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n All Together NOW! is a registered charity set up to provide a tip top news service for anyone whose life is affected by disability, longterm health condtions or age – and raises awareness about how people can overcome personal challenges. n The charity relies entirely on support from its patrons, advertisers and from general subscriptions and grants. n If YOU or YOUR organisation can help, we’d be delighted to hear from you!

0151 230 0307 Editorial Editor: Tom Dowling email: news@alltogethernow.org.uk

Advertising/sponsorship Chris Groves email: sales@alltogethernow.org.uk IT Support: Ken Almond Website: Pharos Design

NEXT EDITION: Monday 7 June, 2010 All Together NOW! is published by All Together Now! Ltd, The Bradbury Centre, Youens Way, Liverpool L14 2EP Registered Charity No.1106387 Company No. 5096931 Printed by Trinity Mirror NW2, Oldham

April/May 2010

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Parents deserve better

HOT WHEELS: Wheelchair dancing is taking off in a big way. Don’t miss the special show at the Wythenshawe Forum On May 15

Dance fever!

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TAND by for some stunning wheelchair dance routines coming to the Wythenshaw Forum. BBC TV’s Dancing On Wheels series provided the inspiration for a new weekly ballroom and Latin dancing class for wheelchairusers in Manchester. One of the show’s consultants, Wythenshawe resident Ray Bulpitt, is currently teaching the Manchester class – the first of its kind in the north of England. The two-hour sessions, under the title ‘Strictly Wheelchair Dancing’, are running at Woodhouse Park Lifestye Centre, Portway – and there’s a glitzy showcase event on Saturday, May 15, at Wythenshawe Forum where dancers will be able to demonstrate what they have learned.

TV show sparks new wheelchair dance classes

Ray has high hopes of training participants to national competition level. He said: “To dance in a wheelchair takes a great deal of control and co-ordination. The pure joy that participants get from being at one with the music is incredible.” Councillor Mike Amesbury, executive member for culture and leisure, said: “We’re expecting that Dancing On Wheels will do for wheelchair dance what Strictly Come Dancing has done for ballroom and it’s great that Manchester is leading the way.”

Disability Sports UK has given its backing to the project, which is being jointly funded by Manchester City Council and NHS Manchester. As well as being an art form in its own right, wheelchair dancing has significant health benefits including improving strength and upper body dexterity. Laura Roberts, chief executive at NHS Manchester, said: “Wheelchair dancing is great fun for all participants, young and old it is also a great way to keep healthy both physically and mentally.” Classes cost £4 (£6 a couple) and £2 for under 16’s(£3 a couple) per session. n Anyone interested in taking part should contact Ray Bulpitt on 07828 201044 or at raymond.bulpitt@ntlworld.com

Parliament’s newest member – at 15

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EET 15-years-old Chris Browne, one of the North West’s youngest parliamentarians. In a ballot that saw the largest number of votes ever cast – almost 8,500 – in a UK Youth Parliament election in Merseyside, Chris won hands down. Chris, who has cerebral palsy and is a pupil at Sandfield Park school, Liverpool, said: “I’m looking forward to representing young people – especially those who are disabled, to make sure their views are heard and are listened to.” Mayor of Knowsley, Cllr Dave Smithson, VICTORY SMILES: Chris with his deputies – Dominic Armstrong, said: “I know that Chris and his deputies left, and Matthew Heaps. Standing, left to right: Cllr Graham will work really hard to ensure that the Wright, Knowsley mayor Cllr Dave Smithson, and Damian Allen, voices of young people are heard at both executive director for children and family services a local and national level.”

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ONE third of parents with disabled children don’t get the support they need for their child’s emotional or mental health problems, says a shock report. And 60% of those who do receive help question its worth. The figures are revealed in a survey by YoungMinds, a charity committed to improving the emotional well being and mental health of children and young people and empowering their parents and carers. The survey also found that 87% of parents found barriers to getting help. These include lack of available services, long waiting lists, being blamed for their child’s problems, and their child not fitting the criteria for support. One of the mums interviewed said: Coping with a disabled child is one of the hardest things that anyone ever has to endure because there are no facilities for them and they are not allowed to have a life like other children are. “Local authorities need to do more for disabled children and their families.” Claire Usiskin, YoungMinds’ helpline policy manager, said: “These families are among the most disadvantaged in the whole population. “Their children suffer anxiety, behavioural problems and depression, in addition to physical health problems and learning difficulties. “Disabilities can lead to emotional and mental health problems for children and not receiving adequate support adds greatly to the despair.” n YoungMinds Parents Helpline, 0808 802 5544 www.youngminds.org

TAKE ME HOME!


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April/May 2010

Major funder to have its own page!

All Together NOW!

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HE Morgan Foundation has become the first major funder to have its own sponsored page in All Together NOW!

Set up in 2001, the Morgan Foundation has been supporting local charities across North Wales, Merseyside, West Cheshire and Shropshire and has rapidly become one of the most highly respected charities in the country. For the past three years they have provided All Together NOW! with a grant towards helping the magazine to become sustainable through advertising. Now the trustees are going one step further by taking a regular page to highlight their excellent work – and feature some of the charities they have been supporting. Steve Morgan, chairman of The Morgan Foundation, said: “We have been supporters of All Together Now! for the past three years and are now proud to be one of the charity’s main sponsors – recognition for the way in which it, and the online magazine, helps bring together so many people and organisations from across the region. “In the months to come we will be using this page to highlight both our work and that of some of the organisations we are helping.” All Together NOW! editor Tom Dowling said: “This is a fantastic boost! To have The Morgan Foundation as one of our main sponsors is tremendous. They are doing so much to help the community. “Hopefully, their involvement might also lead to other funders coming on board to tell our ever-growing army of readers about their own funding opportunities.”

Big boost from Big Lottery All Together NOW! has also just been handed a £9,500 Big Lottery grant to get more dispensers across the region. For the past five years All Together NOW! has been playing a vital role for the 2 million people affected by disability across the North West. The grant means the charity can now look to get

more 30 dispensers into mainstream venues like hospitals, garden centres and visitor attractions. This will increase the circulation, currently standing at about 55,000, and, hopefully, will lead to more sponsorships to ensure the sustainability of the publication. www.awardsforall.org.uk

Tip-toe through the dafs

MARIE Curie Hospice nurses Denise Billows and Sharon Champion are asking readers to join in this year’s Daffodil Field of Hope Walk in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Liverpool hospice. This year’s 10-mile walk – taking place place on Sunday April 11 – follow a scenic route through the parks and woodlands of south Liverpool, taking in the beautiful daffodil Fields of Hope in Sefton Park, Clarkes Gardens and Mossley Hill. Denise said: “We always have between 300-400 participants who raise around £30,000 for our hospice. It’s so inspiring to see people walking together in support of the hospice. Many walk in memory of loved ones, which makes it even more moving. It would be wonderful to see the same support again this year.” To take part call 0151 801 1412. Other Marie Curie fun runs/walks in the North West include: Sunday April 25: Sheffield Half Marathon and the Peak District Ramble. Sunday May 3: Waterloo 5K Fun Run www.mariecurie.org

Wheelchair test track among new services EXCITING plans for new services have been announced by Warrington Disability Partnership who return to their refurbished premises in Beaufort Street in the coming months. The projects include a two-storey workshop for recycling mobility equipment and innovative scooter and powered wheelchair test track. WDP needs around £200,000 to pay for the projects plus furnishings for the new community cafe, training and meeting rooms, reception, showrooms and IT training suite – and are appealing for support from local businesses and the DAVE THOMPSON community. Dave Thompson, chair of WDP, says: “It is all very exciting. We can’t wait to move back into our building and launch all these new services. “We are also looking forward to our Disability Awareness Day, which goes ahead on Sunday, July 11. It’s going to be another record-breaker with lots of exhibitors coming from all over the region – and beyond.” n Contact, tel 01925 240064 or visit www.disabilitypartnership.org.uk

‘One-stop web shop’ A NEW healthcare website been set up to provide a “comprehensive onestop shop” for disabled and older people wanting to live independently. Homecare from The Consortium has hundreds of products available and has its own practising GP, Dr Ellie Cannon, who provides plenty of healthy tips. See Page 7

More from YouTube YOUTUBE, the internet’s biggest video sharing website, has extended its subtitling service for all users. The auto-captioning service will be a big boost for the UK’s nine million people with hearing impairments. The service automatically generates video captions when requested by a viewer. Video owners can also download the auto-generated captions, improve them, and upload the new version. Viewers will soon be able to choose to translate the captions into any one of 50 different languages – and all in just a couple of clicks.

Ben Nevis challenge DIABETES UK want to hear from people prepared to take part in a fundraising walk to the top of Ben Nevis. Dates: May 14-16 and September 17-19. Contact: 020 7424 1000.

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Charity calls for ‘talking buses’

All Together NOW!

April/May 2010

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

NEWS

Awards will honour polio health workers THE British Polio Fellowship wants nominations for its annual awards highlighting the dedication of healthcare professionals who support those living with polio or Post Polio Syndrome. Members of the British Polio Fellowship can nominate their GPs, consultants, physiotherapists, neurologists, orthotists, nurses and other healthcare professionals in four categories: n General Practitioner of the Year; n Consultant of the Year; n Physiotherapist of the Year; n Allied Health Professional of the Year. Dr John Hooper, chief executive of the British Polio Fellowship, said: “It is estimated that around 120,000 people in the UK are living with PPS – a neurological condition which can occur in those who have had polio – and it is still largely under-diagnosed. “It takes on average a shocking six years to diagnose, and then only 18% of GPs know how to treat it.” Nominations – including 200 words supporting your choice – are wanted by email to: info@britishpolio.org.uk Entries close on Friday, May 28, and the winners will be announced in September. n www.britishpolio.org.uk

Kids health concern YOUNG people in care are not receiving consistent access to child and adolescent mental health services, says an Ofsted report. The provision of services varies from good to none at all, according to the study of 27 children’s homes in eight local authorities across England. n www.ofsted.gov.uk

Benefit system ‘unfair to deaf’ DEAF people’s claims for disability benefits are being rejected unfairly, claims deaf charity, RNID.

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LIND charity Guide Dogs has launched a campaign to get audio and visual information on all buses and coaches in the UK. The charity says that ‘talking buses’ that give clear audible and visible announcements about the next stop and final destination will help disabled and elderly FIRST UK BUS has relaunched its UK-wide people to use buses and coaches safely and with free travel scheme for Guide Dogs’ puppy confidence. walkers. Guide Dogs’ campaigns manager David Cowdrey said: Leon Daniels, First UK Bus communications “The law requires new trains and trams to have audiodirector, said: “We are committed to visual (AV) information systems - but not buses and removing barriers for all disabled people.” coaches. “The lack of information on board and they don’t always remember. Guide Dogs is lobbying the “I keep ending up in the depot or makes bus travel less accessible government to amend the Public than rail travel. It’s time for the bus dropped at the wrong stop. I get Service Vehicles Accessibility so distressed and don’t want to to catch up!” Regulations, briefing key MPs and get the bus any more, but have to. reminding them of their Guide Dogs’ research into disabled people’s views and responsibility to make public “A bus should give me my experiences of bus travel shows transport accessible to everyone. independence, not take it they often feel anxious and It is encouraging supporters to away.” vulnerable, and depend on others contact their local MP, asking Companies including Transport to find the right stop. them to sign Early Day Motion for London, Trent Barton Buses Many give up using buses (EDM) 506 supporting the (Nottingham and Leicester) and altogether. Thamesdown Transport (Swindon) campaign, and to write to Sadiq Nora Green from Seaham, Khan MP, the Minister responsible have successfully rolled out AV County Durham, who is partiallysystems on their buses, and report for public transport. sighted, said: “I have to ask the n www.guidedogs.org.uk/talking that customer satisfaction levels driver to tell me when to get off buses have risen substantially.

Sign up for 999 service PEOPLE who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech difficulties are being urged to join a UKwide trial allowing people to text from their mobile phone to the emergency services. Guido Gybels, at the Royal National Institute for Deaf People, said: “This pilot service represents a major step forward.” The service has already handled over 100 real emergency calls and recently the number of registrations topped 4,000 but RNID still need more people to sign up to help

them fully develop the service. n To register you must text the word ‘register’ to 999, then follow the instructions. Alternatively, you can register online at www.emergencysms.org.uk

Their report, Who Benefits? shows that: n Over half of those questioned who claimed Disability Living Allowance had a claim turned downed previously, yet 91% of appeals by BSL users are successful. n 65% of respondents said that Department of Works and Pensions staff aren’t deaf aware, with 31% saying they had been sent a letter they could not understand. n 74% of respondents said that they found the 54-page DLA form difficult to complete, with 56% of BSL users saying they could not understand some of the questions. n 66% said that most of the questions on the form were not relevant to deafness. n When examinations were conducted in the claimant’s home by a DWP health professional, 28% said that they had difficulty communicating with the doctor. RNID chief executive Jackie Bllard said: “The process of claiming DLA and AA is failing deaf people. The sums of money involved can and do make a real difference to people’s lives. “It’s staggering that 91% of appeals against claims refused are successful, and suggests that lots of people are initially denied a benefit to which they are undoubtedly entitled. “We want to work with Government to accelerate change so that deaf people are no longer denied access to benefit entitlements.” n RNID’s Information Line: 0808 808 0123 (freephone) or 0808 808 9000 (textphone) or email information@rnid .org.uk www.rnid.org.uk


Dame Tanni’s next challenge

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April/May 2010

All Together NOW!

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Transport for London’s board AME Tanni Greyby JOHN PRING and chairs its corporate Thompson will fight governance committee. She for improved rights disabled people. also became a member of for disabled people when As a crossbench peer, she the Youth Citizenship she becomes a new said she was looking forward Commission. crossbench peer in the Previously, she sat on both House of Lords this spring. to being able to form her own opinions, rather than being the Sports Council for Wales Dame Tanni said she was forced to vote on party lines. “very proud and very excited and UK Sport during her She already looks set to career as a professional by the enormous challenge” position herself alongside athlete, in which she won 12 ahead of her, following the three other disabled peers, Paralympic gold medals and announcement of her Baroness Campbell, broke 30 world records. peerage by the House of Baroness Masham and Lords Appointments She is also a board Baroness Wilkins, in member of UK Athletics and Commission. opposing continued efforts to led its review of anti-doping She named three areas policy in sport, and is vicewhich she will focus on in the weaken the law on assisted suicide. chair of the athletes Lords: sport, disability rights, Dame Tanni said she had and the health service. committee of the organising “huge concerns” about the committee for the London She said: “Something that campaign to legalise 2012 Olympics and is very important to me is assisted suicide and the Paralympics. getting an appropriate level “emotive” portrayal of Dame Tanni studied politics of service in the NHS.” disability in the media around at university and has always She said there was still so the issue. been fascinated by the much to do in terms of 10_19880_ATN.qxd:all together now Tanni 11/3/10 13:57 1 Dame also sits on Pagemachinery of government. achieving equality for

Increase in poverty and discrimination POVERTY and discrimination experienced by disabled people is on the increase, according to leading charity Leonard Cheshire Disability. The charity found that 42% of those surveyed were struggling to live on their present income, a rise of 9% since 2007. The charity’s Disability Review 2009 also revealed that almost two-thirds (63%) were in fuel poverty, compared to 11% of the general UK population.

Young maestros A MUSIC fund that helps young musicians on Merseyside is staging an open day at 18 Longland Road, Wallasey, on April 10. Two annual awards are given by The Earl Haworth (Tafitifi) Memorial Music Award Fund to students judged to have worked hardest or shown most improvement by the There is also a hardship fund open to young people in the area. The fund is also staging a musical celebration at the Masonic Hall, Hope Street, Liverpool, on May 25. Contact Angela Haworth on 0151 638 9655, or email tafitifi@talktalk.net

The perfect gift for every occasion! G Home of the famous Love2shop Gift Voucher G Over 20 different gift vouchers available G Next day delivery option Accepted in over 20,000 stores in the UK, the Love2shop Gift Voucher is a fantastic gift idea. We also offer other top name vouchers such as Marks & Spencer, John Lewis and Arcadia (Dorothy Perkins & Topshop). So whatever the occasion, the gift vouchers you need are at highstreetvouchers.com

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Craig ‘sees’ again . . . with his tongue!

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April/May 2010

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NEWS

Free internet class for blind people BLIND people around England are getting a free taste of what the internet can offer, thanks to a series of learning days funded through the Government’s Transformation Fund. The 50 taster sessions, spread across the country, are being organised via award-winning charity Screenreader.net. The charity is run by blind social entrepreneurs Roger and Margaret Wilson-Hinds, who won a £70,000 grant from the Government to run the informal adult learning sessions. Instructors are blind, too, and use the innovative Thunder screen reading software, distributed free around the world by Screenreader, to make computers talk. The aim of the sessions – hosted by local blind societies, UK online centres and local authorities – is to show how a talking computer is the modern Braille, a gateway for learning, leisure and work. n www.screenreader.net/index

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EXCITING TRIAL: Exsoldier Craig Lundgerg is in the front line again . . . testing a new device that might give fresh hope to blind people

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SOLDIER who lost his sight after being hit by a grenade can “see” again - using his tongue. Lance Corporal Craig Lundberg can read words, identify shapes and walk around unaided despite being totally blind, thanks to a pioneering device. Craig, 24, is the first person to trial the “BrainPort” invention that could revolutionise treatment for blind people. A camera attached to a pair of glasses converts images into electrical impulses that are sent to Craig’s tongue. By interpreting the different tingles created by the impulses, Craig can mentally visualise his surroundings. “The sensation that comes from the

SIGHTLINE VISION (NORTH WEST)

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tongue device is a bit like popping candy. “It’s hard to explain but from the sensors I can feel what is in front of me. “When I first tried them I walked down a corridor and I could make out the doorways, the walls and people coming towards me. “It was the first time since Iraq that I had been able to do that. It’s a rather odd sensation on my tongue and not that pleasant. “It’s also hard for a chatterbox like me to actually keep it in my mouth!” Craig, who lives in Liverpool, was left blind after being struck by a rocketpropelled grenade while serving in Iraq in 2007.

He was faced with relying on a guide dog or cane for the rest of his life before the Ministry of Defence chose him to try out the device. Craig said: “I do not have to touch or feel anything to be guided – I can visualise things on my own just by wearing these glasses.” “I know this is not going to give me my sight back but it could be the next best thing.” Since being blinded, Craig has climbed Mount Kilimanjaro to raise funds for the Help for Heroes charity, learned to fly a plane, run the London Marathon, and played regularly for the England Blind Football team.

Lending a friendly ear

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EN years ago Mary, from Greater Manchester, was told she had Age Related Macular Degeneration in both eyes. Mary, 79 said:“I was absolutely devastated and had no-one to turn to. I have always been independent and thought I could cope with all that life threw at me, but for those first few months I was at my lowest. “I needed someone to talk to, someone who knew exactly what I was going through.” By chance Mary saw a poster on a hospital noticeboard about a new charity helpline that offered exactly that – a friendly ear and a chance to chat with someone who was also living with the condition. “Life began to be good again,” says Mary, “and I was far more at ease with things. Without this fantastic phone service I

don’t know how I would have managed to get through it all.” The helpline – Sightline Vision (North West) – had just been set up by another woman who had also been told she had AMD. “Like Mary, I was devasted, too,” says Eileen Green. “I felt angry and cheated. It took away my independence and my selfesteem.” Eileen set up the helpine three evenings a week from her home. “It was very scary in those first few months because we didn’t get many calls.” But word began spreading and by 2005 the service had increased to four evenings a week. By 2008 Eileen and her team of eight volunteers – all affected by visual impairments – were dealing with 1,600 calls in the year from people across Merseyside, Greater Manchester, Lancashire,

Cheshire and North Wales Now, in its 10th anniversary year, the charity has added a fifth evening – and three more volunteers are manning the line. Eileen says: “Sightline does not provide counselling, but all volunteers have training in listening skills and can offer emotional and practical solutions. “The free service gives people the chance to speak informally about ANY sight condition affecting themselves and their families. “We hope our message will encourage people to share in our vision.” n SIGHTLINE VISION (North West) current funders include The Morgan Foundation, Community Foundation for Merseyside, and the Dept of Health’s Opportunities for Volunteering Fund.


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NEWS

Swasie warms up for the Wall CHAMPION fundraiser Swasie Turner is back on his travels.

Your one-stop site to help you at home

New rules on the way for scooters

Next challenge is a gruelling seven-day, 100-mile wheelchair trek following Hadrian’s Wall. “It’s going to be RIGHT WHEEL: Swasie Turner preparing to lead the marines on his Hadrian’s Wall fundraiser tough,” says the former policeman who has already notched up 36,000 fundraising miles in his standard NHS wheelchair. Swasie will be setting off from Bowness on Solway on May 15 with Cheshire Police dog handler and former Royal Marine Graham Jones and his police colleague Sergeant Rick Connolly. Also joining the team are former Royal Marine, Gary James, from Plymouth, and Ken Hartley, from Stoke on Trent. “We’re raising money for the Royal Marines Charitable Trust Fund and Help4Heroes,” said Swasie, whose left leg was amputated after being assaulted 11 HE Government is n Moving to mandatory, rather sophisticated. It is only right years ago.

Going up! DISABLED access is to be improved at Llandudno’s Little Orme. The path is being widened for wheelchairs and mobility vehicles. There will also be benches every 200 metres. A gate that allows entry for wheelchair users – but which stops motorcycles – is also being installed.

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planning to introduce new safety regulations for mobility scooters and powered wheelchairs – and look at the capabilities of people who use them. Transport secretary Sadiq Khan said:“Evidence suggests that over the last few years there has been a steady increase in the number of mobility vehicles and, with an ageing population, this trend is likely to increase. “On top of this, the technology for the vehicles themselves is becoming increasingly

then that legislation is brought up to date to reflect these advancements.” The consultation – which will run until May 28 – sets out a number of ways in which safety might be improved including: n Changes to the legal definition of scooters; n Changes to the maximum weight of scooters, and whether they should continue to carry only one person; n Changes to design speeds and permitted speeds for those vehicles which can be used on the highway;

than voluntary insurance; n Changes to the registration arrangements, either through reforms to the current DVLA system or through a move to a more locally-based scheme; n Improving the collection of data regarding the number and safety of these vehicles. The consultation will cover both mobility scooters, which are intended to help people with reduced mobility, and powered wheelchairs for those who need help with everyday movement. n www.dft.gov.uk/consultations

Awards for breaking down the sound barrier PEOPLE and organisations excelling in improving communication between deaf and hearing people are to be rewarded. The Signature charity awards recognise those making a significant contribution towards a society in which deaf and deafblind people have full access. This year’s categories are:

n The Joseph Maitland Robinson Award for outstanding contribution toward achieving a society in which deaf people have full access. n Communication Professional of the Year. n Organisational Achievement Award. n Centre of the Year. n Learner of the Year n Young Learner of the Year (Under 16)

n Teacher of the Year. Closing date for entries for the Teacher of the Year and Learner of the Year is April 21. Other categories, June 30. Signature offers accredited qualifications in sign language and other forms of communication with deaf and deafblind people at more than 700 locations. n www.signature.org.uk/awards

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OMECARE from The Consortium is the first comprehensive online shop for people who want to live life to the full at home as they grow older. Many new advanced products are available to buy direct from the site, which has its own occupational therapist to advise visitors, and there are helpful icons to indentify products for different conditions. In this column, practising GP and Mail on Sunday health columnist Dr Ellie Cannon talks about one common condition . . . One-handedness can be caused by wrist fractures and injuries from falls, strokes, arthritic hand deformity, difficulty in being able to control SINGLE-HANDED muscle TRAY – keep one movement or hand free to amputation. support yourself but It is hard to adapt be able to carry – especially if you drinks or meals. have other Non-slip tray mat physical difficulties prevents items from to cope with. sliding around. Securing things in place can be particularly difficult when you only have one hand, and simple tasks that require fiddly finger movements HANDYBAR – slots such as cutting up into the standard food at mealtimes, catch of your car door to help lift doing up buttons yourself in or out. and undoing lids are everyday challenges. Many people and carers are unaware of the many new innovations that can help with one handedness and FOOD GUARD – fits keep them on plates to independent in prevent food their own homes. spilling off. At the Homecare Microwave and website you can dishwasher safe. find a whole range of excellent products that can help you to manage. Here’s some ideas to help . . . a simple tool for coping with buttons and zips, a single-handed tray, a guard that fits to plates to stop food from spilling over the edge, or therapeutic hand putty for building up muscle strength in your hand or wrist after injury. Check out our website below to find the right advice and products to help you!

www.homecare-products.co.uk 0843 224 1200


Corrie star: ‘I owe my life to NHS’

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More muscle . . . AN ARMY of care advisors is joining the fight against muscle disease across the UK. Adults and children living with muscle disease will now have access to 19 regional care advisors, who provide vital care co-ordination, advice and guidance on services, equipment and funding. The posts – one in the West Midlands, two on Merseyside – have been created thanks to the hard work of campaigning patients in 10 UK regions and the Muscular Dystrophy Campaign. n www.muscular-dystrophy.org

All the lonely people A NATIONAL network of befriending schemes is being set up by Counsel and Care, the charity working with older people. Counsel and Care reckon that £70m of public funding, plus £50m from other sources, could enable 480,000 older people to benefit. One in 10 older people report constantly feeling lonely. n www.counselandcare.org.uk

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ORONATION Street actor Bill Tarmey is backing a new North West TUC campaign to protect and promote public services. ‘Proud to serve the public’ has been launched in the run-up to the General Election as public services are threatened by massive spending cuts in the wake of the recession. Bill, who plays Coronation Street’s lovable Jack Duckworth for 30 years, has singled out National Health Service staff as amongst those public servants who are deserving of extra special praise. He said: “I owe my life to the National Health Service.

April/May 2010

“When I was 35 I had a heart attack on stage in Hale. My mate rushed me to Wythenshawe Hospital and they brought me round. “Everybody was worried sick, except me as I wasn’t conscious! “Since then I have had two separate heart by-pass operations and am eternally indebted to a Lebanese heart specialist called Henri Moussali and the nursing staff at Wythenshawe for their efforts. “Mr Moussali has sadly since died of cancer, but I am still here against all odds thanks to him and the staff. I owe a huge debt to sister Bernie and all her girls who looked after me.

Free DVD! – from the British Heart Foundation

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OUR heart is a muscle that keeps blood pumping around your body. Do you know how to keep it healthy? The British Heart Foundation has made a DVD and booklet called ‘Live with a healthy heart’. It tells you what you can do to look after your heart. The DVD has real people telling their stories. They tell you about changes they made to their lives so that they can live with healthy hearts. After Caroline lost weight, this is what she said: “When I was really big it used to take me half an hour to get to the

bus stop . . . but now it only takes me 10 minutes”. Ian’s Dad and Grandma have had heart attacks. Ian says: “I want to eat and live healthily to stop me having a heart attack.” Emma and Diana know that being active is good for your heart. Diana started a sports group and says: “I have seen a big difference in myself . . . I am a lot happier and am meeting other people too.” There are other stories, too. Order our FREE booklet and DVD ‘Live with a healthy heart’ to find what you can do to keep your heart healthy.

Call 0870 600 6566 or order online at orderline@bhf.org.uk

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

FIGHTING TALK: Bill Tarmey backing the new TUC campaign “They also looked after my wife, Ali, and the rest of my family when they have been needed. I can’t praise the NHS staff enough for their kindness, expertise and dedication.” The ‘proud to serve the public’ campaign will highlight the contribution made by public services and public servants including those who often get

little media attention – in improving the quality of life of people in the North West. Plans are under way for campaign events and meetings, as well as using the internet and social networks to rally opposition to cuts. n www.proudtoservethe public.org.uk


Working TOGETHER!

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

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ELCOME to The Morgan Foundation’s first page in All Together NOW! We have been supporters of All Together NOW! for the past three years and are now proud to be one of the charity’s main sponsors – recognition for the way in which it helps, along with the online magazine, to bring together so many people and organisations across the region. In the months to come we will be using this page to highlight both our work and that of some of the organisations we are helping. Since 2001 The Morgan Foundation has been supporting local charities across North Wales, Merseyside, west Cheshire and north Shropshire. Our philosophy is simple – ‘making a difference’. The help we can give ranges from one-

All Together NOW!

April/May 2010

The trustees of The Morgan Foundation are fully supportive of All Together NOW! There is no doubting the value and importance of the publication

off and on-going grant funding to the provision of ‘Smiley Buses’. Our main focus is on small to mediumsized organisations working directly with children and families, but we are interested in any project that contributes to the quality of life of disadvantaged people in our area. We also encourage entrepreneurship in

the region via the annual Morgan Foundation Entrepreneur Awards. If you need help with funding, then visit the website; check to see if your project fits our criteria, and then give our administrator Jane Harris a call to discuss your plans.

Steve Morgan Chairman, The Morgan Foundation

Music great is guest at Golf Day fundraiser

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OCK legend Robert Plant will be the special guest at this year’s Morgan Foundation and Wolves Aid* Celebrity Golf Day and Gala Dinner on Friday, May 7. Robert has donated and signed one of his Platinum Record Awards to be auctioned in the evening, together with a unique collection of memorabilia. Rumour has it that the former Led Zeppelin front-man will also be taking to the stage and performing a few numbers at the fundraising event being held at Carden Park Hotel, Chester. Jane Harris, administrator of The Morgan Foundation said: “Whatever happens, the evening promises to be a great climax to a fantastic day.” Last year Plant picked up the Q Awards’ Outstanding Contribution to Music Award. He also received a CBE from The Prince of Wales – and was appointed vice president of his favourite football club, Wolverhampton Wanderers.

*Part of Wolves Community Trust

Our Wolves’ link

SMILEY FACES: The Morgan Foundation presented one of their specially adapted ‘Smiley Buses’ to St Christopher’s School, Wrexham

£100,000 on offer

CASH prizes totalling £100,000 are up for grabs – plus a package of valuable professional services – in the The Morgan Foundation Entrepreneur Awards 2010. The awards recognise best entrepreneurial practice in businesses and charities based in Merseyside, Cheshire (west of M6), north Shropshire, North Wales and the Wolverhampton area. Entries will open in June and will close in September. n For full details visit www.mf-awards.co.uk

WOLVES Community Trust is the official charity of Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club. Via Wolves Aid, which is supported by The Morgan Foundation, it helps community groups in the Wolverhampton area. Wolves Aid has the same remit as The Morgan Foundation and, according to the Football League Trust, is the biggest club charity of its type in football. Organisations within Wolverhampton wanting to find out more about Wolves Aid should contact Rachael HeyhoeFlint on 0871 880 8442 n www.wolves-aid.co.uk

www.morganfoundation.co.uk

Schools with big ambitions for all pupils St CHRISTOPHER’S (Wrexham) and Green Park (Wolverhampton) are the two schools that will benefit from The Morgan Foundation Celebrity Golf Day. Both are all-age special schools for pupils with severe, complex and profound learning difficulties – and physical impairments. St Christopher’s school is the largest special school in Wales with 240 pupils and moved to its present premises in Stockwell Grove in 2000. Ever since, staff and parents have been fundraising for a much-needed hydropool. So far they have raised £30,000 towards the £100,000 needed to make their dream a reality. Green Park, meanwhile, will be moving to new premises later in the year where they are required to raise their own funds for specialist equipment. The first priority for this is the provision of a soft play room – a highly motivating learning environment where children with limited physical skills and poor balance can learn motor control without risk of injury or harm. They need £20,000 . . .

Tel. 01829 782800

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April/May 2010

Stations just get better! A

CCESS is getting even better at Merseytravel stations.

The opening of a new MtoGo retail outlet and ticket unit at Hooton station heralds an investment of almost half a million pounds in three Wirral stations in March. Improvements at Hooton also include a fully accessible toilet, along with a new waiting shelter on the Liverpool bound platform, due for completion within weeks. And Rock Ferry and Meols stations are also to benefit from the improvement scheme which has been jointly funded by

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

JUST THE TICKET: Peter Morton, left, and Councillor Mark Dowd, chair of Merseytravel, at Hooton station

Merseytravel and the National Stations Improvement Programme (NSIP). At Rock Ferry the project will bring back into use a building located on the island platform, with the installation of a fully accessible toilet and waiting room, plus the booking hall and entrance will benefit from improved security and lighting. At Meols station improvement work involves new glazing to the footbridge windows and staircase, redevelopment of existing buildings to provide enclosed passenger waiting shelters, a new passenger toilet and automatic entrance doors to the booking hall.

Cash to get more people moving A COMMUNITY transport organisation has received a £25,000 cash boost towards providing affordable transport for disadvantaged people including the frail and elderly and children with special needs. The money comes from the Local Transport Plan partnership of Merseytravel with Knowsley, Liverpool, Sefton, St Helens and Wirral councils, under the Community Access Grant scheme. South Central Community Transport, a registered charity formed in 2003, is a

growing transport company providing affordable transport services to people in Liverpool 8, with a fleet of six minibuses. Neil Scales, chief executive and director general of Merseytravel, said: “This is an extremely enterprising scheme which deserves our support. “It provides a valuable service to a vulnerable section of our society, and is run by an extremely capable and enthusiastic group of volunteers who justifiably meet the criteria of the Community Access Grant scheme.”

Merseytravel is making sure that Public Transport on Merseyside is easy for everyone to use. We care about the accessibility of our buildings, vehicles and information. All of our staff are trained to be courteous and considerate, particularly when our customers have special requirements. Whether it be automatic door-openers in our head office, availability of textphones for main points of contact, or producing timetables in large print, we want to make public transport easier for everyone to use.

Among our services and facilities are: UÊÊ Merseylink – a door to door fully accessible transport service for people who are mobility impaired. UÊÊ ree concessionary travel for over 48,000 people with disabilities. U Modern, low floor, fully accessible buses, which are developed in partnership with local authorities and bus companies. UÊÊ Information in a variety of formats, including the Merseytravel Access Guide – containing access details for all bus and rail stations on Merseyside.

0871 200 22 33 Calls cost 10p per minute from land lines, mobiles may vary

AD346A

Textphone users can dial 18001 then 0871 200 22 33 for a typetalk assisted call.


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All Together NOW!

April/May 2010

WIN! WIN! WIN! 25 high quality trimmers up for grabs A NEW tool designed to make cutting off dead flower heads a pleasure rather than a chore has been introduced by Mr Fothergill’s. These handy ‘mini-snips,’ called Deadheads, are not only ideal for trimming outdoor flowers in beds and on patios but are also useful for tidying up houseplants and for detailed work on flower arrangements. They sell for £3.99 each but we have 25 to give away in this super competition. Regular deadheading encourages the growth of new flowers, giving a longer period of bloom, improving plants’ appearance and promoting their health. Deadheads are also suitable for snipping sappy stems or leaves, ideal for harvesting

action make them easier to use than scissors. Deadheads are among 17 lines in Mr Fothergill’s Garden Essentials collection. For details go to www.Mr-Fothergills.co.uk To enter the competition, answer this question: What are Deadheads’ blades made of?

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F YOUR garden is looking a little flat – both horizontal and humdrum – give it a beautiful boost with a new tree this spring. The changing colours of blooms, berries and autumn foliage can be yours for the planting and the tree’s shape adds a focal point to the most boring lawn. But don’t rush out and buy your favourite until you’ve checked . . . n How tall and broad will the tree become? If it is likely to fill its space after 20 years, it will have given two decades of pleasure and can be replaced. Or an ultimately smaller variety might suit you better. Remember that roots generally spread at least as far as the canopy. n How dense will the foliage be? You might not want to have windows, a patio or other plants in shade. However, if it’s privacy you want, thick, evergreen foliage might be an advantage. Once those points are settled, take your pick from flowering cherries, rowans, ornamental crab apples, witch-hazels and many other species. These are all deciduous and most have branches and leaves that are well spaced so they do not steal much light. Flowering cherries like the graceful pink Cheal’s Weeping Cherry (max 4.5m-15ft) is not too vigorous. Rowan, mountain ash or sorbus, which grows slowly to 8m (25ft) or more, is common

HELP . . .

CHECKLIST

FLOWERS: Lay a thick mulch of garden compost, well-rotted manure or chipped bark round established flowers when the ground is moist. This suppresses weeds and helps plants cope with summer drought. In late April, sow lupin Send your entry with your name and seeds in a nursery bed, 1.5cm address on a postcard or sealed envelope, windowsill herbs, mustard and cress and for (0.5in) deep and 15cm (6in) stating where you picked up your copy of pinching back flowers to encourage bushy apart. Germination takes from All Together NOW! – and tell us what you growth. two to eight weeks so don’t think of the magazine – to: Deadheads Their high quality steel blades remain sharp worry if, at first, only a few of Competition, All Together NOW! The and always give a clean cut, thereby reducing the seeds seem to be growing. Bradbury Centre, Youens Way, Liverpool the risk of disease entering the plants. SHRUBS AND TREES: L14 2EP, to arrive by Friday, May 28, or Mr Fothergill’s say that Deadheads’ compact Overgrown forsythia shrubs or enter online at www.alltogethernow.org.uk size – they’re 10.5cm (4in) long – and spring hedges can be cut back hard as soon as they finish flowering. Take out the oldest stems of shrubs, to the ground, to encourage new shoots. Trim winter-flowering heathers lightly when blooming ends. LAWNS: Re-seed bare patches, protecting the area from birds by covering with netting, or stretching black thread tied 7cm (3in) high between short sticks pushed TREETOPS: into the ground. Feed paleThere is looking grass with a spring plenty of lawn fertiliser and apply weed choice – and and mosskiller if needed. plenty of VEGETABLES: Feed early colour – for lettuces with a nitrogen-based owners of fertiliser – sulphate of small ammonia or dried blood – to gardens. promote quick leaf growth. The beautiful Towards the end of April plant flowers of First Early potatoes and sow Cheal’s French beans. Weeping HERBS: Plant hardy herbs Cherry are like chives, mint, sage and certain to parsley in a bed or pots cheer up conveniently near the kitchen even the door. most basic GLASS: Plant tender, garden. summer-flowering bulbs such And for later as lilies, eucomis and in the acidantheras in large pots and summer grow them in a greenhouse or there are the cold frame until all risk of frost orange has passed. Move them berries of outside at the end of May. the Rowan HOUSEPLANTS: Many (Mountain house plants such as Ash) pelargoniums and various succulents root easily from in the wild and in parks The ornamental crabs (malus) offer an cuttings taken in spring. Insert and streets but its appealing range with scented blossoms in short cuttings in pots of gritty, qualities – cream, shades of white, pink, red and purple, and free-draining compost. Don’t scented spring flowers, fruits varying from bright yellow to red and let the compost dry out. scarlet berries and often deep purple. PATIO: Remove dead foliage bronze autumn leaves – make it worth Among the smallest are three weeping from plants in permanent considering. kinds, Red Jade (3.5m tall, 6m wide (12ft x containers and scrape off the There are varieties with different coloured 20ft), Molten Lava with white flowers and top layer of compost without berries of yellow, orange, crimson, pink or orange fruits, and Candied Apple with pink damaging the roots. If the dazzling white. Smaller kinds include Chinese flowers and bright red fruits, both 4.5m (15ft). lower compost is dry, water Lace with orange berries (6m - 20ft). If planting is confined to a thoroughly. Replace the Where an even smaller tree is essential, the small courtyard or tub on a top layer with fresh witch-hazels are a delightful choice. balcony, look for dwarf ! ME compost mixed with HO ME TAKE The Chinese witch-hazel, Hamamelis mollis, conifers or the weeping general fertiliser. Plant the Kilmarnock willow, Salix grows slowly to reach 3m (10ft) in height and main summer display of caprea.. spread. half-hardy annuals towards the end of May.

Branching out! A tree brings colour and a talking point to the garden

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Disabled and need advice on gardening? Contact national charity THRIVE. Tel, 0118 988 5688. www.thrive.org.uk or www.carryongardening.org.uk


All Together NOW!

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April/May 2010

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

Your guide to theatreland

ACCESSIBLE HOLIDAYS 3GREATCHOICES!

HOTEL Blackpool

Specialist holidays for carers & service users

120, Bond Street, Blackpool, FY4 1HG

EASY ACCESS FOR WHEELCHAIRS CAR PARK EN-SUITE ROOMS ADJOINING ROOMS ELECTRIC HOISTS OVERHEAD TRACKING HOIST ELECTRIC BEDS COT SIDES COMMODES MODERN SPACIOUS BAR & RESTAURANT SPECIAL DIETS CATERED FOR HYDROTHERAPY POOL CONFERENCE FACILITIES LIVE CABARET SHOW EVERY NIGHT PICK-UP AND RETURN SERVICE

PARTY at the Bond Hotel Blackpool, where the great fun atmosphere is a very popular choice for many of our guests. The hotel has 65 bedrooms, most of which are wheelchair-accessible, and all the extra facilities that you might require during your stay. With great food, and nightly entertainment, this hotel offers the perfect Blackpool holiday!

HOTEL St. Annes

The Beach, 69-71 South Promenade, St Annes on Sea, FY8 1LZ

RELAX in our sophisticated new hotel in St Annes. Recently refurbished to the highest possible standard, this stylish 26-room hotel overlooks the sea, and offers a choice of luxurious wheelchair-accessible accommodation - from single rooms up to 3-room suites. The new Bond Hotel, St Annes is the ideal venue for those looking for the chance to unwind in style. ENJOY our de-luxe holiday homes at scenic Marton Mere. If you would prefer a self-catering break, these superbly appointed holiday homes could be just the thing. They sleep up to six, have central heating and all mod cons, are fully accessible, and overlook the beautiful lake and wildlife area at this popular resort.

HOLIDAY HOMES

Marton Mere Holiday Village

LUXURY travel wherever you choose to stay, you will have access to Bond Accessible Coaches Ltd who will pick you up and take you home at very reasonable prices So come and explore a whole world of special holidays for very special guests. Whether it's a week with the stars of “Coronation Street or Emmerdale”, a break on a nature reserve, or a luxury room with a great sea view, we can provide it - and at a great price too!

www.bondhotel.co.uk

sales@bondhotel.co.uk

Booking hotline 01253 341218

Apr 5-10: Dreamboats and Petticoats. Grand Theatre, Blackpool. Musical set in 1961 featuring a string of smash hits. Apr 5-10: Laughter in the Rain. Liverpool Empire. Apr 6-10: Spike Milligan’s Adolph Hitler: My Part in his Downfall. The Lowry, Salford. Apr 7-10: The Glass Menagerie. Liverpool Playhouse. Powerful Tennessee Williams drama. Audio Described, Apr 10. Apr 7: The Variety Show. The Brindley, Runcorn. Apr 9: Dad Rules - Andrew Clover. The Brindley, Runcorn. Apr 12-24: Blood Brothers. Liverpool Empire. Apr 12-17: Riverdance. Palace Theatre, Manchester. Apr 12-17: The 39 Steps. Manchester Opera House. Apr 12-17: Frankie and Johnny. Grand Theatre, Wolverhampton. Apr 15-May 8: Comedians. Bolton Octagon, Audio Described Apr 28; BSL Apr 29. Apr 15: Dana - Civic Event. The Brindley, Runcorn. Apr 16-May 15: A Fistful of Collars. Royal Court, Liverpool. Comedy set in dry cleaners. Apr 16-17: Blithe Spirit. The Brindley, Runcorn. Apr 16: We’ll Meet Again - Hitz from the Blitz. Crewe Lyceum. Apr 16: Cara Dillon. The Brindley, Runcorn. Award-winning folk star. Apr 16: Mark Radcliffe’s the Big Figures & Tom Doughty. Citadel Theatre, St Helens. Apr 17: Highfield Male Voice Choir. The Brindley, Runcorn. Apr 19-24: Nightmare. Crewe Lyceum. Apr 19-24: The History Boys. Clwyd Theatre, Cymru, Mold. Apr 19-24: Witness for the Prosecution. Floral Pavilion, New Brighton. Apr 20-24: Kiss me Kate. The Brindley, Runcorn. Apr 20-24: The Full Monty. The Lowry, Salford. Apr 20-24: Beauty and the Beast. Grand Theatre, Wolverhampton. Apr 21-24: Cinderella. Palace Theatre, Manchester. Apr 22-May 8: Beautiful House. Library Theatre, Manchester. Tragicomic drama. BSL May 6; captioned May 7; and audio described May 8. Apr 23-May 15: Canary. Liverpool Playhouse. Audio Described 13 May, Captioned 15 May. Apr 25: Sing - A - Long - A Rocky Horror Picture Show. Liverpool Empire. Apr 25: On Stage and Screen. The Brindley, Runcorn. Apr 26-May 1: Joseph. Regent Theatre, Stoke. Apr 27-May 15: Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. Palace Theatre, Manchester. Apr 27: Raspberry - life and times of Ian Drury. The Brindley, Runcorn. Apr 29-May 8: A Chorus Line. The Lowry, Salford. BSL, May 5.

YOU’VE GOT TO LAUGH

Spastic Fantastic: Laurence Clark – The Octagon Theatre Bolton, April 30 COMEDIAN Laurence Clark is back on the road with his controversial one-man, onenight show, ‘Spastic Fantastic’ that’s already gone down well in Cambridge, London, Bath, and Salford. Laurence, who himself has Apr 29-30: We’ll Meet Again. Grand Theatre, Wolverhampton. Nostalgic music and comedy. Apr 30: Eric’s Tales of the Sea. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 1: The Little Red Hen. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 3-8: Laughter in the Rain the Musical - The Neil Sedaka Story. Grand Theatre, Blackpool. May 3-8: The Rat Pack Live from Las Vegas (Touring). Liverpool Empire. May 4-8: Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. Crewe Lyceum. May 4-8: Once Upon a Time at the Adelphi. Floral Pavilion, New Brighton. Musical featuring the legendary hotel. May 4-6: All Our Yesterdays 2. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 4-8: Carousel. Salford Musical Theatre, The Lowry, Salford. May 4-8: Mum’s the Word. Grand Theatre, Wolverhampton. May 5-8: Caught in the Net. Preston, Charter Theatre. May 6-7: The Mindshock Prophecies. The Brindley, Runcorn. Brand new tales of terror. May 7: Wishbone Ash. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 8: C’mon Everybody. Rock ‘n’ Roll. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 10-22: Blood Brothers. Grand Theatre, Wolverhampton. May 10-15: When Harry Met Sally. Manchester Opera House. May 10: Stacey Kent. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 11-15: Desperate to be Doris. Manchester Library. Audio

cerebral palsy, challenges audiences to accept his unique viewpoint and delivery style. He says: “I reckon my audiences will either be rolling in the aisles or stunned into a perplexed silence by my story. I can’t wait to find out which it will be!” www.laurenceclark.co.uk Described, May 14. May 13-Jun 5: Rafta Rafta. Bolton Octagon. Audio Described, Jun 2; BSL, May 20. May 14: Closer. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 17-29: One Night in Istanbul. Liverpool Empire. May 17-22: Laughter in the Rain. Manchester Opera House. May 19-20: Desperate to be Doris. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 22: Stewart Francis. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 24-29: Prescription: Murder. Grand Theatre, Wolverhampton. May 24-26: Spirit of the Dance. Regent Theatre, Stoke. May 24-26: Popstar the Musical. Manchester Opera House. May 25-30: The Hobbit. Palace Theatre, Manchester. May 27-29: September in the Rain. Floral Pavilion, New Brighton. May 27: Rob Rouse. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 28: The Ballad of Egg Peel. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 31-Jun 3: Girls’ Night Out. Liverpool Empire. Jun 1-19: Hairspray. The West End Musical. Grand Theatre, Wolverhampton. Jun 2-5: The Mermaid Princess. The Lowry, Salford. F amily show. Jun 3-5: Rat Pack. Regent Theatre, Stoke. Jun 5-Jul 3: Oscar Wilde’s: The Importance of being Earnest, Manchester Library. BSL, Jun 24; captioned, Jul 2; audio described, Jul 1 - 3.


www.alltogethernow.org.uk

All Together NOW!

April/May 2010

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ADVERTISE WITH US !

WHAT’S ON with SAM MERRIMAN Until Aug 7: From Gunpowder to Space Rockets: The China Space Programme, MOSI, Manchester. Everything you wanted to know about how the Chinese are planning to conquer space . . . Until Sep 5: Plantastic! Liverpool World Museum. An insight into the secret world of plants. Young and old will be amazed by the giant leafy canopies, massive seed pods and strange man-made trees. Free. Mar 31-Jun 2: Craft Demonstration, The Museum of Lakeland Life and Industry, Kendal. Craftsmen and women of the Lake District give an insight into the region’s rich heritage. Apr 10: Wheelchair Rambles, Dingle Nature Reserve, Anglesey. Great chance to take part in some wheelchair accessible routes. Contact Gareth Evans: 01248 752 139 Apr 17-18: Sandbach Transport Festival. This year’s event promises to be more spectacular than ever with stunt shows, rallies and plenty more. Apr 17: Moonwatch, Llyn Brenig Visitor Centre, North Wales. Organised with the local astronomy societies, a chance to learn all about the moon and see it at its fullest. Tel, 01490 420 463 Apr 22-Jun 17: Freed Up. The greenroom, Manchester. The city’s friendliest poetry and free spoken word open mic night, offering a chance to see all of the freshest talents and upcoming stars. Apr 23: Rust and Restoration. People’s History museum, Manchester. Take a free guided tour around the newly-opened musuem and discover the struggle of the people of Manchester over the years. Apr 30-May 2: Georgian Fair, Cockermouth, Cumbria.

E! E HOM M E K A T

Travel agents ‘do not understand disability’

Tell 250,000 readers about your venues and services

EASY ACCESS . . . but disabled people need more than just beach ramps

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IGH street travel agents do not understand disabled holidaymakers’ needs, says a new tourism report. A survey of disabled travellers, conducted by The Co-operative Travel and UK disabled tourism charity Tourism for All, found that 84% of respondents did not believe high street travel agents understood their needs, and that 78% did not think they were catered for by the high street. The survey also found that 93% of disabled travellers found their choice of holidays restricted due to their disability. Jane Witherington, commercial and market development manager with The Co-operative Travel Trading Group, said: “Despite there being many

New service to meet needs

tour operators catering for people with disabilities, it has become clear to us as a responsible travel agent that we can and should do more. “As a consequence we have launched a new tailored service aimed specifically at disabled travellers, and trained staff from 40 branches UK-wide to ensure that they are up-to-speed with all aspects of holidays for people who require specialist travel. “In addition, the branches will carry a specialist guide, which contains information such as airport facilities and details of key travel partners in the UK and abroad, alongside other essential information.”

From £699

The company is also aiming to provide training and compliancy across the entire network of 410 branches. Brian Seaman, head of consultancy at Tourism for All, the charity that provides holiday information service for disabled and older people,said: “The problem is that very few agents have knowledge of the issues facing disabled travellers, and this – coupled with a further lack of knowledge concerning accessible holiday providers – means that they have been unable to offer meaningful advice.”

Tel: 0151 230 0307

IRTON HOUSE FARM

Holiday Breaks in the Lakes near Keswick Self catering apartments for 2-6 people. Specially designed with the wheelchair in mind. No steps. Beautiful views in a superb location. Friendly owners in residence. Open all year.

n For more information on

the service, or to find your nearest branch, contact The Co-operative Travel on 0845 266 9228 or visit www.co-operativetravel .co.uk/specialist-travel

For a colour brochure

Tel: 01768 776380

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All Together NOW!

April/May 2010

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

RIGHTS . . . BUSINESS . . . TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION . . . TRAINING . . . JOBS . . .R

Easy route to learning

Interested in a career in sport? Greenbank College in partnership with Liverpool John Moores University has vacancies for its Foundation Degree Inclusive Sport Development starting this Autumn. For a course factfile and an application pack contact 0151 733 7255 info@greenbank-project.org.uk Greenbank College, Greenbank Lane Liverpool L17 1AG greenbankcollege.org.uk Registered Charity No 513814

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ISABLED learners who want to go into higher education are benefiting from a new mentoring project. The Greater Merseyside Aimhigher partnership – consisting of local universities, further education and sixth form colleges, schools, local authorities and work-based learning providers – aims to increase the number of under-represented groups who progress through post-16 learning into higher education, and to increase their prospects of high quality employment. In May 2009 the Peer Mentoring Transition Support Project for Disabled Learners was set up with the hope of supporting disabled learners into higher education. The programme works with disabled learners to overcome any barriers they may face to gain such education. Alex Lancaster, equality and inclusion manager for Aimhigher, said: “Disabled learners are often unaware of the different funding and support available to them at university or what they need to do to access that support. This project recognises that many learners benefit from 1:1 support before that transition to university. “Peer mentors are able to share their experience of higher education with learners in schools and colleges who often feel more

Go into higher education with a helping hand comfortable discussing their fears and aspirations with a disabled mentor who has already made that transition to university.” The peer mentors assist learners by helping them with their application to higher education through UCAS, applying for the Disabled Students’ Allowance (which is funding for specialist course equipment) and liaising with the Disability Services in the university or college to ensure that the correct support will be put in place for when they begin their course.

Guidance During the transitional period the peer mentors are able to offer emotional and practical support. They are there to give appropriate advice and guidance to learners, addressing any issues or concerns they might have. Steph Niciu, one of the peer mentors on the project, said: “The learner may have a fear of disclosure because they are uncomfortable with being labelled as ‘disabled’ and the affect of discrimination.

“We will be able to advise the learner about disclosure, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages therefore allowing them to make an informed decision.” Throughout the programme the peer mentors encourage the learner to become more selfreliant and build their self confidence, making sure that they have made the right decisions and are prepared to face the next stage of their education. Another peer mentor is Alice Doherty, who helped her learner when he decided to apply to university. She accompanied him to the university campus, met with support teams and looked at various options with travel arrangements. Alice said: “When we arrived at the university we began by taking part in the campus tour and this included accommodation, visiting the different teaching buildings and the library services. “Overall, we both felt that it was a very successful day and he was able to find out all the information that would allow him to be one step closer to making his decision.” n If you would like further information about Aimhigher Greater Merseyside or the peer mentoring project please visit: www.ahgtm.ac.uk/peer_mentoring


www.alltogethernow.org.uk

April/May 2010

EDUCATION . . . TRAINING . . . JOBS . .

New one-stop Service makes sense

BRIGHTER FUTURES: new Sensory Service is helping young people

A

NEW service is being developed to provide better support for people with sensory impairments. The Greater Merseyside Sensory Service, aimed at 16-25 year-olds, will support the needs of young people while they study, find work or become more independent. The service aims to be a one-stop shop providing: n Clear information which is easily understood about education or work opportunities n Advice, guidance and support n Assessments, equipment, training and job coaching. The Service, funded through the Invest to Change programme (Greater Merseyside LSC) and sponsored by RNIB/Action for Blind People, is currently compiling a list of contacts of organisations that are willing to offer work placements to students. Liz Jackson, development officer for the Service, and who is also inclusive manager at Liverpool Community College, said: “Research

Help on way for sensory impaired

undertaken in 2008 highlighted there was a clear need for this work. “The new service will not duplicate anything that is going on already, but will add to it and will fill any gaps that exist. “We believe it will significantly improve choice for young people by signposting them to the most appropriate service available. “Since November, we have held focus groups with learners and those who work with them, and have set up two advisory groups for both, which have met in February and March.” The Service is currently loaning equipment to young people. Items include a range of assistive enabling technology such as DAISY players; desktop and portable video magnifiers; Braille note takers; VI specialist software such as Jaws, Zoomtext, Kurtzweil;

laptops, flat-screen monitors and hi-spec scanners; digital video recorders; portable loop systems; and telephone amplifiers. In addition to helping young people, the Service has also delivered sensory disability awareness training to Connexions and work-based learning providers. Visually impaired learner Christina Ward said: “I have been involved in two meetings and a training session where there were lots of good ideas about how to improve the service. “The training session was good and raised awareness to organisations about hearing and visual impairment, which will make it easier for the sensory impaired to get back into work.” The Service’s current funding has just expired. “But we are now seeking long term funding to take the Service forward,” says Liz Jackson. n Want to find out more? Contact Liz on 0151 252 4052 or email liz.jackson@liv-coll.ac.uk

All Together NOW!

15

‘This is an

Liverpool Community College

g n i d n a t outs college’

Summary of Ofsted inspection report, March, 2009

‘ The college has woven an intricate web of learning opportunities and support ’ Ofsted, March 2009 The report highlights the following key strengths:

 high pass rates on most courses

 outstanding teaching and learning

 innovative and high quality partnership working  exemplary responsiveness to the needs of the local community

 outstanding support for learners

 outstanding management of change by the principal and senior leaders

 outstanding curriculum management  outstanding approach to equality of opportunity and inclusion. Course information:

0151 252 3000 www.liv-coll.ac.uk


16

All Together NOW!

April/May 2010

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

All Together NOW!

April/May 2010

Trailblazers go undercover for new job study

RIGHTS . . . BUSINESS . . . TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION . . . TRAINING . . . JOBS . . .R

City College Manchester and MANCAT have come together to form The Manchester College

Better for school leavers Better for employment skills Better for career development Better for businesses Better for higher education Better for you, better for Manchester For more information about courses call: 0800 068 8585 or visit: www.themanchestercollege.ac.uk

M

ORE than 200 young disabled campaigners from across the UK have launched an undercover investigation to find out whether disabled job seekers are still facing discrimination.

The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 should have improved equality in employment, but 15 years on many job seekers with a disability say they still feel they are facing adversity. Shocking figures from The Employers Forum on Disability show the poverty rate for disabled adults in the UK is 30 per cent, double that of non-disabled UK adults. Trailblazers, a campaigning group for young disabled people run by the Muscular Dystrophy Campaign, believe disabled people and their non-disabled peers deserve exactly the same chances at finding

17

EDUCATION . . . TRAINING . . . JOBS . . JOB HUNTERS: Young Trailblazers ready to highlight good and bad employment practices by UK firms

employment, but statistics show that:

n Twice as many UK disabled adults are living in

poverty (30 per cent) as non-disabled UK adults; n There are 1.3 million disabled people in the UK who

want to work and are available for work but cannot find a job; n One in five unemployed disabled people in the UK want to work, compared to one in 15 unemployed nondisabled people; n Only half of working-age disabled people are in work, compared with 80 per cent of working-age, nondisabled people. Jagdeep Sehmbi, 26, from Birmingham, has limb girdle muscular dystrophy, a condition which causes the muscles in her shoulders, arms, legs and hips to waste. She said: “A couple of times I’ve been invited to job interviews where they’ve then contacted me to say the building

isn’t accessible for my wheelchair. So they’ve just had to be called off.” Jennifer Gallacher, 27, from Middlesbrough, has spinal muscular atrophy, a progressive muscle wasting condition. She said: “I wanted to be a teacher and in my interviews for the course I was asked a lot of questions about how I would manage being in a wheelchair and getting around the classroom. I knew I could manage it – I now have a job as a teaching assistant – but they had no experience of disability.

“I still think there is inequality in employment for people with a disability. You just have to look around – how many people with a disability do you see in most workplaces?” Trailblazers’ project manager Bobby Ancil said: “We are hoping our investigation will show there is equality in employment for disabled people, but the stories we’ve heard so far suggest there is still discrimination going on. “The Disability Discrimination Act should have made sure that disabled people had as good a chance at

finding employment as their nondisabled peers, but 15 years on we are still hearing this is not always the case. “Hopefully, the Trailblazers’ report will highlight some of these issues and be a step forward in making sure people with a disability have a fair chance at getting a job like everyone else.” n The Trailblazers network is open to anyone between 16 - 30 years-old who would like to fight for the rights of disabled people. n www.muscular-dystrophy.org/trailblazers

A big THANKS to all our supporters Helping to build a stronger

Would you like

YOUR

organisation to get on board?

future for the local community

TAKE ME HOME!

Call us . . . 0151 230 0307

With a proud heritage which includes the development of the world's first commercial nuclear power station, Sellafield Ltd has emerged from the groundbreaking reorganisation of the country's nuclear assets and liabilities as the team responsible for the safe delivery of multi-million pound contracts at Sellafield and Capenhurst on behalf of site owners the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority. The challenge of managing the UK's nuclear legacy comes with the responsibility to ensure that our operations and activities leave the lightest environmental footprint. To that end the company, in discussion with the Environment Agency, undertakes an embedded programme of monitoring of our environments. We have a long history of supporting our local communities. Working with the NDA our socioeconomic plans encourage employee involvement in local activities, charitable donation schemes and inward investment.

Our endeavours in this area are born from a wish to protect the current skills base, encourage new businesses and, wherever we can, help the overall socio-economic well being of our local communities. We take great pride in being able to make a positive impact on people's lives. We have invested over £2million through our economic development programme. Sustainability and enhanced prosperity in our local regions is the focal point of our economic regeneration policy. We encourage skills development for both businesses and individuals enabling them to take control of their own future. Our support builds upon the efforts and enthusiasm of our partners in the community, and our own employees, where we are all striving to achieve a vibrant and healthy community.

For more information, please visit www.sellafieldsites.com


All Together NOW!

18

April/May 2010

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

RIGHTS . . . BUSINESS . . .TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION . . . TRAINING . . . JOBS . . .R

The Accumulator Quiz

STARSPOT CROSSWORD Can you find the celebrity name hidden in this Starspot Crossword? Complete the crossword in the normal way then make a note of the letters contained in all the squares which are marked with shaded stars. These letters will make an anagram of the name you are looking for. 1

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QUESTION 2 – for 2 points: Who cut off Samson’s hair in the Old Testament?

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ACROSS 1. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 15. 16. 20. 24. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32.

Clearly defined (8) Mystical (6) Mimicked (4) Tear (3) Column (6) Cogitate (8) In repose (2,4) Worthless person (6) Bring into the country (6) Hazy patch of light (6) Man appointed by testator (8) Filter (6) Kernel (3) Endanger (4) Cold symptom (6) Reviving (8)

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 12. 13. 14. 17. 18. 19. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26.

Endearingly sweet child (6) Golfer’s assistant (6) Layout (6) Metallic element (6) Carve (6) Split (6) Wise men (4) Let fall (4) Russian emperor (4) Petroleum organisation (4) Tense (4) Back (4) Insurrection (6) Orange (anag.) (6) Monetary note (colloq.) (6) Famous physicist (6) Dig underground (6) Relax (6)

A B C D

Sweeney Todd Bathsheba Delilah Veronica

Grape vines Orchids Seaweeds Potatoes

QUESTION 7 – for 7 points: Which element is No 1 in the periodic table?

A B C D

A B C D

QUESTION 5 – for 5 points: What was the name of the gang led by William Brown in the Just William stories? Sharks Bandits Pirates Outlaws

QUESTION 6 – for 6 points: What was the title of the debut single by the Pet Shop Boys which became a UK No 1 hit in November 1985? A B C D

A B C D

TV presenter Ben Fogle. See Question 12

Cattle Elephants Birds Lizards

It’s A Sin West End Girls Always On My Mind Heart

Scott Weinger Robin Williams Robert De Niro Leonardo DiCaprio

QUESTION 12 – for 12 points: In which country did TV presenter Ben Fogle take part in the the Marathon des Sables, an ultramarathon lasting for six days?

QUESTION 4 – for 4 points: Which creatures are studied by an ornithologist?

A B C D

A small jungle cat A smoked sausage An Alpine smallholding A jockey’s silk vest

QUESTION 11 – for 11 points: Which actor supplied the voice of the Genie in the 1992 film Aladdin?

SUDOKU

QUESTION 13 – for 13 points: What is the surname of Jane Austen’s character Emma?

Oxygen Iron Hydrogen Helium

A B C D

QUESTION 8 – for 8 points: Which country claimed Queen Maud Land, a region of the Antarctic, as a dependent territory in 1939? A B C D

France Morocco Canada Monaco

Williamson Westwood Woodhouse Woodbine

QUESTION 14 – for 14 points: Of which planet is Miranda a satellite moon? A B C D

Great Britain Norway The United States Argentina

Jupiter Saturn Venus Uranus

QUESTION 9 – for 9 points: What does the W stand for in George W. Bush?

QUESTION 15 – for 15 points: Which Pacific Island is called Rapa Nui by its inhabitants?

A B C D

A B C D

Walker Walter Wallace Warren

Easter Island Hawaii Pitcairn Island Tonga

KAKURO

THERE is just one simple rule in Sudoku. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9, and so must each 3 x 3 box. This is a logic puzzle, and you should not need to have to guess.

EASY

DIFFICULT

3 2 5 5 9 1 6 7 5 2 9 4 2 1 9 6 7 4 9 4 6 9 7 8 5 2 4 3 9 6 5 1 TAKE ME HOME!

A B C D

QUESTION 3 – for 3 points: Which plants have a basal structure called a holdfast? A B C D

30

QUESTION 10 – for 10 points: What is a cervelat?

Bullseye Bullet Bert Brumby

10

22

28

chosen answers and keep a record of your points total. Maximum total points 120. QUESTION 1 – for 1 point: What was the name of Woody’s horse in the film Toy Story?

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Each question has four possible answers and is worth from one to 15 points. Circle your

2 8

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1 6 3 6 1 4 2 3 4 7 1 2 8 9 6 7 2 9 4 8 2 1

“I THINK All Together NOW! is great. It’s refreshing to know someone cares. Picked up at White Rose Centre, Rhyl — Roger Owen, 67 Chestnut Road, Leamore, Walsall

FILL in the blank squares in the grid with numbers so that each horizontal or vertical line adds up to the total given in the box either to the left or above it. Horizontal totals are given in the top right corners of the shaded boxes; vertical totals in the bottom left corners. You can use the numbers 1 to 9, but may not use the same number more than once in any run. The number may be used again, however, in the same row or column but as part of another run.

MEDIUM 11

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All Together NOW! is well written with professional layout and presentation – and has a good choice of quizzes. Picked up at Stapeley Water Gardens. — I Kelly, Egerton Street, Runcorn, Cheshire


www.alltogethernow.org.uk

All Together NOW!

April/May 2010

19

RIGHTS . . . BUSINESS . . . TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION . . . TRAINING . . . JOBS . . .R DIALLING CODES

CROSS CODE 17

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ EACH number in our Cross Code grid represents a different letter of the alphabet. You have three letters in the control grid to start you off. Enter them in the appropriate squares in the main grid, then use your knowledge of words to work out which letters should go in the missing squares. As you get the letters, fill in other squares with the same number in the main grid and control grid. Check off the alphabetical list of letters as you identify them.

1

2

3

4

14

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S

Telephone dialling pads combine several letters on one key. Here we have encoded several sets of words or items by using numbers rather than letters. Then we have divided them into groups of three characters and run all the names one after another to make your task a little more difficult. Can you crack the codes?

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MISSING LINK Each pair of words has a missing word between them that acts as a link to both (e.g. FRONT – DOOR – MAT). The initial letters of the six answers (reading downwards) will spell out a geometrical shape.

1 []’–

2 ABC

3 DEF

4 GHI

5 JKL

6 MNO

7 PQRS

8 TUV

9 WXYZ

Spaces and any punctuation marks are represented by 1.

1. ranks in the armed forces 436 372 512 364 725 173 266 315 438 836 268 126 666 367 313 435 316 277 425 127 442 343 713 594 641 633 423 717 782 376 615 323 37

2. Olympic host cities 766 317 862 546 561 961 227 235 662 128 716 352 687 631 237 172 747 163 942 612 128 526 821 567 126 371 435 746 54

4. types of moving water 787 326 186 337 287 736 819 447 576 651 748 371 874 288 279 136 868 246 143 973 712 272 233 184 331 722 319 448 314 677 371 727 437

5. Queen hit records 264 364 261 742 776 931 273 184 312 426 671 723 461 424 214 681 861 273 251 373 661 817 867 163 266 633 717 737 787 3

PATHWORDS

SPOT CHECK

Starting from the central shaded letter, move one letter at a time (up, down, right or left, but not diagonally) to find 14 sewing techniques.

Can you place the six dominoes (right) into the grid below in such a way that the number of spots in all four rows across and all four rows down totals 11?

865 436 546 489 435

3. Biblical characters 354 524 166 241 465 417 285 156 624 123 335 452 416 673 715 642 417 463 661 638 352 412 365 264 617 351 383

391 746 192 313 918

6. Pacific Ocean islands 429 244 124 747 862 716 673 655 148 261 327 837 124 546 418 266 214 252 724 671 866 421 826 828 816 391 932 526 317 268 212 789

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WORD WIZARD

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Here is an unusual word with three definitions, only one of which is correct. Can you identify the right definition?

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GLYPH

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P M MAKE A DATE

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In which year did all three of these significant historical events take place?

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1. Tony Blair becomes prime minister after a landslide general election victory.

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M M E H G TRANSFORMER

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HIGH

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BUS

SEMI

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REST

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STAND

STRONG

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CHAIR

WEDDING

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OFF

STAND

––––

MONEY

1) A viscous, transparent discharge from a mucous surface;

F

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S

2) An architectural term for an ornamental channel or fluting;

2. Japan’s ‘maglev’ train sets a new world speed record for rail transport of 280.3 mph.

3) A name for nitroglycerine, as used in medicine.

3. The BBC launches its 24-hour TV news channel.

Add the given letter to the first word to make a new word. Clue: Fall asleep when adding to a number.

WAS IT? a) 1996; b) 1997; c) 1998; d) 1999; e) 2000.

____ +N=____N

428 261 373 487 268

ALL THE ANSWERS

5 2 3 9 8 7 1 6 4

SUDOKU EASY

6 9 8 4 1 3 5 2 7

4 1 7 6 5 2 9 8 3

7 4 5 3 6 8 2 1 9

8 3 2 5 9 1 7 4 6

9 6 1 7 2 4 8 3 5

2 8 4 7 3 1 9 5 6

9 1 6 8 4 5 3 2 7

5 7 3 6 9 2 4 1 8

8 2 5 9 7 6 1 3 4

3

17 4

18 5

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19 6

20

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X

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26

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CROSS CODE

6 4 7 1 5 3 8 9 2

3 9 1 4 2 8 6 7 5

1 3 8 2 6 7 5 4 9

7 6 9 5 1 4 2 8 3

4 5 2 3 8 9 7 6 1

SUDOKU DIFFICULT

6pm - 10pm every Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday & Monday

2 7 6 1 3 9 4 5 8

C

P W S

N

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16

0800 587 2252

3 8 4 2 7 5 6 9 1

1

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Telephone Sightline Free on

1 5 9 8 4 6 3 7 2

V

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16 21 17 16

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27 24

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1

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1 6 9

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8 10

15

KAKURO MEDIUM

2 7

2 9 6 7 29

1 7 3 11

Accumulator Quiz 1 – A; 2 – C; 3 – C; 4 – C; 5 – D; 6 – B; 7 – C; 8 – B; 9 – A; 10 – B; 11 – B; 12 – B; 13 – C; 14 – D; 15 – A. Starspot Crossword Across – 1 Specific; 8 Occult; 9 Aped; 10 Rip; 11 Pillar; 12 Meditate; 15 At rest; 16 Rotter; 20 Import; 24 Nebula; 27 Executor; 28 Strain; 29 Nut; 30 Risk; 31 Sneeze; 32 Renewing. Down – 2 Poppet; 3 Caddie; 4 Format; 5 Copper; 6 Sculpt; 7 Cleave; 12 Magi; 13 Drop; 14 Tsar; 17 OPEC; 18 Taut; 19 Rear; 21 Mutiny; 22 Onager; 23 Tenner; 24 Newton; 25 Burrow; 26 Loosen. Star Name: MEG RYAN

Word Wizard No 2 is correct. A glyph is an ornamental channel. Dialling Codes 1. General; Admiral; Second Lieutenant; Commodore; Field Marshal; Brigadier; Flying Officer; Squadron Leader. 2. Rome; Stockholm; Tokyo; Barcelona; Athens; Melbourne; Berlin; Paris; Mexico City; Atlanta; Los Angeles; Helsinki. 3. Elijah; Noah; Goliath; Saul; Jonah; Adam; Delilah; Moses; Jeremiah; Simeon; Methuselah; Benjamin; Samuel; Eve. 4. stream; undercurrent; whirlpool; river; tributary; fountain; geyser; cascade; tide race; white horses;

rapids. 5. Bohemian Rhapsody; We Are The Champions; Radio Gaga; I Want To Break Free; Don’t Stop Me Now; Under Pressure. 6. Hawaii; Christmas; Norfolk; Guam; Easter; Bikini; Samoa; Galapagos; Tonga; Vanuatu; New Zealand; Santa Cruz. Spot Check A = 6; B = 3; C = 5; D = 2; E = 1; F = 4. Missing Link school; quaver; under; arm; ring; easy. Shape: square. Make a Date The year was 1997. Transformer Doze + N = Dozen.

Support for you, your family and friends from those who understand

14

ARE YOU AFFECTED BY SIGHTLOSS?

Pathwords embroidery; crocheting; quilting; darning; smocking; patchwork; binding; pleating; hemming; shirring; needlepoint; topstitching; tapestry; appliqué.

SIGHTLINE VISION (NORTH WEST)


20

All Together NOW!

April/May 2010

CHARITY SPOTLIGHT:

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

Christopher Grange

Home sweet home . . .

GERRY CORNER discovers a den of activity in a quiet cul-de-sac

P

T

HE quality of care, support and encouragement to be found at Christopher Grange has its roots in the traditions of the great Victorian philanthropists. Moved by the plight of adults and children losing their sight, the Very Rev Dr Thomas Youens opened Catholic Blind Institute in Liverpool, in 1841, to address their needs. Today, that organisation is a charity that encompasses the famous St Vincent’s School for blind and partially sighted children, and nearby Christopher Grange, home to an adult visual rehabilitation centre and a residential care home. Christopher Grange, purpose-built in its own grounds, opened in 1972 with forwardthinking principles concerned with maximising the independence and respecting the wishes of every person passing through its doors. Its tranquil, tree-lined setting, set back off one of Liverpool’s busiest roads, means many people are unaware of the inspiring work going on there. A place of learning and companionship, the visual rehabilitation centre equips its users with the means to live as fully and independently as possible, restoring the levels of confidence they possessed prior to developing sight problems. The centre provides a wide range of services in a safe, welcoming and

supportive environment – information technology, independent living skills, mobility training, kitchen skills, Braille and Moon, low vision assessments, information, advice and support. Modern, spacious facilities include a training kitchen where the obvious dangers in preparing meals and hot drinks with a sight problem are met with simple, no-fuss solutions – like a talking microwave, and bumps on the worktop allowing you to safely, and easily, navigate your way round the cooker. In another room, everyday

Welcome to one of the best kept secrets

IN TUNE WITH PEOPLE . . . Christopher Grange has lots to offer

skills like vacuuming, ironing or just turning on the telly get the same treatment. As are potential problems outside the home, like how to avoid panicking if you are at the front of a queue, or what to do if you drop something. A greenhouse is used to cultivate fruit and vegetables, used in the kitchen, and hanging baskets which provide colourful displays are featured around the site. A low vision room contains magnifiers to enable service users gain confidence using low vision equipment they have

been loaned by the local hospital. Demonstrations by suppliers of low vision equipment are also organised to show the latest developments in their products. A can-do approach applies to all the centre’s work, not least in two IT rooms where service users undergo an initial assessment to establish what they want to achieve - whether checking on bank statements, or getting back into work. “Everything is based on what the service user wants to do; their targets, at their pace,” said IT tutor Steve Challoner.

“People achieve things here that they thought would be impossible. But if you want to do it, we’ll get you there.” Mike Bailey attended the centre after developing sight problems, and now he’s the manager! Mike said: “This place gave me my confidence back. Here, you learn that it’s not the end of your life, but the start of a new type of life.”

CHECK OUT OUR NEW WEBSITE . . . www.christophergrange.co.uk

ERHAPS it’s the attitude of staff that sums up the special atmosphere at Christopher Grange care home. Like activities organiser, Sue Jameson, who says: “To us, the residents are not just people with needs – they are friends.” Or perhaps it is people like Anne Mulford, a resident since Christopher Grange opened 38 years ago, who best reflect its spirit. Anne is blind and has piano lessons from her old music teacher who also lives at Christopher Grange. Anne plays at concerts for fellow residents and speaks for many when she declares: “I love this place.” Despite its attachment to Catholic Blind Institute, the care home is not restricted to people with visual impairments, nor to Catholics. It is open to anyone, irrespective of faith, belief, or indeed age – 60 years separates the oldest and youngest residents. A community of Sisters continue to live in the building, providing friendship and – for those wanting it – pastoral care and daily services at the on-site chapel. All rooms are single, decorated to a high standard, and feature en-suite bathrooms. Light, airy dining and communal areas all look on to the extensive gardens. A major attraction to would-be residents is the ‘Market Place’, a widespread communal space with shops – a coffee shop selling sweets, newspapers and toiletries, and a fullyequipped hairdressing salon – seating and plenty of room to wander, listen to the piano, or just sit and watch the world of Christopher Grange go by. A wide range of social activities is matched to the individual – which might mean someone reading a newspaper to a resident, or going on one of the all-year round outings in the specially adapted minibus. Director of services, Lesley Colby said: “It’s difficult to put your finger on what makes Christopher Grange different but there is definitely something special about the place.”

Christopher Grange thanks friends and well-wishers for supporting this feature . . . HOGANS BUTCHERS LTD. (Catering Specialists)

0151 449 3737

Gerrard Oates Tel: 0845 767 6999 Website: www.lyreco.co.uk

0151 526 9654 www.cheweng.co.uk

Tel: 0454 933 2001 www.awbyrnecontracting.co.uk

0151 430 2905 www.cityliftservices.co.uk

0151 493 1300 www.jabelliselectrical.com

0845 606 9090 www.brake.co.uk

Christopher Grange, Youens Way, East Prescot Road, Liverpool L14 2EW Tel, 0151 220 2525 Fax: 0151 220 1972. www.christophergrange.co.uk


Go on, push yourself

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

April/May 2010

All Together NOW!

MS Society

T

HE MS Society is on the lookout for All Together NOW! readers to take part in this year’s ‘wheel & walk’ events. The fun events – taking place right across the UK – make for a great family outing and will boost funds for the charity. Every walk has at least one fully accessible route (ranging from one kilometre to 14k) that can be completed on foot, in a wheelchair, on an electric scooter or pushing a buggy or pram. Saturday May 15 is when the North West event gets under way with three routes planned around Manchester’s Heaton Park – two of which are fully accessible. Peter Marsh, fundraiser at the MS Society, said: “We’re really excited about this year’s programme. “Each location has been chosen for its good accessibility.

“We will provide all the support that people need to help us with fundraising.” Registration costs £10 for adults (£3 for under 16s) and each adult is asked to raise a minimum of £25. Other wheel & walks taking place throughout the year: June 5: Windsor Great Park June 13: Cardiff Harbour June 20: Hinchingbrooke County Park, Cambridgeshire July 3: Leighton Buzzard, Bedfordshire July 10: Roundhay Park, Leeds Aug 15: University of Birmingham Sept 11: Westonbirt Arboretum, Gloucestershire Sept 12: Castlewellan Forest Park, Northern Ireland Sept 18: Lurgan Park, Northern Ireland n For more information call 0870 241 3565 or to sign up go to: www.mssociety.org.uk/wheelandwalk

21

CHARITY SPOTLIGHT

MS factfile

Tell 250,000 readers about your charity 0151 230 0307

TAKE ME HOME!

n The MS Society is the UK’s largest charity dedicated to supporting everyone whose life is touched by multiple sclerosis. n MS is the most common disabling neurological condition affecting young adults. n An estimated 100,000 people in the UK have MS. MS is the result of damage to myelin – the protective sheath surrounding nerve fibres of the central nervous system – which interferes with messages between the brain and the body. n For some people, MS is characterised by periods of relapse and remission while for others it has a progressive pattern. n Symptoms range from loss of sight and mobility, fatigue, depression and cognitive problems. n There is no cure and few effective treatments. n MS helpline, 0808 800 8000

“You can be forced to wait years to get the right wheelchair. It can take away your independence.” Dan Inwood living with MS

The MS Society campaigns with people with MS for the equipment to which they are entitled.

Visit www.mssociety.org.uk to find out more about our work or make a donation. Call our freephone helpline 0808 800 8000 for support and information about MS. MS Society. Putting the pieces together. The Multiple Sclerosis Society of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a charity registered in England and Wales (207495) and Scotland (SC016433)


All Together NOW!

22

April/May 2010

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

ZZZKHDOWKDQGZHOOEHLQJRUJXN

D ‚  Œ{ˆ †……‚ †y Š D „~‰ D ‹ HEALTHY AMBITIONS: Left, Everton players Landon Donovan and Jack Rodwell with (left to right): Robert Lyall, head of sport and recreation at Liverpool City Council: Dr Paula Grey, director of public health for Liverpool, and Andy Hull, director of stakeholder engagement at Liverpool Primary Care Trust RIGHT: Rafa Benitez with Derek Campbell, chief executive, Liverpool Primary Care Trust

WHAT A GOAL! L

IVERPOOL’S two Premiership football clubs are showing their support for the city’s latest public health campaign. The Reds and Blues are backing 2010 Year of Health and Wellbeing, which is raising awareness about the importance of good health and wellbeing for everyone. Dr Paula Grey, director of public health for Liverpool, said: “We are extremely grateful to Liverpool FC and Everton FC for supporting our 2010 campaign. Both clubs have been huge supporters of the NHS and their Football in the Community Departments are strongly involved in health related initiatives. “2010 Year of Health and Wellbeing is a brilliant opportunity for the people in the city to re-focus on their own wellbeing and make a positive difference to their health. “There will be a whole range of activities taking place over the year, ranging from physical activities to art related activities that individuals, couples, friends and families can get involved with and enjoy.” Reds’ manager Rafa Benitez said: “2010 is a unique opportunity for the people across the city to stop, reflect on and consider their health and wellbeing.

Go for it . . . says health chief, Andy

H

EALTH Secretary Andy Burnham heard how Liverpool is marking its Year of Health and Wellbeing when he visited the city. The Secretary of State met with Liverpool Primary Care Trust during his visit to Wavertree, where he was given a flavour of the initiatives that are taking place throughout 2010. Cyclists watched Mr Burnham present a speciallycreated yellow jersey to staff from Lifestyles Wavertree, which won a cycling challenge between Liverpool’s sports centres. Following the jersey presentation, Mr Burnham stepped aboard the Healthy Schools Bus, where children and teachers from St

‘Great campaign’ “I applaud Liverpool PCT and Liverpool City Council for running this campaign and ensuring the issue remains in people’s consciousness.” Everton’s Jack Rodwell said: “2010 Year of Health and Wellbeing is a great campaign for people across the city to take part in and I am delighted to be supporting it on behalf of Everton Football Club. “Any campaign that is designed to increase health awareness is well worth backing and I hope it makes a difference. “Too many young people and adults do not look after themselves properly because they eat a poor diet or don’t do enough exercise.” Liverpool City Council leader Warren Bradley said: “I am delighted that both clubs have signed up to be part of this year. “Supporting a football team is one of the simple steps you can take to improve your health and wellbeing. “This campaign is not just about being fit and active, but also the importance of socialising and sharing a common interest, such as getting together to watch a football match.”

Sebastian’s Primary school in Edge Hill were given a lesson in nutrition, fitness and lifestyle. The bus is an initiative run by Liverpool City Council, Liverpool Healthy Schools, and Everton in the Community. Andy Burnham said: “Liverpool’s Year of Health and Wellbeing is a great opportunity for people to consider the actions we can all take to start leading happier and healthier lives. “Maintaining good physical and mental health should be a top priority for everyone, and I’m delighted that Liverpool PCT and its partners are taking such a proactive, city-wide approach to helping people adopt a better lifestyle.”

Andy Burnham and Jenny Mercer from Lifestyles

Council and PCT team up to fund new projects A RECORD number of community groups are to benefit from a new way of funding grassroots culture in Liverpool. Liverpool City Council’s Executive Board agreed to fund a programme of arts and cultural projects being undertaken by 46 groups and organisations – double the number in 2009 – as part of a unique partnership with Liverpool Primary Care Trust to celebrate the city’s themed year of Health and Wellbeing for 2010. All of the events benefiting from the £200,000 programme, which is being

Check Check out out our our 2010 2010 programme programme of of events events .. .. ..

jointly funded by both organisations, are scheduled to run from April to December. Councillor Gary Millar, Liverpool City Council’s cabinet lead for Enterprise and Culture, said: ‘’Liverpool is awash with creativity and it’s fantastic to see so

many organisations and artists in our communities responding so imaginatively to Liverpool’s Year of Health and Wellbeing.’’ Gideon Ben Tovim, chair of Liverpool PCT, said: ‘“The grants available will provide community organisations with an opportunity to make their own contribution to improving the city’s health through the arts and I’m sure they will make a real difference to those involved and everyone around them.” n PICTURED: Gideon Ben-Tovim, right, with Radio Merseyside presenter Roger Phillips and Cllr Ron Gould

www.2010healthandwellbeing.org.uk www.2010healthandwellbeing.org.uk


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All Together NOW!

Home test for AMD

A vest that shocks TELL-TALE SIGNS of Macular Degeneation

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HE UK’s first ever genetic testing kit for an eye condition that causes blindness is being launched this month. The £399 home testing kit, paves the way for people to identify their own personal risk of contracting Age-Related Macular Degeneration, the world’s most common retinal disease, affecting over 500,000 people in the UK. AMD occurs when the macula – the central part of the retina that sends fine, detailed images to our brain – begins to break down. The number of people with the condition is continually rising and currently affects almost 20 million people across Europe. One in five people over 85 in the UK already have the disease. The testing kit, launched by Optegra – owner of the leading multi-million pound eye hospital in Guildford, Surrey and Yorkshire Eye Hospital – lets people find out whether or not they are likely to contract the disease, and take the necessary steps to slow down its possible onset. AMD has very few symptoms, and by the time it has been diagnosed, permanent visual damage could be done. n Contact Optegra: 0800 358 0825. www.optegra.com

by Beatrice Fraenkel chair, Mersey Care NHS

I

T WAS interesting to see the Department of Health’s new Living Well campaign with TV, radio and on-line advertising to raise awareness around dementia. People who have dementia clearly state ‘I have dementia – I also have a life’. Their aim is to educate the public about their condition and demonstrate the simple things each one of us can do to help someone who has dementia live well. A MORI poll found that one in three (32%) people are uncomfortable around people with dementia. This research backs up the Alzheimer’s Society report Public Awareness of Dementia, in which people with the condition said that revealing their diagnosis resulted in the loss of friends and difficult relationships with family members. What is it I wonder about the terminology, or labelling, or the putting someone in the box labelled ‘dementia’ that sends a shiver through so many of us – fear perhaps?

A

UNIQUE new ‘vest’ monitors – and provides life-saving shocks to people at risk of heart attacks, says a Cheshire-based medical company. The American-made vest is worn next to the skin in much the same way as an ordinary vest – but this one can save your life! “The Lifevest can literally save lives,” said Dr Ian Rankin, managing director of Dot Medical. “It allows patients who might otherwise have to stay in hospital, to go home and resume their lives, knowing that they are being carefully monitored. “It is an excellent alternative or temporary therapy, for people waiting for certain heart operations or who are at risk of a heart attack.” The Lifevest can be worn by people who are at risk of having a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), who are recovering from a heart attack or who are on waiting lists for life-saving heart surgery.

Forgetful

LIFESAVER: The new Lifevest

Stem cell trial for MS Truth about cancers RESEARCHERS in the USA are recruiting for a trial that will look at a procedure that attempts to treat multiple sclerosis damage in the central nervous system with an individual’s own stem cells. The study will test the ability of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from the individual’s bone marrow to both regulate the immune system and to help repair damaged tissue. The study is based in Cleveland, Ohio and will recruit 24 people with relapsing remitting MS. Pam Macfarlane, chief executive of the MS Trust, said: “While this is a USA trial and not open to people with MS in the UK it will provide data on the potential of transplanted mesenchymal cells. “The importance of stringent, controlled trials to establish efficacy and safety cannot be underestimated and it is very encouraging to see that this study is commencing in the USA where there have been reservations about stem cell research.”

ALMOST half of all cancers could be prevented through changes in lifestyle and improved prevention and screening policies, say the World Health Organisation. People can significantly reduce their cancer risk related to tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, excessive sun exposure and obesity by avoiding these risk factors and adopting healthier lifestyles. Zsuzsanna Jakab, new regional director at the WHO Regional Office for Europe, said: “Well-conceived, effective national cancer control programmes are essential to fight cancer and to improve the lives of cancer patients. “We urge governments to rigorously implement the four basic components of cancer control – prevention, early detection, diagnosis and treatment, and palliative care.” Low-income and disadvantaged groups are particularly exposed to avoidable cancer risk factors and infectious agents.

A disconnection between the labelled person and the real person who has been labelled that reinforces that fear? A fear that it will happen to each of us at some time? My own Trust provides services for people with dementia; people like Ruth, a retired school teacher from Liverpool who has a positive attitude to life and attends a Post Diagnostic Support Group run by Mersey Care each week. She acknowledges since she became forgetful it was a difficult time, but since her diagnosis she has maintained an excellent social life, having daily contact with friends and has carers visiting. Ruth goes to chair-based aerobics with a friend, attends a friendship group for older people, and hosts a church group in her home. So the next time you see the term dementia, or mental health, or meet someone who has been labelled, or put in a box, look beyond that. See the person; meet the need; challenge the stigma.


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The race is on to improve equality A NEW programme to speed up the pace at which health inequalities are tackled has been launched. ‘Healthy Places, Healthy Lives’ will see the NHS, local authorities and other public sector bodies working together to tackle health inequalities. As part of this national programme, NHS North West will continue to work with the region’s local authorities to help people make healthy life choices and ensure everyone is given an equal chance of good health. Inequalities in health are caused by social and economic factors, such as where a person is born, how they grow up, the education they receive and where and how they live. Gillian Merron, Public Health Minister, said: “The NHS cannot overcome health inequalities alone. This is why local authorities and the Health Service have been working together to improve health in our communities.” Mike Farrar, chief executive, NHS North West, says: “We are not prepared to tolerate the wide discrepancies in life expectancy we currently experience; whether it is between our region and the rest of the country or between areas within the North West itself. “Our 10-year vision for the region, ‘Healthier Horizons for the North West’, signalled our intention to bring about a real transformation in the health of people in our area. “We will ensure people have access to excellent standards of care, no matter where they live, put a greater focus on promoting good heath and wellbeing and help prevent ill health where possible.”

April/May2010

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Quality Care – that’s our vision FIVE promises have been made to the people of the North West by NHS bosses determined to deliver world-leading health care in the region. The first is a pledge to deliver Quality Care. This will ensure people are given a higher quality of clinical care, receive the most up-to-date treatment as part of their care and have a better experience as a patient. As part of its Quality Care promise, NHS North West is on the way to delivering same sex accommodation and washing facilities in its hospitals. This will improve both a patient’s experience and safety, and ensure they receive their care in the best possible environment. Mid Cheshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has carried out a number of initiatives to improve

the experience of patients in this area and has provided patient information leaflets on the wards of its hospitals. It has also improved signage on bathroom and toilet facilities, making it clear whether these are for male or female patients. Other practical steps being taken by the Trust include the fitting of privacy doors at the entrance to each ward bay. The doors also help reduce infection rates, as well as providing patients with a more private sleeping area. In assessment areas, privacy screens have been installed to give patients who may be in a bed next to someone of the opposite sex added privacy. n You can find out more about all the NHS North West’s promises and discover how they are meeting them by visiting the NHS North West website at www.northwest.nhs.uk

HAY DAY! T he biggest ever study into whether it’s possible to prevent children with hay fever going on to develop asthma, is under way in the North West. The study is being carried out at University Hospital South Manchester. Researchers from the North West Lung Research Centre – plus others across the UK and Europe – plan to recruit 600 children aged four to 11 with no asthma symptoms but who have hay fever and need medication. The idea is to study the youngsters to see if treatment with a prescribed and approved hay fever tablet, which contains natural grass pollen, can also reduce the risk of children with hay fever developing asthma. For the first three years half the young recruits will be given the tablet daily and then followed for two years to determine if the treatment helps prevent them developing asthma. The other half will be given a placebo.

TELL US YOUR THOUGHTS n WE’RE

keen to hear about your experiences of NHS services and any ideas you have that could improve treatment and care for others. n Please send your comments and suggestions to: Communications Team, FREEPOST, NHS North West, 3 Piccadilly Place, Central Manchester, M1 3BN.

Biggest ever asthma study aims to nip it in the bud . . .

Research manager Gina Kerry, who is based at UHSM, said: “We know that childhood allergic hay fever increases the risk of asthma development in later life by up to seven-fold. “This trial will determine if this hay fever treatment can prevent development of asthma in children with grass pollen allergy. n Anyone interested should call 0800

6556553 for more details.

BUSY BEES: Scientists in new hay fever and asthma study. Picture: CLAIRE THAMES

Schools competition to find future scientists

A

N EXCITING new competition is encouraging schoolchildren to become the NHS scientists of the future. Chief Scientific Officer, Professor Sue Hill, says the competition, called ‘Diagnose it,’ asks students to carry out a creative project on the work of healthcare scientists. The winning entries will receive one of four laptops and an invite to meet Professor Hall at her conference in November. The competition was launched during Healthcare Science Awareness Week which highlighted the behind-the-scenes work carried out by scientists in the NHS, with the aim of

promoting their careers to school children. These career options include over 45 specialisms in healthcare science ranging from physics to biology, genetics to bioengineering, chemistry to physiology, which help prevent, diagnose, treat and manage health problems. Professor Hill said: “Healthcare scientists provide the cuttingedge technology and science that helps to improve healthcare for patients. “However, the vast majority of patients are not aware of the complex specialist diagnostic services provided by them. “This competition will encourage

schoolchildren to become NHS scientists and play their part in curing the healthcare problems of the future.” To help with the competition, children will be able to interview NHS Healthcare Science Ambassadors. The ambassadors are healthcare scientists who volunteer their time and make a huge difference to young people by offering mentoring, careers guidance and work-based placements across the NHS for teachers and students. A resource pack and promotional material is also being sent to schools to help pupils with their projects.


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Could YOU be our next Dignity Champion?

SADDLE UP

M

IKE Farrar, chief executive of NHS North West, has given his support to the launch of the Manchester Bike Club. Bike Club is an exciting new project that will bring a wealth of cycling opportunities to children and young people. Mike says: “Exercise is great for your health and I would encourage young people to join Bike Club as a fun way to keep fit, as well as learning new skills and meeting new people.” The club aims to encourage young people, between the ages of 10 and 20, to use cycling as a means of transport and a way to stay healthy. It’s hoped by getting on their bikes young people will discover the freedom cycling offers and enjoy being outdoors. Bike Club also hopes to continue the

momentum created last year by the Department of Health’s Change4Life and Bike4Life initiatives, by promoting healthier lifestyles to families of children in communities at risk of poor diet and low activity levels. Three charities have been involved in setting up the club – CTC, the UK’s national organisation for cyclists; UK Youth, the leading national youth work charity helping over 750,000 young people raise their aspirations and realise their potential; and ContinYou, which provides learning opportunities beyond the school curriculum. Initial funding for Bike Club has come from Cycling England, to which the Department of Health contributes funding. n Want to know more? Visit www.bikeclub.org.uk

A DIGNITY Champion is someone who believes passionately that being treated with dignity is a basic human right – not an optional extra.

n NHS North West chief ex Mike Farrar has been appointed as Sports Tsar by Andy Burnham, Secretary of State for Health. n His new role involves promoting the importance of physical activity across the UK in the run up to the 2012 Olympic Games

Sitting comfortably . . . THE waiting area at Clatterbridge Hospital’s Child Development Centre is in for a makeover, thanks to the generosity of pupils at Greasby Junior School. The CDC is a specialist facility for children from across Wirral who have a disability or who have been diagnosed with some form of developmental delay, due to conditions such as Down’s syndrome, autism or birth trauma. The school’s headteacher Adrian Martin, said: “One of our teachers recommended that we fundraise on behalf of the CDC, so that additional

resources could be purchased to benefit the care and support of children, such as her own son who has autism.” Their efforts raised £1,300. Sandra Shannon, Wirral Hospital Trust’s Associate Director of Operations for women and children’s services, said: “The funds that they have raised will help to significantly improve the waiting area.” n PICTURED: Headteacher Adrian

Martin and pupils Ben and Amy with Sandra Shannon and Maria Parker, marketing manager

They believe that care services must be compassionate, person centred, as well as efficient, and are willing to try to do something to achieve this. Champions are all committed to taking action, however small, to create a care system that has compassion and respect for those using its services.

Big impact Each Dignity Champion’s role varies depending on their knowledge and influence and the type of work they are involved in. There are many small things that you can do that can have a big impact on people’s lives, as well as taking on a more active role if you have the time to do so. Dignity Champions include health and social care managers and frontline staff. They also include doctors, dieticians, porters, care workers in care homes, MPs, councillors, members of local action groups and Local Involvement Networks (LINks), and people from voluntary and advocacy organisations. People who use care services, their relatives and carers as well as members of the public are becoming Dignity Champions. n For details go to http://www.dhcarenet works.org.uk/dignityincare/ Email dignitychampions @dh.gsi.gov.uk Or tel. 0207 9724007.


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April/May 2010

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

. . . with JAN LOCKYER

Bedtime 20,000 ways to help you remain independent Help on the line drinks

Q

I HAVE to spend a lot of time in bed and have difficulty reaching for a drink from my table. Are there any products that I could use to take a drink when I need it without calling for help?

DID YOU know there are over 20,000 products designed to assist older and disabled people on the market? If you need equipment to help you stay independent how do you make the right choice? Disabled Living Centres provide independent information and advice and the opportunity to see and try a

YOU can get water bottles that can be attached to the head of your bed.

A

The bottle has a long tube with a clip that can be attached to your clothing if required. Other drink systems are available and your local Disabled Living Centre will be able to send you information so you can choose what’s best for your needs. Even better, some centres will have the products on display for you to see so you can be sure what you are getting will be just right.

vast range of products with the aid of expert advisors From beds to bath aids, showers to stair lifts, local Disabled Living Centres provide equipment info helplines. So for information on equipment and how to get it contact your local Disabled Living Centre. Many

products can be provided free on loan through local Community Equipment Services. All Together Now! has teamed up with Liverpool Disabled Living Centre to help readers of all ages and abilities stay independent. If you have a question contact the team on 0151 296 7742. Minicom: 0151 296 7748.

CANE AND ABLE Q A

WALK ON THE WILD SIDE: Switch Sticks provide a range of stylish and award-winning walking canes. Check out their website at: switchsticks.com

I HAVE seen people with attractive colourful walking sticks. I think they are a great change from the boring grey ones. Do you know if you can get them in different colours? YES, there are all sorts available, height adjustable and in different colours - red, blue, turquoise, purple etc.

Some have soft grip handles specially shaped for comfort. One blue crutch is a travel crutch which can be easily taken apart into small pieces and reassembled. This handy crutch comes complete with it’s own travel bag. n Contact your local DLC for contact details.

A front door challenge

Q Lifehouse is a new approach to providing services for disabled and older people in Liverpool.

InAll the summer of 2007 the under following moved together to Lifehouse: these teams are now oneservices roof, working to provide the information and advice people need toDock. be as safe and an accessible, newly renovated building at Brunswick

I HAVE just had a new front door installed. Although there are no steps, there is a threshold that stands up about three inches. Two of my relatives use wheelchairs and I’m concerned about whether this might cause problems to them.

independent as possible .

Wheelchair Service 0151 296 7765 Fax:0151 0151296 296 7764 Wheelchair Service Tel: 7765 Assessment for and provision of wheelchairs for people who live in Liverpool. Disabled Living Centre 0151 296 7742 Fax: 0151 296 7743 7748 Disabled Living Centre Tel: 0151 296 7742 Minicom: 0151 296 7744 Moving and Handling Team 0151 296 7750 Fax: 0151 296 7749 Independent information, assessment and advice on choosing daily living equipment and how to get it.

Communication Aids 0151 296 7408 Fax: 0151 296 7764 Moving and Handling Team Tel: 0151 296 7750 Practical advice for disabled people and their carers on moving and handling people. Adaptations Team 0151 296 7757 Fax: 0151 296 7758 Communication Aids Falls Team

0151 296 7769

Tel: 0151 296 7408

Assessment and provision of communication aids for people who live in Liverpool.

Lifehouse is a newTeam approach to providing services for disabled Adaptations Tel: and 0151older 296 7757 Installation of adaptations to safely people in managing in their ownroof home.will improve people in Liverpool. Having allassist these services under one accessibility. Falls Team Tel: 0151 296 7769 A multidisciplinary team providing practical advice and assessment for people who have fallen. Services will be able to work together to provide the independent information, advice and practical assessment people need to make the rightTel: choices 0151 about 296 7782 Telecare service 7733 Advice, assessment and installation of Telecare equipment. equipment. The existing services will be joined by others which will greatly increase theinformation range of information and available. For further call thethe service youadvice require or contact main reception forDay a further information call service you require or visitour a Lifehouse Open list ofifehouse Lifehouse Open Days.

Lifehouse Lifehouse Lifehouse ifehouse Units 4–5 Dempster Building Units 4–5 Dempster Building Summers Road, Brunswick Business Park Summers Road, Brunswick Business Park Liverpool 4BL Liverpool L3L3 4BL Main Reception: 0151 296 7733 Main Reception: 0151 296 7733 www.liverpoollifehouse.org www.liverpoollifehouse.org

YOU can get threshold ramps that can be placed either side or ones that make a bridge over the threshold with a ramp either side.

A

They are made of different materials, have different weight limits and some are easier to move, handle and store than other ramps. Some can be left in place so the door can be opened and closed and others have to be moved out of the way. There are fixed or adjustable size threshold ramps and even modular ramp kits that enable you to make up a ramp of the size you need. For details of suppliers call Liverpool Disabled Living Centre on 0151 296 7742

A new chapter in my life

Q

I HAVE to spend a lot of time in a reclined position. I love reading but my arms get really tired holding books. Any tips? THERE are height adjustable book holders on mobile floor stands

A

which hold books up to 4kg. The book is held on by page holders and it can be angled to just the right position.You can even read with the book directly above you. Your local DLC will have information on a range of book stands.

n BLACKBURN Independent Living Centre, Mill Hill St, Mill Hill, Blackburn. Tel. 01254 269 220 n ELLESMERE PORT Pool Independent Living Centre, New Grosvenor Road. Tel. 0151 337 6399 n HALTON Collier Street, Runcorn. Tel. 01928 582 920 n HANDFORTH East Cheshire Independent Living Centre, Redsmere Road, Handforth Tel. 01625 374080 n HARTFORD Hartford Independent Living Centre, Hartford Business Park, Chester Road, Hartford, Nantwich Tel. 01605 881980 n LIVERPOOL Disabled Living Centre, Lifehouse, Summers Road, Brunswick Business Park, Liverpool. Tel. 0151 296 7742 Minicom 0151 296 7748 n MANCHESTER Assist UK, 4 St Chads Street, Manchester. Tel. 0161 834 1044 n STOCKPORT St Thomas’s Hospital, Shawheath, Stockport. Tel. 0161 419 4476 n WARRINGTON Beaufort Street, Warrington. Tel. 01925 240064 n WILMSLOW Redesmere Road. Tel. 01625 374080 n WIRRAL St Catherine’s Hospital, Birkenhead. Tel. 0151 678 7272

MIDLANDS n BIRMINGHAM St Marks Street, Springhill. Tel. 0121 464 4942/9525 n DUDLEY St Giles Street, Netherley. Tel. 01384 813 695 n SHREWSBURY The Lantern, Meadow Farm Drive. Tel. 01743 210820 n WOLVERHAMPTON Bell Street. Tel. 01902 553 648

What can I do to stop losing my keys?

Q

I AM forever mislaying important things around the house like my keys, purse, handbag etc. It’s really frustrating trying to find them. Can you help?

A

YOU may already have seen locating key fobs. These emit a sound in response to you making a noise like a clap or whistle.

There’s also a new product on the market – a wireless object locator. It includes four sensors that can be attached to your important objects. Three are like key fobs and the fourth is a wallet that you can keep one of the objects in. When you press the buttons on the remote transmitter the sensor beeps to let you know where the lost object is.


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Beat the bogus caller

Knock knock! Who’s there?

• LOCK Home or away – keep all doors LOCKED

Be stranger aware!

• STOP Is anyone EXPECTED? Is the back door LOCKED? • CHAIN Put the CHAIN ON before opening the door • CHECK Ask for caller’s ID Check it by PHONE Ask for your PASSWORD United Utilities is calling on all customers to protect themselves from doorstep criminals. Statistics show that around 35 bogus caller crimes are committed every day in the UK, but this might only be 10% of the total that actually take place as victims often feel too embarrassed to report it to the police. Bogus callers often target areas where United Utilities has been carrying out maintenance work and will use this as an opportunity to trick themselves into customers’ homes claiming to be from United Utilities or 'the water board'. Once inside, they will distract the homeowner while an accomplice helps themselves to money and valuables. Genuine United Utilities’ employees always carry ID cards and are happy to show this to you. They will never put pressure on you to get into your home and are happy for you to phone United Utilities to check their identity.

Bogus callers can be very persuasive, but our advice is to never feel under pressure to let someone into your home. To help you, we operate a ‘password protection’ scheme. When you join our ExtraCare scheme, you can request a password for your address. Then, whenever someone claiming to be from United Utilities calls at your home, you can ask them for your password. Only a genuine visitor from United Utilities will know your password. It’s a simple deterrent that really does work and will give you the confidence to turn people away. To take advantage of the United Utilities password scheme, you must first register as an ExtraCare customer by phoning 0845 746 1100. You can then set up a password. Most gas, electricity and telephone companies will operate a similar scheme - see a recent bill for further details and contact numbers.

Need a little ExtraCare? We offer a range of free services to help customers who: • are older • have a disability • have a serious illness • have sight, hearing or learning difficulties Our services include: • password scheme • personal notification of water shut-offs • large print, Braille and talking bills

To find out more call 0845 746 1100 or textphone 0808 143 1195

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Insults and abuse at parking bays

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OBILISE, the charity for disabled motorists, say that Blue Badge holders are being verbally abused at supermarket car parks. They say that not only do disabled people have trouble parking at the supermarket they also face insults if they dare to question a non Blue Badge holder. These are just a few of the comments noted by Mobilise members who helped in the charity’s Blue Badge Baywatch survey at their local supermarkets: “I can’t count the number of times I’ve been sworn at or threatened with violence whenever I have spoken to a non Blue Badge holder.” — Mr Harrison, Doncaster “What used to be disabled spaces are now ‘parent and child’ spaces and the parking attendants are rude and threatening to any disabled people trying to park in what used to be their bays. Members of the public are worse. One outraged mother threatened to break my windscreen and let down my tyres while I was in the shop. Her “toddler” was about 12 years old!” — Anon, York “I asked a man if he knew he was taking up a disabled bay. He replied “Yes, but why should you get better parking?”

When I tried to explain I have difficulties walking and need that space he said “Why don’t you just **** off and stay at home then?” — Thomas, County Durham “I always have difficulty finding a disabled parking space. Sometimes I have to go to another supermarket.” — Miss Taylor, Yorkshire But it’s not all bad news . . . The winner of the Baywatch 2010 survey was Sainsbury’s. Although they still had an average level of parking abuse of 16%, Mobilise are delighted that almost half of their surveyors reported 0% abuse in Sainsbury’s car parks. Well over half of those who visited Sainsbury’s reported that there were signs up warning that people using the accessible bays without a Blue Badge would be fined. Sainsbury’s customer service director Jacki Connor said: “Last year we introduced a nationwide scheme of monitors to help keep our disabled bays open for those who need them. It is great to hear that they are having a real impact.” The worst supermarket for parking abuse was Tesco, where almost a quarter of all accessible bays were being used by people without a Blue Badge.

;ERXXSHVMZIEFIXXIVHIEP#

%

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3130_Motor Ad 100x135.indd 1

‘Supermarkets must do more than just put up signs’ — Helen Smith

Although Tesco claim that they are starting to enforce the rules at some of their supermarkets, only a measly 10% of people reported any sign of this. A Tesco spokesperson said: “We favour the carrot not the stick. The great majority of our customers observe the policy well.” This was a nearly identical statement to that issued in 2007 when they also told Mobilise that they “preferred the carrot not the stick”. Helen Smith, director of policy and campaigns for Mobilise, was unimpressed.

She said: “It’s disappointing that neither Tesco’s policy or statement seems to have changed, despite bay abuse getting significantly worse – surely that carrot must be long past its sell-by-date now?” Asda was the first supermarket to make a commitment to fining abusers of their disabled bays. In 2007 they were joint worst supermarket with Tesco with 23% of their bays being used by people without Blue Badges, but since Asda introduced enforcement this has dropped to 19.2%. Disappointingly, Morrisons, who came top of the last Baywatch survey with just 13% parking abuse, has seen a significant increase to 17.2% of its bays being used by non-Blue Badge holders. Helen Smith said: “In order to see real improvements for their disabled customers supermarkets need to do more than just put up signs – they need to practice active enforcement as well. “It’s not acceptable for supermarkets to pass the buck on to their disabled customers by refusing to monitor their bays. Instead, supermarkets should ensure that disabled customers can come in and shop - without fear of intimidation.” www.baywatchcampaign.org Mobilise National Office on 01508 489 449 or enquiries@mobilise.info

Tell 250,000 readers about your products and services Call 0151 230 0307

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MOTORING CONTACTS n Wrightington Mobility Centre, Hall Lane, Appley Bridge, Wigan, WN6 9EP. Tel. 01257 256409 www.mobility-centre.org.uk n The North Wales Driving Assessment Centre, Disability Resources Centre, Glan Clwyd Hospital, Bodelwyddan, Denbighshire. Tel. 01745 584858 n Regional Driving Assessment Centre, Unit 11, Network Park, Duddeston Mill Road, Birmingham. Tel. 0845 3371540

n Motability, Goodman House, Station Approach, Harlow, Essex, CM20 2ET. Helpline 0845 456 4566 (voice), 01279 632273 (text). www.motability.co.uk n National Association of Bikers with a Disability, Unit 20, The Bridgewater Centre, Robson Avenue, Urmston, Manchester, Tel. 0870 759 0603. www.nabd.org.uk n Disabled Motorcyclists Association, Ada House, 77 Thompson Street, Manchester, M4 5FY. Tel. 0161 214 8314, 07947 138303. www.thedma.org.uk


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IMPRESSED: Prime Minister Gordon Brown and Scottish Secretary Jim Murphy with some of the Allied Mobility engineering team

PM gets a lesson on access . . . T

HE Prime Minister has underlined the importance of fully accessible vehicles in meeting the needs of wheelchair users. Gordon Brown saw a variety of wheelchair accessible cars, people carriers and minibuses being built during a visit to Allied Mobility’s manufacturing plant in Glasgow. He met several workers on the assembly line, as well as holding discussions with directors about current issues affecting transport for disabled people. Allied Mobility is a key part of the highly

successful Allied Vehicles Group. Over the past five years Allied, in partnership with Motability, has helped transform availability of wheelchair accessible vehicles across the UK. By developing new models, buying base vehicles in large numbers and improving efficiency of production, Allied has been able to drive down Motability Advance Payments, which previously presented an insurmountable barrier to many people who needed a wheelchair accessible vehicle to get about. Over the past five years the number of

people enjoying the benefits of a wheelchair accessible vehicle through the Motability Scheme has increased threefold. Allied Mobility is now the largest supplier of wheelchair accessible vehicles through the scheme. The Prime Minister was impressed by the company’s range of wheelchair accessible products. He also praised the firm’s commitment to training and development, including its support for modern apprenticeships. “You’ve certainly got a very enthusiastic

young workforce here,” said Mr Brown. Allied Mobility co-chairman Michael Facenna said: “It was a great honour for the Prime Minister to come and see us. “Glasgow used to be known around the world for its engineering but unfortunately those traditional industries are now gone. “However, I think the PM was delighted and perhaps a bit surprised to see how we’ve managed to create new manufacturing jobs, at the same time as providing a range of wheelchair accessible vehicles at prices people can realistically afford.”

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COMPETITION WINNERS THE FIVE lucky winners of our recent gardening competition are: Mrs G Middlehurst, Hamilton Street, Atherton, Greater Manchester. She writes: “A really good magazine. Interesting articles and very good gardening tips.” Picked up copy Dobbies, Preston. Mrs G Headley, Llwyn y Moelyn, Rectory Lane Llanferres, Denbighshire. “I think All Together NOW! is a brilliant publication with the right mix of contents.” Picked up copy at Daniel Owen Centre, Mold. Mrs Linda Dallison, Beresford Road, Blackburn. “All Together NOW! is both positive and informative.” Picked up copy at Blackburn Central Library. John Foulds, Ribble Close, Widnes, Cheshire. “I like the publication because it is very positive and inclusive.” Picked up at Rivendell Garden Centre, Widnes Mrs Lilian Randall, Appleton Road, Upton, Chester. “All Together NOW! is great for finding out what I can do and what facilities are available to me. Thanks. (entry by email) All winners receive £30 worth of vouchers which can be exchanged for any items in Thompson & Morgan’s seed catalogue.

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TARAN Tel 01407 721933 n BLACKPOOL Disability Information and Support. Tel 01253 472 202. Textphone 01253 476 450 n CHESHIRE Dis Federation Tel 01606 888400 n CHESTER Dial House Tel 01244 345655 n DENBIGHSHIRE Tel 01745 354445 n ELLESMERE PORT DICE Tel 0151 355 1420 n HALTON Disability Service Tel 01928 717222 n KNOWSLEY DISABILITY CONCERN. 0151 480 4090 n LANCASTER DISC Tel 01524 34411 n LIVERPOOL Association of Disabled People. Tel 0151 263 8366. Text 0151 260 4076 n MERSEYSIDE Inform. Tel 0151 260 4076. n NEUROSUPPORT Centre Tel 0151 298 2999 n MANCHESTER (GTR) Coalition of Disabled People Tel 0161-273 5154 n MOLD Flintshire Disability Tel 01352 755546 n NELSON: Pendle Pakistan Welfare Association. Tel 01282 603 616 n PRESTON DISC: Tel 01772 558 863. Textphone 01772 204 787 n RHYL Tel 01745 350665 n STOCKPORT: Disability Stockport. 0161 480 7248

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Disability Partnership. 01925 240064 n WIRRAL WIRED Tel 0151 670 1500 n WEST LANCS HELPLINE Freefone 0800 220676 n ST HELENS DASH Tel 01744 453053 n WREXHAM Tel 01978 262955 MIDLANDS BIRMINGHAM Disability Resource Centre Tel 0121 789 7365 Disabled People’s Network Solihull Tel 0121 788 1544 STOKE: Disability Solutions Tel 01782 683800 WOLVERHAMPTON Elder and Disabled Group Tel 01902 448552 ORGANISATIONS FOR PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND n ACCRINGTON Tel 01254 233332 n BARROW Tel 01229 820698 n BIRMINGHAM Action for Blind Tel 0121 665 4200 n BLACKBURN Tel 0125 554143 n BLACKPOOL Tel 01253 792600 n BURY Tel 0161 763 7014 n BURNLEY Tel 01282 438507 n CARLISLE: Action for Blind People Tel 01228 595121 CHESHIRE & N WALES: Vision Support. Tel 01244 381515 n CUMBRIA (West) Tel 01946 592474 n CUMBRIA (Sth Lakeland)

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April/may 2010

All Together NOW!

Swimming changes

Anna’s tennis double triumph

BRITISH Disability Swimming is to appoint John Atkinson as national performance director tasked with leading Britain to the 2012 Paralympics. Former director Tim Reddish will become executive director. Atkinson has been an integral part of British Swimming since he was appointed in 2001 to identify and nurture the next generation of elite athletes as British National Youth Coach. Atkinson said: “Leading the programme and working with the athletes and their coaches in the build up to 2012 is an opportunity I relish. “I believe I can have a positive impact on the success of the programme and build on the fantastic achievements.”

Hot shots A SHOOTING club for blind people has opened at the North Wales Society for the Blind’s courtyard in Bangor. Two air rifles with specially made acoustic sights are available for blind people.

Lessons for everyone STUDENTS were given the chance to play wheelchair basketball at Mid Cheshire College. The event, organised by sports co-ordinator Malcolm Tudor – a wheelchair user himself – allowed able-bodied students to experience how different it would be to play sport in a wheelchair. As part of their “enrichment week”, students learned manoeuvring skills in speciallyequipped wheelchairs which costing around £1,600 each, before playing full games of basketball. “You don’t really appreciate the amount of effort that wheelchair-users have to put into everyday life,” said activity and leisure student Steven Hamilton, 16, from Winsford.

31

Marathon task! T

OP wheelchair racers David Weir and Shelly Woods will be seeking revenge at the Virgin London Marathon.

Weir relinquished both his London crown and the course record to his arch rival Kurt Fearnley last year when the Australian beat him to the line by a second in a dramatic finish. Blackpool-based Woods, meanwhile, was disappointed with her sixth place after winning in 2007 and never before missing the podium. Fearnley just lost out to Weir in both 2007 and 2008, so the double Paralympic champion will be keen to defend the title he worked so hard to win. He is in good form, having won the New York marathon last November for the fourth time in a row. However, Weir loves racing on home soil and will come to the race full of confidence. “My preparation’s going really well,” said the Surrey man who won two Paralympic gold medals on the track in Beijing. “I’ve just come back from training in Australia, where I got some good times. “There’s a strong field this year and maybe six who could win, but whoever gets it right on the day is likely to take it. I’m just hoping for a great race in my home town.” Fearnley won’t be the only threat, however, for the race includes the fastest marathon racer of all time, Ernst van Dyk of South Africa, who’ll be aiming for

Weir and Woods ready to battle it out in London

BOLTON’S Anna Tarkowski pulled off a sensational double at the North West Wheelchair Tennis Challenge at South Ribble Tennis Centre, near Preston. Seven years after first setting out in the sport, Tarkowski gained the biggest success of her career to win the women’s singles – and the women’s doubles. Tarkowski, who turned 21 in January, dropped just one set en route to the singles final, where she came up against last year’s runner-up and top seed, Louise Hunt. By comparison, Hunt had eased into the final, dropping just five games, and she moved 5-0 ahead in the decider. However, Tarkowski set about launching an astonishing comeback before edging a close second set to seal a 7-5, 6-4 victory and a North West win for the second year orthotics and prosthetics student at the University of Salford.

‘I just kept trying’

an incredible ninth Boston Marathon title just six days before the London race. There are also two former London champions in the line up – Mexican Saul Mendoza and Frenchman Denis Lemeunier. Woods, meanwhile, faces an equally daunting challenge in the women’s race, not least in the shape of defending champion Amanda McGrory, who last year won a thrilling finish against Switzerland’s Sandra Graf. Diane Roy, from Canada, who was third last year, also returns to battle it out, as does Australia’s Christie Dawes, who will hope to improve on her fifth place finish. The presence of London debutants Wakako Tsuchida, from Japan, with a hat-trick of Boston wins to her name, and South Africa’s Monique van der Vorst, confirms the quality of this high-class field. The Virgin London Marathon takes place on Sunday April 25

“I’m really happy now I’ve got my first international singles title,” said Tarkowski. “It’s been a long time coming. “I didn’t know what to think when I was 5-0 down, I just kept trying to play as well as I could and somehow managed to bring it back. We were a lot closer all the way through the second set, I just managed to win the points that mattered.” Other victories came for David Phillipson, who took the men’s main draw singles title, and John Parfitt who grabbed both the quad singles and doubles titles (with Liam O’Reilly from Middlesex) Despite tasting defeat in the men’s main draw singles, Marc McCarroll earned victory in the men’s main draw doubles with his training partner, Ade Adepitan. Adepitan, perhaps better known providing as much support as possible to for his media work and previous its winter sports in the next four years: sporting success as a wheelchair “We’ve seen a rise in standards across basketball player, is only in his the board and while both sports have got third full year some promising players coming through, playing it’s clear that we need to keep investing to wheelchair TAKE ME HOME! continue the progression we’ve seen here.” tennis.

All eyes now on Sochi after Winter Games’ setback BRITAIN’S Paralympic team returned without a medal from the Winter Games in Vancouver – but there is plenty of optimism from within the camp. Chief executive Phil Lane said: “While we are obviously disappointed, there have been many positives to take from these Games and build on for Sochi.”

“We have come a long way from taking just two skiers to Salt Lake City in 2002. Our seven skiers produced five top ten finishes. “The curlers got very close. Had two stones in two matches gone their way, they would have been in the semis by right.” Lane added that ParalympicsGB will be

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April/May 2010

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All roads lead to Manchester . . . THE world’s leading disabled athletes make their way to Manchester in May for the BT Paralympic World Cup – the biggest annual international multi-sport competition. Almost 400 competitors from 31 countries will be taking part in the event. And for the first time there will be a seven-a-side football tournament (May 26-29). Manchester City goalkeeper Shay Given, who was at the Arndale Centre to help launch the event, said: “The BT Paralympic World Cup has become a well known event in Manchester and it’s fantastic to see

Roll up, roll up . . . for tennis!

ON THE BALL: Great Britain’s footballers set for World Cup

B

OLTON Arena’s High Performance Centre is one of four UK venues hosting a series of wheelchair tennis camps this year. The camps come to Bolton in May and October, kicking off with a joint camp for adults and juniors on Saturday May 15. The following day, a juniors’ Olympic camp is being held as part of the Lord’s Taverners Wheelchair Tennis Junior Development Programme. Another two-day event for adults and juniors is planned for the weekend of October9-10. Some of the best coaches will be on hand and players will be able to try purpose-built tennis wheelchairs, get tips on chair set up

and pick up a whole host of information about the sport. Bolton’s Anna Tarkowski, pictured, who has just notched up a sensational double victory at the North West Challenge in Preston, started her wheelchair tennis career at similar wheelchair tennis camps seven years ago in Nottingham. “Wheelchair tennis is an excellent way to maintain a healthy lifestyle for children and adults with a whole range of physical disabilities,” said Anna. Other camps are being held throughout the year in Loughborough, Swindon and Welwyn Garden City. www.tennisfoundation.org.uk/disabilityten nis/wheelchairtennis/

Football 7-a-side introduced as a new sport. “The GB team has a lot of talent and we wish them the best of luck.” The BBC will again broadcast highlights and live coverage from the Manchester Aquatics Centre on Monday May 31. The week-long programme gets under way with athletics on May 25. Wheelchair basketballers take to the court from May 27-30), and there are two days of swimming (May 30-31). www.btparalympicworldcup.com

Footballers’ fundraisers DANNY Mills, the former England and Manchester City footballer, will take on the biggest challenge of his life on Sunday April 18 when he attempts to complete the inaugural Brighton Marathon – using a wheelchair.

WINNING WAYS: ANNA TARKOWSKI

North West Challenge Full report – p31 by MARSHALL THOMAS

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Danny’s mission is to raise awareness of the day-to-day challenges wheelchair users can face – from inaccessible transport and buildings to negative attitudes. He plans to spend a week living as a wheelchair user – highlighting the barriers faced by disabled people throughout the country. Danny will also be raising funds for two disability charities – the Association for Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus (ASBAH), of which he is patron, and the National Association of Disabled Supporters.

MEANWHILE, exLiverpool and Ireland star Ronnie Whelan will be trekking 130km across Ireland for his daughter, Elizabeth. Whelan is planning a sixday charity walk – The Rocky Road to Dublin – to raise awareness of Myasthenia Gravis (MG). Elizabeth, 24, was a teenager when she learned she had the serious autoimmune disease. “When Elizabeth was diagnosed disease five years ago, we were shellshocked,” said Ronnie. “There was very little information available and we didn’t know anyone else who was affected.” The walk runs from April 29 to May 4 www.rockyroad.ie.


All Together Magazine - Issue 30 _ April 2010