to us. We will have . a large percentage of Mothers present. The present plans include church in a group, initiation services, and a dinner at the leading hotel. PLEDGED Sigma Sigma Chapter announces the pledging of Dona Donahue, Portland, Colorado, Vera Phillips, Palisade, Colorado, on March r6; L. Lois Smythe, Longmont, Colorado, on April3; Rose Marian Poe, Pueblo, Colorado, and Theodoisa Parsons, Montrose, Colorado, on April 6. Ribbon Services were held at the sorority chapter house. ENTERTAINED Miss Audre Peck was hostess to Sigma Sigma Council at a buffet dinner Monday evening, April 4, at her home. Immediately after the dinner, a business meeting was held. Nomination~ for next year's officers were discussed. FORMAL Plans for Sigma Sigma's annual Spring Formal are to be completed in a few days. This formal, given on May 6, will be the first of the vanous sorority and fraternity

formals to be given. In accordance with the usual custom, plans for the dance are being kept secret; however, it is hinted that the music will be good and the programs clever. SONG (Tune: "Was That the Human Thing to Do?") Never thought that I would ever find A sorority that was so doggoned divine. One with girls . so darling sweet and kind Now that's our dear old ASA All our girls have got such hearts of gold, And oh my gosh the fellows they hold! Now they're the best in all the world I'm told, Now that's our dear old ASA. Now we're not trying to boost things up, That's been done long ago. All our girls are on the uppity up, That's all to say and soASA is the best in the world, And we're just a couple of pledgy girls. ' Now that we've said our little sayHail to our ASA. -Composed by Ruth Lowden and Vera Phillips, Pledges of Sigma Sigma Chapter.


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Where, oh where should I begin? Oh where, oh where, can I stop? For the material is long but the space is short-yes, and so far into the night-. Again, we are proud to have possession of the Panhellenic Scholarship Shield for this semester and we are looking forward to gaining it for next and third successive semester so it will be permanently ours,it was awarded to us at the Panhellenic Semester Dinner on Tuesday, March 29. -Our girls have already begun practice for ASA basketball team which is going to compete in the Intramural contests this spring. -Last semester our campus welcomed the new music sorority, Sigma Alpha Iota. Kate Pratt was our guest to the Theta party last week and reports a splendid time. -Last week we took "snaps"-yes, singles, doubles and whole sets for the Reveille. -Tau Tau has three lovely new pledges-Ethel and Atha Miller of Nekoma, Kansas, and Elizabeth Eppstein of Great Bend, Kansas. -Monday evening, March 21, formal initiation service was held for Marguarite Riley, Miss Mae Paul and Eleanor Winters. -Following the Easter Holidays we issued invitations to our Spring Formal which is April 9路 -It was great sport the other day for about ten of us to sit in one of Miss Paul's classes and take our tests. I'm certain our deep thinking and serious expressions must have been an inspiration to the students. -Our Junior and Senior members are busy selling tickets to their respective plays which are to be given soon. -Several of our girls have also gotten their schools for next year-we regret losing them from our active chapter but feel they , are quite fortunate to have positions this year. -And now for real news-Louie Platts, our secretary, didn't seem quite the same after the Easter vacation, she was much happier, and after some questioning we find she was married Friday, March 25, at Wellsford, Kansas, to Wesley Freeman who is a Junior and president of KBT, as well as being prominent in school activities. -Monday, April 4, Tau Tau elected a few of their officers for next year. Shirley Baird is the new President. -Tau Tau is planning on Miss Paul, our faculty advisor, and Shirley to represent us at Estes. -We regret you can't all be guests at the Spring Party because we're going on a cruise. S. S. ASA leaves the Woman's Building Dock at 8:30 o'clock and the entire party are off for a "good-time" in Danceland. A cable from the Captain says the gang plank will be open in order that early guests may select the best deck chairs. As Tire-ing as they may seem we have life preservers and little "Lemon-drop-men" so there'll be no need to fear the trip. And, what could be lovelier than to dance on the deck to muted music under a marvelous full moon? -Sorry we can't have you all there, because you'll miss lots of fun. -And we're all looking forward to the Panhellenic Formal next month just before the commencement activities begin. Wee Wee Winters.


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Waffle Supper Sylvia Schlegel entertained Saturday night at her home with a waffle supper for members 'of Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority. The rooms were decorated with flowers. The favors and place cards were in keeping with the observation of the Washington bi-centennial. Fallowing supper the guests attended the Pittsburg-Hays basketball game. Beth Harkness.

CHI CHI CHAPTER NEWS Chi Chi again,-and, dear me, how busy we are! Although January finals are over, and the new semester half over, it seems that we have more lessons to do than ever. Of course you understand how really sad that is, because, conscientous souls that we are, we simply can't neglect classwork for a good time, and every Alpha Sig loves her fun and frivolity. Perhaps that's why we are giving a Panhellenic dance at the Highland Country Club on April 16. Anyway, it's going to be verx nice, especially so, in that some of our ex-collegios, whom we see so seldom, will be with us. On February 20, we had our initiation services ahd I am copying the following from our local newspaper. "Formal initiation services of Chi Chi chapter of Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority were held at 3 o'clock February 20, at the chapter house. Initiates were Misses Edith Baum, Eileen Brown, Mildred Inman, Margaret Isenhour, Elizabeth Kidwell, Frances Pearce, Dorothy Thompson, Carolyn Frankel and Mildred Morgan. "The Mother's Club of the sorority held its services after the chapter rites. Those initiated were Mesdames F. E. Arnott, Jesse Retherford, Theodore Baum, Irwin Thompson, William Daw, Irene Lamb and J. J. Carney. "A formal banquet in the Hunters' lodge of the Marott Hotel followed. Spring flowers decorated the table. Corsages were presented to the initiates of both organizations. "Miss Josephine Sherrod, president, was toastmistress. Miss Helen Risley welcomed the new members and Mrs. Nettie Turner welcomed the Mother's Club." On April II, we held election of officers and the following were elected: President, Dorothy Thompson; Vice-President, Mildred Morgan; Secretary, Elizabeth Kidwell; Treasurer, Margaret Isenhour; Registrar, Mildred Inman; Chaplain, Frances Pearce; Editor, Eileen Brown. Well, King ASA, don't you think Chi Chi has been quite successful in her accomplishments? I do, and I'm going to keep in closer touch with them hereafter.


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MARRIAGES Beta Beta:

Kathleen McCay to Charles H. Brown on February 27, 1932. Xi Xi:

Ruth Pickhardt to Mont McMill~n on July 22, 1931. Sigma Sigma: Celestia Yost to F. E. Greer on February 8, 1932.

Tau Tau: Louie Platts to Wesley Freeman on March 25, 1932. Rho Rho: Beatrice Annice Graham to Charles Munson. The wedding took place in Charleston, W. Va., on March 26, 1932. They will live in Brammar, W. Va., until the first of June. Mrs. Munson received her A.B. degree from Marshall College in Jun~, 1931. Mr. Munson is a graduate of West Virginia Wesleyan. Pauline Powell to Paul Boggs. The wedding took place in Huntington, W. Va., on February 13, 1932. They will reside in Pittsburgh, Pa. Mrs ~ Boggs received her A.B. degree from Marshall College in June, 1930. Mr. Boggs also received his A. B. degree from Marshall College in June, 1930. He was a member of Sigma Psi fraternity. Faye Shaffer to Neil Chenweth. The wedding took place in Huntington, W. Va., on August 5, 1931. They are living in Chapmanville, W.Va., where both are teaching in the high school.

BIRTHS Mr. and Mrs. Orin Dye Guyton (Margaret Potter Woodard, PP), announce the birth of a daughter on march 13, 1932, at 109 Virginia Street, Sistersville, W. Va. Mr. and Mrs. William K. Gardner (Zara Garratt, PP), announce the birth of a daughter, Zara Ann, on March 5, 1932, at Clarksburg, W. Va.


Address Correction Please send my

PHoEN IX

to the following address:

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Marriage Announcement kf aid en N arne ·····································································································································Married Name···············································'··················································································-··· New Address

Date of Marriage.................................................................................................................................

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A famous tyrant was Polycrates of Samos. Island after island fell at the approach of his warriors, and Spart a was helpless. So great was his power -that finally his friend, the King of Egypt, wrote him, "The gods are jealous of your prosperity. Give up your most valuable possession." To appease the wrath of the gods, Polycrates regretfully threw into the sea his rarest treasure-an emerald signet ring. A few days later, an enormous fish was brought to the feasting table.- Behold, when it was opened, there lay the emerald ring. When the King of Egypt heard the news, he thought, "The gods have refused his offering. A terrible misfortune will befall him." And so it was, Polycrates fell into the hands of an enemy who put him to death by crucifixion. Moral: Cherish your Balfour ring-it is . a symbol of friendship.

L.G. BALFOUR CO. ATTLEBORO ,

MASS â&#x20AC;˘

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KNOWN WHEREVER. THERE. ARE. 5CHOOL~ AND COLLEGES

Sole Official fewelers to Alpha Sigma A lpha

Asa phoenix vol 18 no 4 may 1932  
Asa phoenix vol 18 no 4 may 1932  
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