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IN THIS ISSUE...

SPRING 2018

Message from Chris Overtree . p.2

Making Ohana Their Own . p.6-7

Alumni Notes & News p.10-11

2017 Aloha Annual Fund . p.15

Spotlight: Ohana Family Camp

Ohana Especially Meaningful for Military Families JENN MERRITT Director of Communications

Ohana Director Vanessa Riegler and her staff can’t wait to welcome their first campers of the season on June 24: military families from Vermont and New Hampshire. “The energy at Ohana during Military Family Week is distinctive,” says Vanessa. “It’s a privilege to help these hard-working parents who serve our country connect with one another and build lifelong memories.” The Hendershots from Georgia, Vermont are one such military family.

including the Vermont National Guard Foundation, the New Hampshirebased Jack and Dorothy Byrne Foundation, the Upper Valley United Way, the Ohana Endowment Fund, and the Aloha Annual Fund—the last two of which are funded by hundreds of members of our Aloha family. Living geographically dispersed rather than together on a base or post, National Guard families lack a local community who share similar experiences, such as the stress of a parent’s deployment. The week at Ohana Family Camp enables every family member—soldier, spouse, child—to connect with military peers and make new friends.

“Our entire family loved the week we spent at Ohana Family Camp,” says Melissa Hendershot, whose husband Charles joined the Vermont National Guard in 2009. “Two years later our kids still talk about it. Going to ‘summer camp’ with your children and sharing new adventures is wonderful. Ohana’s program not only benefits the soldier, but recognizes and appreciates the family that serves the military as well.” Since its launch in 2010, Ohana’s Military Family Week has brought together 115 families for one week every summer. Accommodations, activities, and meals are free of charge. A broad tapestry of financial support makes the program possible,

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If you haven't taken in the view of Middlebrook Valley from Ohana's main lodge, add it to your "must see" list. When you visit in person, you'll be wowed by the sight of Lake Fairlee from the porch.

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A Letter from the Executive Director

Dear Friends, As The Aloha Foundation embarks on its 50th year, we simultaneously celebrate and look to the future. Secure in our 113-year history of serving children and families, we contemplate and plan for how we want to be defined during our next 50 years. In this spring issue of Reveille, we explore our youngest program, the now 10-year-old Ohana Family Camp on Lake Fairlee. Ohana Family Camp started with a courageous pivot. The 1911 “Shanty Shane” property became available while the Foundation was amid a major capital campaign. Recognizing the potential to round out our programming across a camper’s lifetime, our leadership envisioned Ohana as a place where families might gather before children were old enough to attend Hive, Aloha, or Lanakila, or after when their time as residential campers was complete. While establishing a new camp was a major enterprise—from grounds and building improvements to program planning to marketing—we were successful because of the Foundation’s agility and strength. Ohana’s first directors Deb and Andy Williams, and then our current director Vanessa Riegler, asked themselves, “What does Aloha look and feel like as a family camp?” Allowing the mission to guide our decisions was invaluable. It taught us to foster adaptability in how we serve people in a changing world yet stay true to our traditions and who we are as a community. Each summer, hundreds of families find peace and reconnection at Ohana Family Camp in ways that mirror what children have experienced at the Alohas since 1905. And Ohana families return regularly. In fact, a high return rate means Ohana’s cabins are full during the nine weeks of family camp programming. More than a bridge to and from residential camp, Ohana has become a place where families describe their own transformation. In the success story of Ohana lies the key to longevity and relevance: our ability to adapt the Aloha spirit into different but harmonizing elements. Each summer, Ohana’s connection to The Aloha Foundation deepens. And each year, we learn from what Ohana has to teach. Aloha & Skol, CHRIS OVERTREE L87-88,*89-05,DP16-18,F*15-PRESENT

Aloha Foundation Program Leaders Chris Overtree Executive Director | Sarah Gordon Littlefield Aloha Director | Kathy Plunkett Aloha Hive Director | Bryan Partridge Lanakila Director Jason Knowles Hulbert Outdoor Center Director | Stuart Fairbairn Horizons Day Camp Director | Vanessa Riegler Ohana Family Camp Director

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Join us to honor...

The Aloha Foundation’s 50th Anniversary this year! STAY TUNED for more details about our November celebration in Fairlee and other opportunities to recognize this important milestone, as we salute the past and build toward a strong and successful future.

Ohana Especially Meaningful for Military Families CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Ohana campers Therese Farrell and her husband are parents of three children ages 10, 7, and 3. After active duty service overseas, they moved to Berlin, Vermont. “We both joined the Army National Guard because we wanted to continue our service and be a part of the military community,” Therese says. Recalling her family’s week at Ohana in 2016, she adds, “It was an excellent experience for our family, and we have since gone back as volunteers to help staff open the camp. I am genuinely grateful for the opportunity and hope to continue our relationship with The Aloha Foundation.” One challenge of the program, says Vanessa, is the growing waitlist. At this time, families may participate in the program just once, even though a successive visit would be beneficial. After applying, qualified families are selected and then assigned accommodations at Ohana on a first-come, first-served basis. Many who wish to participate cannot because there simply isn’t space. Last year, Vanessa resolved to create an additional week of camp so more military families could attend. With careful planning and key support from the Byrne Foundation, Vanessa succeeded: on August 12, she and her staff will welcome a second group of military families to Ohana, a week just for them.

2017 Ohana Family Campers 722 64 27 6

family campers military family campers states represented countries represented

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Ohana Activities: Something for Everyone! Whether you are 5 or 75, love quiet time or group fun, are an experienced artist or have never picked up a paintbrush—Ohana has just the program for you. Ohana specializes in mixed age groups and ability levels, and staff strive to create ways that activities can be open to everyone. Try something new or delve more deeply into an activity you love. And if you prefer to take in the view from the main lodge or finish reading your novel, you are welcome to do that, too!

WOODSHOP Guests of all ages enjoy Ohana’s woodshop. Specializing in hand tools rather than power, this experience focuses on Ohana campers’ own creativity. It is a space for quiet relaxation to work on carving, sanding, or staining projects like spoons, spatulas, ping pong paddles, and carved wooden birds.

ART BARN Imagination is the name of the game in Ohana’s beautiful Art Barn (pictured on the back cover). Campers paint, make pottery and baskets, weave, sew, design jewelry, tie dye shirts, and much more. Parents and grandparents delve into arts and crafts projects alongside their children— and often surprise each other with their creativity.

ARCHERY A very popular activity among Ohana campers, archery begins with a lesson that covers parts of the bow and arrow, selecting the right bow, safety rules, proper stance, shooting, aiming, and retrieving followed by an opportunity to free shoot or participate in games or fun challenges.

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We couldn’t do it without you—thanks for being part of the Aloha community. WATERFRONT Ohana’s beautiful waterfront on Lake Fairlee is a favorite for families. The beach has a shallow, sandy play area perfect for younger children. More experienced swimmers find deeper water and two floating rafts. The peaceful Pavilion offers shade and picnic tables while canoes, kayaks, paddleboards, and sailboats are available for exploring the lake. Certified lifeguards are on duty at all times.

EVENING PROGRAM After dinner, Ohana campers have the option of participating in an evening program. Throughout the week, families might watch a performance by Marko the Magician or a professional storyteller, sing around the campfire, cut loose at a barn dance, stargaze, or learn from a local naturalist.

WELLNESS The natural beauty of Ohana and the break from normal routines inspire rejuvenation. Campers explore ways to improve their overall well-being with simple nature walks, hikes on nearby trails, or through yoga, tai chi, meditation, and even belly dancing.

SO MUCH MORE! Ohana campers also enjoy activities like soccer, tennis, disc golf, capture the flag, ping pong, Scrabble, lawn games, gnome homes, high ropes course, climbing tower, off-site hikes, and local attractions such as biking, golf, horseback riding, or hot air ballooning.

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Making Ohana Your Own Russo Family The season leading up to our week at Ohana in July 2017 was plagued with struggle. My husband, a cancer survivor for three years, had been diagnosed for a second time with the disease. The year was intense and serious, revolving around doctor visits, tests, hospitals, radiation, chemotherapy, and quiet conversations. I had been living and breathing the precarious balance of being my husband’s advocate and cancer care giver, and, in contrast, also being the normalcy-bringer, homework-checker, and decision-maker to our home and four sons. Life had not been easy, and by the summer, I had lost myself somewhere in the urgency and sickness.

The extended Russo family posed for a photo on the famous Ohana rock in July 2017.

But then came Ohana. From the moment we were welcomed and directed to our cabin, I knew we had arrived at a special place. Apparently, there is an unnatural—or is it natural—effect that falls on this unique place. I sensed it shortly after arrival and when I inquired, I learned that this effect is often called the 'Ohana Bubble.' What I had detected, others had also tuned in to, identified, and labeled.

My definition of the Ohana Bubble is this: a little slice of heaven on earth. This is where the cozy and rustic, yet comfortable, accommodations are free of electronic distractions—no internet, TV, cell phones, or computers; where the view from the main lodge does nothing less than inspire; where we would soon find new friends, quiet moments, crazy delicious meals (that I had nothing to do with!), and plenty of activities to choose from. I remember walking around camp that first day, excited to explore what there was to see. I felt like a little child and I recall a grin crept across my face for the first time in a while. I was excited to discover everything Ohana had to offer! So, we jumped in. During the week we started to learn the gentle rhythm of the camp. We scouted out the frisbee golf course, became pottery makers and basket weavers, played some serious badminton and wiffle ball, and spent time at the beach. We paddle boarded, kayaked, sailed. We played tennis, basketball, and tried our hand at archery and leather works. Exciting excursions were made— rock climbing and a high ropes course. We sat on our porch while the kids played volleyball with new friends. We rested at the lodge while the kids challenged each other at ping pong. We saw a show, we touched a snake, and my husband and I played Giant Scrabble while lounging in lazy rockers. At some point small, yet momentous, things started to happen. And I had time to notice. My husband—who has always been a musician, but lost his drive to play and some dexterity during the last year of treatments and medications—started to strum peacefully at his guitar in the relaxed environment…

2017 Ohana Events & Retreats

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event & retreat campers staff members weddings

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Ohana's main lodge was beautifully decorated for Greta Hutchinson and Crosby Nordblom's wedding in September 2017. (We want to know: who won the ping pong game?) Christian Arthur Photography

Hutchinson/Nordblom Wedding Before we knew it, it was wedding weekend, and all our plans were finally ready to be unveiled. While we could go on forever about all the special details, we'll keep it broad: Ohana delivered the best weekend of our lives, and allowed us to build exactly the experience we wanted to impart to our friends and families. From Friday afternoon through Sunday lunch, our guests were constantly forming and reforming different groups to help with wedding prep, play games, tend the s'mores bonfire, or champion trips to the lake… The cabins allowed everyone to unplug and be present together, rather than staying tethered to work or social media. The staff of Ohana was both ever present yet invisible, there to help at all times but never obtrusive. The night became a blur of nonstop dancing to the fabulous band playing in the dining hall, but when we finally returned to our cabin, there were two pieces of wedding cake waiting for us. Perfection. The wedding party tested their badminton skills at Greta & Crosby's reception. Christian Arthur Photography

Brandon Kavanaugh

OHANA CAMPER AND FORMER OHANA STAFF MEMBER

It’s the realization that no matter where life takes me or what path I may end up on, I know Ohana will always be with me. There is so much love and support built into this place that once you become part of it, you’re family. Though life keeps us busy, Ohana will always be my home away from home. Brandon is pictured here with his mom, KATHY BASSETT KAVANAUGH, at Ohana in 2017. The Bassett clan's connections to Aloha go back four generations.

To read their full stories, visit: ALOHAFOUNDATION.ORG/OHANA

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Sustainable & Local Food JASON CHARTRAND Ohana Head Chef

Ohana Family Camp made huge strides in 2017 in the realm of local and sustainable food. More than 80% of our food comes from New England (much of the remaining 20% includes staples like salt and rice). Of that 80%, nearly half comes from within 100 miles of Ohana. ROOT 5 FARM is a certified organic farm

in nearby Fairlee that produces 150 varieties of vegetables. We procure nearly all of our vegetables from Root 5. Some of our biggest hits during the

summer are rainbow chard, baby bok choy, and kohlrabi. Over the course of the summer, we used 500 pounds of Root 5 lettuce mix for salads alone.

bacon, Ohana’s number one breakfast meat, at a reasonable price. This past summer, Ohana purchased 2,000 pounds of bacon.

in Orford, New Hampshire is our sole source for sirloin, pork, and burgers, and for high-quality beef for all of our wedding dinners. Robie Farms is a co-op of smaller farms all agreeing to a set group of standards anchored by humane practices.

Even Ohana’s coffee roaster, BACKCOUNTRY COFFEE, is located right here in Vermont!

ROBIE

FARMS

in Canaan, New Hampshire, which raises antibioticfree, free range, and cage-free chickens, is another great Ohana partner.

BEAR KNOLL FARM

GREEN MOUNTAIN SMOKEHOUSE in Windsor, Vermont provides amazing

each week at Ohana the kitchen team bakes 150 300 450 2000+

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pieces of cake muffins cream puffs cookies

Two gardens on Ohana’s campus contribute to our local sourcing: our OHANA GARDEN where we grow rhubarb, chives, mint, edible flowers (always in our salads), lemongrass, oregano, and cherry tomatoes and our RECYCLE GARDEN where we use leftover roots of vegetables like green onions and basil to regrow them. Ohana’s relationships with local producers sustain our food philosophy. Buying local also means being a good neighbor—a value closely held by all of the Alohas for over a century. There are more connections for us to make, more local partnerships to establish. And the team at Ohana? We are eager to embrace each opportunity as it comes our way.


You keep us strong! Thank you for sharing the Aloha spirit far and wide.

Introducing the 1905 Leadership Circle... The 1905 Leadership Circle is launching to recognize and celebrate leadership gifts of $2,500 or more to the Annual Fund. 1905 members are the vanguard of Aloha’s philanthropic community. In 2017, this group constituted 6% of donors, contributing over 65% of the dollars raised. Their special commitment is manifested in every aspect of excellence at the Aloha Camps – from the first-in-class programs, to the industry-leading 2-to-1 camper to counselor ratio, to the five beautiful campuses, to the ambitiously generous financial aid program.

1905 Leadership Circle members blaze the way for Aloha to be one of the preeminent camping and innovative educational institutions in the country. To learn more, please visit the Giving section of alohafoundation.org

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Here's a glimpse of Bailer Battle, a favorite Ohana activity. The object is to sink your opponent by bailing as much water as possible into their canoe!


News & Updates In Memoriam Former Lanakila Director, Founder/Director of Hulbert Outdoor Center and Executive Director of The Aloha Foundation PAUL PILCHER L57-59,*63-92,LP87-93,*94-01,03-17,HP81-85,87-88,AP87-92,*90,93,9799,05,HGP14-17,DGP12-17 passed away on January 28. Paul was the husband of DAN LAWSON, former spouse of VALERIE WICKS MILLER H*68-72,L*73-85,HP81-85,87-88,AP87-92,*90,93,97-99,LP87-93,*94-01,0317,DGP12-17 and father of JENNIFER H81-85,A87-89,*90,HP14-17, KATIE KNOWLES H83-85,87-88,A89-92,*93,97-99,05-06,DP12-17,LP16-17, and DOUG L87-93,*94-01,03-17. Paul had a deep love for and dedication to the Foundation and its programs, seeing the camps through challenging times and developing new programs and trainings. In addition to his over 30 years as a camper, counselor, and director, Paul was a teacher, headmaster, and later family law attorney and town selectman. Throughout his life he remained dedicated to supporting children and families, especially those from underprivileged backgrounds. His connection to the camps continued until last summer with regular visits to tell Council Fire stories at Lanakila and through his grandchildren KAITLYN WARREN H14-17, WILL KNOWLES D12-15,L16-17, ALEX KNOWLES D16-17, and MILO PILCHER. Paul’s family will host a celebration of his life at Lanakila on June 16, 2018.

Fred Downing A*42,56-82,AP56-60, *61-63,65,68, LP56-61,*62-66 on November 5. Fred was a counselor at Aloha Camp for four decades alongside his wife, the late Judy Chick Downing A*37-41,45,56-82, AP5660,*61-63,65,68,LP56-61,*62-66 who was Aloha Camp Director from 1968 to 1982. Fred and Judy’s children Jani Downing A56-60,*61-63,65,68 and Jim Downing L56-61,*62-66 say Fred climbed over 6,000 miles on New England mountains as Head of Tripping before later becoming Head of the Aloha kitchen.

Dave Hume L67-70,*77-78,80, LP02-07,*08-09, father of Miles L02-07, *09 and Clayton L02-06,*08-09 on December 8 in Gainesville, Florida. Robin Williams L*68-74,76,86,94,LP81-84, 86-91,*9092,93-99, father of Evan L81-84, 86,*90-91,93-99 and Ben L84,86-91,*92,95 on April 5, 2017 in Wrentham, Massachusetts. Peter Quenet L42-44 of Belville, Michigan on October 19.

Jani says of her father, “He stayed in touch with about 50 Aloha campers from the ‘60s and 70s, most of whom responded to my appeal to send greetings for his 100th birthday in September. The outpouring of gratitude for the impact he had on their lives was overwhelming. Although his memory was impaired, he knew who everyone was, where they lived, and what they had done together. It was a wonderful tribute to him and to Aloha.”

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Salamander Sky, illustrated by Meg Brewster

News Meg Brewster Sodano A91,93-95,*96-99 illustrated a natural science picture book called Salamander Sky, written by Vermont author Katy Farber and published by Green Writers Press. Every spring in the eastern United States, thousands of salamanders migrate to ponds and pools, often across busy roads. The book features a mother and daughter who help the salamanders cross the road safely and introduces readers (age 4-8) to the salamanders' life cycle, habitat, and conservation challenges. Visit Meg's website at msodanoillustration.com to see more.

Births Katie Hoenicke A94-96,H*97-03 welcomed Robert Grant Hoenicke on June 10.

(L to R) Amy Peterson, Ashley Freiman (Slobodkin), Tarunya Govindarajan, and Eliza Dodd Leeper—All Club 2000

Boden Jude Baker

To Tory H94-95,A96-98,A*01,03,07,16 and Douglas Baker A*94,99-07,16 a boy, Boden Jude Baker on September 22. Carol Cook Kennedy H*72-76,86-88,HP90, 92,94 is the proud grandmother of Faith Kennedy, born June 17.

Weddings Tarunya Govindarajan A97-00,*03 married Adam Stepinski on September 30 in Windsor, Vermont. Olivia Wheeler H95-00,A01-04,A*05,07,09 married PK Kearney on October 7, 2017 in Grand Teton National Park. This fall, Olivia and PK joined the faculty at Berkshire School in Sheffield, Massachusetts. Olivia is our talented Reveille designer, who also created our 2017 Aloha Foundation Impact Report. Marja Kunz and Jamie Cohen (both club '04) were in attendance as members of the bridal party.

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Have you moved or changed email addresses? Keep us posted so we can keep sending you Aloha news. Parents, please share your children’s updated contact information as it changes or encourage them to do so.

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(L to R) Jamie Cohen, Olivia Wheeler, and Marja Kunz — All Club 2004

Let us know so we can keep you posted!


Ohana family campers doing what they do best: enjoying family, spending time outdoors, and having fun!

Digging in: a Lesson from Ohana VANESSA RIEGLER Ohana Family Camp Director

I spend a lot of time thinking about families. This winter I’ve been considering family connections and relationships—and how building a healthy and thriving family system is similar to building a healthy and thriving organization. In my family, we have our own systems in place for our days at camp, comprised of programs, community, activity, and adventure. When I think about systems, I envision the classic “Iceberg Model.” The tip of the iceberg, in plain sight, is the event or the problem. Just below the surface lies the pattern that emerges over time. Next, you find the underlying structure, the things influencing the patterns. And finally, at the foundation, deepest under the surface, are the mental models, the beliefs and values that hold the system in place. My practical application: the common family struggle of bedtime. For the longest time in our household, we dreaded the simple act of going to bed. The timing was sporadic, we all avoided it, and out of the five of us—my husband Nolan, Stone (7), Coral (5), Zephyr (2), and me—no one was having any fun. We wanted a change, so we stepped back and looked beneath the surface. The patterns we noticed were small, but clear: usually one minor piece of chaos (a kid running around waving pajamas over his head) set off more mayhem. At the structure level, there wasn’t really a plan beyond getting upstairs and getting everyone to bed without both parents falling asleep for the night. Then we found the root cause: so much of the struggle revolved around time, or the lack of it, resulting in nagging, stress, dramatic crying, and general turmoil. We dug in. We went right for the mental model—the picture—of what we wanted bedtime to be: a simple evening routine that involved enjoyable time together as a family.

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From there, we put the underlying structure into place intentionally. We made changes, and found we had to readjust. We involved the kids (other key stakeholders in the system) and learned our oldest son really respected the idea that mom and dad wanted time together just as much as he wanted one-on-one time with each of us. Fast forward and we have a pretty good system of what works for us right now: parading upstairs like a herd of elephants, commotion and laughing, occasional bed jumping, pajama independence, and dental hygiene for all of us. The biggest key has been starting to wind down early enough so we have all the time we need for lots of reading, silliness, and quiet whispering after the lights go out. Over the last six seasons at Ohana, I’ve noticed it’s easier for families to get to the value level of what is most important to them when they are at camp. As they build their way of life at camp over the course of a week, what they value most emerges. When they leave camp, they are able to integrate positive changes into life at home. I know it is just bedtime, but these are the small potatoes that make up our lives. These intentional structures and connections that we build together make our family systems work. It brings the glimmer of the idea that we have it all together— for now.

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Artist and botanical illustrator Lara Call Gastinger from Virginia spent a week at Ohana with her family in summer 2017. Her journal page captures her incredible talent and the essence of Ohana’s natural beauty. For more about Lara’s work, visit LARACALLGASTINGER.COM.

Spend Memorial Day Weekend at Ohana!

May 25th thru May 28th, 2018

Activities for the whole family, delicious meals, and cozy cabin accommodations. Experience Ohana for yourself and start a new family tradition!

OHANACAMP.ORG/MEMORIAL-DAY-WEEKEND-2018

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Be a proud 50 in the 50th...

Join the Gulick Legacy Society! In honor of The Aloha Foundation’s 50th Anniversary this year, we aim to increase the Gulick Legacy Society by at least 50 members—one person for each year we’ve dedicated to fulfilling our mission. It’s easy. Simply include Aloha in your will or estate plans. Or add Aloha as a beneficiary of your IRA, employer retirement plan, life insurance policy, or investment account. To learn more, please visit ALOHAFOUNDATION.ORG/LEGACY or give us a call.

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OhanaTrail System KEVIN BROOKER Ohana Building & Grounds Staff

The view from the porch of Ohana’s dining hall— the geographical center of camp—is unquestionably spectacular. Along Ohana’s property lines, complementing the long-range views of Lake Fairlee and the Middlebrook Valley, is a great variety of geologic and forested treasures we have only begun to discover. Ohana Family Camp is just under 120 acres split almost in half by Quinibeck Road. The parcel has some wetlands, a few cliffs, and almost 1,100 feet of shoreline. The woods are mostly second growth trees as a mix of hardwoods (maples, beech, poplar, oaks, birches, cherry) and conifers (hemlock, fir, white pine). During a walk in the Ohana woods, you may find small critters, some deer, and if you’re lucky, a few turkeys.

Ohana Campus 116 26 20 6

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acres acres mowed tents cabins

Ohana encourages its campers to explore the natural history and wonders of the property. To facilitate this, in summer 2017 local high school students began building new trails around the perimeter of Ohana, which will provide better access to the wooded landscape. When the trail system is completed during the 2019 family camp season, the trail will be almost two miles long. According to Ohana Director Vanessa Riegler, the team owes much of its inspiration for the creation of the perimeter trail to the work of the Upper Valley Land Trust (UVLT) on nearby Ely Mountain, a conservation area. Ohana staff have watched with interest as UVLT has laid the groundwork for long-term stewardship and community enjoyment of the 208 conserved acres by hosting programs on the land: wildflower walks, birding trips, vernal pool identification and amphibian searching, and winter animal tracking. We look forward to reporting back to you on the new trail system and the supporting programs that help campers, guests, and community members discover Ohana’s beautiful natural surroundings.


2017 Aloha Annual Fund: our past & our future

THANK YOU for a record-breaking year for the Aloha Annual Fund!

$623,000 raised from 1,008 donors. Our goal is to raise annually

$1,000,000

$ 1,000,000 by 2022

to uphold our traditions and live out our mission.

$900,000

$800,000

$700,000

$623,000

623

raised this year!

$600,000

$500,000

470

$400,000

365

$300,000

Go to ALOHAFOUNDATION.ORG/IMPACT to view the 2017 Aloha Foundation Impact Report featuring beautiful camp photos and quotes from parents and staff. For more information about our financial performance, visit ALOHAFOUNDATION.ORG/ANNUALREPORT.

$200,000

$100,000

2015

a few HIGHLIGHTS from the 2017 impact report:

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

10,755

183

132

people participated in programs + events at the camps.

camperships at Aloha, Hive, Horizons & Lanakila

campers & counselors from outside the U.S.

REVEILLE CREDITS: Designer, Olivia Wheeler. Primary Photographer, Jenn Grossman.

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Ohana family campers enjoy an excursion to catch and release butterflies in the field next to the Art Barn.

A New Director for Horizons! We are thrilled to welcome STUART FAIRBAIRN as the new Director of Horizons Day Camp. Stuart grew up in the UK, nurturing a love for the outdoors and travel. As an educator for 17 years, including as a geography teacher, he continued to explore beautiful European landscapes. His Aloha journey began in 2000 and expanded into ten Lanakila summers and six Hulbert seasons, as well as Family Camps, Camp Dartmouth-Hitchcock, and Voyager trips. Stuart impressed the search committee with his long history as a traditional and outdoor educator, and his ability to imaginatively articulate how Horizons can grow and thrive in the years ahead. Through his work with the Hulbert Outdoor Center, he is excited to solidify the collaboration between Horizons and Hulbert in ways that will strengthen both. This connection will help The Aloha Foundation attract the best and brightest in outdoor educators as one of the few organizations to provide year-round opportunities for leaders. When he is not directing Horizons, Stuart runs Hulbert's local school programming and yearly vacation camps, and supports ongoing staff development as Hulbert's Program Director of Community Programs. Welcome Stuart!

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Reveille Spring 2018  
Reveille Spring 2018