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DECEMBER 2009 • VOLUME 9 • NUMBER 12

Plucked from waves with two minutes to spare

Farewell and look for solutions on other side of the storm

Seb Josse page 14

Ellen MacArthur page 15

IN THIS EDITION: 100 tips to celebrate 100 columns Sticky’s Tips Page 16

Christmas gift guide Page 22

The title I had waited for so long Shelley Jory Page 30

Save £5 off boat show tickets Page 29

Extremes follow the sun Onboard BT during the Extreme Sailing Series Asia in Hong Kong.

OMAN Sail’s Masirah continued in winning form to take a comfortable overall victory in the first leg of the inaugural Extreme Sailing Series Asia in Hong Kong.  The champions of this year’s European Series, skippered by Pete Cumming of Great Britain, consolidated their overnight lead by winning the first three races to set

them on the way to victory over the 20 races held over five days in Hong Kong’s spectacular Victoria Harbour. While her sister ship fell foul of an Atlantic storm and sank in the Transat Jacques Vabre, the extreme 40 BT took second place in Hong Kong, followed by the China Team and Shirley Robertson’s Rumbo Almeira.

Photo: Guy Nowell/OC Events

 The Wave, Muscat and Red Bull Extreme Sailing Team rounded out the six-boat field.  As Masirah and the BT battled for the top spot in Hong Kong, the fight for third was a thriller between the China Team, making their debut in the Extreme 40 Series, and Rumbo Almeira, skippered by Olympic Gold Medallist Shirley Robertson.

 The event lived up to the excitement generated in Europe. With one race to go and the traditional double points on offer, Thierry Barot’s China Team had to finish ahead of Robertson’s team to secure the last podium position, which they successfully did in a fitting finale to the Hong Kong leg. TURN TO PAGE 2


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk



CREW AND CONTENTS Sea talk.. ................................................ 2 News...................................................... 2 RYA.. .......................................................10 Consultant Editor Bob Satchwell

Ad Manager Katie Hawksworth

Sébastien Josse.. .............................. 14 Ellen MacArthur.. ............................. 15 Sticky’s Tips.........................................16 The Green Blue................................. 20 Christmas gift guide.......................22

Group Sales Manager Jody Bratley

Managing Director Sue Baggaley

Boat show preview..........................28 Shelley Jory....................................... 30 A guide to Dublin.............................32 In the drink........................................ 34 Book reviews.. ....................................37

South Coast Rep. Bill Oakley

Designer Flo Terentjev

Private adverts................................. 38 Classifieds...........................................52 RNLI...................................................... 54 Weather and tides........................... 54

Features Writer Tim Spicer

Production Controller Anthony Gibbons Contributors Ellen MacArthur Sébastien Josse Shelley Jory Sticky Staplyton Paul Antrobus Alex Smith Published monthly by CSL Publishing Ltd Alliance House 49 Sidney Street Cambridge CB2 3HX Tel: 01223 460490 Fax: 01223 315960 Subscriptions: 01223 444081 Recycled paper made up 79% of the raw material for UK newspapers in 2009.

The views and opinions of the contributors to this publication are not necessarily those of the Publishers. Accordingly, the Publishers disclaim any responsibility for such views and opinions. Printed in Cambridge by Cambridge Newspapers. Copyright 2009 CSL Publishing Ltd. ISSN 1475-8237

All At Sea is copyright of CSL Publishing Ltd 2009 and may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publisher. Every care is taken in compiling the contents, but the proprietors assume no responsibility for any effect rising therefrom. We welcome unsolicited manuscripts and photographs, but accept no responsibility for their loss, damage or total disappearance. CSL Publishing also publishes Boat Mart, Jet Skier and PW and Sportsboat and RIB magazines.

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Britannia no longer rules the waves THE chorus of our boisterous alternative national anthem rings somewhat hollow these days. Sadly this autumn, Britannia most certainly does not rule the waves. I know we are not supposed to rock the boat when lives are in danger at the hands of pirates at the Horn of Africa, but just what are we supposed to think? There are complaints of heavy-handed crews aboard the new border force cutters stopping and searching leisure sailors in the English Channel. At the same time it is suggested that the Royal Navy failed to intervene sufficiently to stop Rachel and Paul Chandler being transferred from their yacht to a pirate ship. Reports that a Royal Fleet Auxilliary tanker had sufficient military fire power aboard to outgun the pirates appear to have more than a grain of credence. Other reports suggest that warships in the multi national anti pirate fleet off Africa have let pirates go free because of precise interpretations of international law and fears that they might assert their human rights by claiming political asylum in Europe if arrested. It is no comfort that it is not just Britannia that has ceded control of the oceans. We do not advocate a return to instant so-called justice that was meted out to rogues and vagabonds in centuries past but we do expect a passport – British or European – to mean something. It clearly does not, as demonstrated by the arrest of the British Pindar sailors, Luke Porter, Oliver Smith, Oliver Young, Sam Usher and David Bloomer, en route from Bahrain to Dubai for nothing more sinister than a yacht race. The Gulf is of course distinctly unstable but even Iranian revolutionary guards can detect the subtle difference between a racing boat and a frigate. The fact is that Somali pirates were savvy enough to know the RFA would tread carefully, consult Whitehall and be slow to do anything too risky. The Iranian border guards were no doubt elated to have another opportunity to rub a CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 The Extreme 40s were here in Hong Kong to demonstrate the potential of taking a full scale public event to the region in 2010/2011 - a chance to showcase the spectacle of Extreme 40 racing to the national and international media and VIP guests. Nick Moloney, the skipper of BT, who won Hong Kong’s Around the Island Race as part of the Series, was delighted with his runner-up placing. A big push saw them finish with a second and a win in the last two races to secure the second spot.

Seatalk By Bob Satchwell

major nation’s nose in the dirt. I don’t blame the RFA captain or the Royal Marines on board. They have a chain of command. To a degree I find it hard to blame the Iranians – who would fail to score in front of an open goal? I am concerned about the government, and more precisely the Foreign Office. Diplomacy is a delicate art but it has to be based on at least two essentials. First, it must support what is right, morally and legally. Second, it must be strengthened by conviction that if a softly, softly approach fails, there must be another option. The Foreign Office should take care about claiming too much credit for its efforts with Iran. The Iranians held all the cards and played them skilfully for a week, down to the release of the sailors. In the case of the Chandlers, it might have been better leaving it to the common sense of those closest to the action to make the hard and urgent decisions. Sadly, instant worldwide communications and the vagaries of international politics make that impossible. In a sense Nelson and his colleagues had it easy. In the days when politicians sent a gunboat they were out of touch for months or even years. They had to trust in the good sense of naval officers – and their courage and integrity. Perhaps if Whitehall relied more on the men and women they ask to do difficult jobs at the front line rather than in a comfortable office, retired couples could set sail with greater confidence and young sailors would be able to race in peace. Good winds and calm seas – a very merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year.

He said: “The trap with this type of sailing is to be conservative. If you think that, then you get hammered. You have to race to win. “To win the Around the Island Race was a highlight personally for me. When we finished, we erupted and it was genuine passion,” said the former All at Sea columnist. The Extreme Sailing Series Asia moved on to Singapore for the second leg between December 11 and 15 before the inaugural series concludes in Muscat, Oman, in February. Sinking of the other BT – turn to page 14. Photo: Marco Hong/OC Events


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk



News in brief Top sailors TORBEN Grael of Brazil and Anna Tunnicliffe of the USA have been named as the male and female winners of the International Sailing Federation Rolex World Sailor of the Year Awards 2009. The ISAF Rolex award is the highest award a sailor can receive in recognition of outstanding achievements. The awards have been presented annually since 1994 after voting by 130 member nations. Past winners include Britain’s Ellen MacArthur and Ben Ainslie.

Championship racing POOLE regatta will be the venue for several national and regional championships on 29 to 31 May.  These include a world championship qualifier in the J24 class, national championships for the Multihull Offshore Cruising & Racing Association (MOCRA) and the Sigma 38 class and the national tidal championships for the 2.4m class.  At least three race areas will be arranged in Poole Bay and one, for smaller boats, in Poole Harbour. Further information at www.pooleregatta.co.uk Italy’s Azzurra went on to win the Louis Vuitton Trophy at Nice after defeating Britain’s America’s Cup contender TeamOrigin in the semi final. Azzura beat Emirates Team New Zealand two nil in the finals. FRANCE, Nice, Louis Vuitton Trophy, Day 13, Semi Final Day 2, TEAMORIGIN vs Azzurra, Race 2, Prestart.

Photo © Ian Roman 2009

DAME Ellen MacArthur added her support to Geoff Holt as he prepared to become the first disabled yachtsman to cross the Atlantic. With a planned start from Lanzarote on December 10, Geoff’s challenge in Impossible Dream a purpose-built, wheelchair-accessible catamaran will take him on a voyage across the Atlantic Ocean.   He aims to finish on December 27 but the 3,000 mile journey will take him up to a month to complete, across some of the most hostile waters in the world. Accompanied by a carer he will become the first quadriplegic to make the journey, unassisted in every aspect of the sailing. He sailed the Atlantic three times before an accident in 1984 which left him confined to a wheelchair. Ellen said: “Geoff is one of the most remarkable people I have ever met. Not only has he already achieved the unachievable but he is humble with it. “I think few will understand just how important this challenge is to Geoff; perhaps in a way it is unfinished business. This next chapter is as

incredible as his life so far.” Geoff said: “It’s not about being disabled. It’s not about sailing the Atlantic Ocean. It’s about demonstrating that disability need not be a barrier to achieving something positive in your life” The Ellen MacArthur Trust is the official charity for the Atlantic crossing. The trust gives young people who have suffered from cancer and leukemia the opportunity to experience sailing. The Peter Harrison Foundation has supported Geoff’s Personal Everest. Raymarine has supported Geoff since 2006 supplying essential navigation, communication and safety equipment. Henri Lloyd are providing Geoff with technical clothing. Champagne Pol Roger is also supporting him. www.geoffholt.com See Ellen’s column on page 15.

Photo: onEdition

Ellen sends Geoff personal Atlantic challenge message

Backing a winner HUGO BOSS has announced the continued title sponsorship of Alex Thomson who it has backed for seven years since the 2003 Rolex Fastnet Race.


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk



News in brief Best bar WIGHT Vodka is aiming to create a list of the best yachting bars in the world. Votes can be cast at www.scuttlebutteurope. com/sailors-bars.html. The team at Wight Vodka and Scuttlebutt will choose the best from the responses, with the winners being announced just before Christmas.  Nominations so far include the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club, Mahogany Shoals, Paynes Dock – Block Island, Rhode Island, USA, The Pier View – Cowes, IoW, England, the Bitter End Yacht Club – BVI, the Byron Darnton –  Sanda Island, Scotland and the Soggy Dollar – St Maarten, West Indies.

Fuel discount YACHT Havens Group is offering all RNLI Offshore members a five per cent discount on fuel purchases at their marinas in Lymington, Plymouth, Troon and Largs in a pioneering move to support the RNLI and boost membership. Boat owners must show their Offshore membership cards at point of sale to receive the discount.  The offer is open to all boat owners, not just resident berth holders at a Yacht Haven.   

Search for partners for new Cowes marina Photo: Commission Air

THE search is on for a development and operating partner for the Cowes Outer Harbour project. Cowes Harbour Commission has confirmed its relationship with SEEDA – the South East England Development Agency - and the plan which is expected to include a new 400-berth marina. The Harbour Commission’s primary objective is the delivery of

a new eastern channel and the wave protection required to make Cowes a sheltered harbour. That will require an outer breakwater, the extension to the Shrape Breakwater and the new Eastern Channel.  The commission has committed to providing up to £2.3 million towards the harbour infrastructure works, subject to agreements with SEEDA The commision would prefer

that the private sector be given the opportunity to take the scheme forward. Natural England and the Environment Agency raised the most significant issues as part of the statutory consultation process in respect to the applications for the three consents required for the project. SEEDA and CHC have instructed

the project consultants to carry out report further to the Marine and Fisheries Agency, Natural England and the Environment Agency.   A meeting has been scheduled for this month to discuss the outstanding issues with Natural England and the Environment Agency. It is hoped that this allow the various consents to be approved early in the New Year. www.cowes.co.uk

Route planned for GB RIB rally THERE are 21 confirmed entries and several potential entrants for Great British RIB Rally 2010 that will be staged over 12 days next June.   The RIBs entered range from 11m down to the minimum eligible length of 7.5m. Applications have arrived from all over the UK and mainland Europe and Scandinavia for the 2,010 nm clockwise route circumnavigating mainland Great Britain and Ireland. Organisers are also discussing including a new stage comprising a short additional hop from Great Yarmouth over to Boulogne. Various routing options are still under discussion to and depending on weather conditions there will also be an alternative route in place. The Great British RIB Rally has been conceived by a group of enthusiasts headed up by Patrick Byrne, managing director at Scorpion RIBs. He said: “The Great British RIB Rally offers a genuine challenge, around a demanding coastline that will require good seamanship and boat preparation.” The proposed fair weather route will start at Portland on June 11 to Falmouth where there will be a weather review before crossing to Ireland. After rounding Ireland and the top of Scotland by 21 June the RIBs will be in

Newcastle then Great Yarmouth. After that it is hope there will be a trip to Boulogne before returning to Portland for 23 June. Diesel is relatively simple to find and where necessary it will be ordered in advance in some ports. To solve the issue of a lack of petrol supply, especially on the West coasts of Ireland and Scotland, the Rally organisers have arranged for a support vehicle to follow the fleet and provide back-up in several ways. Although it will be a non-competitive event the rally provides the chance raising funds for nominated charities and organisers are encouraging every entrant to raise money for the hospice movement, and ideally, each boat entering will do so on behalf of a specific hospice. So far the hospices being supported include Trinity Hospice, London; Julia’s House Hospice in Poole; Oakhaven Hospice, Lymington; Hope House, Bristol and Avon; and Lewis Manning Hospice, Poole.  Ideas for fund-raising range from selling logo space on hulls to encouraging one or two paying passengers to enjoy a leg of the rally. Prizes will include the Scorpion Trophy for the Best Log.  Prizes will be awarded at the 2010 BIBOA Annual Dinner in November. www.greatbritishribrally.co.uk


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk

Finalists named for top yachting awards FINALISTS in the 2009 YJA Pantaenius Yachtsman of the Year and YJA Pantaenius Young Sailor of the Year awards have been announced. The winner of each award will be revealed at two separate ceremonies during the Tullett Prebon London International Boat Show in January after a secret ballot by the Yachting Journalists’ Association. Yachtsman of the Year finalists include Paul Goodison, World Laser champion, Olympic Gold medal and five times European champion and the only sailor worldwide to hold all three awards at the same time. Sam Davies was first placed Briton in the Vendée Globe 2008/09 and Ian Williams was twice World Match Race champion who became the first British National to be crowned Match Racing World champion in the event’s 19-year history. Finalists for the Young Sailor award include Isobel Hamilton, 17, who was third in the RYA Youth National Champions and Trials and won silver in the ISAF Games in Brazil and gold in the RS: X Youth Worlds in Turkey and the IWA Worlds in Portland. Phil Sparks and Ben Gratton won Gold in

Sam Davies

Photo: onEdition

their 420 in the Volvo Youth Sailing ISAF World Championships in Brazil, first place in the Kiel Week regatta and third place in the 420 Worlds at Lake Garda. Aaron Lowther and Steve Curtis won their age groups 13 to 16 years olds and 8 to 12 years old respectively for the second year running in the Honda RYA Youth RIB Championship. The winners of both awards are nominated by the public. The Yachtsman of the Year will be announced at a ceremony on Tuesday 12 January at Trinity House, Tower Hill, London. The Young Sailor of the Year Award will be announced at 17:00 hrs on Saturday 9 January on the main stage at the Boat Show at ExCel. RYA Regional Winners will also be presented with their awards at

the ceremony. They are: Eastern: Aaron Lowther and Steve Curtis; East Midlands: Alice Kent and Lucy Childs; Northern Ireland: Chris Eames; North East: Gary Rutherford; Scotland: Callum Airlie; Southern: Phil Sparks and Ben Gratton; South East: Thomas Lambert; South West: Isobel Hamilton; Thames Valley: Sophie Hamilton; Wales: Hannah Tilley; West Midlands: Andrew Bridgman; Yorkshire and Humberside: Emma Labourne and North West: Adam Purcell. The YJA Pantaenius Yachtsman of the Year award was initiated in 1955 by Sir Max Aitken. Previous winners include Eric Hiscock, Sir Francis Chichester, Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, Sir Chay Blyth, Sir Edward Heath, Tracy Edwards MBE, Dame Ellen MacArthur and Ben Ainslie CBE.

Paul Goodison

Photo: onEdition



BMF urges inland waterways re-think THE British Marine Federation has urged the Government to think again about the sale of British Waterways assets. The BMF says the sale could affect the viability of businesses that rely on waterways. Howard Pridding, Executive Director said: “Properly maintained waterways can be a catalyst for regeneration and economic growth and currently support thousands of jobs and businesses across the UK. “The proposed sale of assets calls into question the ability of British Waterways to continue to generate the necessary incomes to fund an ongoing programme of maintenance. “We have grave concerns that this shortfall could lead to a possible partial or permanent closure of some waterways and have an extremely detrimental impact on the operation of waterside businesses.” The BMF has 1,500 member companies and 40 per cent have a direct business interest in inland waterways.

News in brief Optimistic start THE Isle of Wight Council-run Optimist Sailing Academy got off to a flying start with 21 young sailors aged between eight and 15 taking part in the first training session held at the Royal Victoria Yacht Club.  The next session, involving 38 youngsters, takes place on 19 December.  Training sessions cost £25 each and to find out more or book a place contact Susie Moore at the Isle of Wight Council’s Sports Unit on 01983 823818, 07891 622648 or e-mail susanna.moore@iow.gov.uk

Cut price entries PLYMOUTH University Sailing and Power boating club is hosting its first Devon Destroyer fleet racing sailing event off Plymouth Sound on 12 and 13 December and reduced price entry fees are available now.  The Devon Destroyer is open to all types of dinghy and all sailors.  Entry forms from www.sailpower.org.uk

Price freeze CASTLE Marinas, owners of Birdham Pool in Chichester Harbour and Royal Clarence at Gosport plus five inland marinas, has frozen its annual berthing charges with a guarantee that no annual prices will be increased until March 2011 at the earliest.


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk



Street rescue

News in brief Expensive mistakes A RIB driver from Poole pleaded guilty at New Forest Magistrates Court to navigating his RIB without due care and exceeding the six knot speed limit in Lymington River.  He committed three offences including using his boat for waterskiing in Lymington Harbour – and was fined £500 for each offence.  He was also ordered to pay £1,127.50 costs to Lymington Harbour Commissioners and £15 to the Victims’ Fund. 

Call for volunteers THE biennial Commodores’ Cup – one of the most prestigious events in the international yachting calendar and won by Team GBR Red in 2008 – is up for grabs at Cowes next summer.  It is an intense seven-day inshore and offshore racing programme for IRC (endorsed) rated yachts on the testing waters in and around the Solent from 15 to 21 August 2010. Now the RYA is looking for boats to take up the British challenge.  www.rorc.org  

Portland jobs UP to 50 new jobs could be created following an agreement to build 17 new small business units at Osprey Quay the former Royal Navy Air Station at Portland.

Photo: RNLI / Howard Fields

RNLI volunteers from across the north of England and North Wales joined other emergency services in the mammoth flood rescue operation in Cumbria. They rescued dozens of people, including some very young children and elderly people, from flooded homes in Cockermouth, where flood water was surging through the streets at speeds of up to 25 knots. Flood water was so high in places they were rescuing people from first floor windows. Simon Bunting, crewmember at RNLI Beaumaris, said: “Driving boats up high streets is a bit out of the norm but we are all trained for swift water rescue.” Sarah Nimmo-Scott, RNLI Deputy Divisional Inspector North, said: “The RNLI Flood Rescue Team coped brilliantly.” The RNLI Workington lifeboat was also involved in a sea search for a policeman who died after a bridge collapsed in the town.

Conservationists welcome Marine Act NATURE conservationists at Natural England have hailed the Marine and Coastal Access Act as once in lifetime opportunity to enhance and protect the marine environment. Following Royal Assent for the Act, Dr Helen Phillips, chief executive of Natural England, said: “The new Act is an enormously positive step forward and represents a once in a lifetime opportunity to deliver a sustainable future for our marine environment and the many human activities that

depend upon it.” “The marine environment urgently needs greater protection from the overexploitation and damage that has been inflicted upon it. “At last we have a mechanism for safeguarding threatened marine ecosystems and for managing the multiple uses of our seas. By any definition, this is a watershed moment for marine conservation.” She added: “Marine Conservation Zones are urgently needed in order

to protect England’s most important marine wildlife and undersea landscapes.  “They need to be sufficiently large, diverse and interconnected to address ecological needs, but they also need to function effectively alongside other uses of the marine environment.  This has to be a collaborative process and we want everyone who uses the sea to be involved from the outset in developing recommendations on where the new conservation zones should be located.”

A new project has been established by Defra, Natural England and the Joint Nature Conservation Committee and spearheaded by four independent regional stakeholder groups who will have a key role in determining the boundaries of the new Marine Conservation Zones. The regional projects are Balanced Seas in the south east, Finding Sanctuary in th south west, the Irish Seas Conservation Zones and Net Gain in the north east.

Consultation starts on European marine sites A FORMAL consultation on 12 proposed new marine conservation sites started last month. The sites are being put forward as the latest additions to the ‘Natura 2000’ network of European protected areas designed to protect important habitats, species and birds. The 12 proposed new sites consist of ten possible Special Areas of Conservation (and two potential Special Protection Areas) which incorporate a range of important habitats and species - from the sandbanks of the Outer Wash and southern North Sea to

areas in the Irish Sea that are important for birds, and to the cold water coral reefs off north-west Scotland.  Natural England, the Joint Nature Conservation Committee and the Countryside Council for Wales are asking for comment on the scientific reasons for proposing the sites and on the likely impacts of the site designation on marine industries such as fishing, recreation, sand and gravel extraction, windfarms and the oil and gas industry. www.naturalengland.org.uk

Transglobe crews Online auction set for race mode of unique gifts FORTY-two British forces service personnel set off from Perth in Western Australia on three 67-foot steel-hulled yachts leaving Fremantle Sailing Club to tackle a 2,200 nautical mile voyage through the Australian Bight and the notorious Bass Strait en route to Sydney. This is the fifth and a relatively short stage of a year-long, 13-leg tri-service adventurous sail training exercise for crew members, many of whom are  complete sailing novices, and many of whom have only very recently returned from serving in Afghanistan and Iraq. In Australia the yachts will compete in the Rolex Sydney-Hobart race that starts on Boxing Day .

THE Pilotlight once in a lifetime’ auction of one-off Christmas gifts and money can’t buy experiences remains open on-line until December 9. Auction lots include: day on a 43-foot Beneteau yacht with a professional skipper, a fortnight’s work experience at The Moving Picture Company – the animation studio behind Harry Potter movies, a week’s work experience at the Spectator magazine. There is a chance to watch a live recording of SKY’s Soccer AM and VIP tickets to live recording of The X Factor.   Pilotlight is a charity that helps other charities to grow. www.pilotlight.org.uk


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk

Chance to help top world sailors compete in UK THE Royal Yachting Association is looking for a title sponsor to head up the four sailing regatta weeks which will make up one of sailings largest international events; the Laser World Championships to be held in Britain next summer. The event, set to attract more than 1,200 world class competitors from around the globe, will be held at two separate venues. The sponsorship opportunity will provide exposure to the world’s largest class in sailing as well as branding rights and association with a highly regarded World Class event. The Scottish Sailing Institute at Largs Sailing Club will welcome more than 500 sailors, including aspiring 2012 hopefuls for the Laser Radial Women’s and Men’s World Championships from 7-14 July with the Laser Radial Youth Worlds to follow from 18-25 July. Meanwhile, Hayling Island Sailing Club will host 300 budding Olympic Champions contesting the Laser (Standard) Senior and Junior World Championships from 27 August-5 September with the Laser Masters



News in brief Keep it tidy CHICHESTER Harbour has warned sailors to dump their waste in the right place when mooring or using the marinas.  Waste facilities from boats are close to the moorings and it is an offence to dump rubbish at sea or in the harbour.  The harbour has a waste management plan which gives details of where to dump different typres of waste and recycling.  www.conservancy.co.uk

Saving Waste THE British Marine Federation has teamed up with Envirowise, the Government’s environment programme to improve business practices, profitability and competitiveness. Rethink Waste is a free initiative to help manufacturers to reduce waste, improve resource efficiency and save money. Manufacturers taking action to reduce waste and improve their resource efficiency can save up to £1,000 per employee. www.envirowise.gov.uk/rethink Paul Goodison, Olympic Gold medallist, European and British Laser Champion

Worlds from 11-19 September welcoming around 400 sailors in four age categories from 35 years and upwards. RYA Competitions Manager David Campbell-James commented:

“This opportunity provides a fantastic platform for association with a hugely popular international sailing event. “We look forward to working with a sponsor who shares the RYA’s passion

Photo: onEdition

for increasing national interest in sailing and showcasing Britain as a World Class sporting venue.”  Contact the RYA Sponsorship Co-ordinator Holly Adby at holly. adby@rya.org.uk

RoSPA role THE Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents is looking for a young person to take the lead in a project to improve the charity’s involvement with young people in water safety. Contact sneal@rospa. com by December 11.




News in brief Empty vessel A FULL-scale emergency search involving coastguards, police an RAF search-and-rescue helicopter and Dartmouth and Torbay lifeboats, was launched when a 14-foot motorboat was spotted speeding at full throttle after midnight on the River Dart near Dartmouth with no-one on board. It is thought the boat, Red Leader, was stolen from its moorings at Bayward’s Cove, Dartmouth. A sixhour search was called off after no sign was found of any casualty. The boat spun round in circles until the fuel in its outboard ran out. Police said they wanted to speak to a man who turned up at the Dolphin pub in Dartmouth soaking wet after midnight saying he had fallen out of his boat.

Clean up WEST Country fishermen are to become “litter-pickers” as part of a project to rid the sea of dangerous debris. Crews at the ports of Brixham and Plymouth have joined the Fishing for Litter scheme which sees fishermen collecting floating waste. Boats from Newlyn, Looe, Newquay and Appledore are already in the scheme, in which yachtsmen and pleasure-boaters are invited to join. More than 20,000 tons of litter is dumped in the North Sea alone. www fishingforlitter.org

ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk

Register now for Seafair Haven 2010 SEAFAIR Haven 2010 is now open for registrations. Milford Haven Port Authority is hosting the third Seafair Haven between 3 and 10 July and is looking for traditional and classic vessels to come and celebrate the magnificent Milford Haven Waterway. The festival runs on alternate years to the well-established Semaine du Golfe festival in the Morbihan, Brittany. In 2010, the festival will play host to a variety of traditional and classic vessels from Sail and Oar to Old Gaffer, Classic Yacht to Small Tall Ship in celebration of Pembrokeshire’s maritime heritage. The Festival opens on Sunday 4 July with a Public Day at Milford Docks where crews will have opportunities to display their vessels. The celebrations culminate with a Parade of Sail for all the vessels on Saturday 10 July.”

Coordinator, John Arcus said: “Seafair is growing into an international festival that embodies and keeps alive timeless maritime traditions. The week long programme for crews has a blend of seamanship, camaraderie and exploration; mixed in with good food, entertainment and Welsh hospitality. We have already received registrations from both previous and new participants and are pleased with the quality of vessels which have been lovingly restored and maintained. This project is supported by the Rural Development Plan for Wales 2007-2013 which is funded by the Welsh Assembly Government and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development. Boat owners interested in taking part are being urged to register their vessel, at www.seafairhaven.org.uk before 31 of March 2010.


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk



Shining a light on life on the rocks

News in brief Sail school PUPILS aged seven to 11 at Roselyon Primary School in Par, Cornwall are learning the ropes after a sailing club was launched at their school. The young Laser dinghy-sailors are working towards RYA level one qualification during weekly visits to the Polkerris Water Sports Centre.

L’eau standards

Storm lashed Longships Lighthouse. Tim Stevens, image courtesy of Trinity House.

THE National Maritime Museum in Cornwall will be shining a light on the world of lighthouses and their keepers from February with a major new exhibition entitled Life on the Rocks. From the massive scale of these triumphs of engineering to the tall tales of the lighthouse keepers themselves, the exhibition will illuminate stories before they slip out of living memory. The UK’s last manned lighthouse was converted to automatic operation in November 1998, and this exhibition will explore the lives of the last of the lighthouse keepers. For centuries the beacons of light

have protected our seas and Life on the Rocks will feature an array of objects, both large and small. A massive four tonne optic, with its dazzling array of prisms and lenses, will form a sculptural centre piece to the exhibition. Life on the Rocks is being supported by Trinity House, the General Lighthouse Authority, who are generously lending a large number of artefacts to the exhibition which is seen as complementary to their own heritage centre at the Lizard Lighthouse. The exhibition is part funded by a £30,000 grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Relieving the shift on Bishop Rock Lighthouse, 1969. Photo: Gibsons of Scilly

Pioneer gig racer dies RALPH Bird, known to thousands of rowing enthusiasts as the father of Cornish pilot gig racing, has died of cancer at 67, after finishing the last of his 29 gigs in his workshop at Devoran on the River Fal. President of the Cornish Pilot Gig Association which he founded 20 years ago, Ralph not only built six-oared gigs but restored numerous classic boats, including the legendary Treffry, built in 1844 and now the official blueprint for

all racing gigs. Ralph was largely responsible for the resurgence of gig-racing after the war. Now it is a major west country water-sport with more than 50 clubs. More than 2,000 rowers compete in the annual world championships in the Scillies. The last boat from the masterbuilder’s workshop, renamed the Ralph Bird, was recently launched at Newquay.

CLEAN water campaigners, members of Surfers Against Sewage, have written to the Government expressing concern and ‘outrage’ they say, after a study shows nearly a third of UK beaches are being contaminated by raw sewage from outdated pipes – despite standards set 30 years ago.

Top club BOLTON Sailing Club has been awarded the Volvo RYA Champion Club status in recognition of its commitment to youth sailing. The 400-member club, founded in 1952 at Belmont Reservoir is one of the leading sailing clubs in the north of England. It also supports the RYA Onboard scheme which aims to introduce sailing and windsurfing to 500,000 young people across the UK. www.rya.org.uk/programmes/ volvoryachampionclubs


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Keep up to speed with the RYA – on paper or in practice ONE of the great things about any watersport is that you are constantly learning. Whether you’re heading out on to the water for the first time, or perfecting some tricky manoeuvre, it’s all about improving and refining your skills. And this is where the RYA training structure really comes to the fore: It doesn’t matter what kind of boating you are in to, the RYA will have a course and a qualification for you, ensuring that you have the skills to head out onto the water in a confident frame of mind and with safety uppermost. If you think about it, recreational boating has been most fortunate over the years to benefit from minimal interference from the bigwigs in Whitehall. This is in part due to the generally excellent safety record we

have, but it is also a result of the huge success of the RYA training syllabus. Over the years this has provided a safe, structured training programme. The scheme was formulated in the 1960s, with a specific ethos of ‘education not legislation’ at its heart. The RYA has stayed true to this ethos and, in an age where the nanny state seems all pervasive, recreational boaters remain trusted to mind their own affairs, while enjoying the benefits of training schemes that are recognised, admired and often adhered to the world over. The courses are readily available too, with over 2,200 RYA recognised training centres providing training via thousands of RYA instructors. Just look for the RYA tickmark. RYA courses are constantly being

developed and these days they really do offer something for everyone with practical and shorebased courses covering a whole range of subjects from Diesel Engine Maintenance, right through to Sea Survival. So if you feel that you would benefit from a brush up over the winter months, or perhaps you want to try something out for the first time, you can rely on the RYA training schemes to help you out. Of course, while a lot of learning has to be done out on the water, sometimes there is no better way to hone your technique than kicking back with some expert tips from a book. Here again, the RYA has it covered. Over the past decade or so, RYA Publications has grown to establish itself as one of the biggest ‘how to’ marine publishers in the world.

www.endeavourquay.co.uk

Photo: Paul Wyeth/RYA

Originally intended purely to complement the RYA’s famous training courses, the books have now become very much stand alone titles, covering all aspects of boating from handbooks on deep sea fishing, through to tips on wiring your boat. An indication of the success of this policy is the fact that RYA publications are now available in 13 different languages. Naturally, the books complement the training schemes and both are all about helping you to be prepared: The classic illustration of the merits of both books and training is in boat handling: get it right in a tight space in a marina and there are few more satisfying feelings, get it wrong and, well, at the very least it’s going to be embarrassing. Training and reading around the subject can ensure that you have a

plan and a greater understanding of what to expect when you throw your engine in reverse ensuring that the only thing you will hear as you come in to berth are murmurs of admiration as opposed to the ominous sound of shattering fibreglass. An RYA book would make the ideal stocking filler for any seasoned seadog- or beginner for that matteryou can place your order by going to www.rya.org.uk or calling 08445569518. For more information on courses go to www.rya.org.uk, or contact the RYA Training Department direct on: 08445569528.


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Plucked from waves with two minutes to spare ‘ Five hours not knowing what our fate would be ... things were going to prove very tricky’

Inset: BT Open 60, in Azores after the incident during the Transat Jacques Vabre 2009. Photo: Offshore Challenge Sailing Team

Sébastien Josse I WISH I had something else to write about for this post-Transat Jacques Vabre column but fate struck once more and for Jeff and I the race had a bitter ending. Considering the danger of the situation it certainly could have been much worse so, all in all, the outcome is positive. We were both unhurt and BT was salvaged but it’s really hard to get over the disappointment. But let’s go back to the facts before anything else. After having set off from Le Havre on 8 November, heading towards Costa Rica, the fleet of the doublehanded race had to cope with a series of brutal low pressure systems. Some of the crews chose to dive south in order to avoid the

worst winds, others climbed very high north, hoping to capitalise on a bold tactical move. We decided to remain on the direct route, which meant keeping our heads down, taking a beating for three days, but theoretically emerging behind the fronts in the best position possible to tackle the Trade Winds. We were not alone in that option, and in fact the guys who were on the same route eventually composed the final podium. It worked undoubtedly and even if the violent conditions lasted longer than expected, Jeff and I felt perfectly in the game, holding on to first position for most of the week. Just as things were calming down, looking at what the other guys were doing, we decided to ease off a bit. We were faster than anyone else and could afford a little respite. The boat had withstood a few serious beatings because we had been

cautious at all times and we wanted to carry on that way – that meant no unnecessary strain on the gear. A couple of hours after having effectively lifted the foot off the gas pedal, disaster struck in the form of a massive wave that caught BT from her starboard side and shattered the coach roof. As Jean- François, who was inside at the time, recounted: “I was half resting, half analysing weather data at the navstation when suddenly I was submerged by thousands of litres of water. “There were also carbon fibre splinters floating around, and it did not take me long to realise what had happened.” At that moment, I was just above Jeff, as I had been sitting under the cuddy when the wave hit us. BT was very vulnerable and I knew that if a second wave was to strike, the boat would fill up and go under in a matter of minutes.

The BT yacht as seen from a Portuguese Air Force plane minutes before rescue. Photo: Portuguese Air Force

I turned on the emergency beacon, then we canted the keel to port so the boat would heel over, putting the gaping hole out of reach of the waves. Then the waiting game started, and eventually we spent five hours not knowing what our fate would be. The rescue operation had been started, but given the conditions, as it was still blowing 45 knots and waves were still six to eight metres high, things were going to prove very tricky. There was no way we could be approached by another boat. The helicopter was the only solution but the chopper coming from the Azores could only spend 20 minutes in the zone before having to go back to base! The Portuguese Navy pilots and rescue team knew they had a very narrow window as we were almost outside of their range, but they wrapped up the whole

operation in 18 minutes. They were incredibly efficient. I have to say that their professionalism, their modesty and the warmth we felt when landing at the Terceira base really lifted our spirits. I guess that at that point, only that display of dedication and humility was strong enough to make us get over our disappointment – that and the relief to have made it through the day alive. These guys have my utmost admiration and respect, which is also deserved by Charles, Rhys and Pierre-Emmanuel plus the whole crew of the tug boat who managed to go out there and salvage BT against all odds. So it’s true, things did not turn out the way we could have hoped, but I do find great solace in the courage, seamanship and sense of duty displayed by everyone involved. May they feel proud and receive all my gratitude.


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk

Look through the storm to find solutions Ellen MacArthur I CAN’T quite believe it but sadly this will be my last column for All at Sea for the foreseeable future… We have had quite an emotional time of it recently. It brought a lump to my throat to see our BT Open 60, almost completely submerged, being towed back into harbour in the Azores. We won’t know exactly what condition she is in until she gets back to Lorient but at least she is now afloat again. It is obviously not what we were hoping for in the final challenge of the BT Team Ellen partnership, but the main thing is that Seb and Jeff were recovered safe and sound. Their recent ordeal was a reminder that you can never take anything for granted in sailing and that the line between victory and disaster is a very fine one. Looking back on all that has happened since I started writing this column in 2001, it is incredible how much we have achieved as a team – EDS Atlantic Challenge, Trophée Coralia, Fécamp Grand Prix, Zeebrugge Grand Prix, the Transat Jacques Vabres, the Jules Verne record attempt, the Route du Rhums, the Transatlantic Record Attempt, the Round the World Record, the Asian Record Circuit, the iShares Cup, the Archipelago Raid, not to mention the annual Cowes Week regattas and Round the Island Races! I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who was involved in making these happen and who have played a part in creating some incredible memories - crews, shore teams, the media and of course, my BT Team Ellen team mates, Seb Josse and Nick Moloney. So now, as many of you who will have heard my interview on Desert Island Discs will know, I have decided to take on a new challenge – something which I’m sure will be far harder than anything I

BT Team Ellen - the end of an era! Photo: Th.Martinez/Sea&Co/BTTeamEllen

have done before. There is definitely a part of me that would just like to get back out there and have a go at taking back Francis Joyon’s record, but for now something is stopping me doing that. As part of my work with our BT Team Ellen partners over the past three years, I have been researching how we can live and work in a more sustainable way – something I became passionate about through my experiences at sea. I’m going to be working on this full time and to communicate my findings, I am setting up a charitable foundation next year to promote understanding of the basic facts and to help people to draw their own conclusions about the challenges that lie ahead of us. When faced with a storm at sea, I always tried to see through to the other side, and I see this challenge no differently. I firmly believe that we can find the solutions — it will not be the first time that the human race has achieved the impossible through sheer necessity and determination. So a new chapter is starting for me and, apart from my continuing work with the Ellen MacArthur Trust, I will be doing less sailing. But whatever happens, sailing will always be my first love and have an important place in my heart. Thank you for being there to share all the amazing adventures that I have been lucky enough to have so far – I am sure that you have not heard the last from me!

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100 tips to celebrate 100 columns Sticky’s tips By Sticky Stapylton

Since this is my 100th set of tips, we decided to provide simple 100 tips to celebrate. 1. First of all, don’t try do everything yourself. Brief your crew, explain if necessary, demonstrate and then delegate. Monitor thereafter. 2. Keep a warp handy in the cockpit if you do not have a throwing line. 3. Always move forward on a sailing boat on the windward side. If you do loose your footing, you have further to fall and more things to grab. 4. To get rid of out of date flares, take them to a chandler and ask him to take them in, then buy the replacements from him. 5. Think boom, particularly on a reach. If you have the slightest doubt of the skill of your helm, rig a boom preventer. Make sure it can be released from the cockpit. 6. Check your lifejacket before putting it on every time. On a long passage, three or four times I had to tighten the gas cylinder because it was loose. 7. On a delivery of 3,200 miles, I went up the mast ten times. Mind you we did have a halyard part during the first 200 miles, so I was a trifle cautious! 8. Remove your jackstays if leaving the boat for some time. Sun will weaken them and they may fail. 9. Think ‘what if?’ as you brief your crew Think in particular of fire, gas explosion, man overboard, collision, and injury. 10. Think about recovering a man who has fallen overboard. A simple 6:1 tackle with a couple of strops and carabinas is easy to make up.

11. If you have black dust around your alternator belt check for alignment and tension. 12. If your boat is connected to shore power never leave it for extended periods even if you have a galvanic isolator fitted. 13. If you have fitted a gas heater to your boat recently be aware that you may possibly have invalidated your insurance policy. 14. Do you service your engine prior to lay-up or during your winter maintenance? The impeller on a boat I skippered failed two days after she had gone back into the water. 15. If you have the slightest doubt about your position or course, slow down, stop engines, heave to or anchor if you are really unsure of your position. Re-check your navigation plan and cross check with radar, compass fixing and soundings. 16. When piloting your boat into harbour at night many have a mass

of lights, neon, traffic, street, discos, fish and chipperies all lit up so that buoys and leading lights can be quite impossible to see against it all. Look at the large scale chart of your destination port to find an approach direction that is better than others. 17.1 Do you know that if a severe gale warning is given, the mean wind speed is expected to reach force 9 (41knots)? Do you know what imminent, soon, and later mean; what the definition of the various of states of visibility are, and do you understand what slowly, steadily and rapidly mean in relation to pressure system movements? I have a simple handout with all the useful expressions. 18. When using an electronic chart plotter do not use the waypoints at the harbour entrances. Anticipate the direction from which you will be approaching and chose a waypoint which will help you to “eyeball” your way in. 19. When laying up ashore be careful about leaving battery chargers and dehumidifiers on. There have been fires. 20. If you are more than a day sailor think about attending a sea survival course.

21. Place two distress rockets and two red hand held flares in the chart table which can be grabbed quickly in an emergency. 22. Keep one hand for yourself and one hand for the boat and warn crew about keeping their centre of gravity down low. 23. In the galley in a heavy sea always wear waterproof trousers and boots when cooking in rough weather, pour water from the kettle into cups or mugs in the sink, no fry-ups at sea, never walk up the companionway steps with hot drink or food, always pass cups or plates up or place them to leeward in the cockpit and no food or drinks anywhere near a chart or the chart table. 24. On long passages have a dog watch in the late afternoon, where the duration is half the normal three or four hours. One team can prepare the evening meal and the other can clean up and get the boat sorted out. 25. Invest in a gas lighter and every now and again spray a whiff of gas at your sensor just to make sure it is working. 26. Taking bearings with a handheld compass at night, the navigator was surprised to find how poor his fix was. The compass was old and the beta light too weak to read bearings so he was using a torch. The metal parts in the torch and maybe the batteries as well, must have caused some deviation, which gave a cocked hat over a mile wide. If the beta light is not giving you clear readings the compass needs a service or replacing. Charge up the Beta light by holding a lighted torch over the compass for 20 seconds or so.

27. Propane gas lighters apparently do not completely switch off. They can leave a very small flame which is almost invisible and which can slowly heat the area around it until it catches fire. 28. Diffuse torch lights by wrapping some material around the lens cap and securing it with a rubber band or you can colour the lens with a fibre pen or even nail varnish. 29. Try to use a head band torch with the red bulb to help retain your night vision. Always make a point of turning the light off before looking at someone to talk to them. 30. Encourage crew to leave their strops clipped on in the cockpit when they go below, unhooking from the lifejacket or harness so they can clip on before emerging up the companionway. 31. When rowing a dinghy in a cross tide, line up the head of the person in the stern with a static object, or alternatively two objects in transit. Keep your objects lined up and you should arrive at where you wish to land. 32. Once ashore take a bearing of the yacht’s position before returning and use the compass to help you get back. If returning in the dark, always take a torch to warn other craft. If you have some distance to row take flares, a handheld radio and, of course, all should wear lifejackets. I also take a bailer, the pump, repair kit and oars if I have an outboard motor. 33. A nurse I sailed with covered the split ends of her husband’s fingers caused by salt water with Vaseline and then put rubber gloves on top to soften up the skin and speed healing. 34. Ball bearing blocks are unsuitable for high static loads and may be distorted. Plan on blocks with plain bearings or ones with a higher rolling load rating. 35. If you drive a motor boat from the fly bridge be wary of having your radar scanner on. There is danger from electromagnetic energy, especially to the eyes. 36. To estimate distance, sight over your thumb first with one eye and then with the other, the thumb will move over the background, perhaps first crossing a prominent building and second a church spire. The chart will tell you that these two are say 400m apart, use the ratio of distance between eye and outstretched arm/distance between pupils, usually 10:1 and the distance off is then 4,000m. 37. Check your engine compartment to ensure that there is no combustible material which could help a fire to spread. 38. To get back on course when a transit is open, simply turn towards the nearer of the two objects, leading lights or beacons. 39. If you are correcting your course from a reverse bearing, aim along the bearing the mark should be, and then turn to bring the bearing correct. 40. To avoid setting off with your mains cable still attached to the shore, wind the electricity umbilical around the stern line. 41. The simple way to tell how many hours to sunset is to place your arm fully

outstretched so that your palm kisses the lower limb of the sun. Then count down the number of full palm widths to the horizon – that is the number of hours till sunset. 42. If you are not sure whether the wind or tide is stronger when anchoring stop the boat either cross wind or cross tide and see which force takes you in a particular direction. You will then have an idea of which direction you need to point the bow. 43. A laptop power pack can produce interference which may block Navtex signals and you may have to resite some equipment. 44. Put seasickness pills under your tongue to get it into the system more quickly. 45. When you fasten the shackle pin in your ground tackle, hold the open shackle in your right hand with the open end away from you and put the pin through from the left using your left hand. The upward jerking of a pitching boat should tighten the shackle pin rather than loosen it. It goes without saying that the pin must be moused. 46. Go through your first aid kit and make a list of drugs. If there is an accident you ask for medical advice, it is possible that the doctor will ask for the list of drugs. 47. If your gas alarm goes off turn off the gas at the cut off switch, turn off all the burners on the stove, warn everyone and evacuate the boat or at least get up on deck. Open all hatches, deadlights and scuttles. Do not touch any electrical switches. Pump the bilges manually to evacuate any gas. 48. Electronics can fail so make a note in the log of time, log reading and course steered when setting out. If something goes wrong with the GPS, you can at least work up an EP if visibility closes in. 49. If you get lost at night, stop, and gain time to sort out the problem. Motor into wind or tide so there is the least amount of speed over the ground. This gives the navigator a better chance of gathering his thoughts. 50. When crew are working on the boom, it is essential that the main sheet is never eased off. By passing the fall of the sheet between the lower block and the line you can indicate that the sheet must not be touched 51. I think the only way of getting someone unconscious out of the water is for a member of crew to put on a dry suit and help the unfortunate on board. A dry suit does not cost much and could save a life. 52. A couple of years back I had what seemed like an engine fire when the bendix on the starter motor failed to disengage from the fly wheel and with the engine running the starter motor became a second alternator and overheated producing clouds of smoke. A marine engineer advised that starter motors should be taken off engines annually and the lubrication checked to ensure that the bendix worked properly. 53. The purpose of an EP is to tell you where you are going to be in the future. You will then be able to tell if you are going to be set into danger.

54. Remove dry powder fire extinguishers from the bracket occasionally and shake it until you can feel the powder shifting inside. 55. 40 per cent of boats checked by the RNLI have lifejackets which will fail, many due to gas cylinders being loose. 56. Bear in mind that if you are using French charts over the other side of the Channel, most of them are based on the datum ED50. Your UK charts are based on WGS84. So change the datum point on your GPS. 57. Mark your fuel and oil filters with the date and engine hours when you change them, using an indelible pen. 58. Draw up your pilotage plan and write it down using indelible fibre pen on the inside of a used fruit juice carton which has been well washed, you then have a permanent record which is waterproof. 59. An easy way to find out the rise of tide at any given moment is to take a quick fix and note the echo sounding reading. Compare the sounding at the fix with the depth shown on the chart and you have a good idea what the rise of tide is at the time of the fix. 60. The anchor windlass is for laying or weighing anchor and not as a strong point for digging in. 61. To avoid starting the engine with the inlet seacock closed I turn off the engine inlet seacock and hang the ignition key on a small lanyard over the seacock handle. 62. If the ignition key fails to return to its correct position once the engine starts the solenoid will stay engaged and then heat up. Lubricate the switch throughout the season. 63. Wait 20 seconds after firing up the engine to check for water coming out of the exhaust because there could have been a pint or two left in the engine casing after shut down. 64. I am told that if you have a dud handheld flare which fails to go off, you can light the dud from one which has worked properly just before it expires. 65. Anchoring factors: Seabed and holding ground, is my anchor suitable? Tidal flow, currents. Clear of fairways, channels and ferry routes. Adequate marks to find clear exit if we have to leave in a hurry. Length of stay. Depth of water now, next low water’s depth, how much chain? Swinging circle, clear of other moored craft. Weather now and the forecast, do we have shelter? Distance to shore, suitable landing places. Distance to nearest pub. 66. A valise liferaft should not be stowed outside. If water gets inside the covering, it may prevent proper inflation. They should be stored in a locker or down below but easily accessible. 67. On a long passage the barometer is one of the most important instruments on board. It is the trend and its speed which really matter. Keep an accurate record. 68. Sea sickness: I always keep a bucket in the cockpit, much better that the sufferer is sick into a receptacle of sorts than tries to be sick over the side. TURN TO PAGE 18 ▶


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18 69. Apparently we are all made with our hand size in similar proportions to our height of eye and length of arm. So even if you have arms like a gorilla, your hand will still be able to give a rough idea of how many degrees away from a fixed object something lies. I tend to use the forestay or some object stored on the stern, a horseshoe buoy, danbuoy or perhaps a GPS antenna. 70. On a long passage we did all our washing in a bucket with a sealed lid and the motion of the boat cleaned all our shirts and underwear. With soap which works in salt water, you can save on fresh water. You cam dangle your laundry in a bag with suitable soap over the bow whilst at anchor; the pitching motion of the boat agitates the washing. Not advisable in most harbours or marinas. 71. Never hang up your hand bearing compass on its lanyard so that it swings. It could swing against a polished wooden bulk head surface and score it or the compass could be damaged. 72. When piloting a yacht into a port or harbour with a tricky entrance, with many course changes and plenty of dangers, record your track on your chart plotter. Getting out can be made easy by following the reverse of the track. 73. When cooking in a heavy sea, wear oilskins and boots. 74. When buying a lifejacket that it comes with an integral crutch strap and sprayhood. 75. Checking with the manufacturer that it is acceptable to store a cannister liferaft on its side because with some the CO2 bottle will put pressure on the canister seals and moisture may get in. 76. Hold handheld flares over the side and wear a very strong glove. Look away

from the flare because of its brightness. Point the flare down so that burning plastic dross falls into the sea. 77. A lifejacket should be flaked like a sail and it will then inflate more quickly and effectively. Practise putting on our lifejackets in the dark. 78. Before a long distance delivery find out what rescue services there are in each country. We are all so used to the RNLI, it may come as a bit of a shock to find out what little there is available elsewhere. 79. If aiming for a mooring where there is a cill in the approach, always enter on a rising tide.

80. As well as a grab bag with essentials think about a bucket for a loo, two sponges, one to mop up seawater, one to mop and keep condensation to supplement the water, plenty of Carnation milk, extra sea sickness pills and unbreakable spectacles? 81. Ever since I heard of a crew member cross threading the regulator whilst changing the gas bottle and causing a gas explosion, I have made it a two man job. One man does the actual change, and a second checks that it has been done properly. 82. If you have doubts about GPS accuracy it may be worthwhile checking whether you have the correct datum entered. 83. To fill a bucket with sea water

under way drop the bucket in by its lanyard upside down. Pull the bucket up sharply, providing your boat speed is not too excessive, the bucket will come up nearly full. 84. Skippers often underestimate the additional demands placed on inexperienced crew when things began to get difficult and try to do too much themselves. Budding skippers should show crew what to do and then delegate wherever possible. 85. Know your IRPCS (International Rules for Preventing Collisions at Sea) and be aware of how you should approach or cross a traffic separation scheme (TSS). 86. When mooring to a pontoon, quay or rafting, use one rope for each job, each one able to be eased under load. 87. Discourage crew from leaving mobile phones close to your chart table to avoid damage to electronics. Better still, have the damned things turned off! 88. At anchor before nightfall I take a bearing of the best and clearest course out to sea, so that in an emergency I know in which direction I have to steer to get away. With GPS it is a simple matter of entering a few waypoints marking a danger free route to sea. A really slick skipper will have a crew member pressing the waypoint button on the GPS at each turning point whilst navigating in. 89. Pull loops on to the ends of halyards so that messenger lines can be rigged to replace them. 90. Depth soundings are an essential aid in navigation and your fix, whether using the compass or a GPS must be cross checked. I always put my mark on the chart, check against the echo

sounder and enter the time, log reading and course steered on the chart. 91. Some extremely experienced sailors timed the interval between sighting a vessel on the horizon and it reaching close to their position at 15 to 18 minutes so they decided to scan the horizon every 11 minutes to give a buffer for safety. Once visibility deteriorates, the interval must be reduced. 92. When teaching power boat skippers I ask them to find out how much wash a boat produces at certain speeds. See how far away you have to go so that the wash will have no effect on a boat being overtaken or at anchor. Add 50m and then ensure that you go no closer. 93. An old tomato or orange juice container, split open. laid flat and washed can be used as a waterproof notebook. 94. A transit between a part of the boat, your eye and a vessel considered on a collision course will soon show you whether you are, in fact, going to pass close. This can be useful for passing headlands too. 95. Crossing the Channel be aware that there could be fog around which may not be mentioned in our shipping forecasts but may be forecast by the French. Fog often occurs in the area of the Alderney race and the Cotentin Peninsula when the tidal stream changes to the west. 96. The key to finding the mark is to run a bearing from a really prominent charted feature to the point you want, convert this bearing to magnetic. Then ensure you are to seaward of the mark (by sounding or fix) and steer down this bearing line. Take tidal push into account.

97. Given that you know your position, take a bearing on the chart to the mark you wish to identify. Convert this to magnetic, go up on deck with your hand bearing compass and swing it round until the magnetic bearing you have worked out from the chart is in the compass window. You should see the mark you are looking for. 98. Research has found that after a fall, the more dangerous conditions occur when the barometer starts to go up again. There are times when there is a lull and shortly after that the wind comes in more strongly and from a different direction producing a more dangerous breaking sea. 99. With the large genoas it is difficult to see under the headsail. If sailing off the wind, harden up momentarily and sail for a few seconds closer to the wind and to observe the arc which had previously been blanketed. If sailing close hauled, bear away for a few moments.

If you leave your lines “cheesed� 100. and left for a while when moored they will collect pollution, grow mildew and they will not benefit from the odd dowsing from rain. By cow hitching, your lines can be quickly and easily available with one simple tug and they will stay cleaner, longer. instructor@sail-help.co.uk www.sail-help.co.uk


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Sharing the water with care CENTRAL to our enjoyment of boating is being out in the fresh air among the elements - taking in beautiful scenery and seeing the varied and wonderful wildlife that our rich waters provide. But we have to make sure that our actions don’t have a negative effect on the wildlife with which we share the water. A change in legislation means that anyone can now be prosecuted for disturbing wildlife and ignorance of the law is not a suitable excuse. All types of craft have the potential to cause disturbance if handled without care. So it is vitally important that we know what to look out for and how to act when we encounter wildlife. But what exactly constitutes disturbance and why is it so bad? Disturbance means simply affecting the way in which these animals would normally behave for example while breeding, feeding or resting. We have all seen a flock of seabirds rafting up out on the water. Disturbance from one boat is not a big problem but if boat after boat made them take off just as they have just settled, then important resting period would be lost, reducing their ability to hunt and escape predators.

Just follow The Green Blue’s top tips to make the most of your encounters with wildlife. It is their world after all! Boating is a widely enjoyed activity and simple measures can ensure its sustainability for future generations. For more information regarding wildlife disturbance or any other issues visit www.thegreenblue.org.uk or email info@thegreenblue.org.uk.

GREEN BLUE TOP TIPS • Find out whether the areas you visit are protected, and why. • Keep your distance and use binoculars to get a better view. • Keep you noise and wash to a minimum. • Small craft can reach shallow, more sensitive areas. Avoid stirring up the bottom, or disturbing vegetation and wildlife, take care where you anchor. Photo: C Brown

Disturbance of breeding seals on rocks can lead to the animals rushing to enter the water as quickly as possible. This can lead to broken flippers, as well as the young being trampled. If disturbance continues then it

is likely that the seals will look for another breeding site, and may not return for several years. We all love seeing whales and dolphins and it is tempting to interpret a dolphin riding our bow wave as a positive response,

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NOVEMBER 2009

• NUMBER 11 • VOLUME 9

n hoping BT Team Elle high to end on a TJV Ellen MacArthur

IN THIS EDIT

as we Looking east west prepare to race

Stack them up Dry stacking

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Three feet ten across the ocean

Seb Josse 15

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ION:

up Time to wrap season in silk, lace and confetti Shelley Jory Page 13

Just what is the RYA?

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however this takes up a lot of energy and time away from feeding. So it important not to follow them when they leave your boat. Make sure you don’t surprise them with sudden movements and that you keep a steady speed and course.

• Keep a constant speed and direction when you spot whales and dolphins. • Keep a record of your sightings and report them at www.wdcs.org.uk. • Watch The Green Blue’s short film on the best way to watch wildlife.


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk

News in brief Green award MANCHESTER based sailclothing company and British Marine Federation (BMF) member Henri Lloyd has scooped this year’s top award for its commitment to environmentally friendly products. The DAME– Design Awards METS also praised three other BMF members, Kelvin Hughes, Musto and McMurdo.

Olympic effort

THE Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy (WPNSA) joined forces with the local community and the Dorset Police in a rowing marathon to raise money for Children In Need. The public competed in 500m time trials, the same exercise used to fitness test elite athletes, while the police team’s target was to row from the Olympic sailing venue in Weymouth 125 miles to the Olympic site in Stratford, London.

Ocean’s 11 THE Dufour Cup and Rally will be held next year at Ocean Village Marina, Southampton, over the weekend Friday, 11 June, to Monday, 14 June, with a series of three races (classes for racing yachts and for cruising yachts) and social events. For details and booking, see www.dufour.org.uk

Peak performance FORTY teams from the shipping and related industries will scale the UK’s three highest mountains – Ben Nevis, Helvellyn and Snowdon – within 24 hours and it’s all in aid of charity. The Sailors’ Society is looking to raise more than £500,000 from its biennial Three Peaks Challenge from 18 to 21 June. Each team has to raise at least £5,000 for the charity. Contact Vicky MacLeod on 023 8051 5950.

City challenge PELICAN Racing from Cowes has announced the inaugural City Racing Challenge for 2010 by inviting London’s city workers to swap their spreadsheet for a jib sheet and compete against their business rivals on the water. The event at the Island Sailing Club, which starts in April and ends in September, is split into four business sectors and entries cost £1,500 plus VAT per team of three or four people. More info@ pelican-racing.com

MP’s concern EASTLEIGH MP Chris Huhne visited Hamble marina to hear concerns from boaters and marina operators about new laws that could stop the clearing of navigable channels. He said dredging was essential to preserve the 3,261 swinging or marina moorings in the Hamble river.

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Sell your boat for free on www.allatsea.co.uk www.seamarknunn.com


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Christmas gift guide With the sound of jingling bells and reindeer hooves in the air, Tim Spicer has chosen a selection of nautical-themed Christmas gifts to fill your stocking.

UNDER £20 Lomo dry bag • £17 LOMO’S expanding range of drybags sees a new arrival in this 40-litre holdall. Different to most other bags in their range, it opens straight along the top seam as opposed to the usual roll down barrel bags that we have become used to. This wide opening along the top allows more convenient access to you kit, which is great if you’ve got loads of small bits and bobs to find. www.lomowatersport.com

MES Spotlight • £19.95 AN on board spotlight or powerful torch is a vital bit of kit on a boat, particularly as winter increases the likelihood of fog, so it’s good to see the timely introduction of a new product from Marine Electronic Services. The SP2M is a high-capacity spotlight with a two million-candle power halogen lamp and a 95mm reflector, making it an extremely potent tool. It is powered by a built-in 4Ah rechargeable battery and comes complete with an AC charger as well as a DC cigarette charger lead. The dual position swivel handle allows either conventional carrying or ‘pistolgrip’ operation and it also has an adjustable bracket for freestanding work. It measures 208 x 134 x 178mm and weighs just over a kilo and, to help light up your Christmas, MES has reduced the price to just £19.95. It’s a fine addition to a boat owner’s wish list. Tel: 01179 114111 www.mesltd.co.uk

The Minimum Boat book £8.99 THIS quirky, lighthearted compilation by nautical thriller writer Sam Llewellyn is a collection of diatribes neatly geared to the post-recession age. The author turns the clock back to a time of simple joys. The smaller the boat, the bigger the fun, Llewellyn is an advocate of keeping sailing simple, and in this wonderful collection of nautical observations he promotes the minimalist boating lifestyle - whilst poking gentle fun at the expensive, complicated, ostentatious forms of sailing. Laced with humour and tongue in cheek jibes, and illustrated throughout by cartoons from Mike Peyton, this is the ideal bunkside read for those who are attracted to the traditional way of sailing and keeping things simple on the water.


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UNDER £50

UNDER £100

Jetpilot Venice Rash Guard • £34

Medion splash resistant camcorder • £99.99

IT’s time to start thinking about those winter warmers! Rash vests, originally worn by surfers to prevent wax-based chafing when it’s too warm to wear a wetsuit, are also popular with jet skiers as an extra layer to lock in the warmth and stop wetsuit rash. As a leader in the water sports apparel market, Jetpilot offer a range of rash vest designs, our current favourite being the Venice. With four way stretch, UV protection and super cool graphics it’s a winner. Available in long and short sleeve, both £34.26 0151 691 0006 / www.ncjetski.co.uk

THE Medion Life S47000 splashresistant HD sports camcorder is a rather nifty little gadget. Weighing only 85g, it has a two-inch colour display with a robust casing, allowing you to keep it tucked away in a pocket and record those moments on the beach or at sea that deserve to be seen again. With 720p HD resolution, the camcorder can also be used as a digital stills camera and an MP3 player. It is splash-resistant rather than waterproof and the internal memory is only 90MB but you can easily expand the capacity with an SDHC card. The S47000 has a maximum aperture of F2.8, a focal length of f3.99 mm and a shutter speed of 1/2000 so it should be decent with fairly fast moving objects. The price seems about fair too... www.medionshop.co.uk

Reed’s Nautical Almanac 2010 • £29.75 THE Yachtsman’s bible provides all the data required to navigate Atlantic coastal waters around the UK, Ireland, Channel Islands and the entire European coastline from the tip of Denmark right down to Gibraltar and the Azores. This publication also includes a 2010 Marina Guide. The Almanac usually retails for £34.99 but Seamark Nunn are offering it for £29.75. www.seamarknunn.com

Jetski Safari £65 pp for 2 people per PW (variable) WHAT better Christmas present than a jet skiing trip? Based in the stunning Poole harbour, Jetski Safaris offers people the chance to ride personal watercraft for the first time. The company provides all of the necessary riding equipment and can accommodate people as young as 14, as long as they are accompanied by an adult. It is one of the only centres in the country that permits youngsters to ride. It works on the proviso that an instructor is on the water with clients at all times and that children between 14 and 17 years are accompanied by an adult to drive a PW on the Safaris. With qualified RYA instructors for personal watercraft and powerboats it has a thorough approach to training. They also run RYA PW Proficiency courses at the centre. They use Sea-Doo GTIs, which are 130hp each, and nice and stable so perfect for new riders. Good value for money. www.jetskisafaris.co.uk


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk

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Ocean Safety – the Kru Sport Pro lifejacket • £89.99

UNDER £200

COMFORTABLE, stylish and wearable should be three givens when selecting a lifejacket for different types of water use. The Ocean Safety Kru Sport Pro waistcoat design lifejacket fits these three criteria. The Kru Sport Pro is unobtrusive and lightweight, ideally suited for the wearer to be in light clothing or full foul weather gear. The lifejacket features an integral sprayhood and can be either automatic or manual inflation and with or without a harness. In addition it will outperform the current 150 Newton standard, with its superior buoyancy of 175 Newtons, using the larger 38g inflation gas cylinder. www.oceansafety.com

Musto BR1 Channel Jacket • £150 (matching trousers: £90) SINCE its introduction two years ago, Musto’s BR1 range has given UK boaters the option of effective inshore protection in a unisex package at an affordable price. But the new version has been updated to provide a BR1 Channel Jacket designed specifically for women. It retains all the key features of the unisex original (rollaway adjustable hood, fleece-lined collar, double-cuff fastening, double storm flap, handwarmer pockets and Musto prismatic reflectors) but it comes with tailoring better fitted to a woman’s shape. Made from a nylon-faced, hydrophiliccoated fabric, which is waterproof and breathable, it can be teamed with the matching BR1 trousers. The trousers, like the jacket, are available in both unisex and ladies’ sizes, making it very useful gear as we move into the autumn season. www.musto.com

GECKO helmet • £144 THIS full-face version of the Gecko is suitable for protection against extreme weather conditions and high-speed marine activities. The helmet consists of three main parts, an outer shell, internal liner, and retention system. Each part is designed to provide maximum protection and comfort. The inflatable liner system ensuring a true custom fit and has an adjustable control valve, allowing the wearer to adjust the feel of the helmet for maximum comfort and secure fit. The full face Gecko would be suitable for personal watercraft users, power boaters, or Zapcat/ Thundercat racers. The helmet provides fixing points for a wide range of add-ons, including visors, goggles and torches. Order online. www.geckoheadgear.com

Glowfast – luminous draft stripes (30mm x 25m) • £145 GLOWFAST ‘luminous draft stripes’ are designed for sails, so that yachtsmen can see their entire sail shape throughout the night without the aid of a torch. Using patented technology, this product can provide more than 20 hours of visibility with its luminous properties, with as little as 10 minutes of exposure to light. The stripes then recharge during their next exposure to either natural or torchlight. They are made using similar base materials to current sail tapes and as such are lightweight, durable and easy to fit to either new sails or retrofitted to cleaned older sails. The stripes will stick to most fabrics, whether fore and aft or downwind sails. 01489 581696 / Ian.Clark@sailcloth.co.uk


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ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk

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UNDER £500 Hammond STX Drysuit Adult £286.50 / Junior £243.60 DRY suits are essential winter wear whilst on the water. This hand-made dry suit from Hammond, a business with 30 years experience in the manufacture and repair of dry suits can be used for sailing, power boating, waterskiing, wakeboarding, and jet skiing. All seams are single stitched and hand finished with a nylon to neoprene tape. The seals are made from latex and you have a choice of either ankle seals or socks. It has a rear 8bdm zip with an elasticated rear waist and comes with a free suit bag. www.hammond-drysuits.co.uk

X2 O’brien Decade Wakeboard • £340 THE 2009 Decade is the third generation of Daniel Watkins’ signature boards and represents almost 10 years of collaborative wakeboard development. Featuring a wider profile tip-to-tail, the next generation DELTA base, refined molded fins and the biggest rolled edge in our line, the Decade provides catch-free edge response with more pop than ever before. www.obrien.com

Mini-B Diving Pack • £459 (C-Pro model) SPACE is always a premium on board, and bulky heavy kit rolling around on a rough sea has the potential to damage itself and your boat. By wrapping up a full scuba kit in one handy backpack, the Mini-B overcomes nearly all the issues. The Mini-B offers a quicker and more convenient alternative to setting up your full kit when you need to get in the water quickly and don’t plan to stay there too long. With the air tank, regulator, BCD and weights all integrated in a one-size-fits-all backpack, you can be ready to free a fouled prop, check an underwater fitting or repair collision damage in seconds. The only additional kit you need is mask and fins. The Mini-B (minibreather) units come in a variety of models for various applications. www.mini-b.com

UNDER £5,000 Expedition Stingray kayak • £2,690 THE Stingray kayak is fast, light, and strong and has the volume to carry a large amount of equipment. With a length of 5.70 m and a width of 0.52 m, it is the fastest kayak in the Expedition Kayaks’ range. Designed for experienced paddlers who want more from their sport but any moderately competent paddler will easily be able to enjoy this craft. The hull shape is based on proven racing designs and is easily driven in all conditions. It weighs 15.5 kg and features two large entry oval hatches, luggage rack, front and rear bulkheads, foam sandwich carbon seat, safety lines, complete pedal rudder system and carrying handles. www.expeditionkayaks.co.uk


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ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk

Into the new de

ExCeL London – the place to be 8–1 Special features Show Stage

With the Tullet Prebon London International Boat Show fast approaching, Tim Spicer looks at what is new for 2010 and asks National Boat Shows if the recession has made an impact on the event. THE New Year will leave an exciting decade behind it and start a fresh one with new hope for the economy, the marine industry, and the London Boat Show. Now in its 56th year, the boat show is the annual focal point for British boating and 2010 looks set to be a cracker. With new sponsors Tullet Prebon, one of the largest international money brokers on board, National Boat Shows has some major backing, which is being put to good use. New attractions include a lavish Inland Waterways feature, a major West End extravaganza, and interactive areas for families and children. Already, 4,500 tickets have been sold in advance, compared to 1,800 this time last year. It does not necessarily mean there will be an increase in visitors but certainly there is a more positive attitude towards wanting to go to the show. Andrew Williams, managing director of National Boat Shows, said: “We are extremely happy considering the way things are. We are being very open that the show is going to be 15 per cent smaller than last year but that is a reflection of British commerce in general.” “With a reduced inventory, we purposefully took the decision to use 15 per cent less space. I don’t think visitors will notice the difference at all.” In light of the recession there will be nearly 100 fewer exhibitors. Major leisure craft manufacturers such as Suzuki, Honda, and BRP will not be exhibiting in January. But Williams added: “Yamaha, for example, are now having 28 small to medium sized boats on display, which is as many as Suzuki and Honda would have had together. Plus we have a walkway with 20 sail boats, so fewer companies will be present but the same number of brands are represented. We still have a very diverse mix.” There is definitely a positive feeling about the 2010 show, which could signal the start to a great boating year.

The Show Stage was very popular in 2009 and, as a result, has several new additions to build on that success. It has the same footprint as 2009 and is still powered by Fairline but the style will be new. Eight times a day there will be a West End meets East End style fashion show, called Rock the Boat. Full schedules for the stage will be available on www.londonboatshow.com.

Going for Gold

Also on the Show Stage will be Going for Gold, focusing on Olympians preparing for 2012. Visitors will also hear inspirational stories from ‘Boating Heroes’ such as Geoff Holt and Hilary Lister, record-breaking rower Sarah Outen, youngest ever round-the-world sailor Mike Perham and P1 Powerboat Champion and All at Sea columnist Shelley Jory. Huge screens across the Stage will also enable visitors to catch up with the action from 2009.

Ultimate Holiday

Another major attraction will be The Ultimate Holiday competition, in a game show style format. People can enter before attending ExCeL or on the day at Sunsail or Moorings stand, and then the results will be drawn on the final Sunday on the main stage. The prize for one lucky family will be to win four holidays, including a Sunsail holiday, a Moorings holiday to France, an extreme sports winter getaway with Club Vas, and a luxury trip to the British Virgin Islands.

Boating on a budget

Boating on a budget will also being launched on the show stage, which demonstrates how affordable boating can be, and will show the Hunter 19 ‘Barangoola’ being restored to raise funds for RNLI Burnham-on-Crouch. Visitors will be able to follow how volunteers transformed this 36-year-old boat from a forgotten wreck to a sleek cruiser/racer, then be in with a chance to win it.

Get interactive

One of the most prominent new features will be the new Discover Inland Waterways area in the South hall. Andrew Williams said: “People can come and have a walk around and see what it is like – get into narrow boats, walk along the waterboards, and speak to the owners. It’ll be a real experience.” The Andark diving area at the Southampton show has been a success over the years, so National Boat Shows decided to include it at LIBS as well. Visitors can pitch up, get trained and have a go. NBS has splashed out with a larger diving pool than the one at Southampton. Another major feature, sure to attract families and children, will be the new Deck Games area. The centre-piece will be a 25m long one metre deep indoor pool that will feature competitive on-water model yacht racing. Alongside there will be rowing machine competitions, activities for children and on the weekends, younger visitors will be able to experience kayaking on the pool with Pelican Kayaks in a safe, warm environment, conducted under the watchful eye of the Lee Valley Canoe Cycle coaching team.

The Marina on Royal Victoria Dock at last year’s London International Boat Show.


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk

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ecade

17 January Royal Victoria Dock

Outside on the marina some of the largest boats in production from Sunseeker and Princess will be on display, and the dock will play host to The Dinghy weekend on 16-17 January. Princess Yachts will reveal a new 72 Motor Yacht at the show alongside some of their most popular models including the 95 Motor Yacht which will make her second appearance at the show.

Meet All at Sea

Come and see your favourite waterfront newspaper and its sister publications on stand NO13N for an unbeatable subscription offers and to meet the crew.

Getting there

ExCeL is 25 minutes from London Waterloo and Liverpool Street stations and there more than 2,500 car parking spaces.

Tickets

Children aged 15 and under go free and each full ticket admits one adult and two children. The London Platinum Experience, for £85, includes a free parking space, a buffet lunch, a VIP area to enjoy the Show Stage, use of the exclusive Tullett Prebon Platinum Lounge and a free Show Guide. For discounts book through the website or by calling the ticket hotline on 08442 090333. For updates, including opening times, ticket prices and sales, news, feature information and exhibitors, visit www.londonboatshow.com.  

Visitors enjoy a busy day at last year’s London International Boat Show.

Photo: onEdition

ALL AT SEA ADVANCE TICKET OFFER Just £13 – a saving of £5 if you book before you visit Book online or call 0844 209 0333 and quote L26

Photo: onEdition


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The title I had waited for so long Shelley Jory British Powerboat Champion www.shelleyjory.com

LAST month saw Shelley Jory, British Powerboat Racing Champion and the world’s top female racer, become Mrs JoryLeigh when she married marine engineer, Trevor. The marriage took place at Wimborne Minster. Shelley Jory Leigh reports on her big non-race day. AS a powerboat racer heading to the start line before the race so many thoughts and emotions go through your head. There are butterflies in your stomach and your blood is pumping with adrenaline. But that’s nothing compared to how I felt as I prepared for the biggest day of my life on Thursday 19 November – and this time there was not a powerboat in sight! As I pulled up to Wimborne Minster I had one very trustworthy navigator at my side. My father, John Jory, was waiting to guide me up the aisle. On board with me were my bridesmaids Darrell Elmes, Louisa Edmonds,

Sarah Curtis and of course champion navigator Libby Keir. It felt only right having Libby at my side after years of racing together through the tough and good times whilst in Honda, Libby was there when I met Trevor and now she is still by my side on one of the biggest days of my life keeping me calm and focused on the main goal just like when we are in the boat. Dressed in a Justin Alexander dress made of 45 yards of Dupion Silk and 3,000 Swarovski Crystals I was a far cry from the P1 World Championship in my race overalls. But I already felt like I had won a world title as I made my way down the aisle and I was greeted by the familiar faces of people I’m more at home with on the water and on a race day. Sitting in the pews were powerboat world champions Steve Curtis, Neil Holmes and Peter Phillipson, as well as adversaries on the race course Mark Pascoe from Honey Party and Gareth Williams from Voom Voom. com accompanied by his new wife Thundercat racer Naomi. I smiled as I passed Jax Missen, Karen Waterfall and Pete Currington friends from my days in a Honda boat. Further down I saw my personal trainer James Seilo from Catalyst PT and Tracey Clarke from Word Clarke Ltd who have been a fantastic

support to me and of course the girls I work with everyday in Brides of Southampton and all my family and friends. But there at my finish line was the one person I can’t wait to see when I come off the water, who always supports me whether the result is a good one or whether it was rough and hard going. He is the one person who will tell me honestly if I make a mistake – Trevor Leigh my husbandto-be! There were so many special moments during the service but BBC’s H2O programme presenter Tracey Clarke moved me to tears with a poignant “nautical” reading that she had written. We exchanged vows headed off to celebrate at the Chewton Glen in the New Forest. Guests sat on tables named after boat manufacturers Steve Curtis and Pete Currington on the Cougar table and I, of course, was on Princess. My husband and I sped off into the sunset to board the QM2 for our honeymoon cruising the Caribbean before the race season starts again. Just like that big race you have anxiously waited for so long, it was all over far too soon but I emerged the winner as I had secured the title. I am now Mrs Shelley Jory Leigh!

Shelley Jory Leigh & Trevor Leigh


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A guide to Dublin, Ireland With dramatic coastal cruising, a beautiful historic centre, and pubs you could spend your life in – Tim Spicer explores Dublin. STEEPED in history, culture – and not to mention Guinness – Dublin is a maritime city that makes for the perfect boating destination. Voted friendliest city in Europe this year, the city has a warm bustling atmosphere that really makes you feel at home. It is also a fantastic place to take your boat, as there is a river running through the centre and a beautiful craggy coastline for cruising. With its cobbled streets, homely pubs and rugged shores, Dublin is

begging to be explored. Plus it is only a cheap flight or a quick ferry ride away from England. That is unless you decide to cross the Irish Sea by your own steam, in which case you can set sail from Liverpool or Wales fairly easily. We took the easy option of jumping on a ferry, which took us directly into the country’s busiest sea harbour – Dublin Port.

Boating

In recent years, millions of Euros have been spent sprucing up harbours and boating facilities in the capital, and with a booming economic future it is set to become one of the British Isles’ most desirable marine locations. There are four main marinas in Dublin – Dun Laoghaire (eight miles south of the centre), Poolbeg (central), Malahide (ten miles north

ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk of the centre), and Dublin City Moorings (central). Located at Custom House Quay, Dublin City Moorings is a good place to start. Accommodating up to 30 berths, the moorings have 24-hour security and smart card access, new pontoons, pump-out, three-phase electricity and wheelchair access. Berthing is alongside with a draught of 4.2 metres LAT. One of the main benefits of mooring here is that you are in the heart of the city, only six miles from the airport. If you are arriving from the Irish Sea, be aware that the lifting bridge at the entrance to the River Liffey opens for visiting vessels at 11am, 3pm and 9am daily. Leaving Dublin City Moorings, if you head along the River Liffey until you enter Dublin bay, you can bear either left or right, but the latter has more to offer. After passing a power station and vast sandy marshes, the first seaside town you reach is Dun Laoghaire, which makes a good spot for lunch. It is also the main leisure and yacht port serving Dublin and is an ideal stop over for boats making passage. Continuing round the coastline you’ll reach Dalkey Island, a pretty spot with a little village that was founded in Viking times. If you are lucky enough to get sunshine, or fancy a blowy walk on the beach, the bay has several Blue Flag beaches. Cruising on, if you keep the mainland to your right you will soon come across Killiney Bay, which is home to Killiney Beach – a long, picturesque stretch of sand that

shouldn’t be missed. Plus, if you dock here you might even bump into Bono, as this is where the U2 singer has a house.

Culture

Returning to the city moorings, you can stroll up the river to the docklands to see the famous statues built to commemorate the Great Famine of the mid-19th century. Nearby, on North Wall Quay is the Jeanie Johnston, a replica of the famous ship that was used in the famine. The Liffey divides Dublin into the north and south sides, so can serve as a good navigational tool after one too many pints of the black stuff. Heading into the centre, still sticking to the north side of the river you will find O’Connell Street, which is one of the widest streets in Europe and serves as Dublin’s main

ACCOMMODATION B&Bs and hotels are available from around €70 to €200 per night, in and around the centre, with places such as the Central Hotel (one block from Temple Bar) that cost around €100 per night. Booking in advance is recommended and if you’re only staying for a short period and not mooring, make sure that residents’ parking is included. Alternatively, for longer stays and a bit more comfort you can book an apartment for a reasonable price, and there are many within walking distance of the centre with parking. See www.staydublin. com for more details. thoroughfare. It is usually chock-a-block with traffic and people in equal measure


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk

The Temple bar

but the congested madness proffers department stores, hotels, and cafes amongst many other things. It is also home to the famous Spire, a 120metre high metal spike that towers over the city. Also on O’Connell Street is the General Post Office (GPO) with its neo-classical facade which is riddled with bullet holes, and the James Joyce Centre for those interested in the famous Irish writer. The south side of the city is more upmarket and generally nicer to spend time in, as it’s brimming with designer shops, art galleries, and theatres. But most importantly, a fantastic selection of pubs, bars, and restaurants – all intermingled with the old city. Temple Bar is the hot spot and one

of the best areas in town to get a taste of real Irish culture. With 60 pubs in the small area you can wander the picturesque streets, until you stumble across somewhere that tempts you in with the sound of a fiddle. And really, there is no better way to experience Dublin than to root down in a pub, sup a pint of Guinness and convince yourself that it’s smoother and tastier than the stuff you get in England. Needless to say, Dublin is the home of Guinness so a tour of the Guinness Storehouse in St James’s Gate is a prerequisite. It’s only about a ten-minute taxi ride from Temple Bar, and well worth the trip. Inside you will be introduced to the main ingredients of the good stuff, given a tour of the brewing process and, of course, take part in a hearty tasting

33 session at the end. A 15-minute walk from Guinness Storehouse and you’ll reach Baggott Street and St Stephen’s Green, where many of the city’s best restaurants are. Admittedly, the Euro means Dublin is not cheap but the food is consistently good with huge plates of hearty Irish stew, or fresh fish and oysters up for grabs. Dublin is a vibrant European city that oozes character and offers plenty for the boater. While it may not have the best weather all year round, the coastal cruising in Dublin Bay is absolutely stunning and it is really refreshing to boat somewhere quieter than the Solent. Admittedly, the €4.50 pints of Guinness can burn a black hole in your pocket but the music, atmosphere, and overall charm makes it a destination you will want to return to. Whether you’re a wild rover, looking for a romantic boating break, or going for a family holiday, Dublin is a perfect all rounder. If you do not take your own boat you can charter power boats from Irish Water Sports, which is based both in Dun Laoghaire and Malahide. They offer five-metre fully equipped Joker RIBs that will seat six people, and cost €650 for two days. They will also deliver the boats anywhere in Ireland for an extra charge. A valid ISA or RYA boat handling certificate is required for all charters. Malahide Marina is one of the most exclusive yacht clubs in Dublin. It has a very upmarket feel to it and its

facilities are second to none, with a fully-equipped boatyard and swanky marina centre. Within walking distance of the marina are restaurants, pubs, hotels, shops, supermarkets, banks, a post office, a leisure centre, parks, and botanical gardens, as well as beaches,

a golf course and tennis courts. Dublin International Airport is only four miles from the marina, so if you’re flying in with the intention of chartering, this is probably your best bet, as they have a good selection of sail and power boats available for charter.

CONTACTS Dublin Port Authority: www.dublinport.ie / +0353 (0) 1887 6000 Dublin City Moorings: +353 (0) 1818 3300 Dun Laoghaire Marina: www.dlmarina.com / +353 (0)1202 0040 Malahide Marina: www.malahidemarina.net / +353 (0) 1845 4129  Central Hotel: www.centralhoteldublin.com / +353 (0) 1679 7302 Apartments: www.staydublin.com Guinness Storehouse: www.guinness-storehouse.com


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk

34

Thought in a bottle In the drink By Paul Antrobus

A bottle is a always a useful present, but make it different, something that requires a bit of sourcing effort, and it becomes more than just the bottle that counts. A BOTTLE is a always a useful present, but make it different, something that requires a bit of sourcing effort, and it becomes more than just the bottle that counts. On our cruises we often come across enjoyable local drinks, never seen in shops at home because their production volumes are too low for serious exporting. However, you may just find that bottle of holiday nostalgia by surfing some of these sites specialising in the rare and unusual. Here are some we have found useful. Alexander Hadleigh of Locks Heath, Southampton; 81 rums from £11 to £218 a bottle; 39 Cognacs from £20 to £935; 20 Armagnacs from £16 to £735 and 41 gins from England, Scotland, New Zealand, France, Spain, Sweden and the Netherlands from £13 to £39. Gift-by-post service on www.ahadleighwine.com. The Whisky Exchange offers many of the best Scotch whiskies extolled in this column. Blends and single malts, certainly, but also bourbons and the cordials and syrups you need for recreating some of the exotic cocktail mixes you may have enjoyed on your travels. www. thewhiskyexchange.com The Drink Shop (www.TheDrinkShop.com) is another good source of rarities. And Nauticalia shops stock many of our gift suggestions, www.nauticalia. com. My favourite though, is a real Aladdin’s cave you can actually visit in person, Gerry’s shop at 74 Old Compton Street, London W1. “buy almost any drink under the sun here” they say, and it is true! Check it out at www.gerrys. uk.com. If the choice is too mind-boggling, here’s some suggestions featured during the last year of All At Sea drinks:

Pussers red and blue label - always a great sailor’s tipple, smooth golden BVI rum, at Nauticalia from £28, plus a range of ‘Nelson’s Blood’ ceramic decanters from £85 to £99 for a really top-drawer gift.

abv almost a winter warmer; about £26 from the Whisky Exchange or Nauticalia.

Vodka

Give home-grown Wight Vodka, seven times distilled, made from potatoes, in a nautical signal flags bottle. 50° North, the company that makes it, also supports sailing events. (Nauticalia £32) Or authentic Polish, Zubrowka Bison, flavoured with bison grass from the Polish prairies, (£17 TheDrinkShop).

Rum

Skipper – a nice fun bottle and a good traditional dark rum for you captain, (Gerry’s £16.75).

Fizz Whisky

Old Pulteney 12 Y.O single malt from Wick, Scotland, plenty of sea and seaweed, but not heavy peat which Sir Robin Knox-Johnson took on his historic Velux 5 Oceans voyage for his regular evening dram. (Whisky Exchange £21.49 or Nauticalia)

Gin

Bombay Original, something different and real original gin taste (Hadleigh’s). Plymouth, the sailor’s favourite, widely available about £18, traditionally made and a reasonable 41.2 per cent abv. For something special, Plymouth Navy Strength, at 57 per cent

This year it must be the English Camel Valley Cornwall Brut bubbly, featured last month, award winning ahead of French Champagnes. About £20 direct from the winery. (www.greatwesternwine.co.uk/wines/ england).

Schnapps

Linie Aquavit from Norway, matured by being shipped across the equator to Australia and back. Arctic crisp caraway flavours, great over ice at the end of a meal. TheDrinkShop about £25. Who would not be pleased with one of these wonders in their Christmas stocking? Happy Christmas and a successful New Year.


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk

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ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk

37

BOOKS IN BRIEF What Now Skipper? Bill Anderson & Chris Beeson • £8.99 Test your navigation and seamanship skills and learn from expert answers. How would you tackle 40 knots of wind in South Biscay, approaching the Spanish coast in huge breaking waves and no sign of a let-up? Would you take the right avoiding action with a shipping contact fast approaching on a collision course in fog? Drawn from the popular Yachting Monthly Question of Seamanship series spanning 25 years, What Now Skipper? sets out a variety of challenging situations to test your seamanship, navigation and decision-making skills. Former RYA Training Manager Bill Anderson sets the problems, gives his preferred solutions and challenges you to find a better answer. Accessible and entertaining, this book includes plenty of guidance on good seamanship, helped along with useful maps and diagrams and lively colour photos. What Now Skipper? is a great way of thinking your way out of difficult scenarios before they’ve even happened, so you’re calmer and more focused if and when they do. Bill Anderson is the former Training Manager of the RYA and a regular columnist for Yachting Monthly. He has cruised in his own boat all around the UK and Europe. Chris Beeson is Assistant Editor at Yachting Monthly. He has been sailing for over 30 years on all kinds of boats, from Lasers to J-Class, mono and multihull.

Foul Bottoms The Pitfalls of Boating and How to Enjoy Them AC & Black • £9.99 BASED on a series of highly popular articles written for Classic Boat magazine, this witty collection dwells on the scrapes people get themselves into when building and sailing boats of all descriptions. Most sailors will find something to relate to in the escapades and faux pas detailed here, and the stories will undoubtedly bring a wry smile to any boater’s lips. John Quirk’s terrifically witty cartoons help bring these anecdotes to life. Some quotes from the book: “With the ship sinking beneath us, the owner frantically fumbled through the warranty.” “We hit the dining room with the etiquette of escaped lab rats.” John Quirk has been writing for Classic Boat for many months, and his regular column has proved highly popular with readers, not least because of his terrifically detailed and witty cartoons.

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ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | news@allatsea.co.uk

38 trailer sailers

P15367/12 Trailer Sailers

P15040/12

2003 Jeanneau SUN 2000

£12,500

P15226/12

West White Potter

£950

P15388/12

AMPHORA 18

£1,550

P12322/12

Drascombe Lugger

£3,950

1997 MacGregor 26X

£14,900

Ideal day boat in very good condition. Hassle-free preparation, good stability and speed. Spinnaker, deck lights, generous cockpit, portaloo, 4 berths. 8 HP Honda outboard. Recently anti-fouled. On Hampshire Marina. (South)

Good cond. Own trailer. Easy to trail and sail. 2 berth. Good fun boat.

Trailer-sailer Ready for road, 3-berth 18ft bilge-keel Cabin Cruiser, c/w road/launching single axle trailer, two mainsails, nearly-new spinnaker & ditto roller-furling genoa, No.1 jib. anchors, ... (South West)

Excellent condition, full winter tow cover, trailer, Honda 4 stroke, roller, jib, oars, ferders, lines, delivery possible. (North West)

Mac 26X ‘STORM’ High flexibility 26ft trailer-sailer, can also motor at 18 knts! Easy to transport. Full sail set, 50HP engine, fishfinder etc. Lying Derwentwater, English Lakes. SEE MORE on my website: http://www.jrockett.com (North West)

Tel: 07910 345711

Tel: 0161 790 3886

Tel: 01258 837152

Tel: 01254 246274

Tel: 01924 507586

Sailing yachts

P15554/12

P15427aas_A/12 Sailing Yachts

1973 Itchen Ferry 22 Sloop

£6,000

1967 CONYPLEX CONTEST 29

£11,995

Ideal first cruiser Easy to handle, 4 berth comfortable cabin cruiser, fibreglass hull, Yanmar inboard, full inventory, good condition; new genoa and sail cover, regularly sailed, afloat Fareham. Purpose built heavy duty ... (South)

A very nice Conyplex, Contest 29 A Conyplex, Contest 29, built in 1967 completely refurbished and renovated in 2006/7 and has an excellent interior and exterior finish (South)

Tel: 07990 525 992

Tel: 07915 192 420

P15063/12

P12865/12

P15153/12

£28,500

2002 Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 43 DS £139,950

1972 Marcon tomahawk

Bilge keels, wel maintained and equpped VAT paid. Lovingly cared for by long term owner, all up together with many extras Volvo 18hp diesel. Full survey 2006, Gas certificate 2006. Standing rigging renewed 2002. Folding 2 blade prop. Rope Cutter. ... (South)

Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 43 Deck Saloon The yacht has been owned from new, by the present owners. Both retired. Husband in his early 70s and wife in her late 60s, the boat has had gentle use. The yacht has been used exclusively for their ... (South)

bilge keel sloop Good example of this solidly built roomy bilge keel sailing cruiser with 5 berths. Modern instuments, Volvo 10hp and full set of sails. (South)

Tel: 07768 806128

Tel: 07752 199585

Tel: 02380 770712

1987 Moody 28

£5,950

P15552aas_C/Dec/Jan

1978 FARR 36

£23,000

Fast offshore cruiser / racer, 8 berths, 2 head sails, main spinnaker, Epoxy coated, usual instruments, VHF. Lying Gosport.

P15074/12

P15193/12

P13923/12

£6,000

1982 COLVIC WATSON Motor Sailer 26 £22,750

1978 Sabre 27

The Sadler 25 is an excellent performer and easy to sail. Virago has had many updates over the years. Engine. saildrive 280 new 2003 electric and hand start. very little use, approx 50 hours. sails and ... (South)

Long keel with bilge plates, Thorneycroft 90 engine, Navico WP5000 autopilot, 4 berths in 2 cabins, full head room throughout, max 6’2’ separate heads, roller reefing. Reluctant sale. Lying Totnes, Devon. (South West)

5 berth With replacement diesel engine with very low hours. 5 berth, Blue hull, needs general tidying. Ill health forces sale. Has been out of the water for 12 months. (South West)

Tel: 01983 293463

Tel: 01803 843467

Tel: 01803 558789

1977 Sadler 25

Tel: 020 8394 0546

P15395/12

P15516/12

£4,600

P12964/12

P15422/12

£9,500

1984 Custom made Copy Pen Duick 2 £59,000

1987 Tayana Vancouver 42

Bilge keel sailing cruiser helios has had new head linings 2007. She is fresh water cooled has hot and cold running water, shore power, 7 berths in 3 cabins and is in v.g. condition.For more photos and info please email me. (Wales)

1/4 share legend 29 holyhead Due to relocation comprising. B/k 18hp yanmar/sprayhood/furling jib/slab reefing/dinghy outboard/ dsc radio/gps/depth/fish finder/holding tank/oven 2 burner hob. Gas alarm/sleeps 5-6 2cabin. Offers invi (Wales)

Steel Ketch Very successful steel copy of Eric Tabarly’s Pen Duick II. Rigged for serious long distance sailing. Ideal for circumnavigation. One double, three single berths. Comfortable, spacy interior. 50 hp engine.

Strong Sailingboat, Beam: 12 ft, Max Draft: 6 ft Dry Weight: 14000 kg Number of Berths: 7 Hull Shape: Displacement

Excellent price for quick sale 10.05 metres. 6 berths in 3 cabins. Currently berthed in marina on the beautiful Tuscan island of Elba, Italy. Inflatable tender with 5hp motor. Self-furling foresail, coaster ...

Tel: 01656 738461

Tel: 01543 432314

Tel: 00 90 538 987 0966

Tel: 00 34 66 9797884

Tel: +39 338 448 5572

1987 Westerly Tempest

£29,000

P15558/12

2001 Legend 29

P15031/12

1992 Hunter 18.5

£6,500

P15414aas_A/12

P15005/12

2004 Bavaria 44

P14750/12

£98,000

£89,000

1986 Bruce Roberts Bruce Roberts 34 £12,000

Hunter 18.5 for sale. Length 5.7 M Beam 2.15M, Wing bulb keel with 64cm draught and trailerable. Spanish flag with Permiso de navegacion valid up to 03/06/2014 Mercury 5 HP outboard 2004. Roller-reefing ...

A VERY WELL MAINTAINED BOAT IN VERY GOOD CONDITION SLEEPS 8 IN 4 CABINS Blue upholstery, Mahogany interior, Laminated flooring, Sails locker, Teak cockpit, 2 x AFT CABINS, Double berth with lockers + storage space + hanging, Opening deck hatch + opening ... (South East)

Cruising Yacht. A well found 6 Berth yacht (beam 3.12m, Draft 1.68m). Is a delight to sail. 36Hp Bukh marine diesel, Fin keel & tiller steering. Well equipped for cruising. Pinned lowerable main mast for Inland waterways. (South East)

Tel: 34 966763307

Tel: 07903 605990

Tel: 07814 161538

1985 Westerly Fulmar

£32,000

Spacious 5/6 berth family cruiser Obsession is a well maintained and improved boat including electric anchor winch, rebuilt Bukh engine, new instruments and much more. Sea trials and delivery available. Lying Plymouth. (South West)

Tel: 07806 778761

1986 Colvic Countess Ketch

£25,000

P15376/12

WINTER BARGAIN!

£795

20’ Finn keeled yacht, G.R.P, 4 berth, cooker, full set of sails, 4hp outboard engine, large cockpit. Needs work hence price of £795 O.N.O. Located Essex. (East Anglia)

Tel: 07791 549866

Advertise your boat here! Visit www.allatsea.co.uk


ALL AT SEA | DECEMBER 2009 | www.allatsea.co.uk

P15374/12

SELL OR EXCHANGE

£3,450

P12983/12

P15377/12

P15494/12

2002 Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 43 DS £139,950

1964 Gdansk Stocznia Jachtowa Gdansk, Poland Kings Ametyst £10,000

1995 Westerly oceanquestcc

New steel 33’ Bruce Roberts spray yacht, hull and deck, cockpit, rudder, sterngear etc. ready to be fitted out. Consider part exchange boat, car or W.H.Y. £3,450 O.N.O. Located Essex. (East Anglia)

Extra Information: The yacht has the option to be a 2 cabin, 3 cabin or 4 cabin layout. The yacht was delivered as a 3 cabin version. Owners cabin aft, with two cabins forward‚ one double berth cabin and one cabin with two bunk berths. The yacht has two heads, one forward and one aft; both have showering facilities, the aft heads having its own separate full size shower compartment ... (South)

Tel: 07791 549866

Tel: 07752 199585

P15216/12

£2,250

Ellen MacAr

See page

at ringing Bells are racing hectic end of season

Sticky’s Tips 13

sea an old Teaching tricks dog new

wow d Sophie Ellen an on Boat

Show with

Ellen MacArthur

and her

crew.

Photo: Shelley Jory 20

onEdition

show

Show boati

ng

Hilary LIster

and Dee

Caffari

at the Southampt

north and the St Ives Cornwall coast of

Boating

Britain

two ladies, TWO tiny and one great icons big show.

19

for the Buy beer then and Legion for wine look east

32

AAS0909

Tel: 07760 269220

Pages 28

-

Un iv l Marina,

C Th. Martinez/ Photo: Team Ellen Sea&Co/BT

end sailing more on ily the British focussed not necessar The nation’s her is on another career. selected 4’s But that sailing appeared when she Radio n her dramatic 2 institutio PAGE for BBC TURN TO records eight Discs. to try to Desert Islandshe was tempted if Asked

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You can preview your advert before it appears, and then you can also select to advertise in the magazine. Once you have uploaded your advert, you will have a password to change or delete your advert at any time. You can also send you advert by email, by post, or by telephone. All we need to help you sell your boat or equipment is the information in the Advertising Form below.

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2007 LA SE

R STRAT Laser str OS atos in excellent on com conditio bi tra n, inc. to bracket.m iler, top & botto £7,350 hatsu s/ m cove ainsail/ s 4hp ne rs, trape jib/asym season. w 2007 eze (unu etric sp (South) . innaker sed). Ou (unused. tboard Ready to go for

Tel: 01 234 56 78

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.......................................................................................................................................

Sail:

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£25

YEAR: .................................... MANUFACTURER: ............................................................. NO OF ENGINES:

Power tilt trim Suzuki DF60/70hp power tilt trim unit, gc with all pins and side plates. (North East)

SO31

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g

Power tilt trim Suzuki DF60/70hp £350

You can now read All At Sea online! Visit www.allatsea.co.uk

Britain: Boating on Lymingt 29

record given up ing thur has MacAr rated, accord that Ellen hat exagge REPORTS ever are somew . the word for herself around breaking boating Dame her 2005 her life was now ’s win back she said environment. heroine to Britain the of solo record,

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Quick cheque out MEMBERS of a sailing club in Devon saw the dedication of RNLI volunteers first hand when the Exmouth lifeboat crew had to leave a fundraising event to launch to a rescue. The Exe Sailing Club fundraising evening on 19 November had began with Exmouth lifeboat Coxswain Tim Mock accepting a cheque for £2,612 raised by sailing club events. The evening was cut short when the lifeboat crew were called to a sinking boat. In winds of up to 35 knots, they brought two men to safety.

Fisherman overboard CREW members at Howth on the East coast of Ireland launched their inshore lifeboat on the night of 21 November to rescue a fisherman who had fallen overboard. The lifeboat pulled the man from the chilly waters of the harbour and administered first aid as he was suffering from exposure. He was taken ashore and transferred to a waiting ambulance.

Surfer saved THE Mumbles inshore lifeboat was launched to a surfer seen drifting off the south Wales coast in stormy conditions on the evening of 13 November. The 28-year-old casualty had endured strong tides and suffered cramp in very big surf.

Gallantry medal for lifeboat mechanic CREW members at Portrush lifeboat station are to receive awards in recognition of a rescue that saved the lives of two boys in August. Matthew Forsythe and Rhys Sufferin were exploring a cave when they were trapped by the rising tide. The Portrush inshore and allweather lifeboat crews went to the aid of the teenagers after they went missing in the Castlerock Downhill area in Northern Ireland. With support from both lifeboat crews, Lifeboat Mechanic Anthony Chambers managed to swim a lifejacket and helmet into the cave and brought Rhys to safety. He then swam back in and safely took Matthew out too. The boys were passed from the inshore lifeboat to the all-weather lifeboat and airlifted to hospital. Despite suffering from shock and hypothermia, Matthew and Rhys made a full recovery and returned to the lifeboat station to thank Anthony and the crew. Now the RNLI has announced that Anthony will receive the charity’s Bronze

Photo: Mark Jamieson

Medal for Gallantry. RNLI Divisional Inspector for Ireland, Martyn Smith, said: “Having been trapped in the cave for over three hours wearing only shorts and T-shirts on a rising spring tide, there is no doubt that the boys were in very real danger.

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both occasions by the additional lifejacket and helmet carried for each boy. Swimming continuously for half an hour in surging swells, often colliding with the cave walls, Mechanic Chamber’s determination and resourcefulness were critical in saving the boys’ lives that day.” Inshore lifeboat helmsman Gerard Bradley repeatedly manoeuvred his craft in the rocky sea area at the mouth of the cave where conditions were turbulent and crew member Karl O’Neill pitched himself against the elements during the first attempt to swim to the boys. For their part in the rescue Helmsman Bradley (42) and Karl O’Neill (21) will be awarded a Framed Letter of Thanks signed by the RNLI’s Chairman. The rest of both lifeboats’ crews will receive medal service certificates and badges.

Tidal Predictions

ENGLAND — DOVER LAT 51q07cN

“The actions of Mechanic Chambers in making two entries to the cave to rescue the boys demonstrated selfless courage without regard for his own safety. Entry into the cave required immense physical and mental effort, especially as he was hindered on

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ALL TIMES UTC (GMT). REPRODUCED BY KIND PERMISSION OF THE HYDROGRAPHIC OFFICE AND THE CONTROLLER OF HER MAJESTY’S STATIONARY OFFICE. CROWN COPYRIGHT RESERVED

News in brief

Variations on hw dover FALMOUTH

HW

-6hrs

PLYMOUTH

HW

-5hrs 30mins

DARTMOUTH

HW

-5hrs 15mins

WEYMOUTH

HW

-4hrs 45mins

POOLE

LW

+5hrs 45mins

COWES (IOW)

HW

+30mins

SOUTHAMPTON

HW

+30mins

PORTSMOUTH

HW

+15mins

SHOREHAM

HW

+15mins

BRIGHTON

DOVER

WALTON BLACKWATER HW LOWESTOFT

+15mins

HW

-1hr 45mins

ABERDEEN

HW

+2hrs 30mins

NAIRN/INVERNESS

HW

+1hr 10mins

WICK

HW

+30mins

STORNOWAY

HW

-4hrs 30mins

ULLAPOOL

HW

-4hrs 30mins -5hrs 30mins

OBAN

HW

LARGS

HW

+1hrs

DOUGLAS (IOM)

HW

+15mins

LIVERPOOL

HW

+15mins

HOLYHEAD

HW

-45mins

MILFORD HAVEN

HW

-5hrs 15mins

CARDIFF

HW

-4hrs 45mins

BRISTOL

HW

-4hrs 15mins -5hrs 45mins

CORK/CROSSHAVEN

HW

BELFAST LOUGH

HW DOVER (S), +1hr (N)

DUN LAOGHAIRE

HW

+45mins

FULL MOON: 02/12 and 31/12/2009 NEW MOON: 16/12/2009


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