Page 1


2


Welcome to the Alley Theatre

T

he Mission of the Alley Theatre’s   Educa on and Community  Engagement programs is to apply  theatre prac ce in a wide range of  community contexts — to use the prac ce of  theatre to strengthen and  promote the  interpersonal goals of our community partners; to  provide a vehicle for meaningful community  discourse; to create the most advanced training  ground for emerging theatre ar sts; and to            become a driving force for arts educa on within   our schools.   

Our Core Values: 

Empathy and collabora on through the  prac ce of theatre 



Service to our community by  teaching our      art form in  mul ple se ngs  



Innova on and quality in  our prac ce 



Excellence in developing                               exemplary replicable                                     na onally recognized                                  programming  

3


Our Partners in Education Foundation Ray C. Fish Founda on  George and Mary Josephine Hamman Founda on  William E. and Natoma Pyle Harvey Charitable Trust  Na onal Corporate Theatre Fund Hearst Crea ve Impact  Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo™  Immanuel & Helen B. Olshan Founda on, Inc.  The Powell Founda on  Kinder Founda on            Baby Dinosaurs in Staging STEM at the Play Makers Summer  Camp, 2013 

Robert W. & Pearl Wallis Knox Charitable Founda on  Lillian Kaiser Lewis Founda on  William Randolph Hearst Founda on   

Government Texas Commission on the Arts/Educa on  TCA/Public Safety/Criminal Jus ce  Harris County Department of Educa on   

Corporation Boeing   Deloi e  Enbridge Energy Company, Inc.  Macy's  Marathon Oil Company  Parker Drilling Company  Shell Oil Company  United Airlines 

4


Education at the Alley Theatre

T

he Alley Theatre is firmly commi ed to the idea that par cipa on in  the arts and arts integra on in educa on is more than enriching — it is  essen al!  

Studies have illustrated that students who study the arts are more      ac ve in community affairs, assume leadership roles, are more likely to par cipate in  math or science fairs and have increased self‐esteem and confidence.                 

Addi onally, research has demonstrated that what students learn in the arts helps  them to succeed in other subjects and promotes skills that are vital to the future  workforce. But developing a love of theatre is a progressive process, requiring     sustained exposure.    Arts Educa on:  

Improves cri cal literacy skills for all learners 



Sparks curiosity and fosters personal growth 



Celebrates diversity and cultural heritage 



Encourages crea vity and cri cal thinking  



Inspires civic par cipa on 

Senior Summer Conservatory Performance, 2013 

 

Become a School PARTNER Becoming an Alley Partner provides teachers with a valuable outside resource  that augments exis ng curriculum. School  partnerships are tailored to meet  individual school needs and can involve par cipa on in mul ple programs.             Students and educators par cipate in observing plays. They discuss the characters and language. They take part in playmaking,  theatre design and produc on workshops with guest teaching ar sts and with each other. Together, the school and the Alley design  an experience to suit your teaching needs and address the students’ needs.  If you are bringing students to a performance of A Christmas Carol ‐ A Ghost Story of Christmas please consider scheduling a        pre‐ or post‐performance workshop for your group or classes. To check availability, please contact Educa on and Community  Engagement at 713.228.9341 or at educa on@alleytheatre.org.  This teacher guide includes eight lesson plans. The first and last ones are the most essen al in order to prepare students for the  play and to help them process the experience. We have included TEKS sugges ons here for your convenience. Please adjust the  lesson plans for A Christmas Carol to suit the needs of your classroom.  

5


What to Bring to the Theatre Please discuss the “live” qualities of theatre with your students before attending a performance at the Alley Theatre.

T

heatre is very public and it happens before a live audience. This  makes each performance as unique as the group of people who    gather as a community to see and hear it. In the theatre, the           audience affects the performance. An engaged, a en ve and         enthusias c audience will get  a be er performance from the cast and crew than   a disrup ve audience. People play games, text, surf the Internet and watch            television in private. They can also stop and rewind a program or a clip if needed,  not so in the theatre. Therefore, there are different expecta ons of you and your  students when you step into a theatre.  So here are some general guidelines that anyone new to the theatre should know.  (Teachers don’t expect that all of your students will know this e que e, so please  go over these common sense rules.)     

All electronic devices must be turned off upon entering our theatre, especially  cell phones, portable gaming devices, and MP3 players. These items produce  noise that is distrac ng to others and interferes with our equipment. (IF     POSSIBLE, LEAVE BACKPACKS WITH CELLPHONES ON THE BUS OR LOCKED IN  THE CAR.) 



The use of recording or photo equipment of any kind is not permi ed in the   theatre before, during or a er the performance.  



Food and drink are never allowed in our theatre, even for the evening              performances.   



Applause is used to acknowledge the performers and to voice apprecia on or  approval. Dimming the lights on the stage and bringing up the house lights  usually signals intermission. A curtain call in which the cast returns to the  stage for bows follows a performance.  Applause can erupt naturally from an  engaged audience: this is great. 



We welcome genuine reac ons to the work on stage.  However,                   conversa ons and discussions must wait un l intermission or a er the curtain  call.  



Visi ng the theatre should be an entertaining ac vity but it is also one that    requires considera on for fellow audience members, as well as the actors on  stage. 

THANK YOU!

Connections:

6



How is a ending a play different from going to the movies? 



How should you react to any loud noises during the play? 



Why is it so important to not talk during a play? 


What to bring to the theatre:     

RESPECT CURIOSITY QUESTIONS WONDER CONSIDERATION OF OTHERS

What to leave behind:     

CELL PHONES FOOD ATTITUDE JUDGEMENT DISRESPECT OF OTHERS

7


INTRODUCTION:

“May it haunt their houses pleasantly” — Charles Dickens 

N

A Christmas Carol Front cover.   www.commons.wikimedia.org 

o other book or story by Charles Dickens has been  more widely received, cri cized, alluded to or  more frequently adapted to other media. Some  scholars have even claimed that in publishing A Christmas  Carol, Dickens single handedly invented the modern form  of the Christmas holiday in England and the United States.  As G.K. Chesterton noted long ago, with A Christmas Carol  Dickens succeeded in transforming Christmas from a   sacred fes val into a family feast. In so doing, he brought  the holiday inside the home and thus made it accessible  to ordinary people, who were now able to par cipate  directly in the celebra on rather than merely witnessing  its performance in church.     Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol in the 1840s. These   were years of famine in Ireland and severe economic   depression worldwide. Dickens knew and understood   the effects of poverty, and by having Scrooge no ce   homeless mothers huddled in doorways at the end of the  first Stave, he was wri ng from his own observa on and  experience. So today, A Christmas Carol, along with other  works by Dickens, con nues to direct a en on to the  problems of homelessness and economic injus ce on our    very doorsteps. In focusing on such ques ons, Dickens is    a writer for all historical periods, including our own.  

The major change that Dickens made in 1843 when he revised his earlier tale was to transform its central character from a         member of the working class into a wealthy  businessman, thereby introducing a different and considerably more "radical" social  message into the story. Nevertheless, the basic situa on in the two stories is quite similar. Both Gabriel Grubb and Ebenezer  Scrooge are spoilsports. That is, each refuses to join and par cipate in the communal fes val or sacred "sport" of Christmas. In both  stories the spoilsport receives supernatural visitors who instruct him in the human values appropriate to the Christmas season, and  in both stories the spoilsport undergoes a conversion that reunites him with the spirit of community and fellowship. Moreover, a  child or group of children plays an important role in the redemp ve process in both stories.    Reac ons to A Christmas Carol have varied tremendously over the years, with each genera on finding in it a message ‐ spiritual,  psychological or poli cal ‐ applicable to the needs of different audiences. Clearly the Carol is an ideological work, both in and for our  own  me. The enormous success of its mul ple adapta ons tes fies to its enduring value as a marketable commodity. Ostensibly  its message is one that decries the commercialism of a debased Christmas celebra on. Ironically, the story itself con nues to be  bought and sold, packaged and repackaged to meet an apparently inexhaus ble demand (while Dickens himself made li le money  from A Christmas Carol). In the end, it may not ma er that A Christmas Carol has been commercialized, since its story of the  strength of community and the power of love is not lost in buying and selling. 

“Reac ons to A Christmas Carol have varied tremendously over  the years, with each genera on finding in it a message ‐ spiritual,  psychological, or poli cal ‐ applicable to the needs of different  audiences.” ― John O. Jordan, Dickens Electronic Archive  8  

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading  


THE LOW DOWN: A CHRISTMAS CAROL

L

ondon, Christmas Eve 1843. For some, it is a  me for celebra on.   For others, like Ebenezer Scrooge, it’s a waste of  me and money.  Charity and good will?  

Bah Humbug!     Scrooge, a miser and despiser of the cheerful holiday season, gets a reality  check when he receives a visit from the ghost of his former partner Jacob   Marley. Bound in an immense chain of padlocks and cashboxes, Marley warns  Scrooge that he is doomed to follow the same fate as Marley upon his death if  he doesn’t change his ways. Marley then warns Scrooge of yet another fate —  the approaching appearance of three spirits.    Dressed in a ghoulish gown, the Ghost of Christmas Past appears to Scrooge  and takes him on a painful tour of his unpleasant childhood, from his fall from  favor with his father, to the loss of his fiancée. Christmas Past then shows  Scrooge his surprisingly happier memories, such as when an employee    showed Scrooge how wonderful Christmas can be.     But the miserly Scrooge is unmoved.     Back at home, a ra led Scrooge is visited by the Ghost of Christmas Present  who shows him that the holiday fes vi es go on without him: the soulful   family gathering of the poor Cratchits and the wild party at his nephew Fred’s  remind him of what he’s missing. Furthermore, Christmas Present warns  Scrooge that without money, the Cratchits’ youngest and most hope‐filled  member, Tiny Tim, will die.     The Spirit of Christmas Yet to Come, shows Scrooge the world a er his own  death. Not only will his only friends not mourn his death but, for lack of  Scrooge’s charity, Tiny Tim will also perish.    Scrooge awakens the next morning not only laughing and celebra ng, but is  anxious as he can be to splurge on his neighbors. For the Cratchits, he buys a  large Christmas dinner and offers to give their father a pay raise to pay for  Tiny Tim’s health needs. He forgives those in the streets who owe him money,    sings in church, and is finally visited by his nephew, Fred, wherein Scrooge  begs forgiveness and requests a place at the Christmas dinner table.     And with that, Scrooge becomes best‐known for his immense love of the   holiday.  

Declan Mooney as Mr. Marvel in the Alley Theatre’s   A Christmas Carol — A Ghost Story of Christmas, 2012.   Photo by Mike McCormick. 

(L‐R) Jay Sullivan as Fred and Jeffrey Bean as   Ebenezer Scrooge in the Alley Theatre’s   A Christmas Carol — A Ghost Story of Christmas, 2012.   Photo by Mike McCormick. 

“I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all  the year. I will live in the Past, the Present and the Future.  The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut  out the lessons that they teach!” ― Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol  TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading  

9


THE MAN WHO BROUGHT CHRISTMAS BACK

I

Charles Dickens, 1858.  Photo by George Herbert Watkins.   

“With A Christmas Carol,   Dickens succeeded in   transforming Christmas from   a sacred fes val into a family  feast. In so doing, he brought  the holiday inside the home and  thus made it accessible to   ordinary people, who were now  able to par cipate directly in   the celebra on rather than  merely witnessing its   performance in church.”  ̶  G.K Chesterson, Dickens Scholar,  Introduc on to “A Christmas Carol” 

10

n October of 1843, when he started to write A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens  was, at 31, the successful author of Sketches by Boz, The Pickwick Papers, Oliver  Twist, Nicholas Nickleby, The Old Curiosity Shop, Barnaby Rudge, and American  Notes. On February 7, 1812, he was born into a struggling lower‐middle class family  in Portsmouth, England. When he was 10, Dickens's father, a navy clerk, moved the  family to a smaller house in Camden Town, London.     The four‐room house at 16 Bayham Street is supposedly the model for the  Cratchits' house. The six Cratchit  children correspond to the six Dickens children at  that  me, including Dickens's youngest brother, a sickly boy, known as "Tiny Fred.”  Even with the move to London, his family could not afford to send Dickens to  school, and instead he was free to explore the urban neighborhoods around him.  When he was 12, his father found work for him in a factory, and he boarded with  another family. Soon a erward, his father was imprisoned for debt, and the whole  family moved to the Marshalsea debtors' prison except for Charles, who kept   working. He felt abandoned and ashamed of this experience for the rest of his life,  and although he fic onalized it in his novels, during his life he told the truth to only  one person, his friend and biographer John Forster.    Dickens was later sent back to school, but when his parents could again no longer  afford to pay for their son's educa on, he found work first as an office boy in a law  firm, and then in 1835, as a newspaper reporter. He taught himself shorthand and  soon was known as the fastest and most accurate parliamentary reporter in the  city. While working as a reporter, Dickens began wri ng semi‐fic onal sketches   sa rizing daily life, eventually publishing them as Sketches by Boz.     His next work was The Pickwick Papers, which was published in a rela vely new   serial format and helped to establish him as a successful writer at the age of 24.  A er Pickwick, all of his subsequent books, un l A Christmas Carol, were first sold   in serial form. In 1837, Dickens wrote Oliver Twist, a cri cism of the exploita on of  child labor.      In 1842, Dickens made a trip to the United States where he campaigned for the  aboli on of slavery. Upon his return to England, he wrote American Notes, in which  he condemns the hypocrisy regarding labor laws that began in England and spread  to the United States.    A Christmas Carol was wri en during a  me in England when Christmas tradi ons  were in decline.  The overarching themes of goodwill and compassion in the story  did much to enhance the importance of the holiday and inspired great nostalgia for  Christmas in England.  The popular celebra on of the holiday took a sharp upward  swing a er the publica on of the novel in 1843.    Finishing only one more novel (Our Mutual Friend, 1864‐5), Dickens died in   England on June 9, 1870. Buried in Poets’ Corner at Westminster Abbey in London,  he le  behind an unfinished novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood.    Dickens enjoyed immense popularity in his life me and was then best known for his  effec veness as a cri c of contemporary society. He was par cularly effec ve in his  efforts to reform child labor laws in England, due in no small part to his personal             experience as a boy working in a factory. Now, he is perhaps best remembered as  TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       the author of A Christmas Carol.  TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading  


DID YOU KNOW… ?

O

ther novels by Charles Dickens include:   

The Pickwick Papers  · Oliver Twist  ·  Nicholas Nickleby  ·  The Old Curiosity Shop       Barnaby Rudge  ·  Mar n Chuzzlewit  ·  Dombey and Son  ·  David Copperfield       Bleak House  ·  Hard Times  ·  Li le Dorrit  ·  A Tale of Two Ci es       Great Expecta ons  ·  Our Mutual Friend  ·  The Mystery of Edwin Drood  

Dickens’ novel The Old in Curiosity Shop, published

In June 1865, Dickens performed an heroic deed when he rescued passengers from the Staplehurst

1841, experienced dented worldwide rece unp hype unmatched by any book until Harry Potter.

a ny ed m s nam is n e k e ft r h Dic ren a child g his n o m of his A thors. ite au Alfred favor were n e r ild enry h c 0 s, 1 n H Dicke n so y s and Tenn icken ing D Field lwar rd Bu E d wa ns. k Dic e Lyton

kens” the Dic “What lot,” “a mean, used to ke the li rt u h at h ve as in, “t ight ha s.” It m en k ic d devil. rd o w om the come fr

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies     TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language   & Reading  

Rail Crash.

Dickens is the only e author who has a them cy. lega his to ted devo park , Dickens World in Chatham pe’s England, contains Euro longest indoor ride, the “Great Expectations” long flume and the Haunted

House of Ebenezer Scrooge.

Dickens may have had Obsessive Com pulsive Disord er. His habits in cluded arranging fu rniture north to south, touchi ng objects th ree times for good luck and combing his hair hundre ds of times a da y.

Dickens belie ved that a human could die from spon taneous human com bustion .

11


THE TWO FACES OF DICKENS

C

harles Dickens was an outgoing, playful man who loved games and par es. The  act of wri ng A Christmas Carol affected him profoundly. During its composi on,  he wrote a friend that he, "wept and laughed, and wept again, and excited   himself in a most extraordinary manner in the composi on; and thinking whereof he  walked about the black streets of London fi een and twenty miles many a night when  all the sober folks had gone to bed." 

“Those who engage    with his legacy          Despite Dickens's frequent cri cism of organized religion and religious dogma, he loved  ng Christmas. Of the Christmas following the publica on of A Christmas Carol,  encounter many     celebra Dickens wrote in a le er, "Such dinings, such dancings, such conjurings, such blind‐ man's bluffings, such theatre‐goings, such kissings‐out of old years and kissings‐in of  different versions of  new ones never took place in these parts before. To keep Chuzzlewit going, and to do  le book, the Carol, in the odd  mes between two parts of it, was, as you may   him: the republican,  this li suppose, pre y  ght work. But when it was done I broke out like a madman, and if you  the mesmerist, the    could have seen me at a children's party at Macready's the other night going down a  country dance with Mrs. M you would have thought I was a country gentleman of   sen mentalist, the   independent property residing on a  p‐top farm, with the wind blowing straight in my  ve who was a guest at his New Year's Eve  party that year and  protector of orphans,  face every day." A rela described the performance by Dickens and his best friend. "Dickens and Forster above  all exerted themselves  ll the perspira on was pouring down and they seemed drunk  the lover of circuses,  with their efforts. Only think of that excellent Dickens playing the conjurer for one  the despairing father.”   whole hour‐the best conjurer I ever saw."  — Henry Hitchings, Great Contradic ons 

On the other hand, on January 15, 1844, Charles and Catherine's son Francis Jeffery  was born. Dickens's biographer Peter Ackroyd (1990) points out the irony that one  month a er the publica on of A Christmas Carol, which glorifies the family and   especially the pi ful Tiny Tim, Dickens's feelings for his own youngest child were more  Scroogish than Cratchity. Dickens wrote a friend, "Kate is all right again, and so they tell  me is the Baby. But I decline, (on principle), to look at the la er object." When the   Dickens family le  for Italy in July, they le  the baby in England with his maternal  grandmother.    

A er A Christmas Carol, Dickens wrote another "Christmas book," The Chimes, for  Christmas 1844. Dickens wrote three more Christmas books and many Christmas   stories. He edited two magazines, Household Words and All the Year Round, which   published annual "Christmas numbers" for which he wrote and edited stories. Wri ng  about Christmas and, later, giving readings from Carol were important sources of   income for Dickens for the rest of his life. It is possible that Dickens some mes   regre ed this relentless associa on with the holiday. In a le er to his daughter Mamie,  he wrote that he felt as if he "had murdered a Christmas a number of years ago, and   its ghost perpetually haunted me." 

CONNECTIONS: 

While growing up, Dickens’s family resembled the Cratchits, but he acted more  Scrooge‐like as a father to his own children. What were your expecta ons of           Dickens as the writer of such a heart‐warming tale of A Christmas Carol?  



How do those assump ons contrast with who Dickens was in real life?   



Do you think Dickens was a Bob Cratchit or a Scrooge?   

12



Relate him to the character you think he most resembles. 

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading  


FROM MICKEY MOUSE TO KLINGON: THE UNIVERSALITY OF A CHRISTMAS CAROL

C

harles Dickens le  behind only one manuscript of A Christmas Carol.  The manuscript is nearly impossible to follow because of revisions he  made to get the story right. Within the introductory remarks wri en in  December, 1843, he modestly refers to his story as, “a li le book”– which  became one of the most enduring holiday tales ever wri en. 

The first stage adapta on of A Christmas Carol was performed in London in  January 1844.  Numerous other versions followed. However, Dickens   supported only one of these versions in his life me.  He had run into a   plethora of piracy problems with his book, but rather than take legal ac on  against the unauthorized versions, he decided to at least make some money  out of them. By late 1844, there were about 16 produc ons which took place  in New York and London in an cipa on of the holidays. Today, adapta ons   on stage, screen, and radio are performed throughout the world as a   Christmas holiday tradi on. Some famous Scrooges include Alaster Sim,   Sir Ralph Richardson, George C. Sco , Jim Cary and Donald Duck. 

A Klingon Christmas Carol at Commedia Beauregard.   Photo by Sco  Pakudai s, 2008. 

In the last 25 years alone there have been over 300 versions produced in  many forms and fashions.  From Jim Henson’s The Muppets and a Dr. Who  Christmas Special to a Hollywood parody, Ghosts of Girlfriends Past, it seems  there are few adapta ons le  untold.  There is even a Star Trek version of the  Carol.   

Why is A Christmas Carol such a universal tale that it can even be understood  through the Star Trek language of Klingon?  Dickens believed it to be simply  the play’s  associa on with the holiday that made it so popular. But is there  more to it? Teri Downward, a Denver‐based writer on the arts, describes it  simply, “If an old toad like Scrooge can be redeemed, there may be hope for  this world yet.”   

Perhaps it is the hope for the good of humanity that we see in Scrooge’s   ul mate transforma on that keeps us clamouring for yet another adapta on.  Downward con nues, “We are grateful for second chances. We even embrace  them. A Christmas Carol is a year‐end reminder of all that we are and all that  we can be.” The story inspires us to turn inward and iden fy the Scrooge‐like  behaviours within ourselves so we may have the opportunity in the coming  year to change them. Read more at Denver Center Stage Blog or Watch A Christmas Carol  performed in Klingon 

“In the last 25 years  alone there have  been over 300   versions of   A Christmas Carol     produced in many  forms or fashions.”   ̶  Teri Downward, Why Do We Love   A Christmas Carol 

CONNECTIONS: Brainstorm and write out the main plot points and characters of A Christmas  Carol. Create a second list of poten al styles or themes; i.e. Western, Aliens,  Dracula, etc. Divide the students into groups and have them decide on a style  in which they will tell their own five‐minute version of the tale of A Christmas  Carol. Once the students have rehearsed their plays, have each group perform  them for the rest of the class. Once all of the adapta ons have been shared,  analyze what common elements from the original A Christmas Carol were  used in the class’ adapta ons. Finally, discuss why the students believe the  story is such a universal tale by reflec ng on their own experience in             developing an adapta on.  TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading   TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  

13


A SPOOKTACULAR STORY OF CHRISTMAS

O

The Company in the Alley Theatre’s   A Christmas Carol — A Ghost Story of   Christmas, 2012.   Photo by T. Charles Erickson. 

f course, many of us are skep cal of the existence of ghosts. So is Scrooge, at first,  who tries to dismiss Marley’s ghost as a byproduct of indiges on: “There’s more of  gravy than of grave about you.” And many theatrical ghosts can be read as figments  of characters’ imagina ons. In fact, some of the most interes ng decisions that directors  and  designers make in pu ng ghosts on stage have to do with how “real” they are: Who  can see them? Can they interact with objects on the set? A produc on of Macbeth where  we see the bloody ghost of Banquo is very different from one where we, like his guests,  watch Macbeth become completely unnerved by empty space. And if we do see ghosts on  stage, the costume and ligh ng designers have interes ng ques ons to answer: What do  they look like? How supernatural or how normal do they appear? Our Christmas Carol  ghosts are not designed to be overly scary. A er all, this is a show that’s enjoyed by   audiences of all ages. But they certainly are otherworldly appari ons.    People are naturally fascinated by the ques on of what lies beyond death.  And many of us  enjoy a spooky story now and then. As long as those things are true, ghost stories will   con nue to be popular. We hope you enjoy the Alley’s Yule de Spirits.    Not only is A Christmas Carol one of the most beloved holiday stories of all  me, it is also,   as Dickens’s sub tle reminds us, one of the most beloved ghost stories of all  me. It is not  necessarily a natural combina on. The ghosts, a er all, have their own holiday just a bit  earlier in the year. A er October 31, they get packed away with the bats and spiders and  witches, leaving November and December to the angels, elves, and reindeer. But not in   A Christmas Carol, where Dickens mixes spirits both fes ve and macabre. In our produc on,  we at the Alley Theatre embrace the ghostly nature of this story.    Ghost stories have been part of popular culture for decades and there is a long tradi on   of ghosts on the stage, as well.  No fewer than five of Shakespeare’s plays feature ghostly  characters (Hamlet, Macbeth, Richard III, Julius Caesar and Cymbaline). In fact, Shakespeare  himself took to the stage as the Ghost in Hamlet. Hamlet’s ghosts are generally vengeful  spirits, returned from the dead to bring down their enemies from life. But not all theatre  ghosts are such dark figures. Noel Coward’s Blithe Spirit features a ghost whose haun ng  produces comical rather than tragic results. More recent plays such as David Auburn’s Proof  and Neil Simon’s Rose’s Dilemma have more benevolent ghosts who are more interested in  helping the living characters than wreaking vengeance. Our Christmas Carol ghosts draw on  both tradi ons. Marley and Christmas Future, at least, are fearsome figures and there’s an  element of punishment in the ordeal to which all the spirits subject Ebenezer Scrooge. But  ul mately we know that they have the miser’s best interests at heart.   

Harold Bloom, Shakespeare: The Inven on of the Human, 1998   

CONNECTIONS:  John Feltch as Jacob Marley in the Alley   Theatre’s A Christmas Carol — A Ghost Story  of Christmas, 2012.   Photo by T. Charles Erickson. 

Ask your students why they think people like ghost stories. Do they have favorite ghost  stories themselves? 

 Our Christmas Carol ghosts draw on the English se ng of Dickens’s story. In addi on           to Marley and the three Christmas Ghosts, there is a chorus of ghosts represen ng           famous figures or periods in English history, including: Mary Stuart, The Restora on,           Medieval England, Henry V, Anne Bonny, and The Sco sh border wars.   

 Have your students research these periods and try to iden fy the ghosts in the           produc on. Or have them come up with a similar list of ghosts for an American          ghostly chorus. What would those ghosts look like? 

14

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading   TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  


THE 12 MONTHS OF CHRISTMAS

T

he Cratchit family was modeled a er Dickens’s own family growing up.   While the ‘good will and generosity’ of Christmas‐ me certainly can   improve the lives of those in need for those few winter days, it is likely that  Dickens would have wished the spirit of giving to con nue beyond December 25.  Perhaps then his own family would have been a bit more comfortable throughout  the year rather than in the short amount of  me when others were willing to help.  Dickens writes of Christmas as a  me in which “Pe y jealousies and discords are  forgo en; social feelings are awakened in the bosoms to which they have long been  strangers.” How can we spread Christmas spirit all year round?     

ACTIVITY:

Pigeon Coming Back From Outer Space by Frits Ahlefeldt.  www.publicdomainpictures.net 

Split students into groups of four.  Give them five minutes to share their own  Christmas family or community tradi on that involves giving their  me to help  someone else.  Each student has one minute to share their tradi on with the rest of  the group. Within the group, have the students choose which person’s tradi on  could most easily be repeated throughout the year. Using the chosen tradi on, the  students in the group now create a scene in which they play out the tradi on in the  following sequence. First they create a frozen image with their bodies that depicts  the ac on of actually helping others in that tradi on. Then they form a second and  third frozen image, one that highlights the par cular posi ve feeling the people  have while helping others, and the third image depicts that tradi on and the feeling   together but outside of a Christmas context. The students in each group create one  line of dialogue for each character in each image. The groups show these images to  each other, the audience of students can unfreeze one character at a  me to hear  their line of dialogue.      Ask the student audience to reflect on each image by asking ques ons:    

Image 1: What is happening in this image?     Image 2: What par cular emo on is depicted in this image?     Image 2: What new context for this tradi on has been created       in the final picture?     If there are mul ple opinions among the students when answering the ques ons, it  is a great opportunity for them to discuss their different percep ons of the images   presented. By the end of this process, the students should have come up with many  different ways to extend their Christmas spirit and joy to other  mes of the year. 

   

“A Christmas Carol demonstrates that, even in the face of such   poverty and despera on, the winter holiday can inspire good will   and generosity, that the spirit of Christmas need not be lost in an   industrialized city, but can be a shaping factor in the modern world.”   ̶  Teri Downward, Why Do We Love A Christmas Carol 

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading   TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  

15


THE BACKDROP

W

Photo of matchgirls par cipa ng in a strike against  Bryant & May, London 1888 ‐ Anonymous 

hen A Christmas Carol was published in 1843, Queen Victoria had been  on the throne for six years and was to reign for 58 more. Ci es and  towns were growing and expanding all over England, with fewer and   fewer people living in rural areas. The complete lack of sanita on in these large  urban areas led to widespread disease and high mortality rates.     Child labor was s ll common, although a law had been passed in 1833 forbidding  the employment of children under the age of 9 and limi ng working hours for   children aged 9 to 18 to 10 hours a day; however, it wasn’t un l the mid‐1840s  that this law was recognized and obeyed. The Educa on Act, which made it   mandatory for every child to a end school, was not passed un l 1870, which  meant most children in 1843 had no formal educa on. With widespread disease,  lack of educa on and li le child labor legisla on, it is not surprising that in 1839  nearly half of the funerals in London were for children under the age of 10.   The average life expectancy among adults was 27 and among members of the   working class, as low as 22.           Between November and December 1847, 500,000 people (one fourth of the total  popula on) were infected with typhus, and 53,293 died of cholera in 1849. Other  common and fatal diseases were scarlet fever, smallpox, diphtheria and typhoid.     Convicts were s ll being transported by boat to Australia and would be un l the  prac ce was abolished in 1855. Capital punishment was legal and hangings were  frequent public affairs. Dickens played a part in changing the law regarding capital  punishment, but it was 1863 before any legisla on was amended.    England led the world industrially and its rule spread to places including   Canada, India and  Australia. On the home front, railroad building had begun in  1825; six years later 5,000 miles of railroad were laid throughout the country.   Railroads opened up the country and enabled people to migrate to the larger  ci es in search of work, causing overcrowding in ci es like London. The Cratchits  in A Christmas Carol represent such lower‐middle class families. Although Mr.  Scrooge has become the most remembered character from the story, Dickens’s  first readers were probably intended to iden fy with the Cratchit family. In fact,  Dickens modeled the Cratchits' lifestyle on his own childhood experience.     In 1850, there were approximately 20,000 homeless roaming the streets of   London. Unemployment was high and, in 1867, a London newspaper es mated  that there were 100,000 ci zens living by criminal ac vity. A Christmas Carol  demonstrates that, even in the face of such poverty and despera on, the winter  holiday can inspire good will and generosity, that the spirit of Christmas need not  be lost in an industrialized city, but can be a shaping factor in the modern world. 

Scrooge and Bob Cratchit, Woodcut by John Leech,  Illustrator of A Christmas Carol, 1843. 

16

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading  


TERMS YOU SHOULD KNOW

Bedlam ‐ a notorious madhouse in London which no longer exists.    Benevolence ‐ charitable good nature.    Cantankerous ‐ ill‐tempered or quarrelsome.    Colliery ‐ a coal mine.    Debtor’s prison ‐ jail for those guilty of borrowing money which they cannot repay.     Forbearance ‐ tolerance or pa ence.    Foreclosure ‐ a legal proceeding by which property is repossessed by a financial                            Ins tu on.    For fied ‐ strengthened or secured.    Gump on ‐ boldness or enterprise.    Homage ‐ public honor or respect paid to a person or idea.    Miser ‐ a greedy person who hoards money.    Odious ‐ offensive or repugnant.    Parliament ‐ legisla ve body of the United Kingdom.    Penury ‐ extreme poverty.    Shilling ‐ Bri sh currency coin.    Smallpox ‐ an infec ous viral disease characterized by chills, high fever and   headaches with subsequent erup ons of pimples.     U litarian ‐ pertaining to or associated with u lity or usefulness.    Wages ‐ payment for services.    Workhouses ‐ public ins tu ons for the indigent, where residents are required   to earn their keep through hard labor projects. 

Bri sh Parliament, Photo by Craig Zaduck.  www.flickr.com 

Debtor’s Prison, Photo by Virginia Travis.  www.flickr.com 

Hull Royal Infirmary part of the Bri sh Na onal Health  Services, which was previously a workhouse built in  Victorian  mes, Photo by Peter Church.  www.flickr.com   

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading  

17


WHO’S WHO? Ebenezer Scrooge  A crotchety and wealthy businessman who wants nothing to  

(L‐R) Jeffrey Bean as Ebenezer Scrooge and John Feltch  as Mrs. Dilber in the Alley Theatre’s A Christmas Carol –   A Ghost Story of Christmas, 2012.    Photo by Mike McCormick. 

do with Christmas.    Jacob Marley   Scrooge’s deceased business partner who pays Scrooge an   unwelcome visit on Christmas Eve. In life, he had been just as greedy and   ill‐natured as Scrooge.    Bob Cratchit  Scrooge’s clerk. Cratchit is struggling financially, but his large and   loving family fills his life with cheer.    Tiny Tim  Cratchit’s youngest son who suffers from perpetual illness. Despite his  physical ailments, Tim’s joyful a tude brings happiness to all he meets.    Fred  Scrooge’s nephew. Although Scrooge rejects him, Fred refuses to be   discouraged by his grumpy uncle and con nues to invite him to holiday   celebra ons.    Belle  Scrooge’s former fiancée who breaks off their engagement when she sees  that Scrooge’s love of money replaces the love he once held for her.    Mr. Fezziwig  Scrooge’s former employer who throws a lavish holiday celebra on  each Christmas season.    Mrs. Dilber  Scrooge’s long‐suffering housekeeper.    Mary Pidgeon  A seller of an que dolls who owes Scrooge money she cannot pay.    Bert  A food vendor who sells cider, nuts, candies, fruit and other treats with his  two child assistants. He also owes Scrooge money he cannot pay.    Mr. Marvel  An inventor who, like Mary and Bert, owes Scrooge money he cannot  pay.      The Ghost of Christmas Past  This spirit shows Scrooge memories of his past  Christmases, including both joyful and painful experiences.    The Ghost of Christmas Present  This magnanimous spirit takes Scrooge on a  tour of all the fes vi es surrounding the present holiday season from which  Scrooge has separated himself.    The Ghost of Christmas Future This ominous spirit shows Scrooge the bleak  world which will occur a er Scrooge’s own death. 

ACTIVITY: Create family trees for the characters in A Christmas Carol.  Is there any overlap  between the various families? In the Alley Theatre’s produc on, the Ghosts  (Marley, Past, Present, and Future) are played by various people in Scrooge’s life.   How do these characters interact with the three you just created? 

18

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading   TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  


“There are many things from which I might have derived good,  by which I have not profited ... a good  me; a kind, forgiving,  charitable, pleasant  me; the only  me I know of, in the long  calendar of the year, when men and women seem by one   consent to open their shut‐up hearts freely, and to think of   people below them as if they really were fellow‐passengers to  the grave, and not another race of creatures bound on other  journeys. And therefore, uncle, though it has never put a scrap  of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe that it has done me  good, and will do me good; and I say, God bless it!”   ― Fred, A Christmas Carol 

19


A CHRISTMAS CAROL WORD CLOUD: CONTEXT AND THEME

CONNECTIONS:

20



In small groups or pairs, have students select a word they wonder about and actually look it up.   



Discuss any surprising applica ons for this word. Discuss the origin of the word. 



Discuss as a class some of the vocabulary words and how they apply to today’s current events. 



Have students look at the Word Cloud and brainstorm what they think the play might be about.   TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading  


THEMES: COMMERCIALISM AT CHRISTMAS

W

hat Scrooge truly misses out on each Christmas is the  me spent  with his friends and family. The focus of Christmas has, for many,  become preparing to stand outside a superstore at 5 a.m. on  Black Friday and trampling other shoppers to grab the best deals before  they disappear. While it is s ll important for children to sense the   specialness of the day when they open their presents on Christmas   morning, there are ways to provide a life‐long memory without   priori zing consumerism over the much more important communal aspect  of the holiday.     

Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol as a reminder of the truly important   tradi ons that keep Christmas a meaningful  me. Scrooge has spent every  previous Christmas working in order to con nue earning and amassing   money. Once he is transformed, he realizes there is more enjoyment and  fulfillment out of spending  me with his family at Fred’s home and giving  Bob Cratchit the  me off work to spend with his own family.     

The following are some ideas to help children appreciate Christmas as more  than simply a  me of receiving gi s. “[F]ill the season with non‐material  things youngsters can equate with loving and being loved:  

Target™ Black Friday, 2009. Photo by Gridprop.  www.commons.wikimedia.com 

   

Cookie baking in a fragrant kitchen with all hands helping.   A picnic supper in the living room with Christmas stories and songs in  the so  tree glow.   Make a family snowman with hot chocolate a erwards.   Quiet bed me cuddles with talk of what the holiday really means. 

It's also important to make the gi ‐giving something children do too.   Delicious conspiracies about who can make what for whom help to keep  "Tickle Me Elmo" in proper perspec ve and give a richness to the holiday  that no designer Barbie clothes can match.   

Children who are helped to become par cipants in the making of Christmas  rather than just receivers of toys are rarely upset for very long when they  find out that Santa Claus is just a jolly old myth. For they are able to realize  that, "We have seen the real Santa Claus and he is us."   

Joan Beck, Pu ng the Spirit of ‘Giving’ Back Into Christmas   

CONNECTIONS: 

Have the students write out all their favorite things about Christmas.  Then ask them to make a list of these in order of importance to them.  

 Discuss whether material goods were at the top of the list or           interspersed throughout. Create another list that connects each           material item to a par cular memory from Christmases past. Discuss             how we tend to immediately remember the thing itself as opposed to           the more significant memory behind it.    



What kind of meaning does that memory or experience provide that  helps us connect with that item? Is it the material good that’s           important or is it the memory behind it?  TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies         TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading   TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  

21


THEMES: ECONOMIC INJUSTICE Victorian England 

A

The Guardian, August 29, 2013, NY, The Eyes of New York  Photo by The Guardian contributor 

Christmas Carol […] “was an indictment of 19th century capitalism.”   Prior to the cra ing of the book, the Luddite Movement had come and  gone. This was an effort by many English workers, mainly tradesmen in  the wool and tex le industries, to stop the development of Industrializa on in the  early 1800s. They did so by destroying or sabotaging the machines. The reac on  by these workers was fueled in part by the loss of their trades, the deteriora ng    working condi ons in the factories, low wages and the unwillingness of the   government to help them. Bri sh jus ce was swi  and merciless. Several were  hung while others were deported to the penal colonies. Back in the early 1800s  when the factories shut down or laid off workers, without much of a safety net in  place, the workers had to fend for themselves. Throw in the facts that vagrancy  (the lack of a home) was a crime and the inability to pay your debts could land  you in debtor’s prison (which had happened to Dickens’ father) along with the  situa on of many people no longer able to produce their own food, and ‘Merry  Old England’ during that  me period was not a pleasant place to reside without  work or some other means of support.    Modern‐Day America  In America today, we are seeing modern‐day injus ces plaguing the work force.   This leaves many of our ci zens struggling to afford the essen als, just like the  Cratchit family. Fast‐food workers and Walmart employees have been striking to  protest low wages, working condi ons and the inability to unionize without the  risk of losing their jobs. A former Walmart employee, fired for protes ng,   described seeing his co‐workers three days before payday “borrowing money  from each other” as they did not have enough money to eat.      

CONNECTIONS:



The Guardian, August 29, 2013, NY, The Eyes of New York  Photo by The Guardian contributor 

22

Are these large corpora ons the Scrooges of today? What ‘spirits’ do the  companies need to appear before them in order to teach the modern‐day  Scrooges how to change their ac ons and give the many Bob Cratchits of           the world a figh ng chance to feed their families?      What kind of ac ons can we take as individuals and as a community to join   those who are figh ng against such large corpora ons? 

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading   TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  


THEMES: PUTTING A FACE ON INJUSTICE

SCROOGE:  Spirit, tell me if Tiny Tim will live?  SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS PRESENT:  I see a vacant seat in the chimney  corner, and a  crutch without an owner, carefully preserved. If these shadows remain unaltered  by the future, the child will die.  SCROOGE:  No, no. Oh no, kind Spirit! Say he will be spared!  SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS PRESENT:  What then? If he be like to die, he had be er do  it, and decrease the surplus popula on.  SCROOGE:  Do not mock me.  SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS PRESENT:  Forebear un l you know who that surplus is and  where it is. 

Homeless veteran on the street.   Photo by Ma hew Woitunski, 2008.  www.commons.wikimedia.org 

(Page 63‐64, A Christmas Carol Script Excerpt) 

T

hroughout A Christmas Carol, Scrooge shows no sympathy for those with  less who are in need of help. He describes his philosophy toward the poor  as one in which he has no part. Scrooge feels he has enough business of  his own to mind that he cannot take on someone else’s. While our immediate   reac on to Scrooge’s mentality is one of disapproval and disgust, today it can be  all too easy to take on a similar opinion as Scrooge and not even realize it.   Whether thinking on quite large terms about our comfortable, Western way of  life in a wealthy, democra c na on as compared to our brothers and sisters  figh ng for their lives in Egypt or Syria, or on a much smaller scale when we may  not take the  me to connect with a stranger in need because ‘it’s not our   business’ and we don’t want to expend the  me and energy required to   intervene, we can always catch ourselves ac ng in Scrooge‐like ways. If we  disapprove of Scrooge’s ac ons in 19th century England, why do we accept our  own in 21st century America? It is not un l Scrooge connects the weak Tiny Tim   to those people he considers ‘surplus popula on’ that he begins to understand  his own ability to improve their situa on. Is it simply the inability to put a name   to those we see suffering that allows us to ignore our own capacity to act as a  Scrooge ourselves? 

Helping the homeless.   Photo by Ed Yourdon, 2008.  www.commons.wikimedia.org 

CONNECTIONS: 

   

Everyone has a Scrooge inside, how can we iden fy that part of us and  ‘convert’ it to good?  Did someone or something warn you about a situa on ending up a certain  way such as Marley did for Scrooge?   Did you listen to them and change your ac ons?  

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading   TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  

23


A COUTURE CHRISTMAS

C

heck out the process of a costume designer on A Christmas Carol:   

1. Read The Play: First the designers read the script in order to get a sense of  the characters, se ng and the  me period in which it’s set. All of these                elements will affect how they design a costume. 

2. Visual Research: Next they do more research about the context of the play. For   A Christmas Carol, they would look into the fashions of Victorian England. Throughout  the research, the designers iden fy a par cular element of their findings and highlight  it as a theme for the costumes. For example, the environmental soo ness of a newly   industrialized and factory‐run England may provide inspira on for the coloring and   fabrics chosen for the costumes.   

Costume Design by Alejo Vie . 

3. Renderings: Then the designers draw the costumes onto paper. These drawings are  known as renderings of the costume design. These images are then shared with the  director of the play who then approves them for the next step: the physical   construc on of the costume.   

4. Measurements: At this point, the actors' measurements are recorded.   

5. Sourcing Fabrics: The designers determine what and how much of the par cular   fabrics they want to use. Then they research from where to source the fabrics and buy  what is needed.   

6. Crea ng the Fabrics: The tailors create the fabrics to be used in the costumes.   

7. Paper Designs: The drapers draw and cut out paper designs for the costume.   

Alley Theatre Costume Shop.  Photo by: Heather Breikjern. 

8. Muslin Designs: A mockup of the costume design is created using an inexpensive  co on fabric called muslin. By using muslin, the drapers can accommodate the actor's  body and make changes to the design without was ng the real fabric for the costumes.   

9. Adapted Paper Designs: The tailors fashion the muslin designs back into paper to be  used on the actual costume fabrics.   

10. First Hand: The first hand places the paper designs onto the real fabric and cuts out  each piece. The first hand is the first person to touch the real fabric that will be used  on the costumes.   

11. S tching: The fabric is given to the s tcher who then sews the fabric pieces   together according to the design.    

12. Final Changes: The draper then makes any last changes to the fabric pieces before  they are cut.    

13. Cu ng The Fabric: The first hand then cuts out the design from the real costume  fabric. Then they sew together the final costume.   

In the 2013 produc on, the Alley is remoun ng a previous version of A Christmas Carol,  so while they don't go as far back as the research phase, they try to keep the newly  made costumes as consistent with the ini al design as possible.   

Elizabeth Bunch as Ghost of Christmas Past in the   Alley Theatre’s A Christmas Carol – A Ghost Story   Resource: Kim Cook, Alley Theatre Costume Design Assistant  of Christmas, 2012. Photo by Mike McCormick. 

24

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading   TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  


TWEET THE CHRISTMAS CAROL #’S 2 casts of children roles, red and green cast,  each performs every other day,  

27 wigs 5 ghostly appari

ons in the show 

5-7 loads of dry cleaning for each 

2 full weeks of costume cleaning 

performance

a er the show's final performance 

14 sets of facial hair  

50 members of the cast 

4-5 loads of laundry for each             performance 

40-45 loads laundry per week                                 for the two weeks a er the run 

100 pairs of shoes 

CONNECTIONS: Let’s solve some word problems with the numbers from the show!   

 Count how many children you see in the show.  If you only saw one children’s cast during the performance, but            there are two separate casts of children, then how many children are in the en re cast?     



There are 50 actors in the show, and most of them play more than one character.  If everyone in the cast plays two  characters except for Bob Cratchit, Scrooge, and Tiny Tim, then how many roles are there in the en re show? 

 There are four loads of laundry and five loads of dry cleaning a er each show, and there are eight shows in a week.            How many loads of dry cleaning and laundry are done every week?  TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  TEKS Applica ons ‐ Mathema cs  

25


QUESTIONS TO DISCUSS AFTER THE SHOW

Photo by Dana Guthrie.  www.commons.wikimedia.org.   

1. The director of this produc on has talked about trying to create the   “dream‐world” of Scrooge’s mind. What techniques are used in the produc on to  suggest a dream world? Do you think the director has succeeded? Why or why not?    2. What role did Marley’s spirit play in Scrooge’s transforma on? Would the three  spirits of past, present and future have had the same impact on Scrooge without   the presence of Marley?    3. Make a list of Scrooge’s past experiences as a child and a young man. Analyze the  life events and determine how they affected his behavior and a tude in the   present?    4. Dickens’s work was influenced largely by his lack of faith in the government.   Discuss the socio‐economic factors which influenced such works as Oliver Twist and  Bleak House.    5. How did Scrooge’s pursuit of wealth impact his rela onship with Belle? What   quali es do you look for in a poten al girlfriend or boyfriend?    6. Certain actors play mul ple characters in the show, or two characters are made   to resemble each other. Examples include the actor who played Bert, the food   vendor, and the Spirit of Christmas Present, as well as the costume of the Spirit of  Christmas Past which resembles that of the doll from the doll vendor, Mary Pidgeon.  Why might the writer or director have made that choice? What extra meaning does  it bring to the characters?    7. What is an “epiphany?” Describe other characters in literature who have had  epiphanies.   

“I have endeavored in this ghostly li le book, to raise the  Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of   humour with themselves, with each other, and with the   season, or with me.” — Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol  

26

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading   TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  


REFLECTIONS

A

er viewing the Alley Theatre’s produc on of A Christmas Carol, we  encourage you and your students to record your expecta ons and  reac ons to the play. 

Here are some ideas for wri en reflec ons:     What parts of the play did you enjoy and why? What are some specific  lines you enjoyed and why?     How would you have performed one of the roles? What draws you to that  character?     Do you agree with the choices of the director and designers? What would  you have done differently?         

Photo by  Dr. Mitra Ray, 2011  www.drmitraray.com 

ACTIVITY: Consider having students write reviews of A Christmas Carol. Make sure to  include technical aspects such as sound and costumes, as well as specific  notes on ac ng, plot, and the overall experience of the produc on. For more  informa on on wri ng a review, please visit   h p://wri ng.wisc.edu/Handbook/PlayReview.html    Please email any theatre‐related reviews, poems, scenes and essays by your  students to educa on@alleytheatre.org.     All ar cles and content of this Companion Guide are wri en and owned by Alley Theatre   Educa on and Community Engagement department staff and collaborators. Collaborators for this  edi on include Avital Stolar.  

“Drama c conven ons offer a safe harbor for trying out the  situa ons for life; for experimen ng with expression and  communica on; and for deepening human understanding.”     — James Ca erall, Professor Emeritus, UCLA, Department of Educa on  

TEKS Applica ons‐ Social Studies       TEKS Applica ons‐ English Language & Reading   TEKS Applica ons‐ Fine Arts  

27


Happy Holidays from To learn more about Alley Theatre Education programs, visit alleytheatre.org/Education.

Â

A Christmas Carol Companion Guide Alley Theatre  

Learn interesting facts about the Alley Theatre's beloved A Christmas Carol. Happy Holidays to everyone!

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you