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Details of Distinction 2013-14


FOUNDED

1815

by Timothy alden

32ND OLDEST COLLEGE IN THE NATION


Allegheny’s undergraduate residential education prepares young adults for successful, meaningful lives by promoting students’ intellectual, moral, and social development and encouraging personal and civic responsibility. Allegheny’s faculty and staff combine high academic standards and a commitment to the exchange of knowledge with a supportive approach to learning. Graduates are equipped to think critically and creatively, write clearly, speak persuasively, and meet challenges in a diverse, interconnected world.


1 of 40 “Today Allegheny shuns the ethos of prestige places and delivers an education at least on par with—and perhaps better than—those places.”

THE COMPANY WE’RE IN

Colleges That Change Lives

Denison University Earlham College Goucher College Hampshire College Lawrence University Rhodes College St. Olaf College Whitman College

WHAT IT MEANS Colleges That Change Lives was researched and written by retired New York Times education editor, journalist, and longtime student advocate Loren Pope. Selections were solely based on his independent judgment and recognized expertise. CTCL, Inc. works with the chosen schools to support the advancement of a student-centered college search process. CTCL hosts well-attended information sessions nationwide in coordination with CTCL school college fairs.


Top 25

THE COMPANY WE’RE IN

i Harvard University

Most Rigorous Colleges

o University of Pennsylvania p Carnegie Mellon university a Allegheny College s Carleton College d Northwestern University f Duke University g Illinois Institute of Technology

WHAT IT MEANS Newsweek & The Daily Beast assessed the rigor of the curriculum by identifying the 200 most selective schools according to the percentage of applicants admitted and the median SAT/ACT score for accepted students. Those schools were then ranked using data regarding student assessment of workload manageability and the student-to-faculty ratio according to the National Center for Education Statistics. For the final ranking, the degree of selectivity, workload score and student-faculty ratio were each weighted a third.

“Academics are the reason that everyone comes to Allegheny.” Allegheny student quoted in The Insider’s Guide

3


Top 10 “If it sounds as if Allegheny is hard, it is. Students consider themselves to be loaded up with work, and they are okay with it, in part because they have such strong feelings about the professors with whom they work.”

THE COMPANY WE’RE IN

“Up-and-Coming” Liberal Arts Colleges

Beloit College berry College College of St. Benedict Hendrix College juniata College Roanoke College University of Richmond Ursinus College Wofford College

WHAT IT MEANS U.S. News & World Report asked those who responded to the annual peer assessment survey to identify institutions in their 2014 Best Colleges ranking category that are making the most promising and innovative changes in the areas of academics, faculty, and student life. All of the schools that received the most nominations from top college officials in their ranking peer group for being up-and-coming are listed here.

Top Allegheny also remains in the U.S. News rankings of the top 100 National Liberal Arts Colleges. 100


Class of 2017 Students: 606 High Schools: 400+ Diversity: 21%

2,100 students from 45 states and 45 countries

Allegheny has almost quadrupled its Jewish student population since 2003.

4x

“Small and Mighty Campus of Excellence” Hillel’s Foundation for Jewish Campus Life recognizes Allegheny as one of 20 “small and mighty campuses of excellence.” Why “mighty?” Innovative Jewish programming, our growing Jewish population, dedicated leadership, and a commitment to serve Jewish students of all backgrounds.

5


research

Allegheny College Research Seminar Series ACRoSS is an interdisciplinary forum for the presentation of summer research projects to an audience of students, faculty, and administrators. 35 30

NUMBER OF PRESENTATIONS

25

25

20 15 10

14

17

31 25

17

5 0

60 50 40

2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

NUMBER OF STUDENT PRESENTERS 34

30

40

58

51

0

Art Biochemistry Biology Chemistry Communication Arts Economics English Environmental Science

History International Studies Mathematics Neuroscience Philosophy and Religious Studies Physics Political Science Psychology

41

20 10

2013 PRESENTING DEPARTMENTS

N/A 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

120

The average audience size for the ten weeks of 2013 ACRoSS presentations.


llegheny received a grant from the Thomas Lord Charitable Trust, which will support faculty-student $25,000 Acollaborative research in the Chemistry Department and assist students from the department who travel to present their work at professional meetings.

llegheny received a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in support of student-faculty collaborative $600,000 Aresearch in the humanities. The grant funds will be used for summer stipends for students conducting research with faculty mentors, stipends for faculty mentors, and faculty development initiatives focused on humanities faculty. Soledad Caballero, associate professor of English, and Amelia Carr, professor of art, are co-directors for this grant-funded program. he Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded Allegheny a grant in support of adding a faculty member to teach $675,000 TArabic and of continuing to internationalize the campus, providing funds for faculty to expand and enrich the international content of courses and to participate in study tours.

llegheny was chosen to receive a Howard Hughes Medical Institute grant to further develop the Global $1.5m AHealth Studies program. Each four-year grant is in the range of $800,000 to $1.5 million—Allegheny was one of only three schools to receive a grant of $1.5 million. Said Sean B. Carroll, vice president of science education at HHMI, “We know that these schools have engaged faculty. They care deeply about teaching and how effectively their students are learning about science.� 7


honors

senior project

a sampling of

of Bullying: A Search for Self• Psychology Acceptance Anna Sobolov Good Major: Art & Technology; Minors: Economics, French

Electrostatic Characterization of Motif • An VI’s Role in the RNA Helicase DbpA

• Nomad: A Short Narrative Film Nicholas Anthony Ozorak

Major: Communication Arts; Minor: Psychology

Global Strategies of Spanish • The Multinational Corporations: A Case Study of ZARA

Michael A. Kastelic

Noelle Marie Brouillard

Major: Biochemistry; Minor: Psychology

Majors: Economics, Spanish

Investigation of the Hypoglycemic and • An Hypolipidemic Effects of Cinnamon Oil on Streptozocin-induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats Ashley Carroll Baronner Major: Biology; Minor: Science, Health & Society (Self-Designed)

and Biomagnification • Bioaccumulation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Wetland Organisms

Timothy Robert Savatt Major: Biology; Minor: Religious Studies

of Polymers Using Cyano • Functionalization Biphenyl Derivatives with Applications for Solar Cells

Brittany M. Rauzan Major: Chemistry; Minor: Psychology

Effects of Fantasy Football on NFL • The Revenue Blayze D. Schindler Major: Economics; Minor: Mathematics

(World) War on Women: Female Voices • The of Occupied France in Fiction and Nonfiction Roma Panganiban Majors: English, Psychology

or Not To Frack: Performance as a • ToToolFrack for Environmental Activism at Allegheny College

Shannon Patricia Wade Major: Environmental Studies; Minor: Theatre


Window Magmatism in Western North Examination of Keynesian Economics in Really a Refugee: A Constructivist • Slab • An • Not America: Geochemical Trends in Near-Trench the Case of Sino-German Economic Relations Perspective on Changing Forced Migration Igneous Rocks from Southern Alaska to Baja California Holly M. Wilson Majors: Geology, Spanish

Widely Unexplored Role of Privileged • The Prisoners in Nazi Death and Concentration Camps

Hannah Catherine Davis Major: History; Minor: Spanish

Naval Deployments to the Gulf of • China’s Aden: A Focused Case Study on Soft Power Luke Crutchfield Orndorff Majors: International Studies, Chinese Language and Culture (Self-Designed)

Exploration of the Adjoints of Linear • An Fractional Composition Operators on the Dirichlet Space

Reuben Michael Bernstein-Goff Major: Mathematics; Minor: Economics

after the Global Financial Crisis in 2008

Norms

Jiarong Li

Laura G. Thorn

Majors: German, International Studies; Minor: Economics

Major: Political Science; Minor: German

a Left Frontal Day: Coffee, Depression, • Have and Electroencephalography Amanda Dae Woodside Major: Neuroscience; Minor: Dance & Movement Studies

Ethical Analysis of Marine Aquaculture: • An Sustainability, Responsibilities to Producers

and Consumers, and the Moral Status of Fish

Role of the Amygdala in Conditioned • The Fear Response in an Animal Model of Autism Ian D. Colley Majors: Psychology, Music

of Venice: Social Fluidity in the • Courtesans Time of the Renaissance Matthew Adam Bocchi Majors: Women’s Studies, Art History, History

Abigail Marie Bradley Majors: Philosophy, Environmental Science

on the Effects of Synthesis • Investigation Technique and Other Perturbations on the

Spin Crossover Characteristics of Metallic Trigonal Bipyramidal Pentanuclear Clusters Keiron Stoddart Major: Physics; Minor: Economics

100%

All seniors complete and defend the Senior Comp.

9


faculty

achievements

a sampling of Associate Professor of Chemistry Alice Deckert and Professor of Chemistry Martin Serra—along with Brittany Rauzan ’13, Elizabeth McMichael ’12, Rachel Cave ’12, Lesley R. Sevcik ’09, Kara Ostrosky ’09, Elisabeth Whitman ’09, Rachel Stegemann ’14, and Audra L. Sinclair ’10—published a peer-reviewed article titled “Kinetics and Thermodynamics of DNA, RNA, and Hybrid Duplex Formation” in the February 5 issue of the journal Biochemistry (volume 52, pp. 765-772).

Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Science Shaunna Barnhart published “From Household Decisions to Global Networks: The Allure of Carbon Trading in Nepal” in The Professional Geographer. During her summer research trip to Nepal, she gave two presentations regarding her research on biogas, one to the Centre of Excellence and another to the Alternative Energy Promotion Centre.

In collaboration with Liang Yalan and Changhai Nie (both of Nanjing University), Hareton Leung (Hong Kong Polytechnic University), and Jonathan Miller Kauffman ’12, Associate

Professor of Computer Science Gregory M. Kapfhammer published a paper at the

third International Symposium on Search Based Software Engineering. Titled “Empirically Identifying the Best Genetic Algorithm for Covering Array Generation,” the paper describes and evaluates a method for testing highly configurable software systems.

Associate Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for Political Participation Brian Harward received the 2013 CQ Press Award for Teaching Innovation in Political Science, presented by the American Political Science Association.


The company of the Allegheny College Playshop Theatre’s original production “Playing Dirty” won two national awards from the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF). The company won for both Distinguished Production of a Devised Work and for Distinguished Performance and Production Ensembles.

Jocelyn Levis ’13 and Jamie Moran ’15 were two members of one of the 60 undergraduate research teams selected to meet with legislators on Capitol Hill and present their work at the 17th annual Posters on the Hill event, sponsored by the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR). Both students worked on a regional bedrock mapping project with Associate Professor of Geology Rachel O’Brien.

Professor of Art George Roland had a work of computational art accepted for exhibition in the 102nd Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition.

Oxford University Press published the latest book by Professor of Religious Studies Carl Olson, The Allure of Decadent Thinking: Religious Studies and the Challenge of Postmodernism.

Assistant Professor of Environmental Science TJ Eatmon received an honorable mention in the 2013 Carnegie Science Awards. The program honors individuals and organizations from more than 15 categories that have distinguished themselves by making unparalleled contributions to science and technology in various disciplines.

The Princeton Review reports that Allegheny students feel the professors are “amazing” and “very passionate,” and “go above and beyond to make sure their students understand the material.” Students believe Allegheny “is very understanding of how different each student is and tries to help each student excel in his or her own way.”

11


leadership

service &

24

THE COMPANY WE’RE IN

out of 255

Best Liberal Arts Colleges

Amherst College Bates College Bryn Mawr College Carleton College Davidson College Haverford College Macalester College Oberlin College Swarthmore College Williams College

WHAT IT MEANS Washington Monthly’s rankings are unique in that they recognize not only what colleges do for their students but what colleges and their students are doing for the country. The rankings rate the top colleges based on three broad categories: Social Mobility (recruiting and graduating low-income students), Research (producing cutting-edge scholarship and Ph.D.s), and Service (encouraging students to give something back to their country). The rankings also factor in an analysis of which schools combine higher than expected graduation rates with affordable prices.

9th

In the Service category, Allegheny ranked No. 9 in the nation.


received a grant from the IRS in support of the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program. Through this $11,250 Allegheny program, Allegheny students assist low-income and elderly residents of Crawford County in preparing tax returns. Corella and Bertram F. Bonner Foundation awarded Allegheny a grant to establish a Bonner Leader Program $250,000 The Endowment to support 30 Bonner Leaders annually. received a grant from the Corporation for National and Community Service to support the Lake Effect $30,000 Allegheny Leaders program. Conservation & Environmental Sustainability

81%

percent of Allegheny students surveyed reported participating in some type of service while at the College.

Women’s Issues & Empowerment

Health & Prevention

allegheny service n etwo r k i m pa c t areas

Allegheny & Meadville Relationship

Underserved Youth

National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement

Local Foods & Hunger

Homelessness

The annual Peace Corps list recognizes the colleges and universities in the U.S. that produce the most Peace Corps volunteers. Fourteen alumni from Allegheny College are currently serving overseas.

PEACE CORPS 2013 TOP COLLEGES

23

#

Solidarity & Advocacy for Senior Citizens 13


distinctions

athletic

Founding Member

1905

Three of the last five Allegheny Valedictorians have been student-athletes.

1983

The Gators have won at least one conference championship each year since 1983.

Gator Football is the 35th team in NCAA Division III history to surpass 500 victories.

550

Allegheny All-Americans


2013 Hall of Fame Inductees Patrick Stewart ’89 Swimming

David Masciola ’96 Basketball

Amy Schuckert Seago ’99 Track & Cross Country

Jeremy Scott ’03 Track & Field

• Earned All-America honors for four consecutive years

• Scored 1,443 career points

• An 11-time NCAC Champion

• Third leading scorer in team history

• Won the NCAC title in both the 800-Meter and 1500-Meter for three seasons (1997, 1998, 1999)

Recognized as the top pole vaulter among all three NCAA divisions

A six-time NCAC champion

• Received NCAC Middle/Distance Runner of the Year honors for three seasons

A four-time All-American

A two-time NCAA Division III National Champion for 2002

Set the NCAA all-division indoor record in 2003

Believed to be the tallest worldclass pole vaulter in history

• Led Allegheny to four consecutive Top-20 finishes at the NCAA Division Championships

• Named the NCAC Player of the Year for 1995-96

• A seven-time All-American in six individual events

• Led the NCAC in scoring and three-point field goals

• Secured five first-place finishes at the NCAC Championships

• Awarded two consecutive All-NCAC laurels

• Named the NCAC Middle/ Distance Runner of the Year in 1998 and 1999

Today, David is a chemical and environmental engineer for Exxon Mobil.

• Named to the NCAC 1993-2002 All-Decade Teams for both track and cross country

• An eight-time All-NCAC performer • Set the conference record in the 200 Individual Medley twice Patrick is now a renowned hand surgeon in Illinois.

Amy is the head men’s and women’s cross country and track and field coach at the College of Charleston.

The top-ranked indoor vaulter in both 2010 and 2011, Jeremy achieved the ultimate goal of competing in the Olympic Games in 2012. 15


outcomes

“As a nervous H.S. senior, I wasn’t certain that I would get accepted to a school of Allegheny’s caliber. Four years later, I graduated summa cum laude with a full scholarship to the U. of Michigan’s MFA program. Presently, I am pursuing a Doctor of Philosophy degree at Kent State. Not only did Allegheny’s gamble on a statistically lukewarm applicant pay off, but the money I invested in my Allegheny education has paid for itself three times over.”

Allie Brooks ’07

45%

begin their career immediately after graduation; over 90% are working in their field within 8 months.

45%

of Allegheny graduates go on to graduate school and are accepted at rates twice the national average—80-100%.

10%

of graduates earn positions in service organizations, including Teach for America and Peace Corps.


Recent graduates are attending: Carnegie Mellon University Case Western Reserve University Columbia University Cornell University Georgetown University Johns Hopkins University Pennsylvania State University Syracuse University University of Chicago University of Pittsburgh University of Southern California University of Texas at Austin Vanderbilt University Wake Forest University Washington University

Recent graduates are working for: American Conservatory Theater AmeriCorps VISTA CHF International Cleveland Clinic Coca-Cola Enterprises Deloitte Consulting French Ministry of Education Mylan Pharmaceuticals National Hellenic Museum PNC Financial Teach for America The Nature Conservancy Tioga Environmental Consulting U.S. Department of Homeland Security UPMC

“Allegheny College boasts a rich history of academic excellence in an intimate setting, augmented by an emphasis on extracurricular experiences designed to produce well-rounded alumni.”

Forbes places Allegheny among

America’s Top Colleges

in rankings prepared by the Center for College Affordability and Productivity. Forbes’ annual rankings focus on quality of teaching, graduation rates, low levels of debt and graduates’ career prospects.

Top 5%

Allegheny ranks among the top 5% of all schools in the country for the percentage of graduates who go on to earn a Ph.D. Allegheny is in the top 4% in the sciences and top 2% in chemistry. 17


notable

alumni

a sampling of

• Marco Arment ’04 Lead developer of Tumblr; Creator of Instapaper and The Magazine

• Wendy Cooper ’72 Senior Vice President of AXA Financial, formerly the Equitable Companies Incorporated

• Lindsay Baxter ’05 Project Manager for the Pennsylvania Environmental Council; formerly the first Sustainability Coordinator for the City of Pittsburgh

• Clarence Crane 1898 Inventor of Life Savers candy

• Theodore Black ’87 President of the Buffalo Sabres; previous Senior Vice President and General Manager of FSN Pittsburgh and Vice President of the Pittsburgh Penguins

• Edward David ’61 Deputy Chief Medical Examiner for the state of Maine; co-author of The Cadaver Dog Handbook

• Michael Bruno ’77 Managing Partner, Stonebridge Partners (Private Equity) • Benjamin Burtt, Jr. ’70 Winner of four Academy Awards for sound design and sound effects editing for Star Wars, E.T., and two Indiana Jones films; supervising sound editor and sound designer for Star Wars: Episode I–The Phantom Menace and Wall-E • Benjamin Cammarano ’92 Senior Director, Central Media at Microsoft Studios • Tony Cardinali ’91 First Vice President of Franchise Relations at Arthur Murray International (youngest officer and director in the history of the company) • Thomas Carter ’78 Head Team Physician, NBA’s Phoenix Suns

• Clarence Darrow 1878 Lawyer in Scopes Monkey Trial

• William Demchak ’84 President & CEO, PNC Financial Services Group • Judith (Hodge) Dennis ’68 Co-owner and Vice President of Oregon Aero Inc., an aerospace engineering and manufacturing company • Robert Dowling ’81 Director of the Heart Transplant and Cardiac Assist Devices Program for The Transplant Center at Jewish Hospital; world-renowned for performing the world’s first implant of a wholly self-contained artificial heart in a human patient • Timothy Downing ’85 Co-chair of the Human Rights Campaign Board of Directors; Partner with Ulmer & Berne LLP; named a “Leading Lawyer” by Inside Business magazine for the past eleven years and has been listed as an Ohio Super Lawyer


• Douglas Durst ’66 Named “the greenest of New York City’s megadevelopers” by Time magazine • Thomas Francis ’21 Public Health Pioneer who implemented field trials of the Salk polio vaccine and mentored Jonas Salk in vaccine development • Holly Geoghegan ’79 President of Golf Marketing Services, one of the first marketing consulting companies specializing in the golf industry; Host for The Golf Insiders, ESPN radio show; named one of Golfweek’s Top 25 Women in Golf

• Vicki Lipnic ’82 Nominated by U.S. President Barack Obama to serve as Commissioner of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission • Greta Lydecker ’82 Vice President, San Joaquin Valley Business Unit, Chevron North America Exploration and Production Company • Robert Marchman ’80 Executive Vice President/MRD Legal Section at FINRA; former Executive Vice President, Enforcement Division, New York Stock Exchange

• Cris Groenendaal ’70 Broadway’s original Phantom of the Opera

• William McKinley 1861 25th U.S. President

• John Hillkirk III ’78 Executive Editor of USA TODAY

• Megan Murphy ’88 Executive Director for the National Coalition of Girls’ Schools (NCGS)

• Dorothy James Orr ’40 Executive Director of Youth in Action; first female African-American corporate vice president in the insurance industry; pioneer in human rights movement; Commissioner of Human Rights for New York State • Joseph Knupp ’05 Foreign Service Officer at the U.S. Department of State • David Kosak ’96 Game Designer for Blizzard Entertainment; senior designer for World of Warcraft

• Richard Murphy ’71 Pulitzer Prize–winning photo editor • Becky Myton ’63 Natural Resources Coordinator in Mozambique for CARE International; former advisor to the Minister of the Environment in Honduras and consultant for USAID and World Bank • Darrell Park ’91 Author of Better Than We Found It, a book on commonsense solutions to some of the world’s toughest problems

• Kim Phan ’97 Executive Director, International Law Institute • Michael Piraino ’74 CEO, National Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) • Barbara (Webb) Robinson ’4 8 Poet, short story and children’s book author, including The Best Christmas Pageant Ever • Tobias Rose-Stockwell ’04 Founder and Strategic Director of Human Translation, an organization dedicated to developing sustainable solutions to poverty; honored by the Dalai Lama as an “Unsung Hero of Compassion” • Lloyd Segan ’80 Executive Producer of USA Network’s The Dead Zone and ABC Family’s Wildfire and Greek • Bonnie Siefers ’87 Founder and Designer, Jonano; Founder & Editor, EcoCouture.org & EcoCouture Magazine • Paul Siple ’32 Developed the concept of the Wind Chill Index • Ida Tarbell 1880 Investigative journalist; Abraham Lincoln biographer; pioneering muckraking journalist; author of The History of the Standard Oil Company • Roger Tufts ’76 Senior Economic Advisor, Department of the Treasury

19


in 2013

alumni achievements

a sampling of

Susan Werner Kieffer’s ’64 book, Dynamics of Disaster, was released by W.W. Norton Press.

Dr. Stanley Harrold ’68, professor of history at South Carolina State University, received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Roger Lewis ’70 was named to a senior management position overseeing the research, development, testing, and evaluation of the U.S. nuclear weapons program at the National Nuclear Security Administration in the Department of Energy.

Dr. Gail Humphries Mardirosian ’72 was inducted

into the College of Fellows of the American Theatre at the John F. Kennedy Center for Performing Arts.

Marie Rama ’72 published her latest cookbook, Bacon Nation: 125 Irresistible Recipes. She also is the coauthor of the bestselling cookbooks Cooking Basics for Dummies and Grilling for Dummies.

Deborah Slawson ’74 relocated to Paris for three years to work as an environmental research scientist for the French government.

Richard Kaufman ’75 rejoined AOL as a senior copywriter in marketing.

M. Roy Wilson ’76 was elected president of Wayne State University.

Sacit Ertug ’83 won the 2013 BMW Bosphorus Sailing Cup 2013 on May 5 with the sailboat that he built himself. He took first place at the famous regatta, which was held in Istanbul.


Jennifer Colgrove-Martin ’83 was inducted into the 2013 Hall of Fame for the Pittsburgh Marathon because of her efforts as a runner and contributions to the sport of long-distance running. She is a four-time Olympic Trials Qualifier.

Gene Hong ’99 is working with NBC to develop a comedy based on his real-life friendship with Maroon 5’s Adam Levine.

Anne Thibadeau ’08 opened a solo law practice in the Pittsburgh area that focuses on assisting small businesses and entrepreneurs.

Nathan Smith ’01 competed in his fourth Masters tournament on April 11, 2013, at Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga.

Marin Ping ’10 returned to Washington, D.C. this spring from Beijing, where she worked

John Reilly ’04 appeared in both The Dark Knight Rises and Promised Land. He will next appear in Foxcatcher (2013) starring Channing Tatum, Mark Ruffalo and Steve Carell.

Rebecca Allan ’85 opened an art exhibit in New York City at ArtLab78, a project space on the Upper East Side. Brian Stadnik ’87 was promoted to vice president at the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ.

Andrew Pravlik ’96 was honored by Pittsburgh Magazine as one of the “2012 Pittsburgh Select Wealth Managers.”

Candace Leigh Boyer Bowering ’97 was appointed

• • •

Adam Cromie ’05, director of baseball operations for the Washington Nationals, was featured in a Washington Post article titled “Nationals Rely on Scouts-First Approach, but Take Information from Elsewhere, Too.”

with a social enterprise that supports underprivileged youth development, specifically migrant children and young adult orphans.

Emily Sale ’13 attended the Harvard Kennedy School International Development Conference and participated in a Haiti-based case competition. Additionally, she was awarded the Friedman Fellowship from Carnegie Mellon University for summer 2013.

head of global marketing communications

at St. Jude Medical in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., a Fortune 500 medical device company. 21


NSSE National Survey of Student Engagement

Benchmarks set by student assessment indicate Allegheny students rank their school significantly higher than do the students of our Standard Comparison Group (SCG) in all of the following categories. SCG Allegheny’s Standard Comparison Group includes, among others: College of Wooster Connecticut College Denison University Dickinson College Earlham College Franklin & Marshall College Hobart & William Smith Colleges Hope College Ohio Wesleyan University Union College Washington & Jefferson College Wheaton College

= statistically significantly less than Allegheny’s benchmark

= statistically significantly greater than Allegheny’s benchmark

NSSE Top 10%

NSSE ALL

Schools that scored in the top 10%, respective to each individual benchmark (e.g. Level of Academic Challenge)

All participating schools in the 2012 NSSE Survey; participating institutions generally mirror the national distribution of the Carnegie 2010 Basic Classification


Level of Academic Challenge FIRST-YEARS

SENIORS

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE Top 10%

30

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE Top 10%

WHAT IT MEANS Challenging intellectual and creative work is central to student learning and collegiate quality. Colleges and universities promote high levels of student achievement by emphasizing the importance of academic effort and setting high expectations for student performance. • • • • • • • • •

Hours spent preparing for class (studying, reading, writing, doing homework or lab work, etc.) Number of assigned textbooks, books, or book-length packs of course readings Number of written papers or reports of 20 pages or more, between 5 and 19 pages, and fewer than 5 pages Coursework emphasizes: Analysis of the basic elements of an idea, experience or theory Coursework emphasizes: Synthesis and organizing of ideas, information, or experiences into new, more complex interpretations and relationships Coursework emphasizes: Making judgments about the value of information, arguments, or methods Coursework emphasizes: Applying theories or concepts to practical problems or in new situations Working harder than you thought you could to meet an instructor’s standards or expectations Campus environment emphasizes: Spending significant amount of time studying and on academic work

23


Supportive Campus Environment FIRST-YEARS

SENIORS

70

70

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE Top 10%

30

Allegheny

SCG

WHAT IT MEANS

12:1 STUDENTFACULTY RATIO

Students perform better and are more satisfied at colleges that are committed to their success and cultivate positive working and social relations among different groups on campus. • • • • • •

Campus environment provides the support you need to help you succeed academically Campus environment helps you cope with your non-academic responsibilities (work, family, etc.) Campus environment provides the support you need to thrive socially Quality of relationships with other students Quality of relationships with faculty members Quality of relationships with administrative personnel and offices

NSSE Top 10%


Student-Faculty Interaction FIRST-YEARS

SENIORS

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE Top 10%

20

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE Top 10%

WHAT IT MEANS Students learn firsthand how experts think about and solve practical problems by interacting with faculty members inside and outside the classroom. As a result, their teachers become role models, mentors, and guides for continuous, life-long learning. • • • •

Discussed grades or assignments with an instructor Talked about career plans with a faculty member or advisor Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with faculty members outside of class Worked with faculty members on activities other than coursework (committees, orientation, student-life activities, etc.) • Received prompt written or oral feedback from faculty on your academic performance • Worked on a research project with a faculty member outside of course or program requirements

25


Active & Collaborative Learning FIRST-YEARS

SENIORS

60

60

50

50

40

40

30

30

20

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE Top 10%

20

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE Top 10%

WHAT IT MEANS

zero GRADUATE TEACHING ASSISTANTS

Students learn more when they are intensely involved in their education and asked to think about what they are learning in different settings. Collaborating with others in solving problems or mastering difficult material prepares students for the messy, unscripted problems they will encounter daily during and after college. • • • • • • •

Asked questions in class or contributed to class discussions Made a class presentation Worked with other students on projects during class Worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments Tutored or taught other students (paid or voluntary) Participated in a community-based project (e.g., service learning) as part of a regular course Discussed ideas from your readings or classes with others outside of class (students, family members, co-workers, etc.)


Quality of Academic Advising FIRST-YEARS 3.6

3.6

3.4

3.4

3.2

3.2

3.0

3.0

2.8

Allegheny

4 =Excellent

SENIORS

SCG

NSSE ALL

2.8

3 =Good 2 =Fair 1 =Poor

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

Thinking Critically & Analytically FIRST-YEARS 3.6

3.6

3.4

3.4

3.2

3.2

3.0

3.0

2.8

Allegheny

4 =Very much

SENIORS

SCG

NSSE ALL

2.8

3 =Quite a bit 2 =Some 1 =Very little

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

27


College Enhanced Speaking Skills FIRST-YEARS 3.4

3.4

3.2

3.2

3.0

3.0

2.8

2.8

2.6

Allegheny

4 =Very much

SENIORS

SCG

NSSE ALL

2.6

3 =Quite a bit 2 =Some 1 =Very little

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

College Enhanced Writing Skills 4 =Very much FIRST-YEARS

SENIORS

3 =Quite a bit 2 =Some

3.6

3.6

3.4

3.4

3.2

3.2

3.0

3.0

2.8

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

2.8

1 =Very little

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL


Solving Complex Problems FIRST-YEARS 3.2

3.2

3.0

3.0

2.8

2.8

2.6

2.6

2.4

Allegheny

4 =Very much

SENIORS

SCG

NSSE ALL

2.4

3 =Quite a bit 2 =Some 1 =Very little

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

Learning Effectively on Own 4 =Very much FIRST-YEARS

SENIORS

3 =Quite a bit 2 =Some

3.4

3.4

3.2

3.2

3.0

3.0

2.8

2.8

2.6

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

2.6

1 =Very little

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

29


Analyzing Quantitative Problems FIRST-YEARS 3.4

3.4

3.2

3.2

3.0

3.0

2.8

2.8

2.6

Allegheny

4 =Very much

SENIORS

SCG

NSSE ALL

2.6

3 =Quite a bit 2 =Some 1 =Very little

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

Job Knowledge and Skills 4 =Very much FIRST-YEARS

SENIORS

3.2

3.2

3.0

3.0

2.8

2.8

2.6

2.6

2.4

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

2.4

3 =Quite a bit 2 =Some 1 =Very little

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL


Paper or Project Required Integrating Various Sources FIRST-YEARS 3.6

3.6

3.4

3.4

3.2

3.2

3.0

3.0

2.8

Allegheny

4 =Very often

SENIORS

SCG

NSSE ALL

2.8

3 =Often 2 =Sometimes 1 =Never

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

Entire Educational Experience FIRST-YEARS 3.6

3.6

3.4

3.4

3.2

3.2

3.0

3.0

2.8

Allegheny

4 =Excellent

SENIORS

SCG

NSSE ALL

2.8

3 =Good 2 =Fair 1 =Poor

Allegheny

SCG

NSSE ALL

31


board of trustees 2013

• Earl

W. Adams, Jr., Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Economics, Allegheny College

• Christian

L. Allison ’83 Director, Co-Curricular Activities, Managerial Economics, Allegheny College; former Chairman and CEO, Tollgrade Communications, Inc.; Clarion University, Doctor of Public Service (honoris causa)

• Bishop

Thomas J. Bickerton Bishop, United Methodist Church

• Alice

S. Bierer ’59 Retired Chief Executive Officer, Essex Grain Products, Inc.

• Gladys

Mullenix Black ’54 Retired Executive Vice President, Valley Forge Technical Communications

• Edward

Joseph Borkowski ’81 Investor/Consultant

• Willow

Wilcox Brost ’74 Civic Volunteer

• William

H. Brown, Jr. ’80 Managing Director - Investments, Merrill Lynch & Company

• Mark

R. Campbell ’82 Partner, Ridge Policy Group

• Jennifer

Daurora ’99 Director of Business Development, McGinnis Sisters Special Food Stores

• Antonio

F. Dias ’86 Attorney/Partner, Jones Day

• Gary

M. Elliott ’72 Business Consultant

• Mary

H. Feeley ’78, Ph.D. Chief Geoscientist, ExxonMobil Exploration Company

• Kim

Tillotson Fleming Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board, Hefren-Tillotson, Inc.

• Roger

A. Gurner ’63 Executive Vice President, CoVant; Retired Colonel, U.S. Air Force

• Judith

Thomas Horgan ’68 President, Child Watch of Pittsburgh

• Steven

D. Levinsky ’78 Partner, Wellesley Partners

• Richard

W. Maine Private Equity Investor

• Isabelle

Moss ’67 Retired Consultant

• James

H. Mullen, Jr. President, Allegheny College

• Herbert

H. Myers ’61 Retired CEO, Boxlight Corporation

• Christine

Scott Nelson ’73 Director & Senior Advisor, Cornerstone Research, Inc.

• Jerome

V. Nelson ’83 Retired Executive Vice President, International Steel Group; Metals and Mining Industry Consultant, Carnegie Steel Partners

• James

C. New ’67 Retired Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Aurora Diagnostics, LLC

• John

Herbert Niles, Jr. ’59, M.D. President, Primary Care Women’s Services

• Martin

Pfinsgraff ’77 Senior Deputy Comptroller, Large Bank Supervision, U.S. Department of Treasury

• Timothy

L. Reeves ’83 Principal, Allen & Gerritsen

• Yvonne

Reed Seon ’59, Ph.D. Lecturer; Founding Director, Retired, Bolinga Black Cultural Resources Center, Wright State University


• Dag

• James

• John

• Thomas

• Nancy

• James

• Douglas

• Thomas

J. Skattum ’84 Advisor N. Slonaker Retired Executive Vice President & Chief Investment Officer, First Interstate Bancorp; Former Special Trustee for American Indians, Department of Interior

• Robert

L. Smith, Jr. ’73 President/Owner, Acutec Precision Machining

• William

P. Steffee ’57, M.D., Ph.D. Retired Chairman of the Board, AcroMed Corporation

• Hayes

C. Stover ’62, Esq. Attorney/of counsel, K&L Gates LLP

• John

F. Sutphen ’78 Executive Vice President/General Counsel, O’Brien & Gere Limited

• Eddie

Taylor, Jr. ’87 President, Taylor Oswald

• Bruce

R. Thompson ’86 Chief Financial Officer, Bank of America

• Lawrence

M. Thompson, Jr. ’74 Retired Chief Operating Officer, Sovereign Bank

• William

H. Timbers ’72 Private Investor; Retired President and Chief Executive Officer, USEC, Inc.

O. Wible ’71 Founder/President, American Colors, Inc. Yovetich ’87 Senior Research Scientist, Rho, Inc. F. Ziegler Retired Senior Vice President, Treasurer and Chief Investment Officer, Erie Indemnity Company

Trustees Emeriti • Ann

S. Degenhart ’71 Vice President, L & A Excavation, Inc.

• J.

Tomlinson Fort ’50, Esq. Retired Law Partner

• Thomas

T. Frampton ’70, Esq. Attorney/Partner, Goehring, Rutter & Boehm

• Samuel

Hellman ’55, M.D. A.N. Pritzker Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus, University of Chicago

• William

I. Jack ’57 Retired Attorney

• The

Hon. Jack K. Mandel ’58 Retired Superior Court Judge for Orange County R. Mountsier III ’52 Director, Henry & Henrietta Quade Foundation

C. Phillips, Jr. ’56 Consultant F. Pomroy ’56 Consultant St. Clair ’57 Retired Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Phelps Dodge Corporation

• Ferd

J. Sauereisen ’57 Retired Chairman, Sauereisen, Inc.

• M.

Peter Scibetta ’54, M.D. Retired Chief Executive Officer/Radiation Oncologist, Regional Cancer Center

• Henry

B. Suhr, Jr. ’55 Self-employed (Investments)

• Arthur

Tepper ’58 President, Tepper Associates

• Patricia

Bush Tippie ’56 Vice President/Secretary, Tippie Services, Inc.

• Robert

A. Vukovich ’65, Ph.D. President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Wellspring Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

• John

D. Wheeler ’61, Esq. Mayor, Hunting Valley

• Robert

C. Woodworth ’69 Senior Advisor, Advance Publications

• Silas

33


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