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It’s all growing well at the Bridge

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PRING has sprung – and things are certainly thriving for the team at Bridge Community Farms and Wellness Gardens in Ellesmere Port. The charity, which works with unemployed people and those suffering from mental health conditions and life-long learning disabilities, is looking forward to a busy year ahead. It follows their decision to take over a successful Cheshire Veg Box scheme run by The Natural Veg Men from Malpas. Seasonal vegetable boxes are now available for delivery every Tuesday across West Cheshire, Chester and the Wirral. Clair Johnson, Farm & Wellness manager said: “When people buy their vegetables from

us they are not only supporting a great local charity and community farm, they are also supporting sustainable farming practices that protect wildlife, care for the soil and work in harmony with the nature around us.” The charity’s main purpose is to provide a therapeutic environment for people suffering from a range of mental health conditions, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, as well as those with mental and physical learning disabilities. They also create permanent and sustainable jobs for long-term unemployed people by growing and selling fruit, vegetables, salads and herbs to the local community. n Contact: Tel. 01244 732 842.

Medicash put lifebelts on promenade

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WO permanent lifebelts have been installed at Monks Ferry, beside the River Mersey, thanks to the Medicash Foundation, part of Liverpool based health insurer Medicash.

The Foundation’s action follows an appeal after the death of young dad Nathan Cooper and the involvement of MP for Birkenhead, Frank Field. Nathan, known to his family and friends as “Beano”, was dragged under the river after a wave swept him and a friend into the waters between Monks Ferry and the Cammell Laird shipyard in Birkenhead in June 2017. Emergency services were called, and Constable Thompson, together with Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service Marine Rescue Team, rescued his 22-year-old friend. Constable Thompson said: “I was the first officer on the scene. Thankfully, I had removed the ‘throw line’ from

the rear of my police vehicle, as when I got on to the promenade there was not a single life belt or rescue ladder. “The only lifebelt I could spot was on the landing stage for the ferry, simply too far away

to be of any use,” added the officer. In 2017, Medicash chief executive Sue Weir worked alongside a number of partners, including the RNLI, to identify how many lifebelts were needed and the best places for these to be located. Frank Field, MP for Birkenhead and chairman of Medicash, said: “Had there been a lifebelt nearby on that fateful day, perhaps Nathan would still be with us and his young family. “If just one life could be saved by these lifebelts I’d be happy that another family would not have to deal with such tragedy.” The Medicash Foundation has donated over £1m to health-related charities over the last 10 years, and recently announced a further £720,000 was being made available to support health and well-being projects in the North West and beyond. n www.medicash.org/charity

HALF A MILLION READERS . . .

LAW students from the University of Manchester have created new guidance to ensure vulnerable people are protected when using the internet. Working alongside a solicitor and a barrister, they represented the parents of a 21-year-old man with a learning disability living in supported accommodation. The parents had become concerned for their son’s safety, as his trusting and compulsive behaviour would put him in harm’s way. His online activities had put him in contact with known sex offenders as he had accessed pornographic, and in some cases, illegal content while unsupervised.

Best interests

The role of the Court of Protection is to determine whether people are able to make decisions and, if not, to decide what is in their best interests. However, while a vulnerable individual may put themselves in danger online, internet access plays a crucial role in social inclusion and is a right guaranteed by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. In a judgment which has farreaching implications, the judge, Mr Justice Cobb, had to decide how to determine whether someone has the capacity to understand the consequences of their internet and social media usage. Because of the man’s difficulty with flexible adaptive reasoning, he lacked this understanding. As a result, restrictions could be used in his best interests under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 to keep him safe. It was decided that his iPad usage was to be supervised and limited by carers, his mobile phone contract was capped with no internet access, and staff could check his text messages. These restrictions, it is felt, will protect him from online risks.


www.alltogethernow.org.uk

April/May 2019

Hats the way to do it

P

EOPLE put on their wackiest hats at a special awareness-raising event at Liverpool’s Brain Charity.

The annual Head Matters Tea Party provided a great setting for people all over the region to have fun and find out the kind of help available for people affected by brain injury or neurological conditions. Next on the agenda is a Health and Wellbeing Day. Communications officer Kevin Seward said: “Visitors will be able to hear from a range of specialists, such as a talk about fatigue by Suzanne Simpson from the Motor Neurone Disease Association.” n The event takes place on Mon 13 May (10:30am-4pm) n Brain Charity, Norton St., L’pool. Tel, 0151 298 2999

THANKS, MR MAYOR!

HEADS UP: Julie Keith, Carolyn Garlick and Sarah Coughlin

Windfall for local charities

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REAT to be back with this really uplifting spring issue – and even more exciting to be able to pass on some good news from the Lord Mayor of Liverpool’s Charitable Fund.

You may recall that your FREE All Together NOW! newsaper was one of the four charities that the city’s former Lord Mayor, Cllr Malcolm Kennedy, chose to support during his term of office in 2017/18. Despite his personal fears about heights, Malcolm went to the extremes with his fundraising activities, taking part in an abseil of the Anglican Cathedral and even some swashbuckling sword fighting with pirates at the Albert Dock. “I just want to raise as much as I could for my charities,” he said. Well, the good news is that the Lord Mayor’s charity raised a magnificent £44,000! “I am so grateful to everyone who supported our efforts to help,” said Malcolm. ”It really was a great year, a great experience, and I can’t thank

Lord Mayor backs your FREE newspaper

LIVERPOOL Lord Mayor Cllr Malcolm Kennedy

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people enough for their kindness and generosity.”   h We plan using our share of the pot towards the printing costs of a future issue of All Together NOW! The other charities have also welcomed their share of the fund. Mark McVeigh, CEO, Owen McVeigh Foundation, said: “We are delighted with the donation from the Lord Mayor’s fund. We plan to use the funding to continue to create life memories for children suffering with cancer, starting with taking 110 children to see The Wizard of Oz this Easter. 

Tony Lloyd, CEO, ADHD Foundation, said: “We will be using the funding for our 2019 Umbrella Project, which hopefully will start with work across Liverpool schools in May to coincide with the first UK Schools national neurodiversity week May 13-17.” The Choir With No Name say they will also be putting their windfall to very good use. A huge thanks to everyone! I hope you enjoy this issue. We’re bak in the summer! Tuesday 4 June to be precise.See you then! www.adhdfoundation.org.uk

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Countdown to D-Day

SAVE the date – Sunday 14 July. It’s the 28th annual Disability Awareness Day and it’s set to be a cracker. More than 25,000 visitors are expected to attend this year’s event at Walton Hall Gardens, near Warrington. This year’s event is being sponsored by Expanse Learning Group and Harry Fairclough Construction. n Warrington Disability Partnership, tel 01925 240064

Hop to it . . .

CALLING all you clubbers with learning disabilities – make a note of the year’s Frogtastic Club nights at Manchester’s The Frog & Bucket pub in Oldham Street. n Wed 24 April n Wed 26 June n Wed 4 Sept n Wed 23 Oct n Wed 4 Dec There’s also a special Frgtastic in the Park planned for Tues 9 July at Walton Hall Gardens in the run-up to the annual Disability Awareness Day (see ‘Countdown to D-Day’ above). n Advance tickets £6 (tel Heroes Project, 07875 142233) or £5 online at www.ldok.net/shop

They’re in the money

CHESHIRE Community Foundation (CCF) distributed more than £1m of grants to 135 projects across Cheshire and Warrington in 2018. Zoe Sheppard, CEO of CCF, said: “It was a fantastic year for CCF. It is our mission to ensure that the money we receive from our donors is directed towards making the biggest difference to people’s lives.” n Tel, 01606 330607

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CHANCELLOR Philip Hammond has been criticised for ignoring repeated calls for the Government to take urgent steps to ease the social care funding crisis and other impacts of austerity on disabled people. Delivering his spring statement, Mr Hammond made no mention of disabled people and his only mention of social care was to say that future spending would be addressed in the Budget, which is not expected until October or November. In his response to the statement, the shadow chancellor, Labour’s John McDonnell, said Mr Hammond was “implicated in every cut, every closure, and every preventable death of someone waiting for hospital treatment or social care”. In November 2017, the British Medical Journal published research linking government cuts in adult social care and health spending to nearly 120,000 “excess” deaths in England since 2010. The research warned cuts could continue to be responsible for an additional death toll of up to 100 deaths a day if significant extra funding was not found. Philip Connolly, policy manager for Disability Rights UK, said the failure to mention disabled people in the spring statement should be “a wake up call to the disability sector”.

Brits retire Down Under

AUSTRALIA is the top retirement destination for British expat pensioners, with 20% (234,880) of British pensioners abroad claiming their state pension from there last year, says investment company easyMoney. Other top destinations for expat pensioners are the USA, Canada, Ireland and Spain.

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

Therapy garden a sanctuary for North West NEWS

Chancellor blasted for ignoring care crisis

April/May 2019

WORSLEY New Hall was once a magnificent 19th century Victorian mansion, surrounded by glorious formal gardens and fountains, bordering the Bridgewater Canal. The gardens were landscaped over 50 years and featured an 11-acre Walled Garden, an impressive lake with an island, and woodlands. But the site fell into decline, and in 1949, the hall was completely demolished. Now, the gardens are being revived by hundreds of volunteers at the Royal Horticultural Society, who have just announced that they are creating a garden dedicated to the practice of therapeutic horticulture.

The Wellbeing Garden at RHS Garden Bridgewater has been designed with input from more than 20 organisations, including health and social care providers and charities working with people who have mental and physical health conditions. Projects manager Ben Brace said: “We will create a sanctuary that offers space to grow, space to reflect and space to meet others and get moving.” RHS Garden Bridgewater is expected to open next year. The Garfield Weston Foundation has provided funding. n Want to volunteer to help? RHS: Tel. 020 3176 5800

Alarm over cap on help

ACCESS TO FUNDS

IF THE help you need at work is not covered by your employer making reasonable adjustments, you may be able to get help from Access to Work. Tel: 0800 121 7479 Text: 0800 121 7579  www.gov.uk/access-to-work

Highly skilled Pensioners are the most active workers ‘lose vital support’

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HE decision to cap the help given to disabled workers has been greeted with dismay by campaigners.

A limit on the amount any individual can receive from the Government’s Access to Work scheme means many highly skilled people miss out on support, a leading charity says. Diane Lightfoot, head of the Business Disability Forum, said although the cap has increased to just under £60,000, many of those claiming fall “well below” that figure. Sarah Newton, the former Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work, announced that the Access to Work scheme, which provides tailored support for disabled workers, would be increased from April to a maximum of £59,200 to pay additional support such as workplace adaptations, assistive technology, transport and interpreters. She said: “By extending this grant even more people can benefit from this personalised scheme, and more disabled people can thrive in the workplace.” Ms Lightfoot, at the BDF, said the scheme was “a game changer for many disabled people, providing them with the support they need to make working possible. Any additional fundinge is therefore to be welcomed. “We would question, however, if setting a cap – even an increased one – is the most effective way to assess and offer support to the people who need it most. “Our research shows that many highly skilled disabled people are missing out on vital support, and the opportunity to work, simply because their support

needs are assessed as being too expensive. This will still be the case, even with the cap increase. At the same time, we are aware that many others, are falling well below the cap. “It seems only sensible that caps are removed, and each person is assessed as an individual. “Otherwise, the system could be viewed as discriminating against certain groups of disabled people – people whose conditions require them to have more costly support in place. “We also call on Government to update a study of return on investment for Access to Work that showed it more than paid for itself in terms of savings on other benefits. “The Government has set a target of supporting one million more disabled people in work by 2027. Access to Work can help achieve this, but it must be properly funded and available to all who need it.”

HALF A MILLION READERS . . .

NEW research suggests that the over-65s are actually the most physically active age group in the UK. The survey, carried out by the sports store Decathlon, says 44% of older people are taking part in sport eight times more in a typical month compared to only 29% of 25-34 year-olds. Nicola Barnabo, fitness sports manager at Decathlon, said: “The research shows just how engaged this age group is with exercise and the sheer number of times they participate in exercise over a month speaks volumes about their desire to have a healthy, balanced lifestyle during retirement. “This could be down to them being more aware of the health benefits of exercise or the fact that the younger generation are less active due to technology advances.” Top 10 activities – over 65s: 1) Swimming – 38% 2) Fitness/Gym – 29% 3) Cycling – 21% 4) Hiking/Trekking – 19% 5) Camping – 11% 6) Yoga/Pilates – 10% 7) Tennis – 9% 8) Fishing – 6% 9) Running – 6% 10) Horse Riding – 3%


Cancer help is all mapped out

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

NEWS

D

EALING with a diagnosis of cancer is hard enough without struggling to find the support services you need.

Top broadcaster Jonathan Dimbleby discovered that accessing support is “frighteningly difficult” when a pal asked him for help. Now Dimbleby, who hosts the radio version of Question Time – Radio 4’s Any Questions – has created an online map which solves the worry of where to turn. cancercaremap.org, from Dimbleby Cancer Care, was set up after research found a significant lack of awareness across the North West of the services available following a cancer diagnosis. Almost half of those in the region are unaware of emotional support services, such as talking therapy or support groups, despite studies finding mental ill health can affect up to 49% of people with cancer. Over two thirds also lacked awareness of the availability of practical support, such as help with driving or housework. Jonathan, chair of Dimbleby Cancer Care, said: “These results illustrate a

April/May 2019

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‘Women handle stress better than men . . .’

The services are there – but hidden

shocking truth – that vital cancer care and support services are available, yet remain hidden to those who need them. “By 2020, one in two people in the UK will have had a cancer diagnosis in their lifetime. That’s 27.6 million people who may not know where to find cancer support groups in their local area.” Jonathan’s map is the result of personal experience. “Five years ago, a friend asked me to find cancer services for his wife. I realised very quickly that this was frighteningly difficult to do, and that there was no comprehensive resource to help. “At Dimbleby Cancer Care, we wanted to create our own site to ensure nobody facing cancer, goes without the care they need; all you would need is an internet connection and a postcode.” n Dimbleby Cancer Care: 020 7188 7889 n www.cancercaremap.org n www.dimblebycancercare.org

PLANNING THE JOURNEY: Jonathan Dimbleby with his charity’s new online map that details services for people affected by cancer

WOMEN business leaders are better at handling stress than their male counterparts, says a new study. Nearly half of men – 45% – who were asked said their clear thinking was affected by stress at least five times a day. That compared to just 17% of women quizzed in a survey by Paymentsense. Guy Moreve, of Paymentsense, said: “Although the study suggests that female business leaders can handle daily workplace stresses better than their male counterparts, the overall picture is an alarming one. “Our research underscores the daily emotional burden of running a business, and the importance of having a plan to deal with it. While many SME leaders work hard to protect their employees’ wellbeing, they shouldn’t overlook their own. “Even if a business owner is interrupted or prevented from thinking clearly for just five minutes a day by stress, it will damage long-term productivity. Overall, almost one in four business leaders in our study said they are seriously distracted by stress at least five times a day, so this downtime can soon accumulate.”

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April/May 2019

NEWS

Daniel’s vision has been helping others

MORE than 2,200 optometrists and opticians received special training last year to signpost people diagnosed with permanent sight loss to the right support services. The Seeing Beyond the Eyes initiative was set up by Daniel Williams, who is aiming to raise awareness of the difficulties faced by people who are diagnosed with irreversible sight loss among the 15,000 optometrists and 6,000 dispensing opticians in the UK. Daniel has retinitis pigmentosa and developed the programme in response to his own experience post-diagnosis. “Aged eight, I was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa,” he said. “One of the scariest things for my mother and me was the feeling of isolation and not knowing where to go for support. “We saw countless optometrists, dispensing opticians and ophthalmologists, but we were not signposted or referred to support services that would have made our journey easier.”

French connection

HEARING loss charities in the UK and in France have teamed up to fund research towards developing new treatments for hearing disorders, including tinnitus. Action on Hearing Loss and Fondation Pour l’Audition are giving £600,000 to help create new drug, gene and cell-based treatments. According to the World Health Organisation there are almost half a billion people around the world with disabling hearing loss, treatments for which are currently limited to just hearing aids and cochlear implants.

Jobs go at DRUK

DISABILITY Rights UK has been forced to cut its staff of 22 in a further sign of the financial difficulties facing many user-led organisations across the country. The campaigning charity was set for an annual deficit of about £165,000 for 2018-19. DR UK’s chief executive, Kamran Mallick, said: “We planned for a small deficit but like many voluntary organisations, we are feeling the impact of a shortage of statutory and public sector funding and grants.” Last month, leading disability networks warned that user-led organisations were continuing to close across the country, with the sector even facing a “real threat of extinction”.

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

Manchester’s showing how it can be done

A UNIQUE partnership between disabled people’s organisations and Greater Manchester’s elected mayor could provide the template for other regions. Greater Manchester Coalition of Disabled People (GMCDP) said it believed Greater Manchester was the first combined authority in the country to establish such a formal partnership. The authority, led by Labour’s Andy Burnham, has approved funding that will ensure that the lead of a new disabled people’s panel will be a paid position. This contrasts with January’s announcement by Sarah Newton, the minister for disabled people, who said that

the chairs of nine new regional groups, that will make up her new Regional Stakeholder Network, would not be paid. Greater Manchester’s new part-time post has a pro rata salary of £31,100 a year. Brian Hilton, GMCDP’s digital campaigns officer, said: “We are really pleased to be working with the mayor’s office on this important piece of work. “We hope this can become a template for future work, not only with the mayor’s office but across all Greater Manchester authorities. “Not only is it important that disabled people and DPOs are recompensed for their time and expertise, but it’s also important for,

COVER STORY

and benefits, the mayor’s office. Paying for our expertise allows the mayor’s office to make demands on the work we do and the input we provide. “Similarly, we are more focused, invested in the work being undertaken and committed to making the ongoing engagement a success.” The partnership is likely to be seen as a campaigning success for GMCDP, which said before Mr Burnham’s election as Greater Manchester’s first elected mayor in 2017 that it hoped to persuade the successful candidate to make the region a trailblazer for disability rights in England and “develop ground-breaking initiatives to tackle disability”.

BOX OFFICE STARS A

FEW years ago All Together NOW! featured the heroic American pooches that are helping children with all kinds of disabilities off the Californian coast.

Surf Dog Ricochet was the first dog to provide canine-assisted surf therapy in 2010 when she jumped on the surfboard of a boy who is quadriplegic. Since then, she has surfed with hundreds of children and veterans with PTSD. Now, 11 year-old Ricochet and her super dog pals have become IMAX film stars! The film, narrated by Chris Evans (Captain America), takes audiences on a spectacular adventure around the globe to experience the life-saving superpowers and extraordinary bravery of some of the world’s most amazing dogs. Ricochet’s co-stars include Henry, an avalanche rescue dog; Reef, a water rescue dog; Halo, a search and rescue dog; and Tipper and Tony, who sniff out poachers in South Africa. n The film opens in UK IMAX cinemas in April. Full details at: www.superpowerdogs.com

HALF A MILLION READERS . . .

Charities forced to close

THE number of charities closing last year increased by 27%. More than 660 charities closing their doors during last year compared with 526 in 2017. Charity law firm Wilsons attributed the closures to increased regulation on fundraising along with declining levels of public confidence and trust in charities. Stephen Oxley, partner at Wilsons, said: “The financial climate for charities has been getting tougher for a long time, and the last year has seen more of them pass the tipping point into no longer being viable. “First, Government grants were cut, increasing reliance on donations. Donations then started to fall for some charities, in part due to some charities taking reputational hits. “For some charities, the answer will be merging with a bigger organisation with a similar mission, but more will simply be wound up. “We are also seeing more charities choose to wind up voluntarily as they have completed their missions. “There can be some reluctance to do this, but it is often a good thing. A charity that is no longer needed is a charity that has been successful.”


www.alltogethernow.org.uk

April/May 2019

All Together NOW!

Changing lives T HE Steve Morgan Foundation aims to make a real difference by changing the lives of thousands of people across the region.

Founded by Steve Morgan CBE in 2001, the Foundation supports projects that help children and families, people with physical or learning disabilities, the elderly, and the socially disadvantaged across North Wales, Merseyside, Cheshire and North Shropshire. More than £30m has so far been awarded to over 650 charities and organisations, and this number will increase dramatically over the coming years after Steve committed £200 million additional funding

to the Foundation in 2017. Enable funding for individuals was also introduced to provide grants for adults and children with disabilities in financial hardship, who require specialised equipment. There are three types of funding available for organisations which fit the application criteria: n Major grants and one-off capital funding for large projects; n Regional grant funding; n Enable funding for specialised equipment, which includes the brand new Smiley Buses. If you need help, contact us – details at the foot of the page.

WHAT A TRY!

More school trips now on the horizon

Jane Harris, Director of Regional Grants with the Steve Morgan Foundation, hands over the cheque to Dallaglio Rugby Works

Ex-rugby star’s youth scheme is a winner

T

HE Steve Morgan Foundation is supporting a pioneering charity that helps disadvantaged teenagers by using a programme based on the values of rugby.

A big ‘thank you’ from Lexie

THANKS to an Enable grant, eight-year-old Lexie can now go cycling with her family. “I know there are so many people who would like this, so I am very lucky,” she said in a very special message to the Steve Morgan Foundation. “I want to say thank you to the Steve Morgan Foundation

The charity, Dallaglio RugbyWorks, set up by former England rugby World Cup winner Lawrence Dallaglio, has been awarded a grant of £45,000 to help with their programme in a Pupil Referral Unit (PRU) in Warrington. Dallaglio RugbyWorks’ CEO Rachel Roxburgh said: “RugbyWorks is all about helping disengaged young people, and using the values of rugby to help them rediscover themselves and travel on the right path. “It is not about going out and delivering rugby programmes as the Rugby Football Union

for doing this for me.” Lexie, who lives in Llandudno, has cerebral palsy, and has undergone surgery to correct a hip dislocation. She also has significant difficulties with eating and swallowing. Her new Nihola Flex Wheelchair transporter is a customised bicycle, which includes an enclosed platform attached at the front to carry Lexie in her wheelchair.

(RFU) and other organisations do that. “It is about the values of the sport, and working with teenagers to help them, particularly those excluded from mainstream education. One of the key elements of the programme is providing employability opportunities for our

www.stevemorganfoundation.org.uk Tel 01829 782808

teenagers enabling us to develop a bespoke path to sustained education, employment or training for each young person on the programme. We are very appreciative of, and excited about, this funding from the Steve Morgan Foundation.”

Steve Morgan Foundation

BOYS at a Birkenhead school are set for plenty of adventures after the school was awarded the Steve Morgan Foundation’s 69th Smiley Bus. Steven Baker is Executive Head of Kilgarth School, as well as another SEN school – Gilbrook in Wirral – which has already enjoyed the benefits of receiving a Smiley Bus. He said: “We had quite an old minibus at Gilbrook when we got the Smiley Bus, so that one went to Kilgarth. Now that we have another Smiley Bus we can pass that on to our third school. “It makes such a difference, and there were times before we had a minibus that if we wanted to organise any sort of visit, the teachers had to take the pupils in their cars. “It opens the door to so many opportunities, and allows the pupils to access the outdoors as much as is humanly possible. “It was fantastic to see the reaction from everyone when the Smiley Bus first arrived. “To say everyone was over the moon is an understatement!”

@stevemorganfdn

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My dog Faye is turning my life around NEWS

Few disabled bosses at Arts Council England

A MAJOR arts organisation’s poor record of employing disabled people has been exposed just as it won recognition from the Government for its leadership on disability. Arts Council England has admitted only 2% of its directors – and just 3% of its managers – are disabled people, despite having achieved Disability Confident Employer status under a Government scheme. There were also troubling results from its survey of major ACE-funded museums, with the proportion of disabled directors falling from 4% to 2%. The Government’s national development agency for art and culture produced a stream of figures in its annual diversity report which revealed almost no progress in increasing the representation of disabled people among staff, managers and directors in larger organisations funded by ACE. But its own results were just as bad, and often worse, with disabled people making up just 6% of its overall workforce in 2017-18, the same as the previous year. Arts Council England has become the latest employer to achieve the top two levels of the Disability Confident scheme despite their own record on disability employment. According to the Government: “Disability Confident organisations play a leading role in changing attitudes for the better.”

Hopsital fights hate crime ST HELENS and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust has joined forces with Merseyside Police to create the first Hate Crime Reporting Scheme of its kind for local people. Launched after an increase in the reporting of hate crimes in the area, the Trust’s new online reporting system will allow victims to report any incidents or concerns in complete confidence. In the St Helens area alone, there has been a 17% increase in reports of hate crime since 2015. A hate crime is classed as a crime motivated by prejudice on the basis of race, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability. Ann Marr, chief executive of the Trust – which covers hospitals in St Helens, Whiston and Newton-le-Willows, said: “It is vital that as a focal point for the local community, we offer a safe environment for patients and staff. “I am proud that we are the first NHS organisation to provide this new way of reporting hate crime, hopefully it will go a long way to helping protect people’s quality of life.” n You can report a hate crime incident, or receive confidential advice, by visiting the Trust’s website www.sthk.nhs.uk/report-hate-crime and completing a simple online form.

April/May 2019

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ANINE PARTNERS trains amazing assistance dogs to transform the lives of people living with disabilities across the UK, boosting their confidence and independence. The dogs are taught a range of everyday tasks including picking up and retrieving items, opening doors and undressing a person. They can even help to load and unload a washing machine and they can fetch help in an emergency. One of their stars is Faye. NATALIE PRESTON, 29, was partnered with canine partner Faye in July 2013. This is their story...

I

T’S thanks to Faye that I have a full life and a future to look forward to. I wake up every morning with a smile, knowing my best friend is always there ready to help no matter what!

I was born with cerebral palsy. Doctors told my parents there was no hope for me. They said I would never walk, talk or sit up. But my parents didn’t listen. Instead, they spent six hours a day giving me the therapy that enabled me to start to crawling – and taking my first step. I also went on to gain 10 GCSEs and win a place in a mainstream college. During my teenage years I developed scoliosis of the spine. My curve was so bad it was starting to affect my organs and I had to undergo 12 hours of surgery to straighten it. The operation was a success but it has left me with limited mobility and I am unable to bend, take my shoes and socks off or pick things up off of the floor. I was relying on people all the time and I could see my independence slipping away in front of my eyes. I was so excited to hear that my application to Canine Partners had been accepted and couldn’t wait for the call to say that I had been matched with a suitable dog. A year later the call finally came and I met Faye for the first time. I instantly fell in love with her and from day one I felt we had a special connection. She was gorgeous and I couldn’t wait to do my two-week residential training course. Since meeting her, the world around me has become brighter every day. At the end of each day of training we would lie on the floor together and as I talked to her she would gaze into my eyes. I felt she was heavensent. These past few years have been the best of

A REAL TEAM: Natalie and her canine partner Faye who “has given me my life back”

my life. I wake up to a fresh new day not having to think about how I will cope and not worrying about dropping things because I know Faye is always by my side ready to help me. If I drop something she immediately gets it and gives it back to me. Faye helps me get ready in the mornings and brings me my phone and keys without me having to ask her. She gets the washing out of the machine, she gets the post for me and she picks things up from the floor. Faye also helps take my shoes and socks off, flushes the toilet, puts things in the bin and gets money out of the cash machine after I’ve entered my pin number. During my master’s degree she gave me confidence to travel alone on the train to university each day and gave my parents peace of mind that I was being taken care of. While I was out one day I lost my balance. I knew I was going to fall. Faye immediately ran in front of me and put all her weight on me to push me back so that I was upright. Faye hasn’t been trained to do to this, but she knew exactly what do to! Since graduating I have done lots of work

HALF A MILLION READERS . . .

experience with the BBC and in CBBC. I have also worked for CBeebies. I am now working for the BBC as a Social Media Researcher and it is thanks to Faye for giving me the confidence to do this. One of my greatest achievements since having Faye was passing my driving test. This has given me so much independence and freedom and it’s the one thing my parents really didn’t think I would ever do! So now I drive myself the 45 miles into work at MediaCity. It also means that Faye and I go on road trips together for big long walks and we go and visit friends. Before having Faye I was very shy and selfconscious. I would worry about what other people thought of me, but Faye has completely changed that. People actually talk to me now, rather than talking about me or ignoring me. She also gave me the confidence to move out of my parent’s house as I know I won’t be alone. I love Faye so much. She has completely turned my life around. She’s given me my life back and she’s given me something to look forward to. I could not possibly imagine being without Faye. She has simply changed my life. All I can say is thank you Canine Partners. Faye helps me and I love caring for her – together we are a real team.

n Canine Partners: Tel, 08456 580480


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April/May 2019

All Together NOW!

Our website is even easier to use We’re all using the internet more and more as part of our everyday lives. That’s why at United Utilities we want to make it as easy as possible for our customers to access the information on our website LQDZD\WKDWUHLjHFWVWKHLU VSHFLLJFQHHGV To help us achieve this we’ve added an exciting addition to our website called ‘Recite Me’. ‘Recite Me’ lets you customise our website to work in a way that helps you use it best. We’ve made sure it’s really simple to use so don’t worry, you don’t have to download or install anything and there are no compatibility issues. So whether you have dyslexia, a visual impairment or English isn’t \RXULJUVWODQJXDJHĂ&#x;5HFLWH0HĂ KDV the tools to help. This includes the ability to increase and decrease the font size, read aloud the text on the screen, translate the text into KXQGUHGVRIGLÇ„HUHQWODQJXDJHVDQG have full control over background colours and text colours. To access ‘Recite Me’, all you need to do is click on the ‘ACCESSIBILITY HELP?’ button which appears at the bottom right of the webpage you visit. We also have a video on our website which explains ‘Recite me’ in more detail, visit unitedutilities.com/ recite-me to watch. Why not give it a try? It’s free to use and really makes our website accessible to all our customers UHJDUGOHVVRIWKHLUVSHFLLJFQHHGV 03/19/SD/8224

Some of the functionality available with Recite Me includes: Click the Play button to read the text aloud Decrease the text size Change the font Increase the text size Change the background, text and link colours Change the text dimensions Dictionary Translate the text into a GLÇ„HUHQWODQJXDJH Remove images and view in plain text mode Highlight the text then click to download text as an MP3 Magnify what is on the screen Save

Manage your water account online While you’re visiting our website trying out ‘Recite Me’, why not register for My Account? Once registered you can manage your account at a time that suits you to pay your bill, give a meter reading, set up a Direct Debit and update your details when you move. You can also receive your bills electronically rather than through the post so you always have them stored safely online. Visit unitedutilities.com/myaccount to register. And if using your smartphone makes your life easier, why not download our smartphone app? Available for both Apple and Android phones, our app means you can pay your bill and give a meter reading in just a few clicks. Search ‘United Utilities’ on the App Store or Google Play or visit unitedutilities.com/app.

Help when you need it

If you need additional support due to age, ill health, disability or language barriers, why not register for Priority Services? ,Wà VIUHHWRMRLQDQG\RXàOOEHQHLJWIURPD range of additional services so we can UHVSRQGTXLFNO\WR\RXUVSHFLLJFQHHGV Register now at unitedutilities.com/ priorityservices or call us on 0345 072 6093.

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Share your experiences of living with MS

PEOPLE with multiple sclerosis (MS) and their families and friends are being urged to take part in a major survey about what it’s like to live with the neurological condition. Stephen Duff, 54, from Cheshire, was diagnosed with MS in 2010. He said: “Everything the MS Society does is driven by people living with MS, which is why it’s so important as many of us as possible share our experiences of living with the condition. “The last survey showed a third of people with MS weren’t getting enough support with activities like washing, dressing and eating. Since then the MS Society has successfully campaigned for increased social care funding. MS can be painful and exhausting, but by getting involved we can create positive changes that we want to see.” MS affects more than 100,000 people in the UK. It’s often painful and exhausting, and can cause problems with how people walk, move, see, think and feel. n The survey can be completed at www.tinyurl.com/ms-family-friends n MS helpline 0808 800 8000.

Too stressed to be happy

YOUNG people in Lancashire say their biggest worries are experiencing a mental health condition, self-harming, self-image, and taking drugs. One teenager said: ‘Everyone is too stressed to be happy.” Healthwatch Lancashire, which captured the views of 3,600 young people about their health and wellbeing, said young people told them that spending time with their family helped them to stay happy and healthy. Amanda Higgins, at Healthwatch Lancashire, said: “The young people’s voice will enable us to challenge local health providers, using this significant intelligence to suggest that things do indeed need to be improved.” n The full report can be downloaded at: www.bit.ly/2TAssNwb

WHAT A BLAST: Pupils joining in the fun at the Particle Colliders: Accelerating Innovations science

ATOMIC HEROES

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LIND students from across the North West helped to design a unique atomic machine – and then showed it off at an international science symposium.

The students, with help of a teacher and scientists from the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester, created the world’s first ‘Tactile Collider’ – which makes particle physics easier to understand for visually impaired and blind young people. Particle colliders are very large ‘atom smashers’ that improve our understanding of the fundamental building blocks and forces that make up the universe. Science teacher Robyn Watson said: “So many blind people say they didn’t like science at school, that they couldn’t do it because it’s so visual. But it just needed someone to make it accessible. “One of my students, Jack, said that he

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Blind students create first world ‘Tactile Collider’

specifically likes learning through sound. He showed us a game on his iPad, where the screen is blank but, when you put the headphones in, you can hear zombies coming in surround sound. Tactile Collider has been developed with that kind of learning in mind. Robyn, a teacher at Bolton Sensory Support Services, continued: “A lot of people can feel daunted by particle physics, but it is possible to make complex ideas accessible and the kids always come away feeling like they’ve achieved something.” Professor Carsten Welsch, head of physics

at the University of Liverpool, added: “Particle physics is our generation’s equivalent of space exploration. It has the potential to change the world and everyone should be involved and able to believe that anything is possible for them.” Almost 500 students attended the Particle Colliders: Accelerating Innovations symposium at the Arena and Conventon Centre, Liverpool. n Dr Chris Edmonds, at University of Liverpool, and Dr Rob Appleby, University of Manchester, worked with students at St Vincent's School, Liverpool; Turton High School, Bolton; Sharples High School, Bolton; Mount St Joseph, Farnworth; St James Church of England High School, Bolton; and Eden Boys' School, Preston. The project was been driven by science body The Cockcroft Institute, based in Warrington, and funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council.

MP: How I deal with my dyspraxia

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TOP politician has revealed how she hid her disability from bosses for years before becoming an MP.

And Emma Lewell-Buck, the shadow minister for children and families, talked of her pride at finally being able to speak openly about having dyspraxia. Ms Lewell-Buck was previously a social worker but “acutely aware that if there were any job cuts, it would be used against me and I would be the first one in the dole queue”. She said she took work home at weekends, worked late into the evening and started early in the morning because – like many disabled people – she felt she had to

“work that little bit harder to prove yourself or keep up”. The Labour MP for South Shields was speaking at the launch event of Neurodivergent Labour, a political campaign group that will fight for the rights of people with neurological differences such as autism, dyslexia, dyspraxia and dyscalculia. Symptoms of dyspraxia include problems with movement, coordination, judgment, processing,

memory, and some other cognitive skills. Ms Lewell-Buck, said that being dyspraxic affected her every day in her work. She said: “Every single thing I do I need to prep for meticulously, down to the tiniest detail. “But I’m one of the lucky ones because I am in a job where I can openly speak about my disability and I can use my profile to raise awareness.”

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OR 14 years your FREE and favourite All Together NOW! charity paper has been helping huge numbers of people across the North West.

Now, we need some help ourselves … Luckily, over the years, a number of charitable trusts and foundations have come to our rescue. Now we have big hopes that we can persuade more to get on board to make the paper bigger and better – and ensure that the newspaper is around for many years to come. But to do so, we need your help.

Funders need to know exactly how All Together NOW! is making an impact on people’s lives. We have devised this simple questionnaire that will demonstrate just how vitally important and helpful this newspaper is to so many people – and on so many different levels. Please help by filling in the form and sending it back to us. As a way of thanks, we will enter your name into a special prize draw that gives you a chance to win one of SIX £25 gift vouchers.

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Council ups its rates for the care sector

Job exodus to look after relatives

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ORE than 600 people quit work to look after older and disabled relatives every day, according to new research.

Carers UK say that 2.6 million have quit their job to care for a loved one who is older, disabled or seriously ill, with nearly half a million (468,000) leaving their job in the last two years alone. This is a 12% increase since Carers UK and YouGov polled the public in 2013. The findings also show that more people are caring than previously thought, with almost five million workers now juggling their paid job with caring – a dramatic rise compared with Census 2011 figures of three million. Previous research shows those aged 4564 are most likely to have a caring responsibility. Helen Walker, chief executive of Carers UK, said: “Better workplace support for people juggling paid work with caring for a loved one is becoming an increasingly important issue, with a growing need for employers to improve flexibility and, with an ageing population, support people to keep working for longer, contributing to better productivity. “With 15% of the population now working and caring, there is a real social and economic imperative for UK businesses to adopt carer friendly workplaces. Carers UK is urging the Government to improve rights for people juggling work and care by introducing a new right of five to 10 days of paid care leave. “Adequate care and support services are also a key condition for many people’s employment so it’s more important than ever that the Government’s forthcoming social care proposals deliver the high quality and affordable care services we need now and in the future.”

THE survey revealed: n What 89% of carers wanted most of all was a supportive line manager/employer, 88% said the option to work flexibly, and 80% said five to 10 days paid care leave. n 38% said their employer had flexible working but only 12% said they had additional paid care leave. n 33% of people currently juggling work and care said that there were no policies listed to support carers. n 7% said unpaid caring had negatively impacted on their paid work, down from 10% in 2013, indicating that measures by employers to support carers in the workplace have been working well for some.

What we need most is a a proper chat

CARERS UK presented its findings to Caroline Dinenage, Minister of State for Care, at a meeting involving Age UK, Carers Trust, Motor Neurone Disease Association, MS Society, Rethink Mental Illness and Sense, employers, NHS and local government representatives which discussed ways of getting unpaid carers better connected to vital support in the community

N

OT being able to talk to friends about caring leaves one in three unpaid carers feeling lonely or socially isolated, says a leading charity.

Carers UK says despite the huge contribution of unpaid carers to society, an overwhelming majority (74%) feel their caring role isn’t understood or valued by their community. An unwillingness to talk about caring has for many carers created a barrier to their inclusion at work, home and in public life” For lots of people, looking after a loved one is “just something you do”, meaning many do not recognise their caring role straight away. Nine in 10 carers say they have missed out on financial or practical support – or both – because they didn’t identify themselves as a carer. Three in four reported suffering from stress and anxiety as a result of missing out on support. Helen Walker, chief executive of Carers UK, said: “A reluctance to talk about caring is affecting millions of unpaid carers across the UK, meaning many aren’t getting the practical and emotional support they need. “Most of us will look after someone, or be cared for, at some point in our lives so it’s in all of our interests to start the conversation and speak more openly about caring.”

Carer Melanie, 58, who cares more than 60 hours a week for her younger brother Nick who has Huntington’s disease, spoke about challenges she faced finding information and support: “When I started caring for my brother in 2016 it felt as if we’d both fallen through a black hole in space. “As well as the frightening deterioration in his health, I was overwhelmed with the sheer bureaucracy involved in accessing support services, who to talk to and how long it took, all in my own time. “Organisations don’t seem to realise how many hoops unpaid carers have to jump through again and again just to get simple things in motion. “While the NHS have provided some great support there is little joined up practice between local authorities and social services, despite willingness from many of the staff. “I’m indebted to my husband and a few close friends who have helped to pick up some of the strain. In Sheffield we’re also fortunate to have a multi-disciplinary service that provides support for people with long-term neurological conditions. “Disability is fairly public these days but there’s still a lack of comprehension about what it means to be disabled – or caring for an impaired person – mainly because so much of it is invisible to the outer world.”

LIVERPOOL City Council is increasing the rates paid to the care sector, to help with the recruitment and retention of staff. It follows a consultation with providers whose staff help and support around 11,000 people at home and another 3,500 living in residential and nursing homes. There will be an increase of 84 pence in the price paid per hour to home care companies – up from £14.32 to £15.16. Residential care for older people will go up from £426.01 to £445.64 per week, and residential care for people with dementia will increase from £527.97 to £552.99. Nursing care for older people will increase from £465.95 to £487.63 per week, and nursing care for those with dementia will go up from £530.75 to £555.32. There will also be rises for companies who provide staff in supported living, extra care and day services, and those who are employed by people receiving direct payments. Cabinet member for adult social care, Cllr Paul Brant, said: “Staff in the care sector do a tremendous job keeping some of our most vulnerable residents safe. “Despite the financial challenges facing the city council, we are determined to do what we can to make sure staff get a decent pay rise, and we are committed to an ambition of them being paid the Real Living Wage. “In calculating the revised rate we have looked closely at the amount paid by other local authorities in the region as well as taking into account the rising costs in the sector.”

HALF A MILLION READERS . . . Tel 0151 230 0307


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April/May2019

Teenagers preparing for the digital world

employers that are keen SCHOOLS in Manchester to find the best are taking part in a new recruits.” employability programme Digital Inc., funded by helping teenagers aged the Careers & 16-18 with special Enterprise Company, educational needs and Manchester City disabilities gain digital Council, and Greater jobs. Manchester Combined Digital Inc. – a newly Authority, will run in created agency – is Castlefield Campus providing each school with (Hulme), Grange 10 days of employer-led Special School support, with experts from (Levenshulme), local digital companies Lancasterian School coming in to classrooms to (Didsbury), Melland take students through a High School (Gorton), business start-up process North Ridge High and talk about how they got School (Blackley), a job in the creative digital Lecturer Dan Hughes, centre, and students at Melland High School, Gorton Pioneer House School sector. rates than mainstream students. At the (Wythenshawe), Piper Hill High School A total of 80 students are taking part in same time there is a digital skills crisis (Wythenshawe) and Southern Cross School the programme and 16 will then be offered which is costing Manchester’s economy (Chorlton). a supported internship at Digital Inc. millions every year. The UK employment rate for people with Andy Lovatt, managing director of Digital “Digital Inc. seeks to help talented disabilities is 51.3% - significantly lower Advantage, which delivers Digital Inc., said: teenagers from special needs schools get than the employment rate for people “People with special educational needs great digital jobs and also support without disabilities, which is 81.4%. experience significantly lower employment

University’s new centre will help millions worldwide

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ISABLED people from all over the world are to benefit from an £11m trailblazing initiative at Salford University.

A brand new ‘global centre of excellence’ is being created to train highly-skilled prosthetists and orthotists to help meet the growing worldwide demand for artificial limbs, braces, footwear and other devices which help people recover from injury. The centre will train 60 individuals to doctoral level over the next four years, and coordinate new Master’s courses and research to address the skills gap at home and abroad, particularly in low and middle-income countries such as Cambodia, Uganda and Jordan. Malcolm Granat, Professor of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, said: “There is a

woeful shortage of research engineers who have a deep understanding of these challenges. “Our expectation is that this new centre will create a talented workforce, who will be equipped to produce local and global solutions to transform lives.” The majority of students will come from the UK, but the centre will support training for students from low and middle-income countries. The World Health Organisation estimates 100 million people globally need prosthetic or orthotic services and as populations age, more than two billion people are expected to require health-related assistive devices by 2030. In the UK, the Disabled Living Foundation estimates that 6.5m people live with mobility disablement, while in parts of the developing

world, and often in the aftermath of conflict, there is a growing global need for prosthetics and orthotics support. The project, funded by the EPSRC (Engineering & Physical Sciences Research Council) unites 27 industry and clinical partners, including two of the largest manufacturers of prosthetic and orthotic devices, Blatchford and Össur. The partnership brings together both UK undergraduate training centres (Salford and Strathclyde) with research teams at Imperial College London, the University of Southampton, and Northwestern University in the US, the global leader in research in the field. The unique doctoral research training over four years will be complemented by a new Master’s programme operating across all partner universities.

All Together NOW!

Passport to help workers

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NEW type of passport will help almost one million disabled people get the support they need at work, say the TUC.

The TUC and GMB union say it will help workers who are forced to leave their jobs when employers fail to carry out their legal duty to make – and keep in place – the reasonable adjustments needed for them to do their jobs. TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said: “ Employers must do more to make the reasonable adjustments they need. “The TUC and the GMB’s passport is an ideal place to officially and clearly record what adjustments have been agreed, so disabled workers aren’t going back to the starting line every time they get a new manager or role.” GMB general secretary Tim Roache said: “It’s been law for employers to make reasonable adjustments for disabled workers for almost a quarter of a century. “Yet many can face a daily battle with bosses just for the basic things they need to do their job. “But our new reasonable adjustment disability passport could tackle that.” New figures reveal that one-in-ten (390,820) disabled people are dropping out of work – and one-in-seven (555,190) finding new employment every year. Reasonable adjustments could include: providing specially adapted equipment (like a chair, desk or computer), temporarily changing the duties of the job, changing break times or working patterns, or allowing flexible working or time off for medical appointments. When a workplace feature or practice puts a worker or job applicant with a disability at a disadvantage, the employer has a duty under the Equality Act 2010 to see what reasonable adjustments can be made. An employer who fails to make reasonable adjustments is in breach of the law and could be taken to an employment tribunal.

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Advance Payments correct at time of going to press. Images for illustrative purposes only.

Titanium model

Free UK-wide home demonstrations call 0800 916 3028


www.alltogethernow.org.uk

DaVinci can help get you mobile

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OOKING for something to help you get in and out of your car more easily – or need some hand controls to help you get out and about this summer?

Or what about a new wheelchair, a motorised scooter, or a powered handbike? Well if you are yearning to get yourself active this year then Vin Ross and his team at DaVinci Mobility can help you. “We can help with all kinds of problems, “ says Vin, who set up the Gillmoss-based company 17 years ago. “There is nothing we can’t help with. We are wheelchair-users ourselves so we know all about the

problems and frustrations people have in getting and staying mobile. “It can sometimes be challenging, but in most cases it’s not impossible. It’s just a question of being creative and adapting to new situations. “Our team can offer expert advice – and can solve problems. That’s what we are here for.” No task is too small, too big, or too challenging for the DaVinci team. Co partner Steve Curran says: “Lots of people may be recovering from an injury or a health issue and think they have lost their independence. We can show them that’s not necessarily the case. “We just love getting people up and about and living life to the full,” adds Steve. n DaVinci, tel 0151 548 1999

April/May 2019

All Together NOW!

15

ALL REVVED UP: Blind speed world record-holder Mike Newman who set up Speed of Sight

Major boost for speed charity

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OOD NEWS for disabled motorists wanting to experience the thrill of the racetrack . . .

Bolton-based charity Speed of Sight has just had their sponsorship extended by Landsail Tyres. The deal means even more disabled drivers from all over the country will have the chance to enjoy the thrill of driving on a track day than ever before. John Galloway, who co-founded the charity with Mike Newman, said that maintaining its

relationship with Landsail was a key foundation block for Speed of Sight’s plans. “Thanks to the support, we have attracted a lot more supporter organisations within the motor industry,” he said. “But to get our expansion plans going – holding more events at more venues – we wanted to keep Landsail on board.” n Speed of Light, tel 0161 714 4567 n www.speedofsight.org


All Together NOW!

16

ON THE BALL A

BALL-SHAPED gaming controller allowing stroke survivors to work towards their recovery while also having fun is now available to buy.

The NeuroBall – featured in All Together NOW! last autumn – lets users complete hundreds of repetitions of their rehabilitation exercises while playing their favourite video games. On sale for £359, the controller has been shown in trials to improve wrist and shoulder movement, reduce arm damage, and lead to greater social activity. The Brunel University-Neurofenix study showed that despite being primarily older, with an average age of 60, and varying levels of mental and physical impairment, the test group were able to learn how to use the NeuroBall and app independently at home after just 98 minutes of training. They played an average of 17.4 hours,

or 149 minutes per week, exercising their arm 15,092 times with minimum input of just 2.3 hours from the Brunel physiotherapists. Within an hour of play, NeuroBall users are able to complete 840 exercise repetitions, or 14 per minute. Shona Patterson, who had a stroke in 2014, said: “Trying to motivate yourself is quite hard. I was getting bored with my daily routine of stretching and weights. “One day after I had finished using the NeuroBall, I checked the level I could reach with my hand and discovered I could put my hand on top of my head, which was the first time I had been able to do that since my stroke. “I was ranting about how excited I was because it is amazing after four and a half years to still feel you can achieve things.” n NeuroBall, £359 inc VAT, is compatible with Android tablets. It can be purchased at www.neurofenix.com

April/May 2019

Howard’s story may be a real life saver

S

HARING your personal stories about mental health issues can be tough.

Tel 0151 230 0307

“But if it helps just one person, then it’s worth it,” says Howard Dexter, who’s own story is featured in a new book that campaigners feel could be “life-saving”. Howard, 62, was initially diagnosed with depression and sectioned under the Mental Health Act before being correctly diagnosed with bipolar disorder. He said: “It was a relief to finally have a diagnosis of bipolar; it meant I could start to get the right treatment I needed and the medication helped me be stable. “It was a little daunting sharing my story, as it’s so personal, but if it helps one person on the street relate to their life and reach out for help it’s worth it. I really feel like we’ve helped to create something which

HALF A MILLION READERS

www.alltogethe

SHARING: Howard with the e-book

could genuinely be life-saving and I’d encourage as many people as possible to read it.” The free e-book has been published by Brighter Futures, based in Hanley, Staffs. Sharon Godwin, Brighter Futures Clubhouse Network Manager, said: “There’s still so much that needs to be done to help people who are experiencing poor mental health. Our helpline servi received over 950 calls related to suicide over 12 months – that’s in Staffordshire alone. “We hope this e-book will not only help to further t conversation about mental health, but actually save lives.”

n Tel. 01782 406000. www.brighter-futures.org.uk


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HOLD ON

April/May 2019

POLLEN EATERS

THAT’S HANDY! TAG PARTNERS: Laura and Ted trying our their new idea, the Ramble Tag

A

A lightweight upper-arm harness with a handle, the Ramble Tag enables visually impaired people to be guided without the need for linking arms. Its inventors are two Glasgow neighbours – Tom Forsyth and Laura Maclean – who came up with the idea while walking their dogs. Tom, who has been without sight for over 20 years, said: “For a visually impaired person, it can be awkward linking arms or holding hands with someone who is guiding you – especially if you don’t know them very well. “It can feel uncomfortable and can be a reason why many opt out of experiences like sport or travelling, for example. “But with the Ramble Tag, you can have so much more independence and greater mobility, too, as it takes away the danger of miss-footed stumbles leading to a two person pileup.� Laura said: “Linking arms with someone who is visually impaired can be clumsy and frustrating, so Ramble Tag provides a simple, effective solution that gives people a sense of confidence and more freedom.

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“We’re so excited with the interest and momentum that the Ramble Tag has gained since we’ve started telling people about it.� The device has now been shortlisted for the Blackwood Design Awards, which seek out the best new inventions as part of the Blackwood Group’s mission to ensure that those with disabilities can live life to the fullest. Max Brown, chair of Blackwood, said: “The Ramble Tag is a simple, yet ingenious example of an innovative idea that has been created as a solution to improving day to day life. “It just goes to show that a basic design, without all the bells and whistles of modern day technology, has the potential to change lives. “This is the sort of design that the BDAs celebrate – something that makes you think ‘why hasn’t someone done this before?’ � Previous winning designs have included a wheelchair that allows users to control its direction with their eyes, and the ‘S’up Spoon’ – a selfstabilising piece of cutlery that enables users with shaky hands to eat without spilling their food. n Entries close on Friday, April 12. Contact bespoken@blackwoodgroup.org.uk

HALF A MILLION READERS

17

HAYFEVER sufferers could see their symptoms disappear with the use of a revolutionary new nose filter worn inside the nostrils. The O2 Nose Filters have also been shown to reduce snoring in some cases, by supporting the tissues in the nose that relax and vibrate during sleep. Originally launched in America, but available in the UK for the first time this year, the disposable filters sit discreetly inside the nose and are barely visible. “The filters work in a similar way to a magnet attracting iron,â€? said Stefan Viklund, CEO of O2 Nose Filters. “Layers of electrostatic material capture the pollen particles, causing them to stick to the filters and preventing them from entering the bloodstream. “Our tests have shown the O2 Nose Filters are 90-100% efficient at capturing pollen particles. “They could end the misery suffered by the millions of hayfever sufferers in the UK each year.â€? n Price: ÂŁ5.99 for three pairs from www.informcare.co.uk/productcategory/o2/

Simple device could be a winner for blind

SIMPLE arm device that’s helping blind people at some of the UK’s major airports is in line for a top award.

All Together NOW!

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sales@alltogethernow.org.uk


18

All Together NOW!

April/May 2019

SHOPMOBILITY

n ALTRINCHAM . Tel 0161 929 1714 n ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE. Tel 0161 339 9500 n BARROW. Tel 01229 434039 n BIRKENHEAD. Tel 0151 647 6162 n BLACKBURN AND DARWEN. Tel 01254 690566 or 07757 502217 n BLACKPOOL. Tel 01253 349427 n BOLTON. Tel 01204 392946 n CARLISLE. Tel 01228 631564 n CHESTER. Tel 01244 312626 n CHORLEY. Tel 01257 260 888 n COLWYN BAY. Tel 01492 533822 n CREWE. Tel 01270 580 031 n ELLESMERE PORT. Tel 0151 355 1420 n KENDAL. Tel 01539 740 933 n LEIGH, Wigan. Tel 01942 777 985 n LIVERPOOL. Tel 0151 707 0877 n MANCHESTER Trafford Centre. Tel 0161 747 2684 n MANCHESTER Arndale Centre. Tel 0161 839 4060 n NELSON. Tel 01282 692 502 n NORTHWICH, Vale Royal Tel 01606 288820 n OSWESTRY. Tel 01691 656882 n PENRITH. Tel 01768 895 438 n PRESTON. Tel 01772 204 667 n RHYL. Tel 01745 350665 n ROCHDALE. Tel 01706 865 986 n RUNCORN, Halton Lea Tel 01928 710144 n SHREWSBURY. Tel 01743 236900 SKELMERSDALE. Tel 01695 550066 n ST HELENS. Tel 01744 613 388 n STOCKPORT. Tel 0161 666 1100 n WARRINGTON. Tel 01925 240064 n WARRINGTON. Birchwood Tel 01925 822 411 WIDNES: 0151 511 8833 n WIGAN. Tel 01942 776 070 n WINSFORD Tel 01606 557550 n WREXHAM. Tel 01978 312390 MIDLANDS n BIRMINGHAM. Snow Hill Railway Station. Tel 0121 236 8980. Level 2, Centre Car Park, Bullring. Tel 0121 616 2942 n STAFFORD. Tel 01785 619456 n STOKE ON TRENT. Tel 01782 233333 n SUTTON COLDFIELD. Tel 0121 355 1112 n TAMWORTH. Tel, 01827

CONGRATULATIONS to the five lucky winners of our gardening competition to win a copy of Gardening Through the Year, published by Dorling Kindersley. Mrs Sylvia Smith, Hermitage Road, Saughall, Chester (“I picked up my copy of All Together NOW! at Countess of Chester hospital) Mrs Pamela Sadler, Green

The long trek to help homeless

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

Avenue, Davenham, Northwich (Leighton hospital) Miss L Gordon, Euston Grove, Prenton, Wirral (FACT, Liverpool) Julia Threlfall-Dayus, Rishton Road, Clayton le Moors, Accrington, Lancashire (Clitheroe Library) Ian David Williams, Hale Gate Rd. Halebank. Widnes (Widnes Healthcare Centre)

WINNERS of our Brit Floyd competition were:

Mr K Huyton, Brandreth Drive, Parbold Jeanette Flewett, School Avenue, Ness, Cheshire John Bottomley, Seymour Avenue Clayton Manchester Sean White (Ricoh UK)

Fancy dancin’?

SOME new dance sessions are being run by the Wingate Centre, in Wrenbury, Cheshire – and they sound great for disabled people aged 16 and over to get fit and meet new people. Classes run for six weeks, starting on Tuesday 9 April, and there’s a free ‘come and try’ session for new participants. n Booking is essential – call 01270 780456, then turn up in comfy clothes and have a go.

T

HREE friends are striding out to help homeless people, after one of them found himself out of work and having to live on the streets.

Mel Pengelly, Leon Parker and Simon Parker are planning to complete the 80-mile hike from Wirral to Snowdon in just 24 hours. Leon and Simon (not related) served in the army together, but when they left service Leon was unable to find a job and ended up on the streets, along with his dog, Misty. Leon was homeless for three years. Although it’s only the beginning, he now has a new life, new friends, and a new Simon, Leon, Misty the pooch, and Mel career. The Royal British Legion stepped in to help Leon find a place to live, paid his deposit on a Mel, from Pensby, said: “We’ve undertaken property in Birkenhead and provided some similar yomps in the past through the Highlands, furniture. but this is a new and exciting challenge for all of He has now been offered a job with a local us and much further than we have done before.” security company, Churchill Security Ltd, and is The trio will leave the Hillbark Hotel in Frankby looking forward to a better future. at 6am on May 18, supported by other veterans He said: “I was at a real low point in my life, and including ex-Signals, a Ghurkha and medics. without the support of my friends and the Royal n www.justgiving.com/fundraising/ British Legion, I dread to think what might have britishlegiontab happened.”

HELP AT THE END OF A PHONE

n ANGLESEY: TARAN Tel 01407 721933 n BLACKPOOL Disability Information and Support. Tel 01253 472 202. Textphone 01253 476 450 n CHESHIRE CIL Tel 01606 331853 n CHESTER Dial House Tel 01244 345655 n DENBIGHSHIRE Tel 01745 354445 n ELLESMERE PORT DICE Tel 0151 355 1420

n HALTON Disability Service Tel 01928 717222 n KNOWSLEY DISABILITY CONCERN. 0151 480 4090 n LANCASTER DISC Tel 01524 34411 n LIVERPOOL Association of Disabled People. 0151 263 8366. Text 0151 260 4076. n ACSIL (Amputees and Carers), Tel, 0151 261 1166 n THE BRAIN CHARITY Tel 0151 298 2999

n MANCHESTER (GTR) Coalition of Disabled People Tel 0161-273 5154 n MOLD Flintshire Disability Tel 01352 755546 n NELSON: Pendle Pakistan Welfare Association. Tel 01282 603 616 n PRESTON DISC: Tel 01772 558 863. Text 01772 204 787 n RHYL Tel 01745 350665 n STOCKPORT: Disability

Four cheers!

FOUR Liverpool charities are to benefit from this year’s Mossley Hill Athletic Club’s beer festival (April 26-28). Now in its sixth year, the festival has raised more than £60,000. This year’s charities are the ADHD Foundation, Steps to Freedom, the Stand Tall Campaign (funding Merseyside’s Police Horses) and Garston Adventure Playground. See advert p17

Stockport. 0161 480 7248 n WARRINGTON Disability Partnership. 01925 240064 n WIRRAL WIRED Tel 0151 670 1500 n WEST LANCS HELPLINE Freefone 0800 220676 n ST HELENS DASH Tel 01744 453053 MIDLANDS n BIRMINGHAM Disability Resource Centre Tel 0121 789 7365

n Disabled People’s Network Solihull Tel 0121 788 1544 n STOKE: Disability Solutions Tel 01782 683800 n WOLVERHAMPTON Elder and Disabled Group Tel 01902 448552 n WEST MIDS Amputee

Group. 07891 794733; 07585 958322; 07557 228154


www.alltogethernow.org.uk

All Together NOW!

April/May 2019

Rappers unite to battle mental health MANCHESTER’S battle rap MC Bobby Rex teamed up with other top artists to host a battle with a difference – all about mental health. The event, named Speak Up, brought together Klashnekoff, Madness, Bamalam, Tony D, Real Deal and Chilla Jones, all speaking candidly about their own experience – and encouraging young people to do the same. Bobby said: “There’s more help

out there than people realise at times. I want to help push that message – speak up! “It’s a big step to say to someone, here’s how I’m feeling. It’s a big step and a daunting step because you’re bred throughout your life to be an alpha male or you must be this or you must be that. “And really, you mustn’t be anything other than who you are.” New research by mental health

anti-stigma campaign Time to Change reveals that when asked, 88% of young people (1624) would tell friends and family they are “fine”, even if struggling with a mental health problem. To tackle this Time to Change is urging people to “Ask Twice” if a friend says they are fine but they suspect otherwise.

A wheel life story

n Time to Change: Tel. 020

8215 2356.

Stephen spells out what life’s like in a wheelchair

E

VER wondered what life’s like if you permanently have to use a wheelchair?

Well, Stephen Lightbown wants to tell you all about it – via his poetry. Stephen, 38, has been paralysed from the waist for the past 22 years – ever since breaking his back after hitting a tree while sledging in the snow. Now, he’s used his experiences to create his first poetry collection, Only Air. Blackburn-born Stephen, pictured, says: “This collection has been over twenty years in the making. It starts with a life changing accident and culminates in the present day. “I am delighted to be able to share these poems about living with a disability and hope that by reading the book people will develop a greater understanding of what it is like to be a wheelchair user.”

VISUAL PROBLEMS n ACCRINGTON Tel 01254 233332 n BARROW Tel 01229 820698 n BIRMINGHAM Action for Blind Tel 0121 665 4200 n BLACKBURN Tel 0125 554143 n BLACKPOOL: N-Vision Tel 01253 362696 n BURY Tel 0161 763 7014 n BURNLEY Tel 01282 438507

In his deeply personal collection Stephen explores what it is like to go through a life-changing accident and then to re-exist in a world that is suddenly unfamiliar. Stephen says: “The collection considers what it means to be part of a family, being alive when you don’t conform, and making your journey when the way you perceive yourself is often very different to the ways others view you. “At its very core, this is a journey towards normal.”

Stephen is hosting three specific launches that will take place in Bristol at Spike Island on Thursday 11 April, in London at the Poetry Café on Saturday 4 May and on Thursday 20 June at the Darwen Library Theatre. n Tickets are available through the venues, Stephen’s website or via Eventbrite by searching for Access All Poetry. n www.stephenlightbown.com n Only Air, Burning Eye Books, £9.99

HELP AT THE END OF A PHONE

n CARLISLE: Action for Blind People Tel 01228 595121 n CHESHIRE & N WALES: Vision Support. Tel 01244 381515 n CUMBRIA (West) Tel 01946 592474 n CUMBRIA (Sth Lakeland) Tel 01539 726613 n GUIDE DOGS Tel 0118 983 5555 n HENSHAW’S 0161 872 234 or 0151 708 7055

n LIVERPOOL: Bradbury Fields.Tel 0151 221 0888: Action for Bind Tel 0151 298 3222 n MANCHESTER: Action for Blind Tel 0161 787 9252 n PRESTON: Action for Blind People Tel 01772 320550 n OLDHAM Tel 0161 682 8019 n ROSSENDALE Tel 01706 873256 n SIGHTLINE (North West)

Tel 0800 587 2252 n WIGAN Tel 01942 242891 n WIRRAL Tel 0151 652 8877 HEARING ISSUES n BIRMINGHAM Institute for Deaf Tel 0121 246 6101 n CHESHIRE Deaf Society Tel 01606 47831 n CUMBRIA Deaf Society Tel 01228 606434 n LANCASHIRE (EAST) Deaf Society Tel 01282 839180

n MANCHESTER Deaf Centre. Tel 0161 273 3415 Genie Networks. Tel 0161 941 4549. Text 18001 0161 941 4549 n MERSEYSIDE Society for Deaf Tel 0151 228 0888 n SOUTHPORT Centre for the Deaf Tel 01704 537001 n ST HELENS: Deafness Resource Centre Tel 01744 23887 n WOLVERHAMPTON Centre for Deaf Tel 01902

CARERS’ CENTRES

n ACCRINGTON Tel 01254 387 444 n BLACKBURN with DARWEN Tel 01254 688 www.bwdcarers.org n BLACKPOOL Blackpool Borough Council, Tel 01253 477 716 nCUMBRIA Carlisle. Tel 01228 542 156 Penrith. Tel 01768 890 280 Barrow-in-Furness. Tel 01229 822 822 Kendal. Tel 01539 732 927 Whitehaven, Tel 01946 592 223 n CHESHIRE & WARRINGTON Helpline:0300 102 0008 n KNOWSLEY Tel 0151 549 1412 n LANCASTER Tel 01524 66475 nLIVERPOOL Tel 0151 705 2307 n MANCHESTER Tel 0161 835 2995 n MORECAMBE Tel 01524 833456 n PRESTON Tel 01772 200173 n RUNCORN Tel 01928 580182 n WIDNES Tel 0151 257 9673 n SALFORD Tel 0161 833 0217 n SEFTON Tel 0151 288 6060 n ST HELENS Tel 01744 675 615 n STOCKPORT Tel 0161 442 0442 n WARRINGTON (WIRED) Tel 01925 633 492 n WEST LANCS Tel 01695 711243 n WIGAN & LEIGH Tel 01942 705959 / 486923 MIDLANDS n BIRMINGHAM Tel 0121 675 8000 n SOLIHULL Tel 0121 788 1143 n WALSALL Tel 01922 610 810 NORTH WALES n ANGLESEY Tel 01248 722828 n BANGOR Tel 01248 370 797 n CONWY Tel 01492 533714 n DENBIGHSHIRE: NEWCIS, Tel: 0845 603 3187 nDOLGELLAU Tel 01341 421167 n FLINTSHIRE: NEWCIS, Tel: 01352 751436 n WREXHAM CARERS SERVICE

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20

All Together NOW!

April/May 2019

CONKY BILL’S HIDDEN SECRETS

FLASHBACK

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

IRON MAN: Duke of Wellington Memorial Column in Liverpool’s William Brown Street

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IVERPOOL’S so-called St George’s Quarter houses one of the finest collections of neo-classical structures in Europe.

THE COLUMN is, in fact, a hollow cylinder, inside which a spiral stone staircase of 169 steps travels up to a viewing platform below the Duke. Although cemented to the column, the statue is secured in place by a thick steel cable that is kept under tension and anchored at the base of the monument. Also, a recently rediscovered tunnel leads from the basement of St George’s Hall, under Lime Street, directly to a cellar beneath the column, that then gives access to the steps to the top. Another curious feature is what is set into the base of the column’s plinth and pavement. These are the pre-metric Imperial Standard Board of Trade measurements of length at 62 degrees Fahrenheit.

These include St George’s Hall (1854), the Liverpool Central Libraries (1860, restored 2013), the Walker Art Gallery (1877), and the County Sessions House (1884). The buildings all stand along William Brown Street – named after the wealthy banker who, in the mid19th century, gave the money to build the first of these stunning civic and cultural structures, Liverpool Museum (1860), now renamed The World Museum Liverpool. At the head of the street stands a classic monument – Duke of Wellington Memorial Column, otherwise known as The Iron Duke’s Column because of the great commander’s most popular public nickname. His other common nickname, especially amongst his troops but always used with affection, was Conky Bill, because of his great, hooked nose! The column is mounted on a stepped plinth and was erected as a tribute to Arthur Wellesley, the 1st

KEN PYE tells about two magnificent monuments in the heart of Liverpool’s St George’s Quarter

Duke of Wellington (1769-1852), who was one of Britain’s greatest national heroes. This was particularly because of his victory over the French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) at the Battle of Waterloo, which was fought in 1815, in what is now Belgium. Known by the public as ‘The Iron Duke’ because of his determination and formidable resolve, the people of Liverpool wished to honour the memory of this outstanding military leader, who had been Prime Minister of Britain from 1823 to 1830, and again, in 1834. He was also a trusted advisor of a young Queen Victoria. The fluted column was designed

by Andrew Lawson from Glasgow and its foundation stone was laid in 1861. The monument was formally unveiled on 16th May 1863, in front of an appreciative and enthusiastic crowd of thousands of people. As the Iron Duke’s statue was revealed a salvo was fired from 19 cannon, followed by a band playing ‘Hail The Conquering Hero Comes’. Standing 132 feet high, the Wellington Column was carved from Darleydale stone, and supports a bronze statue of the Duke. This figure was designed by Andrew Lawson’s brother, George, and is 14 feet high. It is cast in metal melted-down from cannon captured from the French at Waterloo. The statue is positioned facing southeast, so that Wellington would always be looking towards the site of his greatest victory. A carved brass panel at the base of the column shows the final charge at Waterloo, and the Duke can be seen mounted on his horse, telescope in hand, commanding the advance against the enemy. On the east and west faces of the pedestal other panels, mounted in 1865, list all the names of the Duke’s victorious battles.

The fountain that quenched thousands of thirsts

D

IRECTLY in front of the Walker Art Gallery, and just a few yards further down William Brown Street, stands another classic monument – the Steble Fountain.

Erected in 1879, it is made entirely of cast iron and is named after Lt. Colonel Richard Fell Steble, who was the Mayor of Liverpool from 1845 to 1847, and who gave the fountain to the city. This is a casting of the original statue that was designed for the Paris Exposition of 1867. In

Liverpool, a steam-driven water pump was constructed, at the cost of £400, to drive the water flow of the fountain. This was housed in the basement of St George’s Hall and the sound of its

www.discover-liverpool.com

engine often disrupted the proceedings in the courtrooms above. There is now a modern pump driving the fountain. However, and very sadly, the fountain very seldom flows these days! The figures around its base are the manly river god, Acis, with his voluptuous lover, the nymph Galatea; and of God of the Sea, Neptune, with his consort, the Sea Goddess Amphitrite. The little boy 3rd from the left in the picture is William Masters (18871982), who changed his name to George Stretton and went on to become an outstanding and renowned jazz musician.

Ken Pye – 0151 427 2717


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April/May 2019

How exercise could help in fight with cancer EXERCISE could help patients battling colon cancer, new research has found. Just a short session of high intensity interval training (HIIT), the growth of colon cancer cells was reduced For a long time, the focus on exercise has been on the positive changes in the body that occur following a longer period of training. However, these findings suggest that the effects following a single session of HIIT, an exercise regime involving short, high energy bursts, are also important. The changes following HIIT suggest that repeated exposure to the acute effects of exercise may contribute to the fight against the cancer. These results reinforce the importance of doing regular exercise and maintaining a physically active lifestyle. The study conducted by The University of Queensland in conjunction with the University of Waterloo, Ontario, involved colorectal cancer survivors completing either a single session of HIIT or 12 sessions over four weeks. Importantly, the method used to model the colon cancer cells in the laboratory is very different to how they grow in the human

‘The benefits are undeniable’

CAN high intensity exercise help patients with prostate cancer? That’s what researchers are asking in a new worldwide study involving 866 men with prostate cancer over a threeyear period at sites across Australia, North America and Europe. Dr Ralph Manders, one of the leaders of the team from the University of Surrey and Royal Surrey County Hospital, said: “The benefits of exercise to both our physical and mental well-being is undeniable. “What we are hoping to uncover is whether the same benefits are

experienced when a person is living with cancer, and whether it extends their survival from cancer. “If it does this could be revolutionary in the future of treating and supporting people with prostate cancer.” Sam Gledhill, at the Movember Foundation, said: “Conventional treatments and therapies remain the primary means of attack against prostate cancer. “However, incremental improvements achieved by other means all amount to valuable extra time and quality of life for men diagnosed with the disease.”

High 5s all round! body, requiring future research to translate these findings into human tumours. James Devin, who led the study, said: “We have shown that exercise may play a role in inhibiting the growth of colon cancer cells. “This suggests that a physically active lifestyle may be important in tackling human

colorectal tumours. We would now like to look at how these changes in growth occur and understand the mechanisms by which biomarkers in the blood can impact cell growth.”

n The research has been published in the

Journal of Physiology.

n ELEVEN new

HOME SWEET HOME: Kenneth Farrag, Margot James, Digital and Culture Minister and Catherine Millar.

T

HE very latest 5G technology is helping people to live more safely and independently in their homes. Catherine Miller has epilepsy, while her partner Kenneth Farrag takes medication for diabetes. Both also have mild learning disabilities and live in their own home, run by Community Integrated Care in Liverpool.

As part of the trial the couple have had a Safehouse Sensor installed in their home, which detects falls, changes in temperature and unusual behaviour patterns. The technology alerts care providers if they need to visit – removing the need for unnecessary visits. The couple are also trialling a ‘PAMAN’ device, which provides a video link to their local pharmacy.

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technologies are being supported by 5G as part of the pilot in Kensington, Liverpool, and at the Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust. n They include two new loneliness apps ‘Push to Talk’ that links older people up for a chat and a loneliness quizzing app, which is being used by people with a learning disability at Kensington Community Learning Centre.

Minister for Digital and Culture Margot James said: “5G has the potential to revolutionise every aspect of our lives, from increasing productivity to improving quality of life. “Our successful Liverpool testbed is key to delivering this progress, exploring how we can harness the power of 5G connectivity to transform health and social care.”

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MEDICAL NOTES Worrying link between weight and sexuality

LESBIAN and bisexual women are at increased risk of being overweight or obese compared to heterosexual women. Gay men, however, are less likely to be overweight than their straight counterparts, and more at risk of being underweight. The study, by the University of East Anglia and UCL, is the first to investigate the relationship between sexual orientation and body mass index (BMI) using population data in the UK. The research team pooled data from 12 UK national health surveys involving 93,429 participants and studied the relationship between sexual orientation and BMI. Lead researcher Dr Joanna Semlyen, from UEA’s Norwich Medical School, said: “Our findings are worrying because being overweight and obese are known risk factors for a number of conditions including coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer and early death.”

Loving your liver...

AVOID sugary food and drinks to combat fatty liver disease, says a new study. Researchers found children in a low-free sugar diet group had an average reduction in liver fat of 31%, while children on a typical diet showed no improvement. Blood test measures of liver inflammation also indicated significant improvement for children in the low-free sugar group. Vanessa Hebditch at the British Liver Trust said of the US research: “We are delighted this study backs up what we say in our Love Your Liver campaign about the importance of cutting down on your fat and sugar intake to improve your liver health.”

Top tip to help hips

MANY diseases increase the risks of hip fracture surgery, says a new study. Parkinson’s disease, osteoarthritis, rheumatic diseases, alcoholism and mental health disorders all increase the risk of surgical complications after a hip fracture surgery, according to Finnish researchers. Similar observations have been made in hospital-specific studies in Finland. “Special attention needs to be paid to the treatment of hip fracture in patients who suffer from these diseases,” says orthopaedic surgeon Tero Yli-Kyyny, the lead author of the article.

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MEDICAL NOTES A new injection-style treatment for psoriasis

A

REVOLUTIONARY treatment for people with severe psoriasis is expected to be available to suitable patients from April.

In worldwide trials, the majority of people using the injection-style treatment reported an improvement in their skin condition. Close to two out of every three people (62%) achieved 75% of skin clearance (Psoriasis Area Sensitivity Index or PASI 75) by week 12 and an average of 77% at week 28 after only three doses. And just over half of patients (54%) achieved PASI 90 and an average of 29% reached PASI 100 at week 28. The treatment is injected into the skin, similar to the way people with diabetes inject insulin – but only four times a year. Jacob Anker Rasmussen, of UK pharmaceutical company Almirall, said: “The provisional recommendation by the NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) appraisal committee, who agreed that tildrakizumab is a cost effective option, is excellent news for dermatologists and patients. “It means that dermatologists in the UK now have an additional biologic treatment option and suitable patients can now be considered for tildrakizumab”. The treatment was approved by the European Commission last September. It is already available in Germany and is due to be marketed in all EU Member states.

n PSORIASIS is a chronic immune disease that appears on the skin. It affects an estimated 7.8 million adults in Europe and approximately 125 million people worldwide.. n The most common form of psoriasis, called plaque psoriasis, appears as red, raised areas of skin covered with flaky white scales, which may be itchy and painful and can crack and bleed. n Despite different treatment options existing, many people with plaque psoriasis continue to struggle with the on-going, persistent nature of this chronic disease.

April/May 2019

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Sherpas in shape

AN EXPEDITION to Mount Everest to study why Sherpa people are better suited to life at high altitude could improve the treatment of patients with conditions related to reduced levels of oxygen in the blood and tissues. Dr Edward Gilbert-Kawai, who jointly led the research, hopes the results of their work with the sherpas –who showed improved blood flow and oxygen delivery to tissue – could help in the treatment of critically ill patients. Future research should establish the underlying cellular mechanisms behind this response, Dr Gilbert-Kawai said. Identifying such differences and mimicking those in humans most highly adapted to reduced environmental oxygen may thus reveal novel target pathways that are amenable to drug treatment in the critically ill, and could provide new directions in critical care medicine.” PICTURED: Chomba Sherpa undergoing altitude tests during the expedition

Worst off hit bottle in record numbers

A

LOCOHOL addiction treatment experts are urging the Government to “listen to the numbers” and act on them now.

‘Action over drink crisis won’t wait’

The call comes as the NHS revealed that alcohol related hospital admissions rose by 100,000 people in 2017/18 to 1.2m, representing 7.2% of all hospital admissions for that year. Regionally, Salford once again had the highest rate at 3,430 per 100,000 population, and Wokingham had the lowest rate at just 1,410. The report also shows a 6% year on year rise in the number of alcohol-specific deaths; from 5,507 in 2016 to 5,843 in 2017. This is also a staggering 16% over the last 10 years. Eytan Alexander, head of private addiction treatment specialists UKAT, said: “Alcohol in England is without a doubt at crisis point and worse still, we start another year with no dedicated strategy from Government for tackling alcoholism in this country. “Why is it that alcohol misuse is always

Helping the one in 400 children

shoehorned into the overall drugs policy? It needs to be recognised as a standalone problem, because that’s exactly what it is – a problem.” UKAT say that throughout 2018, over half (55%) of all patients treated were for alcohol addiction, the highest amount they’ve ever treated. UKAT treated 1,025 patients for alcohol addiction in 2018, compared to just 579 in 2015; a 77% rise in just 3 years. The NHS details how 83% of hospital admissions were aged over 45 and that just under two thirds were male. Worryingly, the vast majority (78%) of alcohol related deaths occur between the ages of 40-69 and once again, death rates were highest in the most deprived areas and lowest in the least deprived areas. Think you have a problem with alcohol? Take a 30 second test to see if you need help: n www.ukat.co.uk/alcohol/cage-

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ADULTS with cerebral palsy in England are 14 times more likely to die from respiratory conditions, reveals a new study. The same group are also at three times higher risk of heart disease death than the general population, said the research. The study, published in Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, found adults with cerebral palsy have a four times greater risk of dying from any cause compared with the general population. It is the first time scientists can put a figure on the relative risk of death from different causes among people with cerebral palsy in England. Dr Jennifer Ryan said: “People with cerebral palsy need ongoing support to prevent their condition deteriorating. “We need more research to understand how we can better support them to live a full and active life despite their changing needs”. One in every 400 children in England has cerebral palsy, which affects muscle control and movement. It’s mostly caused by brain injury before, during or after birth. The study, backed by Brunel University London, was published in Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology.

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April/May 2019

Cancer causes premature ageing, say scientists LEUKAEMIA promotes premature ageing in healthy bone marrow cells, a new study reveals. The research shows that healthy bone marrow cells were prematurely aged by cancer cells around them. It is well known that ageing promotes cancer development. But this is the first time that the reverse has been shown to be true. Importantly, the aged bone marrow cells accelerated the growth and development of the leukaemia – creating a vicious cycle that fuels the disease. The study, at the University of East Anglia, also identified the mechanism by which this

process occurs and highlights the potential impact that this could have on future treatments. Dr Stuart Rushworth, from UEA’s Norwich Medical School, said: “Our results provide evidence that cancer causes ageing. “We have clearly shown that the cancer cell itself drives the ageing process in the neighbouring non-cancer cells. “Our research reveals that leukaemia uses this biological phenomenon to its advantage to accelerate the disease.” NOX2, an enzyme usually involved in the body’s response to infection, was shown to be present in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

cells – and this was found to be responsible for creating the ageing conditions. The research team established that the NOX2 enzyme generates superoxide which drives the ageing process. By inhibiting NOX2, researchers showed the reduction in aged neighbouring nonmalignant cells resulted in slower cancer growth. Dr Rushworth said: “It was not previously known that leukaemia induces ageing of the local non cancer environment. “We hope that this biological function can be exploited in future, paving the way for new drugs.”

The ward winners H

ELPING hospital volunteers to have as positive an effect on patients’ lives as possible is the aim of a new national programme.

And a Merseyside hospital trust is one of 12 countrywide chosen to join the Volunteering Innovators Programme to identify the best volunteer schemes and spread them through the NHS. The award-winning team of volunteers at Royal and Broadgreen University Hospitals Trust in Liverpool has signed up with Helpforce, the organisation working with hospitals to enhance the benefits of volunteering across the health service. A successful palliative care service was piloted at the Trust in 2012. Since then the service has proven to be an essential addition to the nursing care on the wards, providing emotional support and a spiritual presence to dying patients and loved ones. The volunteers provide companionship to

Seach for our hospitals’ very best volunteers

dying patients with few or no visitors, offering reassurance and a connection to the community outside the hospital. Volunteers also support families who are unable to visit or those who are emotionally exhausted and in need of a break from their bedside vigil. Following the success of the pilot, the service was extended throughout the trust and has been integrated in the 12-bed academic palliative care unit. The service has also been awarded the Queen’s Award for Volunteering and Macmillan’s Deborah Hutton Award for excellence in Volunteering.

The Trust will work with Helpforce over the next 18 months to develop volunteer innovations that will be refined and shared to help other trusts in the UK adopt effective volunteer services. The Royal and Broadgreen was selected following a competitive process which saw Helpforce receive 115 applications from 90 trusts. As part of Helpforce’s work with hospital trusts, 10 will be funded by NHS England and two by the Royal Voluntary Service. The 10 funded by the NHS England grant will each receive a £75,000 grant, and all 12 will have access to a range of supporting services, digital tools, resources and guidance. Alison Germain-Martin, volunteer services manager at the Trust said, “I am so proud of the amazing work of our palliative care volunteers, their commitment and compassion is truly remarkable.”

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MEDICAL NOTES

Who says bacteria is so bad for you?

BACTERIA –often linked to infection and disease –may have an unfair reputation. Research indicates there are as many, if not more, bacterial cells in our bodies as human cells, meaning they play an important role in our physiology. In fact, a growing body of evidence shows that greater gut microbiota diversity (the number of different species and evenness of these species’ populations) is related to better health. Now, research that’s been published in Experimental Physiology has suggested that the efficiency with which we transport oxygen to our tissues (cardiorespiratory fitness) is a far greater predictor of gut microbiota diversity than either body fat percentage or general physical activity. The findings suggest that exercise at a sufficiently high intensity, to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, may support health through favourable alterations in the presence, activity and clustering of gut microbes.

Cholesterol hope

THE enzyme that loads up fatcarrying particles in the liver before they are transported around the body has been identified for the first time. The discovery by scientists at the University of Warwick also reveals how to slim down these particles to reduce the amount of the worst type of bad cholesterol distributed throughout the body and could pave the way for new treatments to prevent heart disease and strokes.

Muscles in the bank!

THE old advice to “use it or lose it” tells us that if you stop using your muscles, they’ll shrink. Until recently, scientists thought this meant that nuclei – the cell control centres that build and maintain muscle fibers – are also lost to inactivity. But according to a review published in Frontiers in Physiology, modern lab techniques now allow us to see that nuclei gained during training persist even when muscle cells shrink due to disuse or start to break down. These residual “myonuclei” allow more and faster growth when muscles are retrained – suggesting that we can “bank” muscle growth potential in our teens to prevent frailty in old age. It also suggests that athletes who cheat and grow their muscles with steroids may go undetected. www.frontiersin.org/ articles

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April/May 2019

Apr 6-22: Wizard of Oz. Theatre Royal, St Helens. Enchanting panto returns for Easter 2019! Apr 6: Steve Steinman’s Vampires Rock. Opera House, Manchester. Apr 7: An Audience with Simon Reeve. Opera House, Manchester. The world-famous journalist recount tales from over 15 years of travelling. Apr 7: Francis Rossi: I talk too much. Charter Theatre, Preston. Founder, lead singer and lead guitarist of Status Quo talking of his mishaps and adventures of life on the road. Apr 7: An Afternoon with Brian Blessed. The Lowry. Apr 7: Seven Drunken Nights. Grand Theatre, Blackpool.The Story of The Dubliners. Apr 8-9: The Little Mermaid. The Brindley, Runcorn. Out of this world family musical. Apr 8-13: Abigail’s Party. Opera House, Manchester. Mike Leigh’s iconic comedy. Apr 8-13: Hair the Musical. Palace, Manchester. Relive the summer of love! Apr 8-13: Benidorm Live. Venue Cymru, Llandudno. Apr 8-15: The Lady Vanishes. Regent, Stoke. Husband and wife Juliet Mills and Maxwell Caulfield lead the star cast. Audio described, BSL April 13, 2.30. Apr 9-13: Matthew Bourne’s Swan Lake. Liverpool Empire. Apr 9-13: Avenue Q. Floral Pavilion, New Brighton. Musical treat. Apr 9-13: Blood Brothers. The Lowry. Apr 9-13: The Verdict. Grand Theatre, Blackpool.The gripping and critically acclaimed courtroom sensation. Apr 12: Roy Orbison & The Traveling Wilburys Tribute Show. Pavilion, Rhyl. Apr 12-14: Romeo & Juliet. The Brindley, Runcorn. A spectacular evening of dance. Apr 14: Art Garfunkel: An Evening of Songs and Stories. The Lowry. Apr 14: An Evening with Katya Zamolodchikova. Opera House, Manchester. Apr 14: Saba Douglas Hamilton - A Life With Elephants. Lyceum, Crewe. Apr 14: Seven Drunken Nights. Palace, Manchester. The story of the Dubliners. Apr 14: The Illegal Eagles. Grand Theatre, Blackpool. Apr 15: Seven Drunken Nights. Empire Liverpool.The Story of The Dubliners. Apr 15: Real Diamond. Lyceum, Crewe. The Jazz Singer Tour. Apr15-27: Orpheus Descending. Theatr Clwyd, Mold. Tennessee Williams’ deep-south American drama. Apr 15-20: Blood Brothers. Venue Cymru, Llandudno. Apr 15-20: Fame the Musical. Regent Stoke. The definitive 30th-anniversary

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BOX OFFICE CONTACTS

BLACKPOOL Grand Theatre: 01253 290190 BOLTON Octagon: 01204 520661 CREWE Lyceum: 01270 368 242 LIVERPOOL Empire: 08444 999 999 Everyman & Playhouse: 0151 709 4776 Royal Court: 0870 787 1866 Unity 0151 709 4988 LLANDUDNO Venue Cymru: 01492 872000 MOLD: Theatr Clwyd: 0845 3303565 MANCHESTER Opera House: 0870 401 9000 Palace: 0870 401 3000

SALFORD The Lowry: 0843 208 6000 NEW BRIGHTON Floral Pavilion: 0151 666 0000 PRESTON: Charter Theatre: 0845 344 2012 RHYL: Pavilion: 01745 330 000 RUNCORN The Brindley: 0151 907 8360 SOUTHPORT: Floral Hall: 0844 847 2380 ST HELENS: Theatre Royal: 01744 756000 STOKE: Regent Theatre: 0844 871 7627

Put on your dancing shoes

C

ANDOCO, the company of disabled and non-disabled dancers, are offering FREE places on a residential intensive course for young dancers in the summer. The move follows Candoco’s recent appearance as the first contemporary dance company to guest on BBC TV’s Strictly Come Dancing – and a new partnership with fashion group ASOS. Charlotte Darbyshire,

artistic co-director, said: “There is so much physical talent and artistic potential out there among young disabled and non-disabled adults and a huge demand for wider representation in the dance sector and yet, there is simply not enough access to training or routes into the profession.” Auditions are in May. n Dancers interested in applying should contact learning@candoco.co.uk tel, 020 7704 6845

BOOK YOUR SEATS! Compiled by CHRIS GROVES

tour of Fame the Musical starring Keith Jack. Audio described, BSL April 20, 2.30. Apr 15-16: The Illegal Eagles. The Brindley, Runcorn. Apr 17-21: Tom Gates Live on Stage. Liverpool Empire. An exciting and hilarious adventure that sends Tom’s world spinning! Apr 17-20: Shen Yun. The Lowry. An inspiring journey through one of humanity’s greatest treasures—the five millennia of traditional Chinese culture. Apr 18: Hormonal Housewives. Lyceum, Crewe. A seriously funny evening – what these women can’t teach you about modern womanhood isn’t worth knowing. Apr 18-19: The Easter Panto Spectacular – Beauty and the Beast. Pavilion, Rhyl. Apr 19-20: Thriller Live. Southport Theatre. Apr 19: Joe Longthorne. Lyceum, Crewe. Apr 20: Black Magic - The Little Mix Show. Lyceum, Crewe. A highly energetic tribute show

that follows in the footsteps of the award winning girl band, Little Mix. Apr 21-Jun1: Motown the Musical. Regent, Stoke. The music that made history and defined the sound of a generation. Apr 22-27: Dirty Dancing. Palace, Manchester. The classic story on stage. Apr 23: Wannabe - The Spice Girls Show. Opera House, Manchester. Apr 23-27: Home, I’m Darling. The Lowry. One woman’s quest to be the perfect 1950’s housewife. Apr 23-27: Mindgame. Lyceum, Crewe. A mind bending psychological thriller from the pen of Anthony Horowitz. Apr 23-27: Ghost - The Musical. Liverpool Empire. Apr 24: Welsh National Opera: Un ballo in maschera, Verdi. Venue Cymru, Llandudno. Apr 25: Welsh National Opera: The Magic Flute, Mozart. Venue Cymru, Llandudno. Apr 25-27. Wind in the Willows. The Brindley, Runcorn. Apr 26: Welsh National Opera:Roberto Devereux, Donizetti. Venue Cymru, Llandudno. Apr 26-May 11: The King and I. Opera House, Manchester. BSL May 8, 7.30. Audio

described May 9, 7.30. Apr 28: George Hinchcliffe’s Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain The Lowry. Apr 28: Michael Ball. Liverpool Empire. Apr 29-May 4: The Rocky Horror Show. Liverpool Empire. Richard O’Brien’s legendary rock ‘n’ roll musical. Apr 30-May 4: Educating Rita. The Lowry. Willy Russell’s classic play. Apr 30-May 4: In the Willows. Grand Theatre, Blackpool. Hip-Hop Musical of Wind in the Willows. Apr 30: Wet Wet Wet. Charter Theatre, Preston. Apr 30: Coppelia: Vienna Festival Ballet. Floral Pavilion, New Brighton. May 1: Cannon & Ball. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 2: Just Like That! The Tommy Cooper Show. The Brindley, Runcorn. May 3: Totally Tina. Pavilion, Rhyl. The longest running tribute to the legendary Queen of Rock and Roll. May 3-4: Strictly Come Dancing - The Professionals 2019 The Lowry. Manchester. The brand new 80s Musical from the producers of the hit UK tour of Hairspray.

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April/May 2019

All Together NOW!

investigation into The Whitechapel Murders of 1888, May 18: Joe Loss Orchestra. Southport Theatre.The Joe Loss Orchestra has been in operation since 1930 and has never disbanded or reformed. May 19: Solid Gold Rock ‘n’ Roll. Grand Theatre, Blackpool. Marty Wilde’s celebrating his 80th birthday, together with a whole host of other singers May 19: Islands in the Stream. Liverpool Empire. Enjoy the songs of the Queen and King of country music - Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers. May 19: Welsh National Opera Orchestra. Venue Cymru, Llandudno. A concert programme of Grieg, Mahler and Tchaikovsky. May 19: Milkshake Monkey’s Musical: Milkshake! – Live. Floral Pavilion, New Brighton. May 20: Ian McKellen - On Stage. Grand Theatre, Blackpool.. BSL performance. May 20-25. Hair the Musical. Liverpool Empire. Come join the tribe and relive the summer of love! May 21: Elvis Tribute Artist World Tour. Opera House, Manchester. Direct from the USA, the world’s biggest, best and most successful Elvis Tribute show. Youens Way, Liverpool L14 2EP groups of all time. OP tribute group Rumours of May 24. Death and the Maiden. You can also email your entry at Personally endorsed by founding member Fleetwood Mac are back with The Brindley, Runcorn. Gripping competition@alltogethernow.org.uk Mick Fleetwood, Rumours of Fleetwood their ‘Anniversary Tour’ – a high drama, with great intensity, this Please insert RUMOURS in the subject Mac is the ultimate tribute to one of rock brand new show celebrating 50 years is a unique and first-rate thriller. line and remember to include your full and roll’s most remarkable groups. of the best music from the iconic rock May 25-26: My First Ballet: address and a phone number. As in previous shows, there is also a very band. Sleeping Beauty. Opera House, special blues set paying tribute to n Sat 20 Apr: Liverpool Philharmonic Manchester. Give children a first And we have TWO PAIRS of tickets to be Fleetwood Mac’s legendary Peter Green Hall (deadline Friday 12 April) taste of the magical world of ballet. won for FIVE gigs taking place in shows era. n Wed 1 May: Salford The Lowry (deadline May 26: Nights on Broadway across the North West and in North Wales. To have a chance of winning a pair of The Bee Gees Story. Liverpool Friday 19 April) Channelling the spirit of Fleetwood Mac, tickets just tell us who founded Fleetwood Empire. Featuring the Gibb Brothers n Sun 5 May: Llandudno Venue the show offers a great opportunity for fans, incredible songs from over four Mac – and which gig you would prefer to Cymru (deadline Friday 26 April) both old and new, to rediscover the songs decades. attend. Entries please to: RFM Competition, n Fri 24 May: New Brighton Floral and performances that have ensured the May 26: Carpenters Gold. The All Together NOW! The Bradbury Centre, Pavilion (deadline Friday 17 May) band’s place as one of the most loved Brindley, Runcorn. Carpenters Gold authentically perform their greatest hits. May 29: Menopause – The Musical. Floral Pavilion, New Brighton. Hysterical and May 4: That’ll Be The Day. Venue Cymru, Crewe. A brand new show full of opera, May 12: Elkie Brooks. Southport Theatre. uplifting show is packed full of oneLlandudno. Living proof that Rock & Roll will classical, West End and crossover as well as Referred to as ‘the Queen of British Blues’, she liners. never die! their unique, unrivalled on-stage banter. has had over a dozen UK hit singles. May 30: The Carpenters Story. May 4: Menopause – The Musical. Charter May 10: Turn Back Time - A Tribute to Cher. May 13: The Johnny Cash Roadshow. Opera House, Manchester. This highly Theatre, Preston. Hysterical and uplifting show The Brindley, Runcorn. Liverpool Empire. A musical adventure acclaimed concert-style production continues to packed full of one-liners. May 10: An Evening with Katherine Jenkins. unrivalled by any other that truly celebrates the captivate audiences. May 5: Daniel O’Donnell. Southport Theatre. Venue Cymru, Llandudno. career of a music legend. Jun 1: Twist and Shout. Pavilion, Rhyl. An May 5: Rumours of Fleetwood Mac. Venue May 10: Hormonal Housewives. May 13-18: The Mousetrap. The Lowry. all-star cast from the West End deliver a Cymru, Llandudno. The world’s finest tribute Theatre Royal, St Helens. A seriously Deservedly a classic among murder thrillers. musical powerhouse of a show. to Fleetwood Mac. funny evening – what these women May 13-18. The House on Cold Hill. Opera Jun 1-2: Ben & Holly’s Little Kingdom. Opera May 6-11: Dirty Dancing, Liverpool Empire. can’t teach you about modern House, Manchester. Modern day supernatural House, Manchester. From the makers of Peppa The classic story on stage. BSL May, 7.30. womanhood isn’t worth knowing. thriller that will send shivers down your spine. Pig comes this BAFTA award-winning television May 7: Menopause the Musical. Venue May 11: Northern Ballet’s Puss in Boots. May 14-18: Annie. Venue Cymru, Llandudno. animation,live on stage! Cymru, Llandudno. The ultimate girls night out. Grand Theatre, Blackpool. Starring Strictly Come Dancing judge Craig Jun 2: Ruby Wax. The Lowry. The follow up to May 7-11: Much Ado About Nothing. The May 11: Julian Clary – Born to Mince. Revel Horwood as Miss Hannigan. Ruby’s sell out shows ‘Sane New World’ and Lowry. Six years of war are over. Returning May 16-18: Hello Dolly. Liverpool Empire. Lyceum, Crewe. ‘Frazzled’. soldiers swap the battlefield for a landscape of Musical comedy at its best. A lavish must-see May 12: Lipstick on your Collar. Lyceum, Jun 3-8: The Rocky Horror Show. Regent, love, masked balls and laughter. show, featuring great songs and spectacular Crewe. Step back in time to the golden era of Stoke. Richard O’Brien’s legendary rock ‘n’ roll May 8: Charlie Landsborough. Lyceum, dancing. music where the jukebox roared and feet didn’t musical. Touch tour June 7. 3.45. Audio May 17: Liverpool Legends. Theatre Royal St Theatre. The Farewell Tour. touch the floor. described 5.30. June 8, BSL – 5.30. Helens. The Ultimate evening with John May 9: Psychic Sally. Lyceum, Crewe. 10 Year May 12: Imagine. Charter Theatre, Preston. Jun 3-8: Club Tropicana. Opera House, Aldridge, Ronnie Whelan and Steve McMahon Anniversary Tour. The story of John Lennon’s dramatic rise to Manchester. The brand on stage together. May 9: May 28: Strictly Come Dancing – The fame. new 80s Musical from May 17: Jack The Ripper - The Real Truth: Professionals. Venue Cymru, Llandudno. This May 12: The Simon and Garfunkel Story. the producers of the hit Trevor Marriott. The Brindley, Runcorn. Trevor glamorous production brings together some of Grand Theatre, Blackpool. UK tour of Hairspray. Marriott is a retired murder squad detective who the much-loved Strictly Professional dancers. May 12: Soul Legends. Liverpool Empire. has carried out long and protracted reMay 10: The Opera Boys in Concert. Lyceum, Featuring special guest Lemar!

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Books

A mum’s story to her daughter

‘Can I tell you about Nystagmus?’ by Nadine Neckless, Amazon

NADINE Neckles is a blogger and life coachl. She is also mum and full-time carer to her six year-old daughter who has Nystagmus and Chromosome 18q – a rare genetic eye condition. Nadine explains: “As a parent, I wanted to write a book that was accessible to children, hence the decision to tell the story through the eyes of Amber, a seven year-old, black British girl.” The book is an enjoyable, easy and upbeat read. It includes a practical checklist of easy adaptations to make school or home environments easier and more enjoyable for children with nystagmus, as well as a helpful list of recommended resources for additional support.

Think of their futures

April/May 2019

ARIES (March 21st-April 20th)

CHILDHOOD obesity is a serious issue, but one that can be helped with a change in attitude and knowledge. Foresight, a Government-sponsored project, has predicted that by 2050 a quarter of all Britain’s children will be obese. It’s, therefore, in the interest of every parent to make sure that their child is not storing up problems for the future. This easy to read book can set parents on the right path to healthy eating and empower them with helpful information and tips. In addition to being informative, the book gives quick recipes for busy parents with wonderful ideas for snacks and meals.

heads are definitely better than one at the beginning of May. While you forge a new path, your partner will create a stable environment that makes it easier to take risks. The Full Moon on the 18th will prompt you to leave a role that no longer serves you. Stop trying to satisfy others at the end of the month. Your first loyalty is to yourself. If this means turning your back on a toxic situation, so be it.

You want to take on a different role at the beginning of April, but there are people around you hoping to block your path. If you are going to strike in another direction, there will be consequences. You may be at the point that you do not care. If that’s the case, get ready for some fireworks. There are people around you who will try making life very difficult for you. An unusual moneymaking opportunity will become available on May 4th, courtesy of the New Moon. Opportunities will arise out of the blue. You might have a chance to move into a cutting-edge field. On the 18th, the Full Moon will bring an intimate relationship to a head. A difference of opinion will spark a loud argument.

SAGITTARIUS (November 23rd-December

TAURUS (April 21st-May 21st)

Working behind the scenes will be stressful at the beginning of April. On the 19th, the Full Moon will help you wrap up a work project that attracts lots of favourable attention. Don’t be afraid of meeting April’s challenges. They have been sent to move you into a better position. May’s New Moon on the 4th invites you to make a radical transformation. This would be a wonderful time to go for a complete image update and take on a whole new style. An agreement will come to an end when neither party can find common ground on the 18th. That’s when the Full Moon will shed light on deep rifts between you and your best friend, romantic partner or work associate.

GEMINI (May 22nd-June 21st)

Coming to a troubled person’s rescue won’t resolve their problems. This troubled person has to answer for their behaviour. On the 19th, the Full Moon will showcase your creative talent. You’ll have a chance to sell your handiwork for a handsome profit. While this may not be a stable source of income, it will bring in some much-needed extra cash at the end of April. May’s New Moon will prompt you to take a break from your daily routine. An unpleasant routine will come to an end on or around the 18th. That’s when a tense Full Moon will make you choose between duty and happiness. Delegating a job to a relative or colleague will be difficult, but relinquishing this chore will give you more time for the people and activities you love.

CANCER (June 22nd-July 23rd)

The Essential Guide to Child Obesity, Need2Know Books, Amazon

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You have tremendous leadership ability. Your path will become clearer after the 19th, when the Full Moon will help you sew up a real estate matter. It will be possible to spend more quality time with your family. There’s the added bonus of creating an office environment that lifts your spirits and lets your creative juices flow freely. April is your chance to strike out on your own. You’ll be asked to join an exciting club on May 4th, thanks to the friendly New Moon. The Full Moon on the 18th will mark an unfortunate loss. A prospect that seemed like a sure thing will fall through, causing disappointment. Resist the temptation to lash out at the person who asked you to take this risk.

LEO (July 24th-August 23rd)

Legal problems could block your path at the beginning of the month. You’ll fare much better colouring inside the lines than defying authority. If you are hit with a lawsuit, think about settling out of court. On the 19th, the Full Moon will prompt you to put some newly acquired skills to use. The New Moon on May 4th marks an unusual career opportunity. Family life will become tense on the 18th, due to a contentious Full Moon. Your relatives will resent all the energy you’ve been pouring into work. If you’re going to be successful, you must strike a

RUSSELL GRANT CALLING . . .

healthy balance between your personal and professional lives. When you promise to attend family gatherings, recitals and games, keep your word.

VIRGO (August 24th-September 23rd)

Financial matters are high on the agenda and will put strain on relationships bound by money. The Full Moon on the 19th will improve your economic situation. Buying or selling a piece of property will put you in a much stronger position. If you don’t have money for a down payment, a generous relative will come to your rescue. May’s New Moon on the 4th will allow you to broaden your outlook. Going on an overseas trip, getting an advanced degree or starting a whole new project will bring great happiness. The Full Moon on the 18th will make you feel pressed for time. It may be impossible to finish your list of chores. If this is the case, it’s time to delegate jobs to others.

LIBRA (September 24th-October 23rd)

There are tensions in your personal life. If you’re in a relationship, your other half will embarrass you with their wild and rebellious ways. The Full Moon on the 19th emphasises the importance of satisfying your own needs. Use this opportunity to take a college course for pleasure, go on a short trip or finish an important project. Satisfying your intellectual curiosity will strengthen your self-esteem. The second half of April invites you to stop expecting others to satisfy your needs. The New Moon on May 4th brings a windfall that turns your financial situation around. On the 18th, the Full Moon will present an ethical dilemma. It’s important to obey your conscience.

SCORPIO (October 24th-November 22nd)

A work assignment you receive in early April will be difficult to complete. It’s time to put an end to all the in-fighting and back stabbing. On the 19th, the Full Moon urges you to take a break. Sneaking off to a private hideaway will allow you to reflect on where your direction. Two

21st)Financial difficulties could be taking a toll on your union. The Full Moon on the 19th is ideal for attending a festive occasion. There’s a good chance you’ll meet someone who finds you utterly charming. A wonderful offer will arrive on or around May 4th, thanks to an enriching New Moon. This will be a great opportunity to build a nest egg. Although you’re not especially materialistic, you will benefit from having a financial cushion. Being able to travel, write and study without having to worry about money will be liberating. On the 18th, the Full Moon brings an embarrassing secret to light.

CAPRICORN (December 22nd-January 20th)

There will be tension on the home front. Everyone is resisting your authority. You won’t be able to rein in someone who is intent on going their own way. On the 19th, the Full Moon marks an important milestone. You’ll enjoy calling the shots for a change. The first half of May will make you feel like you’ve been reborn. On the 18th, the Full Moon will prompt you to break off a troubled alliance. A group you once loved has changed its tune. You no longer want to be part of its extremism. Walking away will be difficult. You’ll miss certain members who will be upset by your defection. Your first loyalty should be to yourself.

AQUARIUS (January 21st-February 19th

)Someone who has been posing as your friend could be exposed as your enemy. Don’t let feelings of bitterness and betrayal consume you. It’s much wiser to pour your energy into people and relationships that support and sustain you. Don’t be surprised when your popularity soars. Use your connections to realise a lifelong dream. You’re tired of letting negative people drag you down. May will bring some exciting changes. Relocating to a beautiful part of the world is a distinct possibility. If you don’t move, you will welcome a new member to your household. There will be a turning point on the 18th, due to a tense Full Moon.

PISCES (February 20th-March 20th)

A moneymaking opportunity has strings attached, but money from an investment, insurance refund or legal settlement will arrive on or around the 19th. That’s when the Full Moon strengthens your financial situation. During early May someone will contact you out of the blue. They’ll have an exciting offer you can’t refuse. On the 18th, the Full Moon will bring an end to a legal matter, business trip or a period of study and learning. You’ll be less than satisfied with the results. A difference of opinion will stop you from reaching a lofty goal. Good things will come out of this situation, but it will take some time before you can see these benefits.

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April/May 2019

All Together NOW!

We’ve got 10 Yummy prizes to be won

IF YOU think raspberries cannot be grown on a patio – think again. Breakthrough dwarf variety Yummy from Suttons is perfect for a pot and we have TEN, worth £9.99 each, to give away. Raspberry Yummy has been bred to remain compact and fruitful. It also produces fruit in the first year unlike most varieties for which you have to wait until the year after planting. Supplied 15cm20cm (6in-8in tall) in a 12cm pot, raspberry Yummy grows to a height of 45cm (18in) and produces sweet and juicy deep red berries over a long period through summer. It will grow best if transplanted carefully on arrival into rich compost such as a mixture including John Innes No 3 in a pot 30cm (12in) in diameter.

No complicated pruning is needed to keep growth in check. Last year’s stems can be left to start early fruiting although I would expect a bigger, if slightly later, crop if the old fruited stems are cut down. To enter the competition, answer this question: How tall does raspberry Yummy grow? Send your entry with your name and address on a postcard or sealed envelope, stating where you picked up your copy of All Together NOW!, to Yummy Competition, All Together NOW!, The Bradbury Centre, Youens Way, Liverpool L14 2EP, to arrive by Friday, May 24, or enter online at www.alltogethernow.org.uk n www.suttons.co.uk

ALL BOXED OFF!

Guide to growing in containers

CHECKLIST

DECORATIVE AND DELICIOUS – flowers and strawberries grown in containers

C

ONTAINERS can be the gardener’s best friend. They are a special blessing to people with small gardens or living in tower blocks, enabling them to decorate their courtyards or balconies and even raise small crops of fruit, herbs or vegetables. Plants will flourish in many kinds of container – pots, tubs and even polystyrene boxes – as long as they are well drained and reasonably large. For summer-long decoration, plan ahead by buying plugs of your favourite FLOWERS such as petunias, lobelias and trailing pelargoniums (geraniums) and growing them in pots under glass, on a warm, bright windowsill or in a porch. Leave it until mid-May before planting them out in their containers. Feed them weekly with a liquid fertiliser high in potash (potassium). Water by soaking thoroughly when the compost is nearly dry. Once the first flowers start to die, dead-head them – trim them off. This is because plants produce flowers in an attempt to set seed and reproduce themselves. Once seeds have formed and start to ripen, flowering is reduced or stops altogether, as in the case of sweet peas and pansies, but when deadheading takes place, plants detect what has

happened and set about producing new flowers. The best containers for fruit and vegetables in my experience are those made of robust plastic. For herbs, most of which like very good drainage, terracotta is better. A good source of soil or compost is needed to start then, for the next few years, the old compost can be refreshed with a granular general fertiliser and the top few inches renewed. In the past, strawberries are the only FRUIT I have grown consistently well in containers. Plant just five or six to a large pot and do not be tempted to cram in any extra plants. This year I am looking forward to fruit from the new dwarf raspberry variety Yummy – win one in our competition on this page. Many VEGETABLES can be grown. Early crops of radishes and salad onions will succeed in standard seed trays, though I have made deeper trays from some old planks of wood for even better crops. The radish French Breakfast is reliable and I

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am trying the variety Solito which is looking good. Any good salad onion variety, such as Ishikura or Guardsman, will thrive. The length of each vegetable’s roots is key to choosing pots of appropriate depth. Tomatoes have shallow but widespread roots which is why they can be cultivated quite well in growing bags while the variety Gardener’s Delight will be happy in a wide, fairly deep containers. Pots 30cm (12in) deep are adequate for round beetroot, peppers, onions and shallots planted as sets rather than sown, and small lettuces, especially Little Gem Maureen, a selected strain of the famous old Little Gem variety. Containers 45cm (18in) deep are needed for most types of carrot, dwarf peas and French beans. HERBS are among the easiest to grow in wide, medium-depth pots, whether perennials like mint, chives and tarragon or annuals such as basil, coriander and rocket. Enjoy!

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FLOWERS: When the flowers of daffodils, tulips and other spring bulbs fade, spray or water them with a liquid feed once a fortnight until the leaves start to die down. In a warm spell in April, plant perennial flowers such as lupins and dahlias. PATIOS: Plant up tubs and hanging baskets in May or in April if under glass. Protect them at night until the risk of frost has passed. SHRUBS AND TREES: Prune shrubs that have finished flowering. Cut out dead wood, weak growth and crossing branches then trim to keep the shape balanced. Do not prune shrubs and trees that have still to flower this year. LAWNS: Spike lawns, especially if they are damp or mossy, then apply a spring lawn feed, mosskiller or lawn weedkiller as appropriate. Combined formulations are available. For maximum effect, let the grass grow for a week before applying. When moss turns black, generally after a fortnight, rake it out of the lawn. PONDS: Water lilies and other pond species need feeding just like any other plant: use special pond fertiliser pellets pushed down into the roots. April is ideal for pump and filter maintenance so fish and wildlife get the benefit of clear water throughout the summer. FRUIT: Where apples or pears have been infested with grubs, spray with an insecticide when the blossoms are in bud and again when the petals have fallen. VEGETABLES: Most vegetables can be sown outdoors In April but leave French and runner beans until mid or late May. HOUSEPLANTS: Water more freely, feed regularly and do not leave plants in full sun all day except for types really suited to hot conditions.


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28

April/May 2019

The Accumulator Quiz

STARSPOT CROSSWORD Can you find the celebrity name hidden in this Starspot Crossword? Complete the crossword in the normal way then make a note of the letters contained in all the squares which are marked with shaded stars. These letters will make an anagram of the name you are looking for. 1

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1. Perform without preparation (9) 9. Open with a key (6) 10. Arrogant person (4) 11. Musical pipe (4) 12. Ticket, label (6) 13. Venerated (7) 16. Parched (4) 17. ---- and Cromarty (4) 18. Remains of fire (3) 20. At present (3) 21. Lofty (4) 23. Machine-gun (4) 25. Stopping (7) 26. Singer (anag.) (6) 29. Skating floor (4) 30. Work hard (4) 31. Source (6) 32. Great need (9)

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 13. 14. 15. 18. 19. 22. 23. 24. 27. 28.

chosen answers and keep a record of your points total. Maximum total points 120. QUESTION 1 – for 1 point: According to legend, where was the American folk hero Davy Crockett killed?

QUESTION 10 – for 10 points: What type of plant or creature is a death cap?

A B C D

A B C D

A B C D

28 29

Each question has four possible answers and is worth from one to 15 points. Circle your

The Alamo Fort Worth Fort Knox Castle Clinton

Method (6) Stole (6) Church caretaker (6) Prosecuted (4) Sanction (7) Cut short (4) Drawing (9) Mackintosh (9) Opinion (4) Bread paste (5) Opposed to (4) Vexation (7) Comb for flax (6) Social position (6) Join the military (6) Lower leg (4) ---- men’s morris (4)

Butterfly Front crawl Breaststroke Backstroke

A B C D

Lily pad Palm Cushion Frog

QUESTION 3 – for 3 points: What type of vegetable is a savoy?

QUESTION 12 – for 12 points: Which frozen gas is also known as dry ice?

A B C D

A B C D

Potato Runner bean Carrot Cabbage

English singer George Ezra. See Question 8

QUESTION 4 – for 4 points: What is a monocle?

QUESTION 7 – for 7 points: What is the main fruit ingredient of banoffee pie?

A B C D

A B C D

A telescope A single eyeglass A strand of synthetic fibre A person who only speaks one language

QUESTION 5 – for 5 points: How many fluid ounces are there in a pint? A B C D

Sixteen Twenty Twenty-two Twenty-four

QUESTION 6 – for 6 points: What colour flag was historically used to signal quarantine on board a ship? A B C D

Red Black Grey Yellow

Carbon dioxide Oxygen Nitrogen Helium

QUESTION 13 – for 13 points: The first day of which month is known as All Saints’ Day?

Bananas Apples Strawberries Blackberries

A B C D

QUESTION 8 – for 8 points: English singer George Ezra had a hit song that shared its name with which European city? A B C D

SUDOKU

January March October November

QUESTION 14 – for 14 points: Which country lies closest to the North Pole? A B C D

Amsterdam Berlin Budapest Paris

Russia Canada Greenland Iceland

QUESTION 9 – for 9 points: Where is the area historically known as The Barbary Coast, once a haunt of pirates?

QUESTION 15 – for 15 points: Which novel by Charles Dickens features a pub called the Pegasus’s Arms?

A B C D

A B C D

North Africa The West Indies The Bay of Biscay The Red Sea

The Old Curiosity Shop Hard Times Oliver Twist Great Expectations

KAKURO

There is just one simple rule in Sudoku. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9, and so must each 3 x 3 box. This is a logic puzzle, and you should not have to guess.

EASY

4 2 9 9 7 5 3 1 5 8 9 6 2 3 1 9 6 7 4 1 2 7 2 4 3 7 1 3 4 8

A snake A spider A mushroom A jellyfish

QUESTION 11 – for 11 points: What is the name for the fleshy underside of a horse’s hoof?

QUESTION 2 – for 2 points: What is the fastest swimming stroke?

18

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DIFFICULT

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Each number in our Cross Code grid represents a different letter of the alphabet. You have three letters in the control grid to start you off. Enter them in the appropriate squares in the main grid, then use your knowledge of words to work out which letters should go in the missing squares. As you get the letters, fill in other squares with the same number in the main grid and control grid. Check off the alphabetical list of letters as you identify them.

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PATHWORDS

SPOT CHECK

Starting from the central shaded letter, move one letter at a time (up, down, right or left, but not diagonally) to find 20 cricketing terms.

Can you place the six dominoes (right) into the grid below in such a way that the number of spots in all four rows across and all four rows down totals 10?

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DIALLING CODES

CROSS CODE 

All Together NOW!

April/May 2019

2. Pontiac, chief of the Ottowa Indians, surrenders to the British after the siege of Detroit.

3) A Native American people comprising the westernmost branch of the Sioux.

3. John Wilkes is expelled from the House of Commons after publishing his paper Essay On Women.

Add the given letter to the first word to make a new word. Clue: Make very warm welcome to house.

WAS IT? a) 1724; b) 1744; c) 1764; d) 1784; e) 1804.

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ALL THE ANSWERS Pathwords – square leg; googly; stump; umpire; bail; bye; innings; boundary; ball; run out; crease; third man; over; fielder; duck; wicket-keeper; bouncer; century; drive; cut.

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3 4

8 2 10

Accumulator Quiz 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A; 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; B; 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D; 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; B; 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; B; 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D; 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A; 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; C; 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A; 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; C; 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D; 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A; 13 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D; 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; C; 15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; B. Starspot Crossword Across â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 Improvise; 9 Unlock; 10 Snob; 11 Reed; 12 Docket; 13 Revered; 16 Arid; 17 Ross; 18 Ash; 20 Now; 21 High; 23 Sten; 25 Halting; 26 Resign; 29 Rink; 30 Toil; 31 Origin; 32 Necessity. Down â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 Manner; 3 Robbed; 4 Verger; 5 Sued; 6 Endorse; 7 Dock; 8 Sketching; 13 Rainproof; 14 View; 15 Dough; 18 Anti; 19 Chagrin; 22 Hackle; 23 Status; 24 Enlist; 27 Shin; 28 Nine. Star Name: ROBERT REDFORD

Word Wizard No 1 is correct. A lagena is a bottle. Dialling Codes 1. swimming pool; theatre; football stadium; bingo hall; snooker club; cinema; nightclub; skating rink; restaurant. 2. teapot; dinner plate; ash tray; flower pot; coffee cup; chafing dish; piggy bank; gravy boat; sugar bowl; flagon. 3. credit cards; bus pass; money; house keys; wallet; cheque book; purse; shopping list; key ring; address book; biro. 4. genetics; virology; astronomy; botany; metrology; mechanics; oceanography; ergonomics; phonetics; radiology; optics.

5. Finland; United Kingdom; France; Italy; Germany; Luxembourg; Denmark; Greece; Slovenia; Belgium; Switzerland; Sweden. 6. Chamberlain; Callaghan; Peel; Baldwin; Attlee; Gladstone; Thatcher; Blair; Disraeli; Churchill; Wilson; Asquith; Eden. Spot Check A = 1; B = 5; C = 6; D = 2; E = 4; F = 3. Missing Link saddle; line; even; day; garden; easy. Transport: sledge. Make a Date The year was 1764. Transformer Hot + S = Host.

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All Together NOW!

April/May 2019

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‘The most inclusive English Open yet’

All set for para ice hockey season

THE 2019 British Para Ice Hockey League gets under way in May – without reigning champions Kingston Kestrels, who have surprisingly withdrawn from this year’s competitons. It leaves Manchester Mayhem, Cardiff Huskies, Peterborough Phantoms and Sheffield Steelkings all in with a fighting chance of glory. Manchester Mayhem’s opener is against Cardiff Huskies on Sunday 19 May, 6.15pm at Planet Ice, Altrincham. Then it’s an away trip to Peterborough on Sunday 1 June. Free admission to all games. n www.bpih.co.uk

Spinal games

THIS year’s Inter-Spinal Unit Games has attracted the biggest entry in its 30-year history. Almost 200 newly paralysed adults from 15 spinal injury units across the country – including Southport and Oswestry – are taking part in the fourday event, which goes ahead at Stoke Mandeville Stadium (8-12 April). n WheelPower: Tel. 01296 395995

Medals for all

PEOPLE who guide blind runners in the London Marathon (April 28) wll also be officially recognised and receive medals this year. National disability charity Sense has hailed the decision as recognition for the efforts of those who help navigate visually impaired participants around the worldrenowned route.

TERRY IN THE HOT SEAT!

T

WENTY-FIVE years ago, when a tumour cost keen golfer Terry Kirby the use of his legs, he thought: “That’s it, I’ll never play again.”

Yet Terry, now 63, not only plays but has just made history as the first wheelchair golfer to become a club captain – certainly in England and probably worldwide. He’s taking on the role as a golfer. “I have never been treated any different from anyone else within the club,” said Terry. “When I first started some people thought they had to give concessions but I soon put a stop to that! I’m just treated as any other golfer. That’s how I want it.” He added: “I rock up and have a laugh and a joke and get the mickey taken out of me, just like anyone else.” Terry’s story is both inspirational and highlights the work of the charity for wheelchairs golfers, the Handigolf Foundation, which he chairs. He has taken the captaincy at Tapton Park Golf Club, Chesterfield, Derbyshire, something he would have believed impossible in 1994.

First golfer in a chair to be appointed club captain

A tumour in his spinal cord left him without the use of his legs. “Then, I was thinking that’s it, I’ll never play golf again and it was a total change in my life. But 25 years later I’m captain of a golf club,” he said. Handigolf, which is supported by England Golf, not only organises competitions but hires buggies to wheelchair users who want to get back on the fairway, or take up golf. Terry came across Handigolf when his physiotherapist spotted a flyer for a taster day. He went along and four weeks later was playing in his first disability competition. He returned the next year and won it! Terry enjoys all aspects of the game, but particularly the competition. He’s held a handful of national disability titles and has been a European title runner-up.

“There are other wheelchair sports,” says Terry. “But I always say golf is a sport for life, once you are into it, that’s it. “To be perfectly honest, golf has really kept me going. It’s been the mainstay of my life over the last 25 years.” He plays off a handicap of 26, saying “not bad for one arm and sitting down!” Jamie Blair, England Golf’s disability manager, said: “Congratulations to Terry and best wishes for a fantastic year as captain. It has been great to work with Terry over the past five years and see his passion for the game. “His captaincy will raise awareness of disability golf and the opportunities for people who previously played, but might have stopped due to injury or illness. Terry is proof that there is a way to adapt to make the game for all.” n You can find out more about why Terry plays and how he plays on the England Golf YouTube channel www.youtu.be/Yjk6koHfbGI n To find out about ways to return to golf email: development@englandgolf.org

ENTRIES have opened for the 2019 English Disability Open, which is being run solely by England Golf for the first time. The championship takes place on the Gainsborough course at Stoke by Nayland Golf Club, Essex, over the weekend of September 78 and will be played under the modified rules of golf for players with a disability. Among those expected to enter are defending champion Mick Horsley, (Marriot Breadsall Priory, Derbyshire) and the current No 1 on the World Ranking for Golfers with a Disability (WR4GD), George Groves, of Addington Palace Golf Club, Surrey. Now in its fourth year, the tournament is open to anyone with a visual, hearing or intellectual impairment, as well as players holding a European Disabled Golf Association (EDGA) Access or World Rankings Pass. Jamie Blair, disability manager for England Golf, said: “We’ve been working closely with EDGA to broaden the criteria and are proud that this event will be more inclusive than ever and is a national championship for golfers with a disability playing at our affiliated golf clubs and further afield.” n www.englandgolf.org

ENTRIES are also open for the The Sidey Scottish Pan-Disability Open 2019, taking place at Dalmahoy Golf & Country Club, East Championship Course Edinburgh (September 8-10) n www.scottishdgc.org.uk

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SUBSCRIBE! Back row, from left: Billy Mullins, Richard Gillette, Michael Mathieson and Thomas Halliwell. Front, from left: John Westwell, Lee Myers and James Rotherham pictured with LFCA referees Ray McLaughlin (left) and Jim Nolan and team coaches Donna Brannan and Karl Hughes

The magnificent seven referees

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EVEN disabled footballers have qualified as referees. The Dunningsbridge players, who compete in the Liverpool County FA Disability League, completed their law awareness courses at Greenbank Sports Academy in

GB go down narrowly in thrilling rugby final

south Liverpool. It means they can now officiate in any disability football match or tournament. The course focused on the 17 laws of football, and how these laws should be implemented by referees. The players were also given

advice on effective decision making, how misconduct should be reported and movement and positioning. Team coach and care worker Karl Hughes, at the New Directions South Hub in Netherton where the team is based, said: “The course has

given them another string to their bow, and also provided them with an insight into the challenges that referees face at all levels of the sport.” Richard Gillette, one of the newly qualified referees, said: “Now I’d like to work towards a coaching qualification.”

NAME

ADDRESS

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REAT Britain’s wheelchair rugby team lost by just two tries to Japan in a thrilling final of the King Power Quad Nations final in Leicester.

In a game jam-packed with everything that makes the sport such an exciting watch, spectators were on their feet as GB star athletes Aaron Phipps and Jim Roberts smashed into Yukinobu Ike as they tried to disrupt the playmaker whose height advantage and throw presented a real challenge to all teams. With the game looking evenly matched

All Together NOW! is helping and inspiring tens of thousands of people whose lives are affected by disability. But the charity needs to find ways to balance the books. You can help in a big way by becoming one of our loyal subscribers. For a suggested £15 donation (more, if you can afford it!) we will send you the next SIX editions.

throughout, GB ended the first half two tries up before errors in the third quarter cost them dearly. Japan, who showed the same composure and discipline that gave them their first world title in Sydney last summer, held out to win

the match 53-51. GB’s Phipps and Roberts won individual awards as the best in their class of all the teams competing. A record number of spectators attended the three-day tournament at Leicester’s Morningside Arena.

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OUR FREE and favourite All Together NOW! newspaper is getting BIGGER and BETTER – and making more and more friends!

110,000 copies of this edition are now finding their ways into homes all over the North West – and we have lots of people to thank for this, including fantastic support from some of our community-minded supermarkets. You can now pick up your paper from four more Asda stores (Cockhedge, Warrington; Hulme; Eastlands and Trafford) and from Sainsbury’s new Great Homer Street store in Liverpool. Hundreds of copies are also now flying out of Walkden Shopping Centre. Liz Cotterill, Asda Pride Network Ambassador at Warrington, said: “We love the ethos behind this paper. The All Together NOW! background video brought the charity alive to us.” HERE’S WHERE YOU CAN PICK UP YOUR FREE COPY 

Liz Cotterill at Asda, Cockhedge Centre

FORMBY TESCO, Altcar Road LIVERPOOL TESCO Deysbrook TESCO, Park Road ASDA Utting Avenue ASDA Breck Road ASDA Smithdown Rd ASDA Hunts Cross SAINSBURY’S Great

Homer Street, Liverpool SAINSBURYS Woolton KNOWSLEY & St HELENS ASDA Huyton Lane ASDA St Helens, Kirkland Street LEIGH, WIGAN ASDA Atherleigh Way RUNCORN

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Catharine Arnold, at Asda Trafford, said: “All Together NOW!’ is now regularly being picked up from a box by our Community Boards.” All Together NOW!’ is also a big hit at Asda Eastlands. Community workers Naomi McDonald and Lisa Casey say it’s a perfect way to reach and help customers. Meanwhile, Angela McIntosh, at Asda Hulme, said: ”It’s another way of us showing custmers that we really care.” Stephanie Brennan, PR Ambassador at Sainsbury’s Great Homer Street, Liverpool, said: “We are delighted to support this fantastic charity. The newspaper is going to be very popular with our customers.” n Want a box in your store? Call us now on 0151 230 0307 n Our backgrounds video is at: www.alltogethernow.org.uk ASDA West Lane SKELMERSDSLE ASDA Ingram Roas SOUTHPORT ASDA Derby Road WARRINGTON ASDA Cockhedge WIRRAL TESCO Bidston Moss ASDA, Bromborough

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Gareth Halliwell, manager, and Stephanie Brennan at Sainsbury’s Great Homer Street, Liverpool. Picture: KEN ALMOND

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