Explore Dunedin Summer 2021-2022

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EXPLORE FREE COPY

Summer 2021/22 ŌTEPOTI

A

destination

DELIGHT

TO

Get cultured

Check out Dunedin's beating creative heart

YOU

Fun for the family

A day out at the parks, playgrounds, and beaches

Wild times

Get out and about around the city



EXPLORE SUMMER 2021/22 www.exploredunedin.co.nz

Welcome to

Contents 4 �������������� EXPLORE DUNEDIN Ōtepoti is one of the great small cities. 5 �������������� OUT AND ABOUT Get to know Dunedin, from the hills to the beaches.

Explore Dunedin

7 �������������� FROM DUNEDIN TO THE WORLD NOM*d’s Margi Robertson remained in Dunedin while the label went international.

This guide is designed to inspire you to explore all the amazing things that Dunedin has to offer.

10-11 ������ FAMILY FRIENDLY There are fun times to be had at Dunedin’s beaches and playgrounds.

With family friendly activities, cultural highlights, the best of local retail, and delicious things to eat and drink, Explore Dunedin will help you find everything that makes this city such a vibrant and exciting place to visit.

13 ������������ PLACE OF LEARNING Since 1869 the city has been a unique place of higher learning opportunities.

Editor Gavin Bertram

gavin.bertram@alliedpress.co.nz

Creative Director Jasmine Couch Marketing Charlotte Thompson Sales Manager Matthew Holdridge

matthew.holdridge@alliedpress.co.nz Unless otherwise stated photos are from ODT archives. Cover image: Tunnel Beach. Josh Withers on Unsplash

General enquiries to Explore Dunedin magazine, PO Box 517, Dunedin 9054. Phone (03) 477-4760. Published by Allied Press Ltd, 52 Stuart St, Dunedin 9016. © 2021. All rights reserved.

DUNEDIN, NEW ZEALAND

contents EXPLORE / 3

8-9 ���������� 125 MOMENTS The events that have made Dunedin into the fascinating place it is.

14-15 ������ 10 ICONS These are the things to see if you’re only in town for a brief visit. 16-17 ������ DINING OUT A guide for tantalising your taste buds in Dunedin. 18 ������������ CULTURAL TOURISM If you want culture, you’ve come to the right place. 20-21 ������ SHOWCASE An eclectic range of local businesses and their wares. 22 ������������ WILD WILDLIFE From the landscapes to the animal life, it’s totally wild out there. 23 ������������ ACTIVE PURSUITS Walking, jogging, golfing, mountain biking – Dunedin has it all. 24-25 ����� Stay there Book a hotel or motel in Dunedin. 26 ������������ DOING THE BUSINESS Dunedin has long been the home for innovative businesses.

Dunedin’s Day & Night Pharmacy Open 10am-10pm, 365 days a year. Confidential ECP services prescriptions/advice & more.

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Explore Dunedin

4 / EXPLORE dunedin

It’s time to

photo: Skyimages / getty images

Dunedin/Ōtepoti is one of the great small cities. It’s a welcoming place, and a study in contrast.

The city possesses an abundance of both cultural and natural wealth. It has soul and vibrancy, but with an unmistakable laid-back feel.

The Central Otago Goldrush of the 1860s allowed the building of the city of their imagination. The schools, University, amenities and institutions still revered today came into being.

In recent years Dunedin has felt the beginnings of a renaissance, but while it moves into an optimistic future, the rich history is retained and celebrated.

And gold attracted others: the Chinese arrived to rework the Otago fields and make their mark. A strong Jewish community bequeathed us a rich artistic legacy.

Māori came first: Waitaha, Kāti Māmoe, Kāi Tahu. Sealers and whalers arrived, followed by the Free Church pilgrims of 1848 — Scots seeking freedom. They imagined a city and called it Dunedin (an anglicised name for Edinburgh — the name was suggested by publisher William Chambers as an alternative name to New Edinburgh).

Dunedin’s landscape, climate, and the cultural mix, produced a grounded population with creative tendencies. Those from out of town often came to study, and to experience the wildlife, the architecture, or the culture. Many stayed for the surf, the art, the bike tracks, and everything else Dunedin has to offer.


photo: RuslanKaln / getty images

the suburbs EXPLORE / 5

Out and about

in Dunedin Dunedin offers plenty beyond the culture and architecture of the central city. Have a poke around the suburbs and you’ll find plenty of hidden gems.

T

HE GARDENS end of North East Valley combines the charm of second hand shops with some great foodie spots. Or if you’re feeling energetic, Baldwin Street — the world’s steepest — awaits. Recover with an ice cream and a wander around beautiful Chingford Park. The central hill suburbs tell the story of Dunedin’s heritage, with everything from glorious villas, well-maintained bungalows, and even quaint working men’s cottages. Māori Hill, Roslyn, Belleknowes, and Mornington all flow into each other, with a range of cafes and shops dotted along the ridgeline above the city’s town belt. Unsurprisingly, cable cars were once the best mode of transport to reach these elevated suburbs. Take in the view over the central city and harbour from Roslyn Bridge.

Look south and you’ll find South Dunedin and St Clair. The sprawling, heavily populated south of the city has its own thing going on, and is totally different to the CBD. St Clair Beach is a magnet for sun lovers, swimmers, surfers, and, well, everyone who likes food. Perfect for morning coffee, a long lunch, or casual evening dining, and you can walk it all off along the beach. By following the harbour along Portobello Road you can discover the various villages along Otago Peninsula. Macandrew Bay is very family friendly, with a gentle beach, playground, and galleries. At Portobello you’ll find a pounamu shop, and eateries offering al fresco dining. There are a number of walks in the area, and you can return to town via Highcliff Road, including Larnach Castle, and amazing harbour views. On the opposite side of the harbour is Port

Chalmers, full of charm and history. Heritage buildings have been transformed into cafes, restaurants, and shops, and you can learn about Antarctic exploration at the Maritime Museum. At Flagstaff Lookout there are panoramic views of the port, as well as the Hotere Sculpture Garden. The 1870s’ bluestone Carey’s Bay Historic Hotel offers an excellent menu with a focus on the tempting local seafood. Over the hill on the shore of Blueskin Bay and you’ll find Waitati. From craft beer, artisan groceries, and galleries, this is a growing community with its own distinct identity. Or head south to Brighton, a great place for a family day out with a picnic, fish’n’chips, or an ice cream at the beach. Whichever direction you head in, there’s always something new to do in Dunedin.

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6 / EXPLORE promotion

train trip

Book a world-class

with dunedin railways

Last summer, every single Dunedin Railways journey was a sell out. So, book now to ensure that you don’t miss out on the even bigger range of world-class train trips being offered this summer. Many of these exciting experiences are perfect for the whole family — and they’re priced accordingly. In mid-2020, Dunedin Venues Management Ltd (DVML) were tasked with looking after Dunedin Railways during the Covid-19 enforced hibernation period. They designed trips tailored for the local market, and that approach has been expanded upon this summer. “We see the train trips as an event, and we’ve made it more about the destinations,” DVML’s Asset and Compliance Manager Troy Williams says. “People are there for the enjoyment of it, and they’re getting to spend time with the family. It’s quite unique.” Those destinations take in Hindon, Waitati, and Oamaru, with return trips ranging from several hours to full days.

The Inlander visits Hindon in the spectacular Taieri Gorge, stopping for an hour at the perfect time for a picnic lunch at the scenic Hindon station. It’s possible to book a combo with The Seasider in the afternoon. This journey travels to Waitati via a scenic coastal route that winds behind Port Chalmers and nearby bays. With two hours to enjoy at the destination, passengers can take shuttles to the Orokonui Ecosanctuary or Arc Brewery, look around the shops, and enjoy what the town has to offer. With the local community embracing the idea, it’s a great afternoon out. The Victorian — a culture packed day trip to Oamaru — is being offered on both December 4 and January 15 this summer. Then there’s the more social Twilight Train, a 2.5 hour evening trip to Seacliff that is running on Friday nights in the lead-up to Christmas. “It’s for everyone who wants to get on board and have a train journey for a couple of hours

and take in the beautiful scenery,” DVML Business Development Manager Kim Dodds says. Carriages on the Twilight Train can be booked for social functions such as workplace and club parties. Dunedin Railways also offers charters and have put on trains for special community events over recent years. Tickets for the superb trips offered by Dunedin Railways this summer make great gifts. But while there are many more scheduled than last year, it’s a good idea to book now to avoid the disappointment of missing out.

To book on Dunedin Railways’ world-class train trips, visit www.dunedinrailways.co.nz, or the Dunedin i-SITE


feature EXPLORE / 7

In February 1999 a highpoint came for NOM*d when the label was selected to show on the runway at London Fashion Week. The New Zealand Four that also included Zambesi, Karen Walker, and WORLD were the first designers from this country to appear at an international fashion week. Accompanied by music from Dunedin band HDU, the NOM*d show included Robertson’s first foray into woven garments. “And now the woven collection is way bigger than the knitwear,” she notes. “To achieve that, we employed graduates from the Otago Polytechnic or who had a fashion design education. Whereas my education was really no education, and just a feeling for it.”

world

From Dunedin to the

While her NOM*d label went international, designer Margi Robertson has remained in Dunedin.

O

N HER phone, Margi Robertson has a childhood photo of herself and her mother Zinovia at the St Clair Beach playground. The family hadn’t long been living in Dunedin at the time, having emigrated from Greece. First they’d settled at Chatto Creek in Central Otago, where Robertson was born. But the NOM*d fashion label founder has called Dunedin home since before the age of three. As a result she has a deep connection to the city and its culture, and that has long permeated her work. “When we started NOM*d it was really important that we had a trademark or signature,” Robertson says. “I’d like to think people don’t really confuse NOM*d with any other brand that’s available in the New Zealand market.” Their mother’s ability to create something unique with fabric remnants rubbed off on both Robertson and her sister Liz Findlay, who’s behind Auckland’s Zambesi label. Dunedin in the mid-1970s was fairly staid when it came to fashion, and so in 1975 Robertson and husband Chris opened the Hang-ups Boutique. The shop was stocked with product from emerging labels, mainly from Auckland. It became Plume in 1978, which can now be found on George Street in Dunedin and High Street in Christchurch. Then in 1986 NOM*d was launched, thanks to a realisation

Robertson had when going on fabric buying trips to Japan with sister Liz. “I was being her sidekick and her sounding board,” she says. “And I thought, ‘actually, what am I doing? We might as well be creating something of our own too’.” With a life in Dunedin that now included two children, the family didn’t feel compelled to move north. Fortunately survivors from the city’s once massive wool milling industry remained. NOM*d were able to have their first ranges of knitwear manufactured at Tamahine Knitwear with yarn from the Roslyn Knitting Mills. That industry eventually died in Dunedin and the label’s manufacturing is now done elsewhere, but it enabled the early development of NOM*d. Robertson’s designs drew on her early 1980s experiences in Japan. She specifically notes the referencing of traditional costumes, a one-sizefits-all philosophy, and the presence of black as aspects that guided the NOM*d aesthetic.

Having always appreciated all types of fashion and designers, Robertson describes herself as a ‘fashion fancier’. It’s a term she’s borrowed from the writing of Eden Hore, the late Naseby farmer and prolific collector of fashion from the 1970s and ‘80s. She is now on the steering committee for Hore’s impressive collection of mainly avant garde New Zealand designs. In 2018, Robertson was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to the fashion industry. Having travelled extensively with the business, she’s been able to compare the Dunedin lifestyle to other locales and says that it’s “always a great place to come home to”. Among Robertson’s favourite things are being able to walk to work, and the ease of getting around the city. “And we have some amazing restaurants considering the population,” she says. “And it’s quite easy to get somewhere quite isolated. Walking up to Ross Creek, you wouldn’t even know how close the city was — you could be in Fiordland if you didn’t know better.”

A tip for visitors:

I always think the Albatross colony is quite cool to go to. It’s a great drive, taking the high road on the Peninsula up past Larnach Castle, and then the low road back. There’s a bit of that Scottish, Gaelic thing there. That’s generally what I’d say for a bit of Dunedin culture. Otherwise, there’s food...

And of course, the unique subculture of Dunedin was also a large part of the equation. “I think what influenced me was the late ‘80s and the ‘90s with the music scene, and that presence of street fashion,” Robertson reflects. “Now you see luxury brands like Louis Vuitton and Balenciaga embracing street culture, but it’s something that has always existed in my world.”

photo: DunedinNZ


8 / EXPLORE history

EventsDunedin that shaped

Every city has a story. Here are 125 moments from Dunedin’s history.

12 million years BP............

Rev. Thomas Burns arrives as Free Church minister.

1330s.......................................

1851.........................................

Dunedin Volcano active. First Māori arrive.

1725........................................ Arrival of Ngāi Tahu.

1770........................................

Cook’s Endeavour sails by.

1810s....................................... Sealers’ War between Māori and Europeans begins.

1815......................................... William Tucker first European settler.

1831......................................... Weller brothers begin whaling and trading.

1840........................................ Treaty of Waitangi signed by local chiefs.

1844........................................ New Zealand Company arrives. Site for Dunedin settlement decided.

1845........................................ Otago Association founded.

1846........................................ Charles Kettle begins Dunedin survey.

1848........................................ Dunedin is founded. First Scottish settler ships arrive.

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Otago Witness weekly newspaper starts.

Above: Before the Gold Rush: Dunedin in the late 1850s

1871......................................... University of Otago is first in the country.

1872........................................ New Zealand’s first golf course in Mornington.

1873.........................................

New Zealand Clothing Factory established by Bendix Hallenstein.

1853........................................

1874........................................

1858........................................

1875........................................

William Cargill becomes first Otago superintendent

Cutting of Bell Hill, which is later razed.

1861........................................ Central Otago Gold Rush begins. Businesses including the Otago Daily Times founded.

1862........................................ Establishment of Vauxhall Pleasure and Tea Gardens.

1863........................................ Otago Boys’ High School founded

1864........................................ George Parr XI cricketers from England visit.

1865........................................ Dunedin becomes New Zealand’s first city, under Mayor William Mason. New Zealand Exhibition world’s fair held Southern Telegraph Line opens. Chinese miners invited to Otago.

1868........................................ Otago Museum founded.

Larnach Castle, designed by Robert Lawson, is completed.

Lawson’s First Church is finished. God Defend New Zealand words written by Thomas Bracken. Union Steam Ship Company launched by James Mills.

1876........................................ Speight’s Brewery opens.

1878........................................

Dunedin-Milton telephone line tested. Railway to Christchurch completed.

1879........................................

Cafe Chantant fire in the Octagon claims 12.

1882........................................ First shipment of refrigerated meat leaves Port Chalmers.

1883........................................ Carisbrook ground opens.

1884........................................ Dunedin Public Art Gallery founded by William Hodgkins.

1889........................................ New Zealand and South Seas

Exhibition attracts 600,000. Thomas Baldwin parachutes from balloon over South Dunedin. Gun emplacement built at Taiaroa Head due to Russian Scare.

1895........................................ Mark Twain visits.

1896........................................ First female medical graduate Emily Siedeberg.

1897........................................ Ethel Benjamin is first female law graduate.

1898........................................ Otago Settlers Museum founded.

1901........................................ Thomas Kempthorne’s Locomobile driven along Princes St. Sir Peter Buck (Te Rangi Hiroa), the first Otago Māori graduate. Hillside railways workshops open.

1904....................................... All Blacks play Australia at Tahuna Park.

1906....................................... Dunedin Railway Station opened. First Rhodes Scholar Robert Farquharson.

1907

New Zealand’s first hydro-electric station at Waipori River.

1910........................................ NZ Express Company building is country’s first ‘skyscraper’. Robert Falcon Scott’s Terra Nova departs for Antarctica.

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history EXPLORE / 9

A modern city: Dunedin embraces its history and the future.

1914........................................ First flight over Dunedin made by James Scotland. WWI begins, over 1500 Dunedin deaths. Dunedin’s Gillies and McIndoe pioneer plastic surgery techniques.

1917......................................... Donald Brown posthumously awarded Victoria Cross.

1918........................................ Spanish Flu, 273 fatalities.

1919........................................ Albatross egg discovered at Taiaroa Head.

1921......................................... First radio broadcast by Prof Robert Jack.

1922........................................ NZ beats Australia in first football international at Carisbrook.

1925........................................ Three million visitors to New Zealand and South Seas International Exhibition.

1929........................................ Cyclone causes Great Leith Flood.

1932........................................

1945........................................

German U-Boat sails past Dunedin.

1947........................................ Otago wins Ranfurly Shield, defends it 18 times.

1952........................................ Yvette Williams wins long jump gold in Helsinki.

1969........................................

1992........................................

1971.........................................

1994........................................

Dunedin Stock Exchange demolished.

Columbus New Zealand first all container ship to visit.

1972........................................

1955........................................

First section of Southern Motorway opens. Now world-famous Dunedin Longitudinal Study begins.

1957........................................

1977........................................

Queen Elizabeth II visits on Coronation tour.

Janet Frame’s Owls Do Cry published. Northern Motorway opens. Mornington line final cable car to close.

1961........................................ MS Seven Seas first cruise ship to visit.

1962........................................ Momona Airport opens. First television broadcast to Dunedin.

1963........................................ City’s first computer at Cadbury Fry Hudson.

1964........................................ Moana Pool complex opens.

Jetty St overbridge opens.

1979........................................

Abbotsford Landslide destroys 69 homes Cadbury Payroll Robbery nets over $50,000.

1980........................................ Aramoana declares independence after fighting off smelter. Arai Te Uru urban marae opens.

1981........................................ Springbok Tour protests, Otago narrowly lose. Royal visit. Queen shot at by Christopher Lewis. Dunedin Sound begins with The Clean’s Tally Ho single.

1964........................................

1987........................................

1965........................................

1989........................................

Dunedin’s Clive Hume receives Victoria Cross. Fire at Seacliff Lunatic Asylum claims 37.

1966........................................

1990.......................................

1943........................................

Main roads change to one-way system.

Great Depression spurs riots.

1939........................................

The Beatles perform two Town Hall shows.

1942........................................

Rolling Stones visit, Keith Richards not impressed.

WW2 begins, almost 1000 Dunedin casualties.

Hyde rail disaster kills 21.

Olveston House left to city by Dorothy Theomin.

1968........................................

Baldwin St recognised as world’s steepest. New boundaries make Dunedin biggest city in NZ.

David Gray kills 13 at Aramoana. The Chills Submarine Bells album #1 in New Zealand.

1991........................................ Otago are NPC champions.

Richard Emerson launches brewery.

Five members of the Bain family are murdered. First international flight arrives.

1996........................................ Danyon Loader wins double gold at Atlanta.

1998........................................ Ngāi Tahu claim settled.

1999........................................ NOM*d appears at London Fashion Week. Highlanders lose Super Rugby final at Carisbrook.

2002....................................... Final Southerner train service.

2006....................................... Icebergs pass by Otago coast.

2011........................................ Occupy Dunedin protest in the Octagon. Elton John opens Forsyth Barr Stadium.

2012........................................ Hamish Bond rowing gold in London.

2014........................................ Dunedin becomes UNESCO City of Literature. City wins national Gigatown competition.

2015........................................

Highlanders are Super Rugby champions. Destructive South Dunedin floods.

2018........................................ Cadbury factory closes.

2020....................................... Covid-19 pandemic hits.


photo: ilkercelik / getty images

10 / EXPLORE family fun

Play time

Marlow Park Known as the Dinosaur Park thanks to its iconic slide, this St Kilda beachside playground has been loved by generations of kids. With an array of play equipment, and a recently improved cycle track, there are hours of fun to be had.

Family friendly fun D

UNEDIN may be a city with some heavy historical weight. But it also offers a good dose of fun, with younger family members well catered for.

Tūhura Otago Community Trust Science Centre is the biggest of its kind in New Zealand, with a Tropical Forest, the Beautiful Science Gallery, and Perpetual Guardian Planetarium.

There is no shortage of playgrounds, pools, parks, beaches, and other outdoor spaces where excess energy can be burnt.

Toitū Otago Settlers Museum is another must-visit, telling the story of the people of Dunedin and the surrounding area. There are 14 galleries, with many interactive displays.

And there are also engaging indoor attractions, including Otago Museum. The kids will love Animal Attic, a treasure trove of over 2000 taxidermied creatures of all descriptions. And the Museum’s

But after exploring the cultural centres of the city, and enjoying the local cafes and restaurants, it’s time for some outdoor time at one of Dunedin’s playgrounds.

Memorial Park A huge playground in Mosgiel, there’s something for everyone here. A triple slide fortress, a skate park, great climbing, a secure space for the very little ones, and open spaces for ball games, it’s definitely worth a visit. Botanic Gardens A smallish, safe playground for all ages, with much more besides. There’s open space for picnics and running around, ducks to be fed, the Winter Garden to marvel at, and up the hill there’s an aviary, and various themed gardens to be discovered. Bayfield Park Besides the Andersons Bay Inlet, and the sportsgrounds of Bayfield Park, this is the perfect sunny day picnic spot. The kids can enjoy slides, swings, see-saws, a spiderweb net, tunnels, and the rocktopus.

Market Reserve Closer to town and set well back from Princes St, here you’ll find equipment including swings, a fort, see-saws, a jungle-gym, and now has Dunedin’s first balance park. There are also benches and shady places for a quiet picnic lunch.

42 royal terrace dunedin

ST CLAIR HOT SALT WATER POOL Come and swim at one of Dunedin’s favourite swimming pools this summer OPEN DAILY Monday to Friday: 6am – 7pm Saturday and Sunday: 7am – 7pm Admission charges apply The Esplanade, St Clair Phone: 03 455 6352 www.dunedin.govt.nz/stclairpool A department of the Dunedin City Council

From the gardens and gallery to the great hall, the opulence of Olveston is a visual, historic and aesthetic delight By guided tour only, commencing daily at 9.30am, 10.45am, 12pm, 1.30pm, 2.45pm & 4pm

(03) 477 3320 | reception@olveston.co.nz www.olveston.co.nz


St Clair and St Kilda A trip to Dunedin wouldn’t be complete without a visit to the city’s most prominent — and legendary — stretch of sand. An easy journey from the centre of town, St Clair and St Kilda face the Pacific Ocean. But they’re both favoured swimming spots, with surf patrols during the warmer months. It’s also a mecca for surfers, with one of the most consistent breaks in New Zealand. And St Clair Esplanade offers a range of cafes and bars, ideal for lunch, an evening meal, or just a coffee while taking in the stunning ocean views. Brighton Another favourite spot for local families is Brighton Beach, which offers something for everyone. Set by a charming seaside village 20km from Dunedin, it’s perfect for a relaxed day trip. The surf lifesaver patrolled beach may be small, but it’s invigorating. There is plenty of space for the kids to run around, and

photo: Melanie Mittmann / EyeEm / getty images

beaches EXPLORE / 11

beached Get

the creek is great for smaller swimmers and paddlers. Bring a picnic, or grab an ice cream or fish’n’chips nearby. Warrington Head north out of Dunedin, past Waitati, and you’ll spot the Warrington turn-off. Here you’ll find another gorgeous sandy beach, again with its own surf life saving club operating over summer. A relatively safe and sheltered spot, the beach offers great conditions for swimmers and beginner surfers. The Blueskin Bay estuary lies over the spit, and there’s a playground and picnic area right by the beach at the Warrington Domain. Long Beach A 2.4km stretch of soft white sand and fairly calm surf in a quiet spot half-an-hour from Dunedin — what’s not to like? On a good day, Long Beach is an absolute gem, with plenty of space for a picnic, and good swimming even though there are no life savers on patrol.

It’s also a destination for local rock climbers, and there’s a huge cave at the northern end that’s well worth a visit. And around the beach and lagoon there is an abundance of bird life, including little blue penguins, herons, and pūkeko. Macandrew Bay On the harbour side of Otago Peninsula, Macandrew Bay is a pleasant community with all you need for a perfect family outing. The small beach is the safest around, shallow and sheltered, with no surf. Across the road is a cafe, dairy, art gallery, and an excellent playground. It’s just a 15-minute drive from the centre of Dunedin, or there are buses hourly — and a shared cycle path the whole way. Beyond these safe beaches, there are other must-visits. These include the incredible Tunnel Beach, the isolated Victory Beach, Sandfly Bay, Doctors Point, Karitane, Taieri Mouth, and many more.

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Surrounded by dramatic coastlines, Dunedin has more than its fair share of wild beaches, often totally deserted. But it also features a handful of family friendly beaches that provide relatively safe swimming, some with lifeguards on duty over summer.


12 / EXPLORE promotion

Otago Museum... more than a museum!

O

tago Museum has eight free galleries telling the story of the nature, science, and culture of Otago, Aotearoa and the world. Wander around the beautiful historic building exploring the treasures of the Museum’s collection. A children’s favourite is the magical Animal Attic with hundreds of creatures and quirky Victorian taxidermy. The Museum regularly has world-class travelling exhibitions, and the 2021/22 schedule is no exception – don’t miss the monster exhibition on this summer and autumn!

Otago Museum is the perfect day out for families. With New Zealand’s largest science centre, a collection of 1.5 million taoka and items, the only 3D planetarium in Australasia, and a huge indoor Tropical Forest butterfly enclosure, you’ll discover more than a typical museum.

The Museum’s science centre, Tūhura Otago Community Trust Science Centre, is incredible. With a three-storey slide, a bike-riding skeleton, and 43 other hands-on interactives, there is so much to discover. Children can build, dance, and play their way through the space learning about the wonder of science. There is an infinity room where mirrors and lights stretch out around, above and below you in an explosion of colour and light; a vertical wind-tunnel where you can design your own flying object to hover in the air above your head; and the heady delights of big screen PacMan, so you can show the kids how you did it! The Tropical Forest is the hottest place in Dunedin. Kept to the humidity and warmth of a tropical rainforest, it is home to a thousand iridescent butterflies, giant African millipedes, tarantulas, tiny zebra finches and other rainforest creatures. With a sky bridge and a five-metre waterfall, it’s a lush paradise that will astound your senses. Otago Museum has the most technically advanced planetarium in New Zealand. It is a 360-degree dome theatre with a screen that surrounds you. Stretching from the ceiling to the floor, you’re immersed in the action and can explore the world from deep inside our earth to the edge of the Universe. There are regular live shows, and the kids’ Spacetronauts series is the most popular ever. The planetarium turns into a rocket and blasts off

to the stars, moons, and planets while showing you some explosive science experiments on the way! School holidays are the perfect time to visit the Museum. There are the famous free Makerspaces, where you can use fantastic resources to make guided crafts, free science shows that will amaze, and fun and free events for families. It is not just for kids, though. Otago Museum has late-night events with musicians, drink tastings, and design workshops, along with some of the best local exhibitions of artists and incredible talks from world-class speakers and experts. Otago Museum . . . more than a Museum!


a place of learning EXPLORE / 13

learning A place of

Dunedin rightfully claims the title of being a student city. Every year the influx of tertiary students renews the youthful vibrancy of the city.

T

HE University of Otago alone attracts over 20,000 students each year, while Otago Polytechnic has well over 8000. A high percentage of these arrive from outside of the region. Ranked highly among universities from around the world, the University of Otago’s academic excellence is undisputed, and its student lifestyle is more than legendary. First years students thrive at the 15 residential

colleges, where they are well fed, academically supported, and they can revel in inter-college rivalries. There are many annual traditions to maintain, including the Toga Parade and other Orientation Week activities, the Capping Show, Hyde Street Party, and cheering the Highlanders on from the ‘Zoo’ at Forsyth Barr Stadium.

And of course, flatting in Dunedin offers the opportunity for both responsibility and independence. The rental accommodation stock ranges from aging and historic houses to modern multi-unit complexes, all within easy walking distance of the campus and the city centre. Established in 1869, Otago was New Zealand’s first university. It’s claimed more firsts since, including the country’s first female medical graduate, Emily Siedeberg (1896), first female law graduate Ethel Benjamin (1897), and the first New Zealand-trained Māori medical doctor, Sir Peter Buck.

The University has also developed a strong reputation for supporting the arts through its Burns (literature), Mozart (music), and Frances Hodgkins (art) Fellowships.

It’s home to the country’s only Dental School and Surveying School. The Medical School has satellite campuses in both Christchurch and Wellington, and the life-changing research that has emanated from it has made an impact globally.

Above left: Libby Blore and Sarah Thompson celebrate collecting Otago Polytechnic degree certificates. photo: Gregor richardson / odt Above right: the formal entrance to the University of Otago at the intersection of St David and Cumberland Streets. photo: gerard o'brien / odt


10 cultural icons

14 / EXPLORE 10 cultural icons

must-see Dunedin

THERE are too many Dunedin highlights to name. So we’ve narrowed it down to a list of highly recommended places to go and things to do if your time is limited.

1 The Octagon

2 Baldwin Street

PHOTO: P A Thompson / Getty images

A microcosm of everything good about Dunedin — green space, art, history, and hospitality. In the upper Octagon is the superb Dunedin Public Art Gallery, the Robbie Burns statue, the Dunedin Writers Walk, and plaques for local Olympic medallists. The lower side has the Regent Theatre, and an array of al fresco eating establishments.

The eight-sided city centre is not Dunedin’s most famous route - that honour falls to the world’s steepest street. North East Valley’s Baldwin Street was first officially recognised by the Guinness Book of Records in 1987, before losing the title in 2019 to a Welsh pretender. That decision was rightfully reversed due to an appeal in 2020.

3 University of Otago 4 Museums

PHOTO: DON T ON UNSPLASH

Founded in 1871, the University of Otago is the oldest in New Zealand. Having moved to its North Dunedin location in 1879 after a few years in the Exchange, the University has been expanding since. It’s both the centre of learning and a hub for the 20,000 strong student population, who add a certain vibrancy to the city.

The city and surrounding region’s history is brilliantly told at both the Otago Museum, and Toitū Settlers Museum. In The Octagon, Dunedin Public Art Gallery has an incredible programme of exhibitions. And the Dunedin Museum of Natural Mystery simply needs to be seen to be believed.

Explore Dunedin’s stories at one of New Zealand’s most innovative museums

• 18-hole Family Mini Golf • 250m+ Golf Driving Range • Plant Land & Pots • Real Berry Fruit Ice Creams • Topiary Cafe On Site • Mini Trains Running Sundays • Glorious Giftware • Florist & Fresh Flowers

0m2 new 25 aze living m 7 DayS OPen

109 Bush Rd, mosgiel P 03 484 7319

www.walsplantland.co.nz

For all your shrubs and trees at prices that please

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OPEN 7 DAYS | FREE ENTRY | FREE WIFI 10am – 5pm | Closed Christmas Day 31 Queens Gardens, Dunedin P (03) 477 5052

www.toituosm.com


One of only three authentic Chinese Gardens outside of China, Lan Yuan commemorates the important place of Chinese people in Dunedin. Opened in 2008, it was attracting over 30,000 people annually just a few years later. As well as being a lovely place to visit, the Garden is also a popular venue for weddings and functions.

7 Otago Peninsula

The Peninsula is a wildlife mecca, described by environmentalist David Bellamy as “the finest example of ecotourism in the world”. From the Royal Albatross Colony at Taiaroa Head, to yellow-eyed penguins, little blue penguins, sea lions, fur seals, and more, there’s plenty to see. There’s also important human history, from Māori through to early European settlers. And of course Larnach Castle.

9 Beer

Since pioneering days, beer has remained a prominent aspect of the Dunedin landscape. James Speight launched his brewery in 1876, and it’s still producing the famous Gold Medal Ale on Rattray Street. And since 1992, Richard Emerson has been an important figure in the craft beer world. Around the city there are plenty of places to enjoy a pint or two.

10 Dunedin

DUNEDIN BOTANIC GARDEN A Six Star Garden

The Dunedin Botanic Garden has 30 tranquil hectares where you can hear native birdsong while you explore the plant collections or soak up the expansive views. Open every day from dawn until dusk. Free entry. For information, call 03 477 4000. Corner of Great King Street and Opoho Road. www.dunedinbotanicgarden.co.nz A DEPARTMENT OF THE DUNEDIN CITY COUNCIL

The late Dr Rodney Wilson said in 2009 that Dunedin should be recognised as a World Heritage Site for its “astonishingly well-preserved architecture”. Certainly there’s an abundance of gems, including Lawson’s First Church, Troup’s Railway Station, and Bury’s University Registry. Wander the streets and you’ll see plenty more.

photo: SDickin / getty images

Chinese Garden

6 Architecture

photo: Rattapon_Wannaphat / getty images

5 Lan Yuan, Dunedin

10 cultural icons EXPLORE / 15

8 Green spaces

Looking for quiet time? There is no shortage of places to escape in Dunedin. The city centre is bounded by the Town Belt, which takes in sports grounds, the Botanic Gardens, Signal Hill, and a forested strip along the hills. You’ll also find Chingford Park in North East Valley, and amazing gardens at Larnach Castle and Glenfalloch.

Railways

George Troup’s 1906 Dunedin Railway Station is the most photographed building in New Zealand, with up to 100 trains a day departing at its peak. Dunedin Railways still depart from the Railway Station, with world class train trips including this summer’s The Inlander, The Seasider, The Moeraki Victorian, and The Twilight Train. Book online early.

photo: travellinglight / getty images


16 / EXPLORE promotion

GU

IN

IDE TO

D U N E DI N

The best places to get good food that will tantalise your taste buds. From degustation to à la carte — Dunedin has something for even the most discerning foodie.

VOGEL ST KITCHEN    One of Dunedin’s largest and most vibrant cafes, VSK is nestled in the heart of the thriving Warehouse Precinct in a beautiful Victorian printer’s building. We offer the kind of warmth and hospitality that has put us on the map as one of the city’s best breakfast and lunch hot spots. Our menu offers all-day breakfast, brunch and lunch options and a wood-fired pizza menu that promotes the flavours of the region: fresh, simple, quality and free range. Coffee Supreme coffee and a nicely edited range of regional beers and wines means you are supporting our South Island producers. For a true taste of Dunedin, come and visit us today — we’re open 7 days a week.

76 Vogel Street p 477 3623 www.vogelstkitchen.nz

afternoon high tea with DISTINCTION    Join us for an exquisite selection of tea time delights and the perfect blend of Dilmah tea at Distinction Dunedin Hotel — Dunedin’s former Chief Post Office. Sweet: chocolate brownies with orange blossom cream, raspberry lamingtons, macarons, belgian chocolate truffles. Scones: fresh scones served with strawberry jam, crème fraiche & butter. Savoury: selection of finger sandwiches, savoury tartlets. Accompanied by a fine selection of bottomless Dilmah loose tea or espresso coffee. From $27.00 per person

Available 12noon-4pm daily Reservations (03) 471 8543 www.distinctionhotelsdunedin.co.nz


promotion EXPLORE / 17

Ironic CafÉ and Bar

NEW NEW NEW Corporation

Award-winning Ironic Café and Bar achieves results year upon year for their excellence in food and informed, friendly staff. Supreme Winner of the NZ Café of the Year 2014, Beef & Lamb Excellence Award 2016. Sunny and close to Dunedin Railway Station and parking. Ironic encompasses the ultimate in indoor and outdoor dining, complete with large evening fireplace. Wheelchair accessible. Full bar. Live entertainment at times. Each Saturday, the Dunedin Farmers Market is held opposite Ironic.

New New New is Dunedin’s largest independent craft brewery. We are a brewery, a taproom, a restaurant, and a bespoke hotel offering, with a very futuristic edge. Our menu is ever evolving, so there are new beers and foods on offer all the time. In addition to our normal offerings, we host beer festivals, quiz nights, events and concerts.

9 Anzac Ave / www.ironiccafebar.co.nz Sun-Tues 8am-3.30pm, Wed-Fri 8am-late, Sat 7am-late + 10 George St / 9am-2pm weekdays

218 Crawford Street, Dunedin Central New Zealand HQ +64 3395 6445 newnewnew.nz

Zanzibar

Albar

Nestled on George Street, Zanzibar features eight rotating craft beer taps and one of the country’s best curated gin selections, with over 120 gins from around the world. Perfect for a quiet catch up, after-work drinks, or listening to live music. Zanzibar gives you the perfect insight into the wonderful world of craft gin and beer. Check out what we have on tap via our Untappd page, or visit our website for more info.

There’s nothing gimmicky about Albar, the most subtly Scottish pub this side of the equator, a local favourite and the social hub of many. However, “being Scottish” at Albar is as natural as drinking whisky, with in-house whisky tastings and a double of the Albar ‘Malt of the Month’ always available for $12.

New New New Corporation, your Real Local.

311 George Street, Dunedin Central Midday-late, 7 days www.zanzibardunedin.com

135 Stuart Street, Dunedin Central p 03 479 2468

cobb & co.

etrusco

If you grew up in New Zealand, you’re bound to have fond childhood memories of eating Cobb Crunchies, slurping on Pink Panthers, and racing to solve the puzzles on the back of your placemat with a little red pencil. The best part? You can enjoy all that again — and make new memories too.

Etrusco at the Savoy has been one of the city’s most wellestablished, popular Italian restaurants for 28 years. Owneroperated, with authentic Italian heritage. Enjoy a wide range of tasty pasta dishes and pizzas or complement your meal with delicious Italian-style breads, antipasto and salads. Top it off with Italy’s famous sweets: tiramisu, gelato and more.

We believe everyone deserves to enjoy simple, fresh NZ food with family and friends in a relaxed and friendly space.

Dunedin Railway Station, 20F Anzac Ave p 03 929 1073 / e Dunedin@cobb.co.nz

8 Moray Place, Dunedin Central, Dunedin 9016 p 03 477 3737 etrusco.co.nz


Cultural tourism

18 / EXPLORE culture

So you want culture? Well, you’re in the right place – Dunedin is a very cultured city.

Over the decades it’s been the breeding ground for generation upon generation of creative talent, right across the artistic spectrum. The city boasts a rich heritage in literature, visual art, music, architecture, fashion, and beyond. From the University of Otago arts fellowships, to the underground fringes,and everything in between, Dunedin is fertile ground for those driven to create.

Literature.............

Since 2014, Dunedin has proudly claimed the status of a UNESCO City of Literature. It’s well-deserved, as many famous writers, poets, playwrights, and publishers have lived and worked here. Janet Frame, James K. Baxter, Charles Brasch, Ruth Dallas, A.H. Reed, and Hone Tuwhare are just a few. They’re all represented on the Dunedin Writers’ Walk in the upper Octagon.

Street Art..............

In recent years Dunedin has joined the international street art movement. The city has been enhanced with a growing array of work from artists both local and international, including Belgium’s ROA, Phlegm (UK), Pixel Pancho (Italy), and Dal East (China). There is an established street art trail in the central city to meander around, and enjoy both the art and the unique ambiance of New Zealand’s first city.

Music....................

Let’s not forget the city’s fine musical legacy. The Dunedin Symphony Orchestra has been performing regularly since 1965, while the Mozart Fellowship and the University of Otago Music Department are prominent on the musical landscape. Contemporary music also looms large, from ‘70s acts including Lutha and Craig Scott, and on to the Dunedin Sound of the ‘80s and ‘90s, with bands like The Chills, The Clean, Straitjacket Fits, and The 3Ds gaining international acclaim. That’s continued, with Six60, Nadia Reid, and others going on to big things.

Architecture........ photo: gerard o'brien / odt

Art.........................

All of this creativity is surrounded by Dunedin’s amazing built heritage. Standouts are the famed neo-gothic glory of the Railway Station, the University Registry building, the newly refurbished Law Courts, the stunning First Church spire, and Larnach Castle, to name a few. To see how the city’s Edwardian residents aspired to live, Olveston Historic Home is a

The city’s cultural claims stretch far beyond words. It’s also been home at some point in the careers of some of New Zealand’s best known artists, including Frances Hodgkins, Colin McCahon, Robin White, Gretchen Albrecht, Shane Cotton, and Ralph Hotere. Some of their works can be viewed at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery in the Octagon. There are also numerous dealer galleries to visit, that represent all tiers of New Zealand artists.

photo: jimfeng / getty images

must visit. And around every corner in town you’ll stumble upon lesser-known architectural treasures.

Fashion................. Dunedin has become a noted fashion hub. It’s long been host to iD Dunedin Fashion Week, showcasing both established and emerging designers. Many of the latter come from the Otago Polytechnic Fashion Design School. Unsurprisingly numerous designers choose to take inspiration from the city’s unique mood, with NOM*d, Company of Strangers, Charmaine Reveley and others working from here.

Sport..................... Is sport culture? Well, why not… there is a Dunedin Olympic Walk in the Octagon to match the Writers’ Walk after all. The city has produced many famous sports people, and been host to a raft of memorable sporting moments at venues including Carisbrook and more recently Forsyth Barr Stadium and the University Oval. The New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame can be found in the Dunedin Railway Station, although its future is undecided at time of writing.


Welcome to one of the most beautiful and unique destinations in New Zealand. Established in 1874 our lovely little local gem is counted among the oldest original pubs in the country. This picturesque Victorian stone building rests on the banks of Otago Harbour, an easy 15 minutes drive from Central Dunedin. Open daily for lunch & dinner, serving coffee, craft beers & Central Otago wines, we specialise in local seafood but provide something for everyone including a dedicated vegan menu. Rest by one of our three cozy open fires or soak up the sun and water views on the large terrace and courtyard. Don’t miss out on this special experience when exploring the delights of Dunedin.

17 Macandrew Rd, Carey’s Bay, Port Chalmers, Dunedin phone (03) 472 8022 | info@careysbayhotel.co.nz | www.careysbayhotel.co.nz Photo: Andy Thompson Photography NZ Ltd


20 / EXPLORE promotion

Showcase An eclectic range of Dunedin’s finest businesses and their wares

2GYPSIES

vull design

Unique gifts, furniture, global art, and homewares. Alive with attitude, a living style combined with culture design and global art.

Wander into Vull Design in Moray Place and expect to be welcomed to a carefully curated, unique collection of gifts, jewellery, homeware and occasional furniture. From locally made Obie & Co candles, handmade Claybird Ceramics from Auckland, to hand-painted clutches from artist Tiff Manuell of Australia and photo art from Love Warriors of Sweden. Everything instore is carefully hand picked and constantly evolving. Warm and friendly service will top off your shopping experience!

34 George Street www.2gypsiesportchalmers.com

34 Moray Place, Dunedin www.vulldesign.co.nz

Artifolk

Dunedin Museum of Natural Mystery

Artifolk is a delightful wee gift and homewares store located in the heart of Macandrew Bay. Here you will find a unique range of handmade products from Artisans including; art, jewellery, soap, woodwork, sewing and woollen knitwear. Beautifully curated home decor from throughout NZ and beyond also features, including kilims, furniture, baskets, books, bags, textiles and more. You will definitely find something unique for living and giving here!

The Dunedin Museum of Natural Mystery is a small, private museum and gallery based at the home of artist Bruce Mahalski. The museum contains collections of skulls, bones, unusual biological material, ethnological art and items relating to local history as well as his own art made from thousands of bones. Free street parking or walk up from George Street. See the website for opening hours and entry costs.

Summer: 12.30pm-4pm, Tues-Sun 491 Portobello Rd, Macandrew Bay, Dunedin Artifolk

www.royaldunedinmuseum.com

Design Withdrawals

Royal Albatross Centre

Design Withdrawals has a relaxed environment allowing customers to browse and feel welcome to admire our unique, quirky and extensive collection. We have everything from stunning David Trubridge designer lights, New Zealand made jewellery to hilarious and cheeky socks. Design Withdrawals offers a gift for everyone. We look forward to welcoming you.

At the tip of the Otago Peninsula lies Taiaroa Head, home to a rather famous seabird with a 3-metre wingspan — the Northern Royal Albatross. The Royal Albatross Centre’s guided tours offer an exclusive look into this unique area. Tour options provide insight into the fascinating lifecycle of the albatross — view the only mainland nesting colony. Other options explore the human history of the headland — walk the underground tunnels of Fort Taiaroa.

7 Moray Place, Dunedin 03 477 9296 www.designwithdrawals.co.nz

PHOTO: CHRIS MCCORMACK

PHOTO: stephen jaquiery

1260 Harrington Point Road, Otago Peninsula, Dunedin 03 4780 499 / albatross.org.nz


promotion EXPLORE / 21

middlemarch lodge & Tours

GUILD

Book a one- or two-night shortbreak escape for two people. Quality accommodation with en-suite, and welcome platter on arrival. Tours and activities include local historical highlights guided tour, walking the Rock and Pillar ranges, Sutton Salt Lake and cycling the Otago Rail Trail. See an Otago you haven’t experienced before. Breathe fresh air and be pampered. Go on — you know you deserve a break! Special prices for packages.

GUILD is your go-to for locally designed fashion, jewellery, homewares and gifts. Our aim is to extend the stories behind locally made, quality goods and in turn forge a strong bond between our customers and designers. The store is staffed by the designers, so every time you visit, you get to meet one of our talented local designers.

022 694 1390 www.middlemarchlodge.co.nz

145 Stuart St, Dunedin Tuesday-Friday, 10am-5pm Saturday and Monday, 11am-3pm www.guilddunedin.co.nz

Visit and explore the only authentic scholar’s garden in the Southern hemisphere.

O P E N D A I L Y 10am – 5pm Admission charges apply

C L O S E D C H R I S T M A S D AY Cnr Cumberland and Rattray Streets (beside Toitū Otago Settlers Museum) www.dunedinchinesegarden.com | 03 477 3248


Wild Wildlife T

HE COASTLINE and peninsula are a seabird spotters’ paradise. Albatross, penguins, shags, spoonbills, oystercatchers, giant petrels, and sooty shearwaters all make their home here.

their patch though, so make sure to stay at least 20 metres away.

Sightings of orca and dolphins are common in the harbour, and there have been occasional visits from the Southern Right Whale, which was once on the brink of extinction.

Dunedin is home to the only mainland breeding colony of albatross anywhere in the world. The Northern Royal Albatross/ Toroa can be seen at the Royal Albatross Centre at the end of Otago Peninsula. You can take a guided tour to watch the antics of these majestic seabirds in their natural environment.

Fur seals are in abundance around the rocky coastal outcrops, and one of the world’s rarest sea lions — Hooker’s — can be seen sunbathing on many of the sandy beaches surrounding the city. They are protective of

Everyone falls in love with the Yellow-eyed Penguin/Hoiho, and the world’s smallest penguin, the Little Blue Penguin/Kororā. Sightings of these penguins are usually at dusk when they scurry back from the sea to

photo: jef wodniack / getty images

22 / EXPLORE wildlife

With its amazing variety of habitats and landscapes, Dunedin’s natural environment makes it the wildlife capital of New Zealand. their nests. The best safe viewing of Hoiho is at Sandfly Bay or on a Penguin Place tour, while Kororā can be viewed from a platform just below the Royal Albatross Centre. Both are endangered species and must be given space. On the hills above the other side of Otago Harbour is the predator-free Orokonui Ecosanctuary. This is home to some of the world’s most fascinating and rare forest birds, reptiles, and plants. You can wander through the native forest with or without a guide, and may see takahē, tuatara, Otago skinks, kaka, bellbirds, and tui. If you really want to get up close and personal with New Zealand’s native birds, this is the place to be.

photo: westend61 / getty images


active pursuits EXPLORE / 23

Active pursuits It’s your round......

The selection of golf courses all around Dunedin is sure to offer something to please players of all abilities. Among them is St Clair Golf Club, on the cliffs above the beach and offering spectacular ocean views. The beautiful course has been the host for many national and international events, with golfers including Seve Ballesteros and Sir Bob Charles having graced the fairways.

On your bike.........

Dunedin has become a mountain biking mecca, with many kilometres of custom designed track to be found on the hills surrounding the city. These include the awesome Signal Hill Reserve, with a world class network of trails for beginner, intermediate, advanced, and expert riders. Mountain Biking Otago has also developed tracks at Wakari Creek, Whare Flat, Bethune’s Gully, Nicols Creek, and Swampy Summit.

Venues Functions C A T ERI NG U P TO 1 50 G U E STS

photo: linda robertson / odt

A HARBOUR city surrounded by hills, Dunedin naturally provides recreational opportunities. Whether golfing, cycling, walking, or jogging there’s plenty to do and see.

Walk it off................

A great place for walking, Dunedin has a range of tracks offering something for all ages and abilities. The Dunedin Town Belt has been preserved since the early days of European settlement in Dunedin. This strip of parks and bush offers plenty of recreational possibilities, including walking. You can explore from any point, or attempt to traverse its entirety from the Oval to the Dunedin Botanic Gardens. Ross Creek, off Burma Road, is a short and picturesque wander that weaves through native bush and exotic forest around one of New Zealand’s oldest reservoirs. The family-friendly loop is popular with walkers and joggers, as well as the local birdlife. The surrounding reserve offers the opportunity to find some solitude adjacent to the city, with bush, creeks, and even a waterfall. The Pineapple Track leads to the top of Flagstaff, which has stunning views over the city and the Taieri Plain when the weather allows. From Booth Road you’ll get a real workout on the climb, or you can begin on Whare Flat Road, for a short and steep chike to the summit. Either way, it’s a great

way to get your bearings — and some exercise — in Dunedin. You can drive to the top of Mount Cargill for superb 360-degree views. But if you are feeling more adventurous, you can follow the relatively easy tracks through the bush from Bethune’s Gully. Once at the top though, a detour to the Organ Pipes is compulsory. These hexagonal basalt columns are one of Dunedin’s most unique natural features. Be careful on the loose rocks that you’ll have to negotiate though. A popular coastal walk on the Otago Peninsula, the Sandymount Track offers great views of Hoopers Inlet and Allans Beach. The hour-long walk has ups and downs through farmland, to a series of viewpoints. Begin at the carpark on Sandymount Road, off Highcliff Road. Victory Beach is one of the more deserted beaches on the peninsula — apart from the abundant wildlife. Allow a couple of hours, as there’s a trek across farmland and the Okia Reserve — taking in the distinctively shaped Pyramids en route. The beach is home to sea lions, seals, and penguins — and at the southern end what remains of the SS Victory, wrecked here in 1861.

PLAY GOLF C A T ER IN G U P T O 1 50 G U ES T S

J O I N D U N E D I N ’ S M O ST I D YL L I C G O L F CL U B

20 Isadore Road, St Clair, Dunedin • (03) 487 7076 • www.stclairgolf.co.nz


24 / EXPLORE accommodation

Book your

Dunedin motel directly NORTH DUNEDIN 315 Euro

Bluestone on george

Located in Dunedin’s vibrant café and retail area, only a 3-minute walk from Dunedin Hospital, a 5-minute walk from the Octagon, and a 10-minute walk from the University of Otago. Ample free onsite parking in the heart of Dunedin city center. All windows double glazed and soundproofed. Free Wi-Fi.

Enjoy the relaxing ambience of this modern boutique accommodation. Tastefully-decorated rooms, all with balconies or patios. Guest lounge serving a light menu, and plentiful outdoor seating as well as a manicured garden. Walk to many fabulous local dining options, cafes, bars, the main shopping area and the city’s attractions.

315-319 George St / 03 477 9929 stay@eurodunedin.co.nz www.eurodunedin.co.nz

571 George St / 03 477 9201 stay@bluestonedunedin.co.nz www.bluestonedunedin.co.nz

538 Great King Motel 538 Great King St / 03 477 7983 info@greatkingmotel.co.nz www.greatkingmotel.co.nz 755 Regal Court 755 George St / 03 477 7729 stay@755regalcourtmotel.co.nz www.755regalcourtmotel.co.nz 858 George St 858 George St / 03 4740047 reservations@858georgestreetmotel.co.nz www.858georgestreetmotel.co.nz Alcala Motor Lodge Cnr George & St David / 03 477 9073 alcala-motel@xtra.co.nz www.alcalamotorlodge.co.nz Alexis Motor Lodge 475 George St / 03 471 7268 stay@alexis.co.nz www.alexis.co.nz Alhambra Oaks 588 Great King St / 03 477 7735 info@alhambraoaks.co.nz www.alhambraoaks.co.nz Allan Court 590 George St / 03 477 7526 stay@allancourt.co.nz www.allancourt.co.nz Amross 660 George St / 03 471 8924 amrossmotel@callplus.net.nz www.amrossmotel.co.nz Aria on Bank 42-46 Bank Street / 03 473 1188 stay@ariaonbank.co.nz www.ariaonbank.co.nz Aurora on George 678 George St / 03 477 7984 stay@auroradunedin.co.nz www.auroradunedin.co.nz Beechwood 842 George St / 03 477 4272 info@beechwood.co.nz www.motel-accommodation-dunedin.co.nz Bella Vista Dunedin 704 Great King St / 03 477 2232 reservations@bellavistadunedin.co.nz www.bellavista.co.nz

CENTRAL DUNEDIN 97 Motel Moray 97 Moray Place / 03 477 2050 info@97motel.co.nz www.97motel.co.nz Aaron Lodge 162 Kaikorai Valley Rd / 03 476 4725 lindsay@aaronlodge.co.nz www.aaronlodgetop10.co.nz

Dunedin Palms Motel

Cable Court Motel 833 Cumberland St Nth / 03 477 3525 cablecourt@ilt.co.nz www.cablecourt.co.nz Commodore Motel 932 Cumberland St Nth / 03 477 7766 info@commodoremotel.co.nz www.commodoremotel.co.nz Cumberland Motel 821 Cumberland St Nth / 03 477 1321 cumberland.motel@xtra.co.nz www.cumberlandmotel.co.nz Dunedin Motel + Villas 624 George St / 03 477 7692 staydunedin@xtra.co.nz www.dunedinmotels.co.nz George Street Motel Apartments 575 George St / 03 477 9333 info@georgestreetmotel.co.nz www.georgestreetmotel.co.nz Garden Motel 958 George St / 03 477 8251 info@gardenmotel.co.nz www.gardenmotel.co.nz Highland House 1003 George St / 03 477 2665 dunedinbookings@gmail.com Leith Valley Holiday Park & Motel 103 Malvern St / 03 467 9936 stay@leithvalleyhp.co.nz www.leithvalleytouringpark.co.nz Owens Motel 745 George St / 03 477 7156 owensmotel@xtra.co.nz www.owensmotel.nz Sahara Motels 619 George St / 03 477 6662 info@dunedin-accommodation.co.nz www.dunedin-accommodation.co.nz Woodlands Motels and Apartments 594 Great King St / 03 477 0270 woodlandsvillage@xtra.co.nz www.motel594.co.nz

Fantastic inner city location, just a 5-minute walk from the centre of Dunedin. Walking distance to bars, cafès, restaurants and shopping. A stone's throw from Dunedin’s warehouse precinct featuring boutique bars, cafés, and entertainment. Studios, spa bath units, one-bedroom units, an executive onebedroom spa pool unit, and two-bedroom family units available. 185 High Street / 03 477 8293 stay@dunedinpalmsmotel.co.nz www.dunedinpalmsmotel.co.nz Law Courts Hotel Cnr Cumberland & Stuart Sts / 03 477 8036 admin@lawcourtshotel.co.nz. www.lawcourtshotel.co.nz Motel on Carroll 10 Carroll St / 027 217 9019 brian@moteloncarroll.co.nz www.moteloncarroll.co.nz Motel on York 47 York Place / 03 477 6120 info@motelonyork.co.nz www.motelonyork.co.nz Roslyn Apartments 23 City Rd, Roslyn / 03 477 6777 roslynapartments@xtra.co.nz www.roslynapartments.co.nz


hotel spotlight ebb — dunedin

Ebb is a contemporary neighbourhood hotel that provides relaxed luxury on your journey. Dunedin’s history and coastline was the inspiration for the hotel, designed by local architect Gary Todd and Sydney-based interior Architect Indyk Architects, bringing their characteristic eclectic flair to Ebb’s interiors. Dunedin is a unique destination, renowned for its music, food, wine and design. Surrounded by South Pacific Seas, it combines rugged and picturesque landscape, perfect for wild and woolly walks, with historic city sites and a buzzing contemporary city scene, the perfect base to explore, escape or simply go with the flow. An ode to our unique place in the world, inspired by all the people, places and things that make Dunedin special. Come as you are, go as you please. 82 Filleul Street, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand +64 (0)3 260 6800 ebb-dunedin.co.nz / Follow @ebbdunedin

accommodation EXPLORE / 25

Dunedin Leisure Lodge — A Distinction Hotel

Welcome to Dunedin’s only garden hotel. Dunedin Leisure Lodge is located within two acres of beautifully kept garden, and just a six-minute drive from the city centre (or seven, in rush hour). Neighbouring the Dunedin Botanic Garden, Dunedin Leisure Lodge is a short stroll to Otago Museum and the University of Otago. Forsyth Barr Stadium is also within easy walking distance. Their unique surroundings make for a truly relaxing place to stay, no matter how busy your visit might be. Dunedin Leisure Lodge offers a wide range of accommodation to suit every need and budget including Corporate King and Superior King with enough room for 2 adults and a child. Dunedin Leisure Lodge has a 4-star Qualmark rating and the Enviro-Silver award.

30 Duke Street, North Dunedin 03 477 5360 www.dunedinleisurelodge.nz

Dunedin motels continued . . . SOUTH DUNEDIN 555 Dunedin 555 Anderson Bay Road / 03 455 5779 stay@bwdunedin.co.nz

Majestic Mansions Apartments @ St Clair

www.555onbayview.co.nz Adrian Motels 101 Queens Drive / 03 455 2009 adrianmotel@xtra.co.nz www.adrianmotel.co.nz Bayfield Motel and Apartments 210 Musselburgh Rise / 03 455 0756 info@bayfieldmotel.co.nz www.bayfieldmotel.co.nz Carisbrook Motel 169 South Road / 03 455 2167 carism@xtra.co.nz www.carisbrook-motel.co.nz Esplanade Motel 14 Esplanade / 03 455 1987 bookings@esplanade.co.nz www.esplanade.co.nz Dunedin Holiday Park 41 Victoria Rd / 03 455 4690 office@dunedinholidaypark.co.nz www.dunedinholidaypark.co.nz

OUTER DUNEDIN Bella Vista Mosgiel 85 Gordon Road, Mosgiel / 03 484 7258 stay@bellavistamosgiel.co.nz www.bellavistamotels.co.nz Bonnie Knights Motel 18-20 Quarry Rd, Mosgiel / 03 489 2415 stay@bonnieknights.co.nz www.bonnieknights.co.nz

Experience Dunedin's boutique, contemporary motel at St Clair Beach — a unique stay with off-street parking and 1-minute walk to the beach, cafés, bars and restaurants. Ideal for short and medium-term stays. Sink into the calm at the Majestic Mansions — seaside in the city — your perfect getaway, home away from home. 15 Bedford Street, St Clair 03 456 5000 bookings@majesticmansions.co.nz www.majesticmansions.co.nz

Mosgiel Regency Motel 50 Gordon Road, Mosgiel / 03 489 4711 mosgiel.regency@xtra.co.nz www.mosgielregency.co.nz Portobello Motel 10 Harington Point Road / 03 478 0155 portobellomotels@xtra.co.nz www.portobellomotels.com Longbourne Lodge Motel 100 School Road South, Mosgiel / 03 489 5701 longbourne.lodge@xtra.co.nz www.longbournelodge.co.nz


26 / EXPLORE business

business Dunedin

does THE

Left-right: Speight's Brewery has been a presence in Dunedin since the late 1800s. Photo: ODT archive The Hallensteins' factory in the Octagon in the early 20th Century. Photo: ODT archive Learning platform providers Education Perfect are a leader in the city's tech sector. Photo: Gregor Richardson

From its beginnings to the present day, Dunedin has been the home for innovative business.

T

HE CITY’S early development as a major commercial centre was a consequence of the Central Otago Goldrush of the 1860s. That phenomenon saw Dunedin burgeon overnight, attracting hard working entrepreneurs with a vision for the new colony. Brands including Shacklock, Hallensteins, Hudsons, Greggs, Bell Tea, Methvens, and Speight’s were all born in this atmosphere of opportunity. H.E. Shacklock pioneered the manufacture of coal ranges, especially with the Orion. By 1894 Shacklock appliances were being sold throughout New Zealand, and the company went on to produce the country’s first electric range in 1925. In 1955 they were taken over by Fisher & Paykel, and that company still maintains a large design centre in Dunedin. Businessman Bendix Hallenstein opened the New Zealand Clothing Factory in Dunedin in 1873, which led to him opening his first store in the city. Hallensteins, like his other enterprise The D.I.C. department stores became national chains. The D.I.C. was bought out by rival Arthur Barnett in the 1980s. Hudson’s Biscuits boomed in Dunedin from 1868, when Richard Hudson built his first

bakehouse. Soon, his chocolate and cocoa manufacturing plant was also operating. In 1930 Hudson’s joined with Cadbury to make New Zealand’s first Cadbury Dairy Milk chocolate bar. A year later, the first Jaffas began rolling down cinema aisles around the country. Alongside chocolate, tea was another staple produced in Dunedin. Bell Tea, New Zealand’s oldest tea company, were here for over 100 years, starting in 1898. Tiger Tea was another institution in the city, with its enduring slogan “It’s so good, it goes further. Traces of the company can still be spotted around town. Gregg’s has been a success story since Irish immigrant William Gregg established the company in 1861. Originally specialising in coffee and spice, their range has expanded over the decades. George Methven launched his Dunedin iron and brass foundry in 1886, and started making tapware a decade later. Now in its 135th year, Methven continues to innovate, and the company operates in several territories internationally. Another grand stayer is of course Speight’s Brewery, which was established here by George Speight in 1876. Within 10 years they were

the biggest brewery in the country, and have remained an impressive presence since. Today you can take the Brewery Tour, and experience the hospitality at Speight’s Ale House. Other Dunedin companies that have survived through the years include handmade footwear manufacturers McKinlay’s (1879), beverage makers West’s (1876), food company Harraways (1867), and Otago Furniture (1868). In 1913, J & AP Scott was established as an engineering repair company. It has grown and diversified over the years, and now manufactures advanced automation systems for industry around the world. A thriving technology sector is also now stepping up to contemporary business challenges. A new wave of Dunedin-founded companies has emerged over recent decades, many the product of the city’s tertiary education institutions. These include Education Perfect, Timely, ADInstruments, and gaming company Runaway. Both they and the heritage companies that are still here ensure that Dunedin’s legacy as a leader in innovation continues, with strengths in design, education, health, technology, manufacturing, food, and natural products.


The story that stays with you. Southern charm for the contemporary traveller

Enjoy the very best of the Otago region at five-star boutique hotel, Fable Dunedin. Setting a new standard in contemporary luxury, every detail is attended at this artfully refurbished heritage property. Thoughtful touches in the sumptuous décor add beauty at each turn, offering the occasional nod to the region’s Scottish heritage. Local produce suppliers take centre-stage in our restaurant and event menus, thoughtfully created by one of Dunedin’s top chefs.

Book your stay fablehotelsandresorts.com +64 3 477 1145 @fablehotelsandresorts

fablehotelsandresorts


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