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The Responsible and Sustainable

Tourism Handbook

Southern & East Africa Volume 4 The Essential Guide

SOUTH AFRICA’S SHINING STARS www.sustainabletourism.co.za ISBN 978-0-620-55987-4 ISBN 1-00000-000-1

ISBN 1-00000-000-1

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Ever wondered what the star insignia behind the counter of your favourite hotel, B&B or self-catering chalet actually means? Well, those stars are probably the reason why it’s your favourite. As the TGCSA, the Tourism Grading Council of South Africa, we have checked in and checked out over a thousand hotels, guest houses and B&Bs to ensure that when you book a room at a star-graded institution you get exactly what you expect. So, when you pay for all the bells and whistles you can rest assured that’s exactly what you’ll get.

We are the only officially recognised organisation that authorises accommodation establishments to display Quality Stars. Whether you want to get your establishment graded, you want to find a top-class graded establishment or you want to learn a bit more about the TGCSA visit tourismgrading.co.za today.


A SYMBOL

4064 | iww.co.za | ew

of national pride


Gautrain is proud to fly the flag for South African public transport. Gautrain has, to date, transported over 50 million rail passengers and currently carries 1.4 million passengers per month. It has created 122 000 direct and indirect job opportunities during construction and 600 direct and indirect jobs after the start of operations while stimulating property development in areas around its stations and contributing to the goals of transit-oriented development, better land use and redressing spatial planning.

www.gautrain.co.za


Responsible and Sustainable

Tourism Handbook

Southern Africa 2015/2016 EDITOR Niki Glen

CLIENT LIASON OFFICER Natasha Keyster

CONTRIBUTORS Niki Glen, Val Payn, Kirsten Keun, Caroline Ungersbock, Darryl Erasmus, Rob Trautmann, Matthew Drew, Kevin Mearns, François Bédard, Annalie van Vuuren, Laura Schenk, Ken van Sweeden, OJ Tshamboko

PROJECT LEADER Vania Reyneke

LAYOUT & DESIGN Sheeth Hanief

CHIEF EXECUTIVE Gordon Brown

EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Shannon Manuel

DIRECTORS Gordon Brown Andrew Fehrsen Lloyd Macfarlane

MARKETING MANAGER Nabilah Hassen-Bardien COVER PHOTO The Oyster Box Hotel

SALES TEAM Robin Temmers, Gerhardt Burger, Linda Donogue, Zainab Gravenor

PRINCIPAL FOR AFRICA & MAURITIUS Gordon Brown PRINCIPAL FOR UNITED STATES James Smith

PEER REVIEWER Prof Kevin Mearns

PUBLISHER

PROOF READERS Niki Glen, Caroline Ungersbock CLIENT LIASON MANAGER Eunice Visagie

www.alive2green.com www.sustainable tourism.co.za

The Sustainability Series Of Handbooks PHYSICAL ADDRESS: Cape Media House 28 Main Road Rondebosch Cape Town 7700

ISBN No: 978 0 620 45240 3. Volume 3 First Published February 2012. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any way or in any form without the prior written consent of the publisher. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Publisher or the Editor. All editorial contributions are accepted on the understanding that the contributor either owns or has obtained all necessary copyrights and permissions.

IMAGES AND DIAGRAMS: TEL: 021 447 4733 Space limitations and source format have affected the size of certain published images and/or diagrams in this publication. For larger PDF versions of these FAX: 086 6947443 Company Registration Number: images please contact the Publisher. 2006/206388/23 Vat Number: 4130252432 Partners/ Affiliates/ Media Partners:

DISTRIBUTION AND COPY SALES ENQUIRIES distribution@alive2green.com INTERNATIONAL FRANCHISE ENQUIRIES info@alive2green.com PAPER ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES sales@alive2green.com

SOUTH AFRICA’S SHINING STARS Ever wondered what the star insignia behind the counter of your favourite hotel, B&B or self-catering chalet actually means? Well, those stars are probably the reason why it’s your favourite. As the TGCSA, the Tourism Grading Council of South Africa, we have checked in and checked out over a thousand hotels, guest houses and B&Bs to ensure that when you book a room at a star-graded institution you get exactly what you expect. So, when you pay for all the bells and whistles you can rest assured that’s exactly what you’ll get.

We are the only officially recognised organisation that authorises accommodation establishments to display Quality Stars. Whether you want to get your establishment graded, you want to find a top-class graded establishment or you want to learn a bit more about the TGCSA visit tourismgrading.co.za today.

THE TOURISM HANDBOOK 10019492 TGSA A5 print Ad_02.indd 1

5 2016/03/22 3:24 PM


Introduction The Regional Tourism Organization of Southern Africa (RETOSA) is a Southern African Development Community (SADC) institution responsible for tourism growth and development. In part, the aims of RETOSA are to increase tourism to the region through sustainable developments and initiatives, effective destination marketing and improved regional competitiveness. RETOSA Member States are Angola, Botswana, D R Congo, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The organisation works together with Member States’ tourism ministries, tourism organization and private sector partners. Working in close cooperation with the region’s national tourism organisations, the private sector and media partners, RETOSA engages in several projects while promoting tourism investment and affecting transformation through public sector facilitation.

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Vision To make Southern Africa the destination of choice in the world by 2027. RETOSA’s Mission To implement impactful, innovative and high tourism growth projects through stakeholders’ participation, sustainable production and consumption practices. Objectives The primary objective of RETOSA shall be to facilitate and promote the development of equitable and ethical tourism throughout the Southern African Region taking due consideration of the overall development of the people, vis a vis the Region’s natural and cultural resources. RETOSA shall continue to lobby for the removal of barriers to the free trade in tourism services across member-state’s borders.

Simba Mandinyenya Acting Executive Director,RETOSA

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Travelling in Southern Africa is an unforgettable experience. This is a region of extremes – a world in 15 countries. Wilderness The mist enshrouding the Victoria Falls, the deep silence among the ochre dunes of the Namib, your first glimpse of a mountain gorilla in its natural habitat.– all these things will touch your soul in ways you’ve never experienced before. Get up close and personal with wild animals, exotic birds and unique and diverse insects and plants. Climate You will never find better climate than what Southern Africa offers. The natural beauty is so spectacular that you won’t be able to take it all in. The wonder of snow-capped mountains, rugged coastlines and tropical islands compete with sweeping carpets of vibrant flowers and vast areas of unspoilt wilderness. The warmth of the sun can quickly turn to storms, lightning, mists that provide fresh experiences.

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Humanity The rich histories and cultures of Southern Africa’s hospitable people will stay with you long after you’ve left. Masks, drumbeats and rituals, ancient rock art and primeval dancing will draw you into the rhythm of Africa. Diversity Experience Southern Africa in whichever way you please: drive, ride, raft, soar, glide, ski or hike – the options are endless. And so, without further ado, here they are – the 15 incomparable countries that make Southern Africa.

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The hallmark of Quality Tourism in Southern Africa

Displaying the SATSA logo tells your customers that your business adheres to a Code of Conduct and is a

Credible and Trustworthy Business Partner The Association offers its members:

• Bonding • Lobbying at all government levels • Networking with a wide variety of tourism stakeholders • Trade show representation and international marketing • Business and staff benefits in banking, insurance and communications www.satsa.com membership@satsa.co.za Tel: 011 886 9996 3rd Floor Petrob House, 343 Surrey Ave, Ferndale, Randburg


The

Sustainability and Integrated REPORTING HANDBOOK South Africa 2014


Caroline Ungersbock Chair and Co-founder Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme

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he Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme has come a long way since we were incorporated as a nonprofit company in December 2012. This is 4th handbook that we have edited. This year we will be organising the 5th Tourism Dialogue for Sustainability Week to be held in June at the CSIR in conjunction with our partners Alive2Green. In October 2014 the STPP was accepted as Affiliate Members of the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) and in 2015 we were made official partners of the United Nations

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10YFP programme (UNEP10YFP). It was exciting to receive our letter of endorsement from the Department of Environmental Affairs, stating their commitment to working with 10YFP secretariat and the local implementation partners. The STPP is now also on the steering committee of the Regional Tourism Organisation of Southern Africa (RETOSA), serves on the board of the N12 Treasure Route Association and chairs the Service Excellence in Tourism Forum. We are involved with a number of other tourism organisations that collectively


assist stakeholders in getting the messages of sustainable tourism and the tools for implementing sustainability practices to the people who need them most. This year, we will be hosting our first STPP Conference, which will help create the linkages between agriculture, food and tourism to strengthen the economies of smaller towns. There are many other linkages to be created, as evidenced by the Tourism DartboardTM, which we will refer to later in the handbook. The theme of the UNWTO for 2016 is ‘Universal Accessibility (UA)’. We have launched a Universal Accessibility Programme with our partner, the African Centre for Universal Access and other UNTWO Affiliate members. The aims of the programme are threefold: 1) to encourage businesses to adopt UA in their operations, 2) to sensitise staff on how to interact with people that have disabilities or challenges with access and 3) to equip businesses with the right tools at affordable prices to implement UA solutions. We want to show businesses that it is not difficult to adopt UA principles and that there is not necessarily a huge cost to it. The STPP is the official sustainable tourism Implementation partner of the N12 Treasure Route Association (N12TRA). The N12TRA spans 1350 km, across 5 Provinces. There are 38 towns along the route with an additional 50 towns in the 100 km corridor. We have started with responsible and sustainable tourism implementation workshops which includes the STPP Resource Efficiency Programme. We have had an overwhelming response. Well done to all the businesses that are committed. Lastly, we have received feedback from our two icons in Mount Fletcher. You will

FOREWORD

recall the story of struggle of Thebetheni Tsheka and Phindile Sobhuza who have worked tirelessly to establish a tourism industry in Mount Fletcher. They have now opened a coffee shop as well so as to get travellers to stay longer. They have managed to get the buy-in from the local chief to bulid a lodge. They are struggling. And they are doing so becasue of a lack of external input and support. We need to rectify this matter. Their spirits should not be broken. I really am proud to be the Chair and Co-Founder of the Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme. I am even more proud to work with Niki Glen our Programme Director. Niki has worked tirelessly over the past 3 years to complete her PhD in developing a framework for the implementation of sustainable tourism practices in smaller accommodation establishments in South Africa. The research that she has done, together with the STPPs impacts and insights deserve the attention of the Tourism Minister and all who work with him in the department. We will continue to work tirelessly as we are passionate about the change we see for the future, and we will continue to hold hands with many different industry partners. We once again invite you to join the journey in order to strengthen small businesses in the tourism industry and supporting the tourism value chain in making South Africa one of the most revered sustainable tourism destinations. Please join us in our journey.

Sincerely Caroline Ungersbock

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T

ourism in South Africa is a catalyst for economic growth and social development. Thus it needs to be encouraged and stimulated by all stakeholders within the industry. In the past, encouraging tourism through picturesque images of white sand beaches and ‘indigenous’ cultural experiences, ensured the mass exodus of wealthy travellers to the next tourism ‘hot-spot’. Today’s tourist however, is a savvy, hyper-informed, internetreliant individual who demands to know everything from where his is food produced, to how his waste is disposed of and how energy efficient his hotel room is. For the tourism industry to grow in South Africa stakeholders need to use sustainable and responsible methods of operation which are transparent, encourage local ownership and not only take from the environment but give back to it, so that future generations might also benefit from responsible tourism. A reliance on international tourism can make the industry a volatile one. The international media often uses umbrella terms when referring to Africa and issues such as last year’s Ebola crisis can have devastating effects on the tourism industry even for unaffected countries thousands of kilometres away. This in conjunction with sometimes difficult immigration laws can create fluctuations in international tourists entering the country, placing unnecessary pressure on stakeholders. With this in mind FEDHASA promotes local tourism as a means to grow tourism sustainably. By hosting the Lilizela-Imvelo Awards, we believe it is important to take cognisance of the fact that as an industry, we have not capitalised on domestic tourism enough in recent years. Pricing, whether real or perceived, is one of the biggest challenges for promoting

FOREWORD

Tshifhiwa Tshivhengwa Chief Executive—FEDHASA local tourism within our borders. The industry needs to look at how to package domestic travel differently and how to make it easier for the average person to travel and to believe they can take a short holiday in South Africa. The benefits of tourism on the average South African are far beyond those employed within the industry, the multiplier effect of money spent on retail, car hire and accommodation reach the hands of many. Encouraging stakeholders to promote responsible and sustainable tourism is paramount to FEDHASA and in partnership with the Department of Tourism, forms the mandate of the Lilizela-Imvelo Awards.

Sincerely Tshifhiwa Tshivhengwa

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Niki Glen Editor

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he Responsible and Sustainable Tourism Handbook has now truly gone international. The STPP has travelled extensively over the past 2 years to various international destinations. We always carry a suitcase full of books. Unfortunately, they are quite heavy, so we have had to learn to pack fewer shoes and less make-up. We have received feedback from many international sources in addition to local sources, commending the content as greatly contributing to the understanding of sustainable tourism and provided access to practical tools to implement relevant practices. We trust that this year, we will continue the journey and add meaningful tools for the tourism trade to utilise when they are planning and booking itineraries.

Sincerely

Niki Glen

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CONTRIBUTORS

NIKI GLEN (EDITOR)

Niki Glen (MBA Civil and Structural Engineer, cum laude) is a co-founder of STPP. After working for Transnet and Gibb Africa, she became a programme Manager for Absa, Barclays, Standard Bank and Liberty Life, running mass-scale programmes over 11 African Countries. However her interest lies in sustainability and environmental and social preservation. Niki is the editor of the Responsible and Sustainable Tourism Handbook Volume 1 and Volume 2, and is currently studying to attain her Doctorate in Environmental Management and Responsible Tourism.

VALERIE PAYN Valerie Payn has been involved in the NGO Sustaining the Wild Coast ( SWC) for a number of years as a board director. ( See SWC website www.swc.org.za) . She has also served as SWC Chair. She has an Mphil, Degree in Sustainable Development Planning and Management ( cum laude) from Stellenbosch University’s Sustainability Institute, and is particularly interested in sustainable and integrated landscape management. She is the author of the e-book How to Create a Garden with a Healthy eco- system, and Garden Sustainably, a practical interactive workbook on sustainable landscape design and blogs about sustainable and ecological landscape design issues on her Sustaining the Wild Coast is a not- for- profit volunteer run organisation that works at a grassroots level along the Pondoland Wild Coast, operating as a network organisation to assist local wild coast communities realize their own vision for sustaina ble development in the region.

KIRSTEN KEUN Spending my formative years in the Blyde River Canyon, Kruger National Park and coastline of Southern Africa, I am tickled by the culture, nature and adventure around me. I am curious of African culture and driven by experiences and adventure that the continent presents. My passion to care for and guide visitors through our amazing, beloved and complex country and continent is matched by my curiosity and interpretation of society and the environment at large. I love hiking, bird watching, photography, reading, horse riding, wine tasting and surfing. I work in five languages and hold an MBA with the Management College of Southern Africa. My research investigated quality of service in a safari setting. My focus is on taking care of- and assuring my guests’ safety in the interesting natural and cultural African landscape. My tourism career involves international experience of more than eighteen years of guiding as a Naturalist, Field Guide, Nature Guide, Horse Safari Guide, White Water Rafting Guide, Dive Master and Tour Director.

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CAROLINE

CONTRIBUTORS

CAROLINE is chair and co-founder of the Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme. The focus of the STPP is to drive change across the tourism industry thus making it more sustainable. Caroline, serial entrepreneur and owner of a number successful businesses is entrenched in tourism. She is a member of various committees, forums and boards in the Tourism Industry, including the Tourism Grading Council and chair of Service Excellence in Tourism. Caroline previously held positions as president of the National Accommodation Association of South Africa (NAA-SA), board member of the Tourism Business Council of South Africa (TBCSA), member of the FEDHASA Large Hotel Group Committee, chairperson of the National Tourism Sector Strategy—Tourism Growth and Development. Caroline conducts workshops and training for the STPP programmes. She has been instrumental in many changes at regulatory level to create an enabling environment for sustainable tourism and represents sustainable tourism issues at the parliamentary portfolio committee on a regular basis. Caroline also regularly appears as a guest speaker at various tourism forums country wide. She is passionate about sustainable tourism and is seen in the industry as a leader in driving awareness and implementation amongst small business

DARRYL ERASMUS Hospitality sector specialist, Darryl Erasmus, was appointed in September 2015 as Chief Quality Assurance Officer for South African Tourism. Darryl , who has Bachelor of Commerce Degree majoring in Marketing and Business Management, has considerable commercial experience in sales, marketing and communications in the B2B tourism, technology and financial services environment with emphasis on channel and distribution management. He is well known to the hospitality sector after spending a number of years in a myriad of operational, sales and marketing roles. These experiences he garnered with well-known brands such as Protea Hotels, Holiday Inn and Crowne Plaza. He has also led marketing and corporate communications efforts across Africa for the Travel Commerce Platform, Travelport, before taking up the role of Chief Executive Officer at Questek, a technology provider in the passenger transportation sector. His role as Chief Quality Assurance Officer for South African Tourism is focused on supporting and empowering the thousands of graded establishments across the country. This he undertakes through partnerships with valued industry stakeholders, whilst constantly searching for innovative ways and global best practices to add value to the graded community, and support the overarching South African Tourism strategies.

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CONTRIBUTORS

ROB TRAUTMANN

Rob Trautmann is the owner of a number of successful businesses, but his passion is to promote and develop tourism and to help communities across the country to benefit from tourism. Rob has served on a multitude of tourism committees, including the Potchefstroom Tourism Association, as committee member, vice-chairman and chairman; Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality, as member and chairman; Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality Tourism Strategy Task Group; N12 Treasure Route Association, as member; N12 Treasure Route Association Board of Directors, as chairperson and member of the panel for the development of a Provincial Tourism Sector Strategy. Rob has also served on community based committees including St Mary’s Anglican Church; Trustees and Finance Board of the Diocese of Matlosane; Registrar of the Diocese of Matlosane; Bishop Tutu Heritage Site, Potchefstroom Round Table 47, as member, vice-chairman and chairman; Potchefstroom Rotary Club, as member and president; Various social and community based committees; Potch/Tlokwe Business Chambers; Central Primary School PTA Chairperson; Central Primary School Governing Body, as member and chairperson; and Potchefstroom High School for Boys Governing Body as member. Rob has received numerous awards for his contribution to the tourism industry and community development, including Potchefstroom Tourism Association Ambassador – 2009; Potchefstroom Tourism Association Tourism Development – 2010; North West Province Ambassador – 2010; North West Province Ambassador Finalist – 2012; Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality Tourism Ambassador—2013; Paul Harris Fellow 2010. Rob has had regular television and radio appearances and is otherwise deeply entrenched in trying to help tourism in South Africa become more sustainable. He is currently a CEO of Gizmo Marketing and manages Gizmo Office Automation, a supplier of Kyocera copiers, printers, facsimiles and scanners. He provides business solutions, websites and social media support in the Potchefstroom area, North West Province, Northern Free State and Southern Gauteng.

MATTHEW DREW Matthew Drew is the N3 Gateway Strategy and Financial Consultant. Matthew graduated in 2007 with a Bachelor of Commerce in Economics, majoring in Finance, Strategy and Economics. He has also obtained a Diploma in Project Management from Executive Education (Pty) Ltd. in 2009 and a Certificate Course in eMarketing from Stellenbosch Business School in 2011. Matthew started his professional career in Johannesburg where he developed strong managerial skills. He subsequently decided to pursue his passion for tourism development in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands, where he now lives. Matthew has extensive experience in business and tourism consulting and currently has his own company, Next Step Consulting and is a Director of Haley Sharpe Southern Africa. He has previously worked with the Midlands Meander Association, Executive Education, Birdlife South Africa. Matthew currently provides consulting services to Sappi Limited, N3 Gateway Tourism Association and clients of Haley Sharpe Southern Africa. He has a passion for rural tourism development and enjoys working with public and private sector partners and stakeholders.

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KEVIN MEARNS

CONTRIBUTORS

Kevin Mearns is a Full Professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of South Africa and a Y2 NRF Rated Researcher. Kevin’s specialist area of research involves the application of sustainable tourism indicators to tourism ventures across Southern Africa. Kevin received his academic training both locally and abroad in the United Sates and the United Kingdom in Environmental Design and Management as well as Geography and Environmental Management. Kevin is an active scholar and has published more than 23 peer reviewed scholarly papers and chapters.

FRANCOIS BEDARD Dr. François Bédard is professor and director of the Department of Urban Studies and Tourism at the School of Management, Université du Québec à Montréal (ESG UQAM), Canada. Since 2006, he is the director of the Montreal-based World Centre of Excellence for Destinations, created with the assistance of the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO). He is specialized in information technology applied to the tourism industry, tourist destination management, and e-learning in higher education institutions. He was a guest speaker at many international conferences and seminars, and has published numerous articles in tourism management, in particular about adaptation to new technology in the travel & tourism sector.

ANNALIE VAN VUUREN Annalie van Vuuren has been the Project and Event Manager for the SASOL Solar Challenge in South Africa, since July of 2013. She’s qualified in Social Work, Clinical Psychology and Occupational Psychology, but has acquired a broad experience in Project and Business Management. She started her career in the South African Correctional Services, and then moved on to operate a private practice in Social Work for almost 10 year. In Botswana she started her own retail business during 2007 and resided there for 2 years, before moving back to South Africa to manage a similar business in Pretoria for another 3 years. She also puts her organizational skills to good use in managing a family with 5 children, varying from 3 to 16 years. With her husband and children, she currently resides in Pretoria.

LAURA SCHENK Laura Schenk graduated in 2015 with a Bachelors degree in Tourism Management in Rotterdam, Netherlands. While doing a specialization course in community-based tourism in her 4th year, she realized why she studied tourism: she is passionate about local, fair and sustainable tourism. After a research trip to Masakala in South Africa, she wrote her graduation thesis on local community benefits of tourism in Italy. She is now determined to get to know all the ins and outs of the professional responsible and sustainable tourism environment.

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CONTRIBUTORS KEN VAN SWEEDEN Ken van Sweeden has been underwriting and developing liability products in the South African insurance market for some thirty years. The last eighteen years he has specialised in Directors and Officers Liability after successfully launching the first D&O product sold domestically in South Africa. He joined Budget Insurance firstly as a consultant in May 2012 and then as a permanent employee on the

1st July 2012. He is responsible for the underwriting and development of

the Professional Liability suit of products that began with the launch of the Errors & Omissions (Professional Indemnity) product (4th March 2013). This was followed by Directors and Officers Liability in August 2013. Ken is an Associate of the Insurance Institute of South Africa by examination and a member of both the Institute of Directors of Southern Africa and the Professional Liability Underwriters Society (PLUS) in the USA.

OJ TSHAMBOKO OJ Tshamboko is Chairperson for Dr Kenneth Kaunda Tourism Association, Deputy Chairperson for Potchefstroom Tourism Association, Deputy Chairperson for N12 Treasure Route Association Board of Directors, North West Provincial Lead for N12 Treasure Route. He is the owner and Director for two companies namely OJ Productions Pty ltd and OJ Tours & Travel Agency Pty ltd .a winner of Best Emerging Tourism Product of the year 2011 (Tlokwe Municipality Awards) , Best SMME Tourism product of the 2013 (Tlokwe Municipality Tourism Awards) and Best BBB-EE Product of the year 2014 (Tlokwe Municipality Tourism Awards). OJ Tshamboko completed his Matric in 1996 and in 1997 studied Electrical Engineering and later Business Management, he lately become actively involved in Tourism sector by owning Tourism related company .currently he is busy with Project Management course. A motivational Speaker, professional Programme Director and preacher, OJ is known by his nick name� OJ the Dreamer�.

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RT

On your next holiday, consider the road less travelled.. Being a Responsible Traveller

Travelling can be stressful at most times, but responsible travel choices are a way of ensuring that your travels don’t stress the environment or host communities. By choosing to be a responsible traveller, you are contributing to the sustainable future of Africa and to the long-term development of your host destination. Next time you travel, select properties and facilities that have been independently certified on their social, cultural and environmental performance.

GreenLine is South Africa’s leading responsible tourism certification programme for accommodation facilities and our members are independently monitored to ensure that they meet the highest standard of responsible business practice in an effort to ensure that tourism benefits all.

learn more about your  destination, its people and cultures.  respect the dignity of others and ask before taking photo’s  dress appropriately, particularly at religious or cultural sites  dispose of your waste responsibly - recycle where possible  minimise your use of water and electricity  support local tour guides where available  don’t buy goods made from endangered or threatened species  support local entrepreneurs, crafters and curio shops  avoid giving cash donations - rather become involved or give in-kind Take only pictures, leave only footprints!

For more information on how you can be more responsible about your travel choices, visit www.greenline-rt.com today and help us make southern Africa the most responsible destination globally.

The Heritage Environmental Management Company tel: +27 012 667 6658 fax: +27 086 610 7120 e: info@heritagesa.co.za web: www.greenline-rt.com


Le Franschhoek Hotel & Spa, situated in the Cape Winelands, offers luxurious hotel accommodation and a truly unique winelands hotel experience. This luxury Hotel features 63 en-suite, elegantly finished rooms and suites, and two lavish villas. Each boasts breath-taking views over either the towering Franschhoek Mountains, or manicured gardens. Le Franschhoek Hotel is elegantly portrayed in their fine dining eatery – Dish Restaurant. Offering diners an opportunity to indulge in a scrumptious a’ la Carte menu, this Franschhoek restaurant is complemented by warm service, and picturesque placement. The menu is seasonal and under direction of Executive Head Chef, and experienced gastronome, Scott Shepherd. In addition, it is an ideal destination for a team building, corporate function or even a fairy tale wedding, boasting 5 world class conference venues, seating from 20 to 120 delegates.

16 Minor Rd, Franschhoek Website: www.lefranschhoek.co.za email: reservations@lefranschhoek.co.za call: +27 (0) 21 876 8900


CONTENTS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Introduction Niki Glen

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Some ideas on Sustainable Tourism from the Pondoland Wild Coast Val Payn

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Travel: frontier of opportunity or anchor of inequality Kirsten Keun

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The importance of speaking to your stakeholders: faceto-face Caroline Ungersbock

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The impact of grading on the sustainability of tourism businesses Darryl Erasmus

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Collaboration in Transfrontier Conservation Areas in Southern Africa Richard Wyllie

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N3 GATEWAY – Views On Sustainable Tourism Matthew Drew

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The Air Transportation Industry’s Response towards Mitigating Climate Change: The Case of IATA Kevin Mearns

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THE POWER OF ORANGE Modern lifewipe is so hectic filled with so that we’re all inclined toand believe everything advertisers us, and select products that just we think It’s odd to toxicand chemicals allmuch overinformation your oven, floors, counters, toilets in order to gettell them “clean,” but that’s what aremajority the most convenient ourconventional lifestyles. One of cleaners. the most important aspectsspent of our lives is to live in clean, and healthy to environments at the of us do for with Advertisers billions in 2011 to dust-free entice shoppers buy morewhether and more home,So office outsurprising and about. We alsoour lovehomes to keep are ourselves and our families safe from harmful or toxic elements, and yetjust it’s common practice perhaps stuff. it’sornot that full of things we don’t even use — or like. This stuff so happens to–be where we believe it’s morelurk. convenient – tosmall use toxic chemicalsthat to clean ourthe ovens, counters, bathrooms andCleaning clothing. products are necessary a because lot of toxic chemicals It’s the changes make bigfloors, differences over time. for maintaining attractive and healthful conditions in the home and workplace. In addition to the obvious aesthetic benefits of cleaning, theis removal of dust, can allergens, and infectious is crucial toThe maintaining a healthful indoor But the truth that those chemicals have a serious effect on our agents health in the long-term. time for change is here – nature hasenvironment. provided us with the perfect alternative to harmful chemicals: orange oil. A powerful and completely organic detergent, orange oil is able to lift and remove the most stubborn When considering natural cleaning in your homebusinesses, or office you should be and thinking orange. dirt, grime and grease, whether in our homes, factories, schools, hospitals all other areas. Triple Orange are eco-friendly products that simplifies your life by providing you with a non-toxic solution to all your cleaning requirements. Triple Orange products help you keep all your environments clean, sanitized and smelling fresh and natural. And the best part of all… With Triple Orange Wonder Gel doing all the hard work of cleaning and Triple Orange Bio-Det taking care of your laundry, you only need it’s completely non-toxic! two things: Triple Orange Wonder Gel takes all the hard work out of cleaning, while Triple Orange Bio-Det is your natural choice for all your laundry. • Wonder Gel is an all-purpose cleaning gel that will clean your entire home, from windows to floors, dishes to bathrooms. Highly concentrated, dilute it with cleaning water and forhome ages. • Wonder Gel is an all-purpose gel 1fortub yourlasts entire or business from windows to floors, dishes to bathrooms. Highly concentrated and an incredible degreaser, just dilute it with water and watch your tub last and last. • Bio-Det: a laundry soap (hot or cold water) machine or hand-wash. The combination of ingredients is gentle on your fabrics and will leave your clothing soft and smelling •Bio-Det laundry soap citrus works fresh with hot or cold water, and machine or hand-wash. The combination of ingredients is gentle on your fabrics, leaving your clothing soft, beautifully clean and smelling citrus fresh. Orange oil is the main ingredient, aside from the therapeutic benefits of orange oil it is also a powerful degreaser. Extracted the peel of the sweet orange, oil breaks naturally.source. Triple They Orange are pet Triple Orangefrom products are completely organic, child-orange and pet-friendly, anddown come grease from a renewable haveproducts not been tested friendly and eco-friendly, have not tested onnaturally-derived animals are biodegradable formulated with, derived on animals, are biodegradable and been formulated with ingredients thatand are hypoallergenic. Safe naturally for you, safe for ingredients that are hypoallergic and oranges grow on trees are a renewable resource. your family, safe forsince the environment.

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CONTENTS 9

10 11

12 13

Geotourism Explorer: What is it and what will it mean for South Africa? Dr François Bédard

100

South African Solar Challenge as catalyst for tourism Annalie van Vuuren

108

Tourism as a tool to uplift communities Laura Schenk

116

Risks facing tour operators – and how to manage them Ken van Sweeden, Budget Insurance

122

Storytelling: A compelling case for local community involvement – N12 Treasure Route OJ Tshamboko and Laura Schenk

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FEDHASA IS PROUD TO BE ONE OF THE OLDEST

INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS AROUND FEDHASA CAPE CELEBRATING

10 YEARS

 65 YEARS AND STILL COUNTING! 10 REASONS WHY YOU NEED TO BELONG 1

2

3

4

5

FEDHASA has been recognised and respected by government and all industry role players as the representative body and voice for the South African hospitality industry, since 1949. The association represents the interest for the hospitality industry, including hotels, guest houses, B&B’s, restaurants, caterers and industry suppliers and service providers.

FEDHASA uniquely holds two registrations that sets us apart from other industry associations – i.e. • Industry Trade Association operating as a Section 21 Company (not for gain) and • Employers’ Body, giving you as the employer (FEDHASA member) access to representation at CCMA-level, should the need arise

Industry-related, Specialised Advice & Assistance is just a phone call away, e.g. legislative updates & advice, labour relations advice, industry-specific Pension Fund, and other helplines are available.

Direct representation and/or lobbying on your behalf – private sector negotiations and representation on e.g.: TBCSA, TGCSA SAT, NdT, CATHSSETA, Wesgro, Northern Cape Tourism, other Association partners such as our Joint Association Member (JAMMS) partners - Cape Town Tourism, SAACI, SATSA, etc. This also includes various networking opportunities with other industry segments and players via workshops, forums and events, etc.

Regular weekly Communications and Updates, keeping you ahead of the rest!

COST-SAVING BENEFITS 6

Credit Card Discounts – very special, exclusive rates of 2%, for members only & also Workplace Banking from Absa.

7

SABC TV License discounts – 25% discount on commercial licenses

8

Discounts and special rates from • Checkers – Corporate benefit card & discounts • Ultra-Liquors – preferential rates & free delivery • Dining-Out – free set-up costs • Sleeping-Out – free member listings, etc.

9

Corporate loyalty programme where members can save up to 15% on all SAA-operated routes (domestically, regionally & internationally)

10

Selected ‘member-to-member discounts’ from our industry supplier members – some of which are extended exclusively for FEDHASA members; business-to-business’ opportunities.

For more information, please do not hesitate to contact your relevant FEDHASA Regional Office: FEDHASA Cape (Western & Northern Cape Provinces) Tel: 021 552 9870 | E-mail: fedhasacape@fedhasa.co.za FEDHASA East Coast (KZN & Eastern Cape) Tel: 031 312 3609 | E-mail: fedhasakzn@fedhasa.co.za FEDHASA Inland (Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo, North West, Free State) Tel: 0861 333 427 | E-mail: info@fedhasa.co.za

www.fedhasa.co.za


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

T

he Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme would like to thank Alive2Green and their team for providing us with the opportunity to make a truely significant contribution to raising awareness of Sustainable and Responsible Tourism and its core principles. We would also like to thank all the contributors for agreeing to provide their input to create a collection of perspectives which will have a significant impact on the main-streaming of Sustainable Tourism Practices. Thank you to all the sponsors for their much need contribution in spreading awareness and providing access to products and services to assist tourism businesses to move forward on the Sustainable Tourimsm Journey. Lastly, thank you for our peer reviewers who have worked “behind the scenes� to help us make this handbook series a fantastic success.

Sincerely The Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme

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PROFILE

MANAGING FEDHASA INCIDENTS – ARE ProvidingACTING a unified voice in the YOU RESPONSIBLY? hospitality industry

BY ANDRÉ DU TOIT

F

How you manage is critical for those ounded in incidents 1949, FEDHASA (Federated involvedHospitality and indeed Association the sustainability your of ofSouth business. However, statistics gathered during Africa) is recognised by Government over show that the capacity of as 5000 the cases official representative of the tourism businesses to dealofwith critical incidents hospitality industry South Africa. With andindustry accompanying exposures has remains proven tothe be support, FEDHASA a gap of its own. umbrella association for hotels, restaurants, Most rely on staffcentres, and assistance companies to conference caterers, selfmanage theiraccommodation, incidents and evacuations. Whilst catering home hosting these are often carried acceptable establishments (B&Bsout andwith guest houses), outcomes, the minefield of potential exposures clubs, taverns, shebeens, suppliers and thattrainers, have been escapedand en route is providers terrifying. consultants service There’s a lot more to industry. it and right now, whether to the hospitality you have realized it or not - you are exposed! It“ATisFEDHASA important understand we WEtoensure that the that industry cannot predict about when legislative and wherechanges an incident is informed that willaffect happen, will beand there to dealindustry with it thewho business submit andviews whatto the outcome will” says be. CEO EveryTshifhiwa incident policy makers, is different in its nature, location, of injury, Tshivhengwa. “We also offertype a basket of number of people, availableranging resources etc.,SABC so it benefits to our member from is important to manage according principles TV license discounts, bankingto solutions, andconsulting, not predetermined Don’t use and many protocols. more. checklists, use resources. decide on your “FEDHASA seeks toDon’t grow an inclusive emergency response plan of time; decide hospitality industry byahead providing a unified what you need do when and you understand voice to to enhance promote what the is happening. Treatand each risk as of unique. It’s okay development growth a sustainable to be abstractAfrican and vague before an incident and South hospitality-trading SPECIFIC during one. environment. ” How we think is the cruxasof everything. Newly appointed CEO last year, We are all guilty ofexperience hindsight biasincludes as it reTshivhengwa’s assures us of our actions. Even if something tourism marketing, sales, corporate travel does go wrong weproject tend tomanagement, believe it could’ve management, and been worse ifplanning. we hadn’tHe done XYZ.sixAsyears a result we strategic spent in the seldom go back analyze incidents, we just US where he and worked for Myriad Marketing forge ahead and lose out on a precious learning and South African Tourism, promoting the opportunity. country to the Northern American market. ItOn is his a fact thatto staff are prone bias return South Africa, to hepositive has worked because of their role within for organisations suchtheasstaff-guide-guest Protours, HRG relationship and asand a result Rennies Travel SARS.tend to choose the more positive option when given two.

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THE TOURISM HANDBOOK

Anchoring (i.e. once a decision has been made it is very difficult to change course) just makes this worse, regardless of the information received. If further symptoms made themselves apparent they may be ignored because the decision to see the incident through had already been made. Another two characteristics common to individuals in tourism are: • Premature closure – jumping to conclusions. • Action orientation – tending to take practical action instead of waiting for someone else to do or provide instruction. Sometimes this can be dangerous as the skills and expertise in incident management may not be present. Hospitality staff have a very powerful action orientation and are some of the worst at premature closure. Both can have detrimental effects in the course of incident management. These are the honest truths and the fact is that… Tshifhiwa Tshivhengwa • It is a rare person is genuinely calm Chief who Executive—FEDHASA whilst responding to a threatening incident • It is a rare person whoFedhasa consistently makes Tshivhengwa’s vision for has been good decisions under those relationship circumstance to strengthen the association’s • Nobody is naturallyand equipped to itfunction with all stakeholders reinforce as the in a multitask, multivariable rapidly changing voice on matters affecting the hospitality stressful environment and those that choose industry. to, are even rarer. • Everybody has Educating as limits. key Exceed those and performance Physiological “The hospitality drops. industry faces manyand mathematical fact. matters, legislative challenges from labour changes, new regulations, and technological DON’T EXPECT your PEOPLE to atmanage changes. The greatest challenge the incidentsis–surviving EVER – the theyglobal needeconomic HELP from moment EXPERTS. that could further impact slowdown This is what required order toSouth manage inbound travel.is Also, the insluggish an incident and ensure the best outcome. African economy that is impacting domestic • Gather information – get tourism and corporateabout travel,”the he incident says. accurate data/ask the right questions


PROFILE • On-site first aid • Managing the scene – for both staff and guests • Managing the media – limiting reputational damage with accurate reporting • Consulting with doctors • Communicating with all stakeholders • Activating and coordinating appropriate assistance e.g. Dispatching ambulance – ground or air • Arranging guarantees of payment and insurance • Preparing for Hospitalization • Post-operative care • Managing potential litigation or claims Find me someone who can do this all and manage your business and I will arrange the necessary spandex with capethe andnumber undies on “Additionally, increasing of theyouth outside because theyhospitality will be worthy of involved in the industry superhero is one status! sector that we are continually With alltodue respect to your has operations striving improve. FEDHASA a youth andsegment teams on theis ground and considering that aimed at attracting and theretaining way we young think and actThis under stressful talent. program will circumstance, I don’t believe operation many haveyear the be enhanced in 2016/17 capacity to deal withwe thereach scenario (or young would to ensure that more want to) whenpeople in actual fact they should be hospitality in universities, colleges, focusing on the remaining guests and leaving and hotel schools. ” this upFedhasa to a network professionals. Cape of hastrained identified investing • The Types of Incidents: in education as the biggest return on • Emergency incidentsand as such investment medical for the industry, • Personal injuries/fatalities established the Fedhasa Cape Youth Bursary. • Accidents (motorCape vehicle, “The Fedhasa Youthquad-bikes, Bursary is boating open to etc.) students and trainees currently in • the Assaults andor Robberies employ studying at Fedhasa Cape • member Natural disasters (Flood, etc.) institutions andfire establishments. Entrants should have successfully completed Core services to subscribe their second year of to: study and have • entered Telemedical consultations or will be entering their third year • of Incident plan creation study,” management explains Tshivhengwa. “We aim to • encourage Remote management of rescue them in future studies withinand the medical and staffto show that a commitment to industry, • education Medical evacuations and will lead to success”. • Post traumatic risk Continuing its assessments pledge to increasing • skills Mediadevelopment management in the sector, FEDHASA • Legal liability management

So …Why do You need Incident Management Services? • Because people’s lives and wellbeing depend on the right decisions being made • Because it is better to professionalize your management of critical incidents. • Because dealing with emergencies situations is beyond your scope of work • Because your business and its reputation is at stake • Because you are seriously exposed to liability when critical incident occur • Because the cost of liability can now easily exceed R100 million • Because it’s not worth taking the chance As you will appreciate, it is not one specific action that will mitigate risk but rather a combination that will reduce your exposure at the end of the day. There a network has been appointed by NDT to are implement of experts and specialists out project there that the Food Safety Program pilot thatyou can team up with better ismanage your ended in 2015. The to program aimed at risk and provide you and withposition peace of mind. improving food safety South Use them. Africa as a food safe destination. SATIB24 Crisis Call isthat oneis such “This is an initiative aimedcritical at incident management service inwith enhancing responsible tourism the an insuranceThe component ONLY available to SATIB country. pilot program was done in clients. It forms an integral of ourNatal African Limpopo, Mpumalanga, andpart Kwazulu presence and can betrained coupled medical Province. FEDHASA 100with students emergency evacuation policies that can cover in these provinces and successfully guests, staff or both. Critical incidents impose placed majority of trainees at hospitality a threat of loss This - something happening establishments. program isbad being rolled that may costinlife, limb, and and 300 money, loss of out nationally 2016/17 students reputation, property damage will be trained across allor9 asset provinces, ” says or business interruption. Management of these Tshivhengwa. situations our specialist team abreast minimises Whilst by keeping members ofthe loss and maximises the outcome. It is about industry changes and trends through taking the “luck factor” and out of incidents regular communiques social media,and doing the things that stack odds in your FEDHASA frequently hoststhe events and favour. The where field ofmembers litigationarehas changed workshops updated somewhat withchanges, liability becoming an onerous on legislative potential industry threat to allpolicy markets and for this reason threats and implementations as wellwe offer additional taking the load off as other industrysupport related by matters. your the incidents Inshoulders additionbytomanaging being the industry’sand controlling FEDHASA exposure. Italso is your watchdog, offersresponsibility tangible and this will the sustainability benefits andultimately support toensure its members. of your business. THE TOURISM HANDBOOK

31


INTRODUCTION

Niki Glen


INTRODUCTION

1

T

he past three editions of the Responsible and Sustainable Tourism Handbook have covered a number of topics linked to the implementation of sustainable and responsible tourism practices. Last year, we unravelled the UNWTO / UNEP definition of Sustainable Tourism, i.e “tourism that takes full account of its current and future economic, social and environmental impacts, addressing the needs of visitors, the industry, the environment and the host communities “ and came up with a number of themes that fit into this definition. We then looked retrospectively at how we had covered the themes in the past, where the main aim of the handbooks was to provide many different industry stakeholders—including tourism business, the public sector, associations, communities and individuals— with practical tools to help them with the implementation of sustainable and responsible tourism practices. This year, however, the Sustainable and Responsible Tourism Handbook Volume 4 is specifically targeted at bringing new perspectives to the trade, including online booking engines, tour operators, travel agents, tourist information offices, industry associations and destination marketing organisations. It is critically important for the sustainability of the tourism industry that the trade, as a first point of contact with tourists 1) gains perspectives on some of the sustainable tourism initiatives and programmes around South Africa 2) gains a greater understanding of why these initiatives are important to the tourism industry and 3) what they (the trade) can do to contribute to the sustainability of the industry. In tourism, as in many other industries, it is often those who have the biggest budgets and the loudest voices who get

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THE TOURISM HANDBOOK

most business. But markets are changing. Consumers are more aware of the impacts of their behaviours on our planet, which means that tourists are more aware of the impacts (positive or negative) of their travels on the places they visit. There are many products and destinations that are not yet top of mind, do not yet appear on page one of search engine results, are not yet linked to package tours, or are not even discoverable on the internet. Yet, these products and destinations are seated in magnificent places and are occupied by real people with real needs and real stories to offer the changing tourist. We hope that this edition of the handbook will help to bring greater attention to these types of products from the trade. We start off with Val Payn portraying the beauty of Pondoland and the Wild Coast. The region offers a rich cultural heritage and natural beauty deemed to be a botanist- and photographer‘s paradise. Mention is made of mining interest and interest in declaration of a national park, both prospects being viewed as major threats to the preservation of the region and the question is raised: how does one plan to bring opportunity to the local people, without destroying the very things that make a place precious, unique and special? Is tourism the answer? In chapter 3, Kirsten Keun contemplates the ecological and social costs involved in human activity in areas which have previously been relatively untouched. Kirsten argues that the footprint of the new-age tourist[1] must be recognised and calculated, rather than ignored or overlooked. In other words, a business case, which considers costs, benefits and risks needs to be developed, not only from an economic perspective, but also from an environmental, social, cultural and heritage perspective. A common middle ground


1

needs to be found between tourist and host. But how do we do this? Caroline Ungersbock, in chapter 4, provides a starting point. She presents a case for face-to-face interventions with stakeholders -those who want to develop local tourism industries, those who should benefit from such efforts and those who need to support implementation through appropriate policy development. She refers to the case of Medellin, Colombia, where the mass scale change that has occurred in the city within a short period of time has attracted the attention of many tourism industry stakeholders worldwide. The transformation of the city was no co-incidence, and South Africa’s tourism stakeholders can take key lessons from Medellin’s successes and apply them locally. Caroline highlights that these face-to-face discussions need to be underpinned by practical and implementable tools and solutions. Darryl Erasmus introduces just such a tool in the form of tourism grading in chapter 5. The Tourism Grading Council of South Africa’s star grading system was developed as a quality standard for accommodation and conference providers. However, as a well-established and entrenched system, it has the potential of expanding its criteria to progressively include environmental, economic and socio-economic principles to address the needs to the more conscious / new-age tourist. The new-age tourist does not just use cues such quality standards to make decisions, but is heavily influenced by online and social media. The grading system therefore has a number of new angles to consider in its future strategies. Then we move onto another topic close to my heart. Val and Caroline refer to the passion and commitment of individuals who are responsible for turning tourism dreams into memories, while Kirsten

INTRODUCTION

and Darryl talk about the importance of quality and service when in the interaction with the tourist. They emphasise that developing sustainable tourism takes time and includes repetitive meetings, planning sessions and stakeholder engagement with a variety of stakeholders. The most important factor in gaining traction and implementing positive change, however, is the commitment of passionate individuals. These are people who do not participate for financial gain, but rather because the have a deep need to make a difference. I have been privileged to meet a few such people – all the contributors to the previous editions of the handbook fit the profile. I have singled out one such person for chapter 6: Rob Trautmann. He is a role model for the tourism industry in that he has dedicated much of his life to the advancement of sustainable tourism, supporting SMMEs and emerging enterprises by becoming entrenched in tourism. One of his areas of focus has been on market access, a major component of sustainable business. Rob has provided platforms to tourism and other businesses to gain access to not only individual town or city websites, but also destination marketing sites, therefore supporting business-to-business and business-to-consumer marketing. Rob has been involved with marketing the N12 treasure route for more than a decade, and is now driving sustainable tourism and market access along the N12 through his role as the chairperson of the N12 Treasure Route Association. Route development and marketing is a growing phenomenon in South Africa, as many tourism products and destinations recognise the compounded benefits of attracting more tourist through shared marketing platforms and umbrella brands. But there is also an increasing realisation that marketing a destination will not bring sustainability on its own.

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35


INTRODUCTION

1

In chapter 7, Matthew Drew provides a perspective of challenges that routes face by providing insights into the journey to sustainable tourism of the N3 Gateway. In order for tourism to become truly sustainable there must be broader beneficiation than is currently the case. On the N3 corridor most members fall into the accommodation category, but more activities and attractions are needed to service the needs of tourists. This is exactly where the development opportunities lie and where the broader community can benefit from sustainable tourism development. There are also many other opportunities to address sustainable tourism development issues, for example through tour operators, transport companies, educational institutions, product and service providers to name but a few. In chapter 8 Kevin Mearns provides insights into some of the initiatives that the airline industry has undertaken in their commitment to reduce carbon emissions. He mentions a number of programmes. We have gained insights into of SAA’s biofuels programme during sustainability week 2015. This programme not only addresses environmental impacts, but also creates much needed jobs as a result of tourism demand. It is critical that tourism professionals are made more aware of such programmes, which is what GEOTEX proposes. In chapter 9, François Bèdard gives us insights into the Geotourism Explorer (GEOTEX) programme, which the STPP is helping to launch in Southern Africa. This is a tool to be used by educators and industry professionals to teach learners, the very people who will be doing the onthe-ground implementation, the how-to of sustainable tourism project implementation. The GEOTEX programme provides credibility to sustainable tourism initiatives in future. It also does not just look at the efforts of individual businesses, but rather the efforts

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THE TOURISM HANDBOOK

and geographical location or route and is an ideal tool for route development such as the N12 Treasure Route or the N3 Gateway. Initiatives such as the Sasol Solar Challenge, introduced by Annalie van Vuuren in chapter 10, is an example of an event that can bring tourism to routes such as the N12 and N3. The challenge, now in its 8th year in South Africa brings environmental best practice, community development, education, tourism and other industries into a collaborative space and is driven by stakeholders who are not traditionally seen as “tourism stakeholders”. As I mentioned before, tourism is everybody’s business and the solar challenge proves this irrevocably. In chapter 11, Laura Schenk gives is a few tips on what to look out for in the implementation of Community Based Tourism (CBT) initiatives. The last thing a travel agent needs is for an accommodation establishment or a tour operator to


1

dramatically fail, leaving the tourist stranded. Laura highlights that CBT initiatives have to be built on sound business principles and has to be managed with sound operational practices so as to ensure the sustainability of the businesses and the communities they serve. In chapter 12 Ken van Sweeden of Budget Insurance discusses the types of risks that tourism businesses face. Many tourists (e.g. the new-aged tourist) live for discovering the unknown or having that unexpected encounter that Kirsten Keun refers to. It is up to the tourism trade to help create better awareness amongst businesses and tourists alike of risks that could potentially shatter a business or strand the tourist. Businesses, no matter how big or small, face the same risks and need to mitigating negative impacts in the unlikely event of something going wrong. And then: When all is sorted, the tourist is booked, paid, transported, delivered,

INTRODUCTION

accommodated and ready for action, the stories of success need to be told by the people—the communities – who have created them and who have owned them for generations. They can then tell stories of local culture, local talent, natural beauty, beautiful towns, welcoming communities, holding hands for success, excellent service and unforgettable quality, unexpected encounters and beautiful memories. OJ Tshamboko end our handbook in chapter 13 by telling the story of storytelling, and how this in itself is creating new opportunities in tourism. Now we need the trade to help by supporting all who are working so hard and with so much passion to make South Africa ‘the best place to live in and the best place to travel to’. [1] 

Experienced tourists know what they want, are spontaneous and flexible and are looking for the authentic experience

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SOME IDEAS ON SUSTAINABLE TOURISM FROM THE PONDOLAND WILD COAST

Val Payn


INTRODUCTION PONDOLAND

1 2

P

ondoland’s Wild Coast is different things to different people. To fishermen, it is ocean waters richly blessed with shad, shark, sea bream, and a host of other sea creatures. Not to forget the annual and legendary East Coast sardine run, when winter schools of sardines carry frenziedly feeding pods of dolphins, whales, sharks and seabirds in their migratory wake up the coast.

Fishermen’s cottages lie scattered along the coastline in small isolated hamlets. Many of these simple family holiday abodes have been in the same family for generations, ever since their forebears lived in the area as traders, farmers, missionaries and doctors. The descendants of these early white settler families can tell interesting stories, if you engage them, of a history of gun-runners, outcasts, rogues, shipwrecks, fortune hunters and many good, well-meaning folk too. Most of the white settler families were ousted from their businesses during apartheid, when the area became the Homeland of Transkei, but they managed to retain their cottages. It was fishing that introduced me to Pondoland’s Wild Coast. My father would take me on annual fishing holidays there as a child, and I fell in love with the place. Little could I guess my youthful love affair would develop into a vocation that would see me involved in the NGO Sustaining the Wild Coast (SWC), an organization dedicated to finding sustainable solutions to the dilemma of development in the region. The Pondoland Wild Coast, with its unforgettable landscape of deep, forested gorges, rolling grass covered hills, sandy coves, high sea cliffs, and the rich culture of the amaMpondo, is a photographers dream – think of photographer and local historian John Costello, who co-authored the book Mkambati and the Wild Coast with conservationist Div De Villiers.

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Then there are botanists, like the late, renowned botanist Tony Abbott and other nature lovers who cherish the areas unique natural heritage. The Wild Coast is internationally recognised as a centre of Plant Endemism and Botanical ‘Hotspot’. There are 196 plant species that are endemic to Pondoland, which means they occur nowhere else in the world. More than 2253 different plants species have been identified in the region. That is more plant species than are found in the entire Kruger National Park. I hiked with Tony once, near Waterfall Bluff, where one can see the spectacle of a waterfall plunging off high sea cliffs directly into the sea. Elsewhere in the world, waterfalls plunging straight into the sea are a rare sight, but here quite common. There are five such sea cliff plunging waterfalls along the Wild Coast. Tony was looking for something special, a unique species of cabbage tree. He had an inkling that some specimens might be found around here, but


2

he was looking for proof. We came across a formidable crevasse incised by a stream through the flat rock shelves characteristic of this area. Tony let out an excited yell. He had found his prize growing in the crevasse. Of course, Pondoland is called Pondoland because it’s the ancestral home of the amaMpondo – indigenous people with a rich cultural history. The amaMpondo people have lived along the Wild Coast for at least 500 years, and oral history suggests the amaMpondo may have been resident in Pondoland as early as 1300, if not earlier. Shipwreck survivors from the Portuguese Sant Alberto , wrecked in 1593, described the amaMpondo as being ‘cultivators of the ground, by which means they subsist’. In 1635, survivors from the wreck of the Nossa Senhora de Belem, wrecked between the Mtata and Bashee, said of the Mpondo. “Their grain is millet...They have maize also, and plant large melons... and beans and gourds of many kinds, also sugar canes.

PONDOLAND

Cows are what they chiefly value; these are very fine”. Was that a hint of envy amongst the Portuguese? In rural areas one still finds communities of amaMpondo practicing the age old traditions, growing crops and keeping cattle for sustenance. Cattle are still amaMpondo families pride and joy, and play an important role in many cultural rituals and ceremonies. Along the northern section of this coastline is a stretch of rolling coastal dunes. An Australian mining company has put in an application to mine the dunes, which are richly deposited with rutile and other valued minerals. Mining would involve desiccating the dune covering vegetation, building large flooding ponds to liquefy the sand, and hoovering up the extract. It’s a noisy, messy, dusty, land degrading business that does not bode well for tourism development in the area. And what, one must ask, will happen to the people who have lived in villages in that area for many generations, and whose

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43


INTRODUCTION PONDOLAND

1 2

livelihoods and cultural traditions depend on the land, if the miners get their way? The majority of local people do not support the mining. They wish for more benign sorts of development, like tourism. Not so long ago it was suggested that the Pondoland Wild Coast should be declared a National Park. Local people who live in the area were horrified. They saw the idea of a National Park as much a threat to their livelihoods and way of life as the mining. The Pondoland Wild Coast is not just Nature. It is also people with a rich culture, fascinating history, and spectacular landscape and seascape all woven together. It offers great opportunity for tourism development. But

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how does one plan so that tourism brings opportunity to the local people, without destroying the very things that make a place precious, unique and special? SWC has grappled with these sorts of questions. Sustainable tourism is related to the idea of sustainable development. If tourism is to be sustainable, deeper questions need to be asked. Questions like what exactly is the goal of ‘development’? Who, or what, is being ‘developed’? And for what, or whose, benefit? What, or who, is being ‘sustained’, and how? And what is it that makes a place unique, and how can one plan so that this uniqueness is not undermined by tourism? To answer these


2

questions, people who live in an area need to be deeply involved in the planning, thinking through and implementation of any tourist development plans. Without a clear understanding of what is intended, whose purpose is being served, and what the costs and benefits might be, there is a danger things can go badly awry and tourism could become destructive and unsustainable. In a country like South Africa, with its huge income disparities, there is always pressure for tourism to deliver ‘economic benefits’, especially in areas like the Eastern Cape which are often described as economically depressed. But developing sustainable and environmentally responsible tourism takes time. It involves meetings, networking, planning, revising, training, more meetings and networking. It requires the involvement of many different stakeholders, with different priorities, visions, agendas and skills levels. SWC has always focused on ‘bottom up’ development. That is, small scale development that up-skills and brings economic benefits directly to local communities, and that encourages and rewards their own entrepreneurial efforts. In our work along Pondoland’s Wild Coast, SWC has found that coastal communities, and the individuals and organizations that support them, are often in survival mode as the fight against mining eats up their time and resources. Trying to grow tourism that will grow revenue but preserve the wildness is an ongoing challenge. Then there is the ongoing challenge of how to facilitate collaboration between coastal communities and individuals, and resources (of money and people) outside those communities. Communally “owned” projects often fail – it is too easy to avoid responsibility when ‘everyone’ is an owner. Entrepreneurial individuals can be resented for success. So how should projects be initiated, organized

PONDOLAND

and sustained to ensure both the efficiency that often characterizes individual ownership and shared benefit for communities? SWC has tried to bring some of the benefits of tourism to local Mpondo communities by sponsoring training for local guides, and encouraging the development of low impact eco-trials, guided and organized by local Mpondo guides. Hikers on the trails are hosted by local village families, in ‘homestays’. Tourists get a real experience of local ways of life, and economic benefits go directly to local communities. We hope this encourages local people to appreciate and see the real value of their culture, heritage and landscape. It is often hard, slow going, but sometimes unexpected magic happens. In the words of Margie Pretorius, SWC’s Director for Tourism. “I think that the biggest positive effect of SWC’s focus on tourism in 2015 was the unplanned support of Bongani’s Mandela Day hike for local school children. The hike was his idea. SWC helped to cover the costs and helped to organize media coverage. As a result of this the children had a great hike. Bongani and his company Absolute Wild Coast got great media exposure and his bookings increased dramatically. This meant more bookings for homestays and more money into communities. Unplanned magic created ongoing impact! I think there is something to be learned from this process about how to find ways of supporting individual entrepreneurs doing community projects that benefit both individual projects and whole communities”. See http://www.amazon.com/ Ecological-Gardeners-Handbook-EcoSystem-Sustainably-ebook/dp/B013CCJNSC and Linkedin page https://www.linkedin. com/today/author/valerie-payn-903a9515. She lives in southern Kwazulu-Natal for some of Val’s work.

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PROFILE

MANAGING INCIDENTS – ARE AQUILA PRIVATE YOU ACTING RESPONSIBLY? GAME RESERVE BY ANDRÉ DU TOIT Eyeballing the Big 5 Close up, together with outstanding personal service. It just does not get better than Aquila Private Game Reserve. With game drives, quad bike and horseback safaris situated under 2 hours from Cape Town, it’s the closest you can get to real Africa. In the raw. In the lap of luxury.

How you manage incidents critical for those Anchoring (i.e. once a decision has been made it www.aquilasafari.com FACILITIES ANDis ACTIVITIES: FOUR STAR ESTABLISHMENT | PREMIER, LUXURY AND STANDARD CHALETS | LUXURY AND STANDARD LODGE ROOMS TRIP SAFARI | HORSEBACK SAFARI | STAR SAFARI | OVERNIGHT SAFARI | FLY IN SAFARI | WINE TASTING is very difficult to change course) just makes this involved and indeedDAYthe sustainability of| QUAD yourBIKE SAFARI | INDOOR & OUTDOOR RESTAURANTS | 2 OUTDOOR POOLS | WET BAR | CIGAR LOUNGE | CONFERENCE CENTRE | LIBRARY | WINNER CURIO SHOP | CHILDREN’S FACILITIES & JUNIOR RANGER PROGRAMME | ARC (AQUILA ANIMAL RESCUE CENTRE). business. However, statistics gathered during worse, regardless of the information received. There are two swimming pools, a pool bar, If 2014 & 2015 over 5000 cases show that the capacity of afurther symptoms cosy cigar loungemade and a themselves large diningapparent room tourism businesses to deal with critical incidents where they may bechef ignored because the presents a the richdecision variety to ofsee the incident through had already been made. and accompanying exposures has proven to be authentic South African cuisine. Superb South a gap of its own. Another characteristics to African winestwo are on offer with yourcommon meal. Most rely on staff and assistance companies to individuals tourism 2015 andin2016 wasare: a year full of surprises • Premature jumping conclusions. manage their incidents and evacuations. Whilst and reward for closure Aquila ––they had 4to rhino calves • Action orientation – tending to take these are often carried out with acceptable born in 3 months. All calves are doing wellpractical and outcomes, the minefield of potential exposures canaction instead of waiting for someone be seen on most game drives at Aquila.else that have been escaped en route is terrifying. Onetoofdothe or calves provide instruction. Sometimes was rejected by its motherthis be dangerous as the andtask expertise There’s aet lot in more it and right now, whether thetopristine Southern Karoo andcan Aquila has taken on the skills gigantic of you haveHighlands realized itagainst or not a- backdrop you are exposed! in incident management maycan notfollow be present. of dramatic hand rearing this little infant. You his It is mountains, important to that we progress on the Facebook page ARCatAquila. the understand Aquila Private Game cannot predict and where anreal incident have a very 2015 sawstaff Aquila, once again,powerful scoopingaction up Reserve offerswhen an exciting taste of Africa Hospitality willjust happen, whohours will be there dealby with it 3orientation and are Lilizela some Imvelo of theTourism worst at awards at the annual two short from CapetoTown road. and what the outcome will be. Every incident awards. premature closure. can have detrimental This annualBoth programme seeks to effects in the incident management. is different in home its nature, location, typevariety of injury, andcourse rewardofthe tourism industry Aquila is to an enormous of recognize number people, available etc., so it andThese are the truths and theand fact is its impact onhonest the social, economic game,ofincluding the Bigresources 5. Two- to threeis important to manage to principles that… issues facing South Africa. hour game drives according are the perfect way environmental • It iswas andtonotsee predetermined Don’t use Aquila a rare genuinely calm theperson winner who in theisLarge Tourism the animals protocols. in four-wheel-drive checklists, resources. decide onAyour whilst responding to aSocial threatening incident vehicles,use quad bikes orDon’t on horseback. new Enterprise section for Best Involvement • It is a rareand emergency response ahead of time; person consistently makes activity offered forplan guests is the “Stardecide Safari”, Programme firstwho runner up for Best what you need to do youtounderstand good decisions under those circumstance where guests arewhen invited join one ofwhat the Economic Impact and Best Single Resource • Nobody is naturally is happening. Treat each riskinasthe unique. knowledgeable rangers BomaIt’s asokay they Management, Energy. equipped to function in to be abstract vague before a multitask, multivariable rapidly changing explore theand southern skies. an incident and SPECIFIC during one. cottages are built largely stressful environment and those that choose Aquila’ s four-star How think is theand cruxwood of everything. to, are even rarer. from we rock, thatch to blend with We all guilty of bias as it re-A • Everybody has limits. Exceed those and the are environment andhindsight offer every comfort. assures us ofhoneymoon our actions. Even if something performance drops. Physiological and luxurious suite is perched on a hill does weromantic tend to believe it could’ve mathematical fact. forgo thewrong ultimate getaway. Situated been worse ifto wethe hadn’t done XYZ. Asnewly a resultbuilt we adjacent restaurant is the seldom goLodge, back and analyze 3incidents, we just DON’T EXPECT your PEOPLE to manage Aquila comprising levels, accessible forge lose out on amagnificent precious learning byahead a glassand panelled lift with Karoo incidents – EVER – they need HELP from opportunity. vistas, with 22 rooms facing the reserve and EXPERTS. Itthe is amountains fact that staff prone22 to rooms positivefacing bias This is what is required in order to manage andare another because theirthe role withinThese the staff-guide-guest awayof from reserve. two room types an incident and ensure the best outcome. relationship as aaresult tend choose the • Gather information about the incident – get combineand to form perfect suitetofor a family. more positive option when given two. accurate data/ask the right questions

S

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PROFILE

BIG 5 SAFARI

So …Why do You need Incident Management • On-site first aid • Managing the scene – for both staff and Services? • Because people’s lives and wellbeing guests • Managing the media – limiting depend on the right decisions being made reputational damage with accurate • Because it is better to professionalize your Over 10,000 hectares of Big management 5 Conservancy reporting of critical incidents. • Consulting with doctors • Because dealing with emergencies • Communicating with all stakeholders situations is beyond your scope of work • Activating and coordinating appropriate • Because your business and its reputation is at stake assistance e.g. Dispatching ambulance – • Because you are seriously exposed to liability ground or air • Arranging guarantees of payment and when critical incident occur • Because the cost of liability can now easily insurance • Preparing for Hospitalization exceed R100 million • Post-operative care • Because it’s not worth taking the chance • Managing potential litigation or claims As you will appreciate, it is not one specific Find me someone who can do this all and action that will mitigate risk but rather a manage your business and I will arrange the combination that will reduce your exposure necessary spandex with cape and undies on at the end of the day. There are a network the outside because they will be worthy of of experts and specialists out there that you can team up with to better manage your superhero status! With all due respect to your operations risk and provide you with peace of mind. and teams on the ground and considering Use them. the way we think and act under stressful SATIB24 Crisis Call is one such critical circumstance, I don’t believe many have the incident management service with an capacity to deal with the scenario (or would insurance component ONLY available to SATIB want to) when in actual fact they should be clients. It forms an integral part of our African focusing on the remaining guests and leaving presence and can be coupled with medical this up to a network of trained professionals. emergency evacuation policies that can cover • The Types of Incidents: guests, staff or both. Critical incidents impose • Emergency incidents threat of loss - something bad happening Eyeballing the Bigmedical 5 Close up, together with aoutstanding • Personal injuries/fatalities that may cost life, limb, and money, loss of personal service. It just does not get better than Aquila • Accidents (motor vehicle, quad-bikes, reputation, property or asset damage or Private Game Reserve. With game drives, quad bike and business interruption. Management of these boating etc.) horseback safaris situated under 2 hours from Cape • Assaults and Robberies situations by our specialist team minimises the Town,• it’s the closest you can get to real Africa. Natural disasters (Flood, fire etc.) loss and maximises the outcome. It is about In the raw. In the lap of luxury. taking the “luck factor” out of incidents and Core services to subscribe to: doing the things that stack the odds in your AND ACTIVITIES: • FACILITIES Telemedical consultations favour. The field of litigation has changed FOUR STAR ESTABLISHMENT | PREMIER, LUXURY AND STANDARD CHALETS | LUXURY AND STANDARD LODGE ROOMS • DAY Incident management plan| QUAD creation with SAFARI liability becoming an TASTING onerous TRIP SAFARI | HORSEBACK SAFARI BIKE SAFARI | STARsomewhat SAFARI | OVERNIGHT | FLY IN SAFARI | WINE | INDOOR & OUTDOOR RESTAURANTS | 2 OUTDOOR POOLS | WET BAR | CIGAR LOUNGE | CONFERENCE CENTRE | LIBRARY | Remote management of rescue and threat to all markets and for this reason we WINNER• CURIO SHOP | CHILDREN’S FACILITIES & JUNIOR RANGER PROGRAMME | ARC (AQUILA ANIMAL RESCUE CENTRE). 2014 & 2015 medical staff offer additional support by taking the load off • Medical evacuations your shoulders by managing the incidents and • Post traumatic risk assessments controlling exposure. It is your responsibility • Media management and this will ultimately ensure the sustainability • Legal liability management of your business.

Real Africa. Real Close To Cape Town.

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TRAVEL: FRONTIER OF OPPORTUNITY OR ANCHOR OF INEQUALITY.

Kirsten Keun


TRAVEL: FRONTIER OR ANCHOR

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A GROWTH SPURT Worldwide, travel has seen phenomenal growth and now forms the backbone of the modern service economy. Travel can change lives by introducing visitors to host communities, and their spending power can improve education and health services. Sustainable inclusive growth can improve the lives of millions and protect nature via a novel bearing. On the other hand, a narrowminded and profit fixated industry possess the potential to propagate even larger gaps between the wealthy and poor of our planet, fuelling social decay and natural degradation.

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A sustainable travel industry breeds conscious informed travelers and service suppliers who ensure that economic benefits flow to the areas and people where most needed. An unhealthy consumptive industry overreaches its supply and promises services indiscriminately, regardless of the social and environmental needs of the destination. While travel grows exponentially, it could either nurture the foreign human and natural offering, or consume it. Hastily attracting tourists only for their spending power can have long-term negative effects on nature and society.


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Supporting local entrepreneurs can have a positive long-term benefit on the community, individual and environment. Understanding the ecological and social costs involved in human mobility is fundamental to sustainable growth in travel. The travel footprint of the modern traveler must be recognised and calculated, rather than ignored or overlooked. Travel demand potentially addresses inequality, channelling sustainable local development. A kind of development cognisant of the impact of indiscriminate human expansion is needed. The impact of travel can be utilised to mitigate environmental and social impact. Developing sustainable travel relies on the understanding and recognition of the impact of the activity and the ensuing mitigation. The movement towards sustainable travel is aware of the impact and consequences of wanderlust and professional travel. Maintaining and developing responsible

TRAVEL: FRONTIER OR ANCHOR

international human mobility requires participants to learn about destinations and make informed decisions. A sustainable industry is responsible and transparent and includes all role players. Responsible travel ensures impact mitigation and inclusion of all parties involved. Communities and parties involved are the custodians and caretakers and the key to sustainable practice. Consideration for culture and tradition of host communities are fundamental aspects of sustainability. PRECIOUS AND PRECARIOUS. Growth in travel fluctuates with ebbs and flows of stability and volatility in the geopolitical landscape and humans’ state of mind. In times of economic and social stability, humans are likely to travel more often. For some, travel can be regarded as a luxury or part of relaxation and entertainment. For others, travel is part of

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TRAVEL: FRONTIER OR ANCHOR

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a work agenda and imperative. For work or pleasure, humans travel from home when the essentials there are in abundance. Whatever the motivation for travel, in times of perceived insecurity potential travelers bunker in at home and avoid a change of scenery. In a contradictory way, insecurity may also trigger migratory actions of people and groups. Refugees travel in a hurry away from failed states and war. Factors that rouse travel include economic emancipation, self-realisation, improved destination offerings and increased information flow. Elements that prevent potential tourists from travelling include disease, war, economical volatility, fear of the unknown and terrorism. Curiosity about “who is in town” can ignite relationships between visitors and locals. But if locals perceive visitors only behind the lens, meaningful interaction remains elusive. Visitors must treat locals with respect and dignity to fully benefit from the curiosity and hospitality of the host community. NURTURE NATURE AND BIODIVERSITY. Costing ecosystems and human society side to side is a novel way of doing business. Dreams and evidence of early humans living in a more equal environmental dispensation seem to exist only on a preindustrialised planet. Our expansion and consumption proceed to drive many life forms to extinction. Travel is a powerful way of introducing ideas and lessons from foreign countries. Visitors bring stories of success and ideas of improvement, but things are often done differently from home. At the same time as a sensitive and respectful approach can nurture new areas, insensitive selfish development can lead to exploitation and negative impact. Exploited natural elements in travel include wildlife, plants, water and the local geography. Ecological costs are observed in an attempt

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to calculate the price of a natural experience. For example, a safari requires animals to be observable and in certain abundance in the activity area. In order for animals to settle or remain in such an area, a healthy balanced ecology must be maintained. Should natural or man- made disaster disturb, displace or destroy wildlife, sustainability of the tourism attraction may be jeopardised. Practical ways to maintain a safe and healthy ecology includes involving local communities on the peripherals of wildlife areas. When humans here benefit from— and value wildlife, they protect areas and raise flags in case of environmental threats. The web of life is delicately interwoven with all role players and persons, animals or elements of interest. YOUR CULTURE, MY CULTURE. The human element is often the base of the travel experience. A significant part of the tourist’s experience relates to the interaction enjoyed with locals, service providers and fellow travelers. Cultural variations may be challenging and fascinating at the same time, and must be prudently managed to enhance travel sustainability. Misunderstanding cultural differences or disregarding foreign practices cripples sustainable travel. The sustainable responsible traveler asks the question: “would I do this at home?” For example, locals who are photographed without permission may be offended, while the visiting photographer remains ignorant of the local’s discomfort. Bilateral cultural sensitivity, tolerance and respect breed sustainability and understanding across more than geographical borders. Travelers can treat or spoil, and grey areas develop where cultures meet. CHANGE IS THE NEW ORDER A revolution in travel expose providers in direct and altered contact with clients and


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buyers. Quality travel involves a serviceoriented product with real time support and unexpected authentic additions. The travel experience can shift to a more direct benefit of local enterprise. Service representatives deliver hand-held support with a focus on style, value and quality. Sustainable industry growth and management requires a holistic environmental approach, while an emphasis on client convenience can boost sales. New market opportunities exist in securing nature friendly practices with peace and benefit to locals and visitors alike. Stories online and elsewhere tickle the curiosity in an age where everyone wants to travel. It is beneficial to travelers to easily accrue information of attractions. But information must be treated with discretion. Information on where to find rare animals in parks is a case in point. Such animals may also be on the radar of illegal poachers. If information is easily available, it could end up in the wrong hands; to the detriment of the targeted animal population. The service professional multi tasks to the benefit of the traveler where a compact and effective service chain is essential. Service professionals perform a critical part of the travel experience. Representing the complete destination, consumer preferences and choices are often based on the recommendation of the service professional. Professionals realise that their actions represent an opportunity to participate in sustainable development. Today’s travel agents are ones who travel, accruing information and sharing this in support of their clients. Guides become agents and agents become guides. Today’s traveler is more independent and makes more last minute decisions using mobile technology to share information about continuous change in tastes, preferences and behaviours.

TRAVEL: FRONTIER OR ANCHOR

Considering the various stimulants and inhabitants for travel, it would seem challenging to prepare a tourism offering in this unstable environment. Southern African investors may have found that preparation is key in surviving the growing but unpredictable market place. Thriving travel enterprises save in times of low arrivals, simultaneously preparing capacity for increased demand. Sustainable travel organisations and service professionals prioritise and perform corporate, social and environmental responsibilities. AN OPPORTUNITY TO CLOSE THE GAP. Sustainable travel can provide economic social and environmental support to host communities. Sustainable development empowers locals and supplies them with job opportunities and income, at the same time mitigating the environmental and social costs. However, some local communities are not ready for the lessons and ideas introduced by foreigners. For example, locals may use firewood for cooking and until an attractive alternative to burning wood for cooking is introduced, no change should be expected. Foreigners may view this with suspicion, as burning fires represent environmental issues. A healthy and open relationship is therefore needed between parties. Travel can potentially fund sustainable solutions to local problems. Collaboration and empowerment of local communities is a key in improving the relationship between man and the environment. Locals must be motivated to take ownership of their heritage and become the caretakers of the land. Sustainable travel protects destinations and the environment for the enjoyment of future generations. Travel professionals have a critical role to play in ensuring sustainable travel demand is created within the tourism supply chains.

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Discover yourself in It’s a royal experience * Come face to face with the big five * Enjoy our magnificent scenery * Sample our community tourism spots * Hike our hills and valleys * Participate in our traditional events

For your copy of the Swaziland Discovery Tel: (09268) 40 42531 EMPHALWINI Mall Office, Mbabane, Tel: (09268) 44 24206 Ngwenya Office Email: information@tourismauthority.org.sz or write to P.O. Box A1030 EMPHALWINI Mall Office, Mbabane

www.thekingdomofswaziland.com


Swaziland 3

THE GLOBAL SUSTAINABLE TOURISM COUNCIL

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PROFILE

MANAGING INCIDENTS – ARE DISCOVER YOURSELF YOU ACTING RESPONSIBLY? IN SWAZILAND

py of the Swaziland Discovery

40 42531 EMPHALWINI Mall Office, Mbabane, 44 24206 Ngwenya Office

mation@tourismauthority.org.sz or write to

030 EMPHALWINI Mall Office, Mbabane

thekingdomofswaziland.com

It’s a royal experience How you manage incidents is critical for those

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involved he andgeography indeed the of sustainability youra Swazilandofhas business.textbook However,like statistics gathered during simplicity. Swaziland over 5000 casesitself show capacity of divides intothat fourthe clearly defined tourism businesses to deal with critical incidents parallel natural regions running from north andtoaccompanying exposures has17,proven to be south and covers just over 000 square a gap of its own.It is situated between the kilometers. Most rely on staff and assistance companies to republic of South Africa and Mozambique. manage their incidents and evacuations. Whilst Swaziland has very vital traditions these are oftentocarried outculture. with acceptable amounting a distinct In presentoutcomes, thewhere minefield of potential exposures day Africa, traditions are generally in thata have escaped en route is terrifying. state been of radical change, sometimes even There’s a lot more to it and rightis now, whether moribund, the Swazi culture an interesting youand havenoble realized it or not - you aremain exposed! phenomenon. The reason It important to understand thatare wea foristhis ethnic vitality is that the Swazi cannot predict when and where relatively homogeneous nation.an incident will happen, who will be there to deal with it andKnown what the outcome be. Every as the ‘place will of kings’ for itsincident famous is different in itskingdom, nature, location, type ofspecial injury, authentic Swaziland’s number of people, resources etc., so it attraction is her available unique blend of traditional is important to manage according principles and modern. The envy of many to countries in andAfrica, not predetermined protocols. Don’t and use Swaziland is peaceful and tranquil checklists, use resources. Don’tand decide on your has preserved its cultures traditions as emergency response ahead of time; decide a vital element in plan the day-to-day existence what need to do when you understand ofyou its people. This balance of ancientwhat and is happening. Treat Swaziland each risk asand unique. okay modern gives her It’s people to be abstract and vague before an incident and their distinctive character. SPECIFIC during one. Swaziland – independent since 1968 – is How weonly thinkthree is themonarchies crux of everything. one of left in Africa. We all Majesty guilty ofKing hindsight it reLed are by His Mswati bias III, theasnation assures us in of its our actions. something rejoices rich culture,Even socialif and natural does go wrong we tend to believe it could’ve heritage for future generations. “Our children been worsenever if weforgive hadn’t done XYZ. result would us if we letAs allaof this we go seldom go back andSobhuza analyze II.incidents, we just to waste” – King forge ahead and losetoday out oncan a precious learning Few countries boast the safety, opportunity. stability and peace, which Swaziland enjoys Itboth is a internationally fact that staff are prone bias and withto herpositive neighbors. because of their role within cannot the staff-guide-guest Visitors to the country help but feel relationship and asthe a result tendand to friendliness choose the and appreciate warmth more positive option when given two.

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BY ANDRÉ DU TOIT

Anchoring (i.e. once a decision has been made it is to change course) just ofvery theirdifficult hosts nor fail to appreciate themakes safetythis worse, regardless of the information received. If it promises travelers. further made themselves apparent The symptoms Kingdom of Swaziland is nestled they may be ignored the decision between some of because the greatest parks to insee the incident throughofhad already been made. Africa: just South Kruger National Park common andAnother North oftwo the characteristics extensive KwaZulu Natal to individuals in tourism are:perfect stop over Park System. It is the • Premature closure jumping to conclusions. to escape the heat– of the lower veldt • Action to takeofpractical areas andorientation experience– tending the coolness the action instead of waiting for someone enchanting Swazi mountains and theelse to do orfriendliness provide instruction. Sometimes refreshing of the Swazi people.this can be dangerous as thewonders skills and of expertise Swaziland also possesses her in incident management mayhas not put be present. own, like Sibebe Rock, which the Kingdom in the Guinness Book of Records Hospitality a very powerful action for being staff the have largest outcrop granite orientation arethe some of the Mines worst at rock in the and world, Ngwenya premature closure. Both have mines detrimental which are said to be thecan oldest in effects in the incident management. the world andcourse date of back well over 43,000 These are thepaintings honest truths and back the fact years, bushmen that date to is that… and rocks which are said to be over 450AD • It billion is a rare person wholittle is genuinely calm 3.55 years old! The kingdom of whilst responding to a threatening incident Swaziland also has safaris and game parks, • It is a not rare as person who as consistently though sizeable those of makes her good decisions under neighbors. However, whatthose theycircumstance lack in size • Nobody is naturally equipped and quantity, they make up for to in function quality in multitask, multivariable rapidly changing anda opportunity for close encounters with stressful choose game from environment small vehiclesand andthose eventhat on foot! to, are even Access to rarer. Swaziland may be made • Everybody Exceed through any ofhas thelimits. twelve borderthose postsand performance drops.Matsapha Physiological or the centrally located Airport,and mathematical fact. of the country easily with all four corners accessible by tarred road. A new airport has DON’T EXPECT your and PEOPLE to manage recently been opened is expected to incidents – EVER they need from start operating soon.–This is the KingHELP Mswati EXPERTS. III International Airport. The capital city, This is what is required in order to manage Mbabane and the industrial hub, Manzini, an incident and ensure the centers best outcome. are sophisticated business offering • Gather the tranquility incident – get an upbeatinformation alternativeabout to the accurate data/ask the right questions


PROFILE • On-site first aid • Managing the scene – for both staff and guests • Managing the media – limiting reputational damage with accurate reporting • Consulting with doctors • Communicating with all stakeholders • Activating and coordinating appropriate assistance e.g. Dispatching ambulance – ground or air • Arranging guarantees of payment and insurance • Preparing for Hospitalization • Post-operative care • Managing potential litigation or claims Find me someone who can do this all and manage your business and I will arrange the necessary spandex with cape and undies on the outside because they will be worthy of superhero status! Withsenses all dueof respect to your operations and timelessness found in more andoutlying teams on thewhich ground considering areas are and divided into four thecategories: way we think andnature act under stressful wildlife, reserves and circumstance, I don’t believe manytraditional have the lodges; hotels, casinos and spas; capacity to deal(the withmost the scenario (or would attractions sacred being the want to) when in actualCeremony); fact they should be Incwala or Kingship and sport focusing on the remaining guests and leaving and adventure. this upVisit to aSwaziland network and of trained professionals. experience the wide • The Types of Incidents: range of activities offered within the small • Emergency medicalGo incidents peaceful Kingdom. white water rafting • Personal injuries/fatalities on the Great Usuthu River, an event that • attracts Accidents (motorfrom vehicle, nationals as far quad-bikes, as Namibia. boating etc.) Swaziland also offers activities such as hiking • on Assaults andand Robberies light trails very challenging trails that • can Natural disasters (Flood,like firethe etc.) be found in places Ngwempisi Hiking Trails, which is not your average trail! Core to subscribe to: Goservices trout fishing in the Shiselweni Region • at Telemedical consultations the Mahamba Gorge or go watching • at Incident either management the North or plan the creation South of the • kingdom. Remote A management of rescue and portion of our accommodation medicaloffer staffday walks, and walks done over facilities • aMedical numberevacuations of days. • Post traumatic4risk Swaziland’s x 4 assessments trails are also out of this • world! Media Many management an event has been held in the • Legal liability management

So …Why do You need Incident Management Services? • Because people’s lives and wellbeing depend on the right decisions being made • Because it is better to professionalize your management of critical incidents. • Because dealing with emergencies situations is beyond your scope of work • Because your business and its reputation is at stake • Because you are seriously exposed to liability when critical incident occur • Because the cost of liability can now easily exceed R100 million • Because it’s not worth taking the chance As you will appreciate, it is not one specific action that will mitigate risk but rather a combination that will reduce your exposure at the end of the day. There are a network of experts and specialists out there that you can team up with to better manage your risk and provide you with peace of mind. kingdom, where numerous nationalities Use them. from far and wide visit the Kingdom just for SATIB24 Call israce oneatsuch critical these events.Crisis The bicycle Mlilwane with an isincident another management draw card for service internationals. insurance component ONLY available from to SATIB The previous one had nationals clients. It formsand an South integralAfrica part of Mozambique as our wellAfrican as presence and can be coupled with medical the Swazi nationals. emergency policies that cango cover For the evacuation serious adventure freak, guests, staff both. Critical abseiling or or paragliding andincidents feel like impose the a threat of loss bad happening whole world is at- something your feet! Swaziland has that become may costhome life, limb, andlovers, money, loss of also to biker come reputation, property or asset damage and enjoy yourself on your Harley in the or business interruption. Management of these kingdom. If all that noise is not suitable situations by our specialist for one, then maybe take team time minimises out to gothe loss and maximises theand outcome. about bird watching and try name Itallis498 taking the “luck factor” of incidents bird species found in theout country. Visit ourand doing the things that stack the odds in your website, www.thekingdomofswaziland.com favour. field of litigation has changed for moreThe information. somewhat with liability becoming an onerous No matter where your travels take you threat the to all marketsofand for this one reason within Kingdom Swaziland, will we offer additional taking the load meet with the support courtesy,byfriendliness and off your shoulders incidents genuine desireby tomanaging help and the share, whichand controlling exposure. It isSwaziland your responsibility makes it easy to see why claims and thisthe willvisitor…. ultimately ensure the sustainability to offer ”a royal experience. ” of your business. THE TOURISM HANDBOOK

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SUSTAINABLE TOURISM INDICATORS TO MANAGE SCARCE WATER RESOURCES

Melissa Baker and Kevin Mearns


STAKEHOLDER COMMUNICATION

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he STPP attended the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) General Assembly in Medellin in Colombia in September 2015. There are many things that South Africa can learn from Medellin, but the most important thing is collaboration. Through the integration of transport, education and health, the city has created connectivity for communities to learn, get to clinics, to have access to decent jobs and to have new opportunities. In other words, citizens have a future. The city has over a very short period, dramatically changed living conditions for its citizens. Communities are still poor but they are no longer a ‘violent’ poor society, as they now have access to what satisfies their basic needs – income, homes, transport and education. There is a public library in every train station and shopping area and within reach of every citizen. People get to work through an extensive network of public transport, which includes train, tram (launch ready 2016), bus, cable cars, escalators, bicycles and taxis. And if you have a bit more money and you can afford a motorbike, travel is even easier, as road infrastructure is excellent and roads are relatively safe. It was fascinating to travel on a cable car as if it were a train, with stations to hop on or off. It was even more fascinating to see massive escalators taking commuters up and down the mountain, with slides for children who may find the journey down a bit tedious.

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Medellin was the number one murder capital of the world in the early 2000s, but has fallen so far in ranking, that it is deemed by many reports to be “too safe for dangerous city ranking”[1]. A truly amazing achievement in a short space of time. The secret? Mass scale collaboration, mass scale commitment to change by all citizens, but most importantly, mass scale implementation of change through ongoing, repetitive and persistent face-toface discussions with citizens who were in desperate need of change. This allowed for breaking down the barriers between the people that struggled to make sense of poverty, crime and violence on a daily basis and for policy makers to understand the problems, barriers, challenges, needs, wishes and dreams. It was the public service being public servants in its purest form. Together, public service and citizens developed a vision for the city, and commitments were made to aggressively implement that vision. As a whole, Colombia has made tremendous progress towards eking out


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crime and violence and building the tourism industry as a pillar industry of its economy. “Magical Realism”, which is the universal by-line that defines tourism in Colombia becomes reality when you visit Medellin. There, life is still hard and citizens still face massive challenges, but they have magically transformed the city and their own lives. Their slogan­—“Actitud”—says it all. It was agreed upon during the intensive consultative processes, that lead to the transformation of the city. It acts as a reminder to citizens on a daily basis that if your attitude is right and you act upon what is required, life will get better. The STPPs philosophy has always been that the starting point to mass scale change is to engage our stakeholders face-to-face. The best way to get people to work together and to take action is to have face-to-face discussions with them and to provide them with real solutions to overcome barriers and issues. As a small private sector organisation with a hands-on approach, but limited resources, we do not necessarily have the

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political support to help towns and cities in South Africa the way that the city of Medellin has tackled its problems. But the principles remain the same and we do believe that there will be a tipping point for many towns, where citizens will come together to take positive actions. We are seeing this already. Since our inception in 2012, we have travelled to all corners of South Africa, and we have engaged with many stakeholders through our workshops. We have had many individual and group discussions, where the citizens of towns—whether tourism business owners, community members or public sector staff—have shared their problems, barriers, challenges, needs, wishes and dreams. Every town is different and every town must have a different solution. However, the outcomes should be sustainable communities and sustainable cities, where everyone’s basic needs are met, so that they can serve the tourist with “Magical Realism”. The Cape Town Declaration captured this concept beautifully in saying that responsible tourism is a tourism ‘that creates better places for people to live in, and better places to visit’. But we need “Actitud”! In 2014, the STPP became the official sustainable tourism implementation partner of the N12 Treasure Route Association (N12 TRA). The N12TRA was established primarily as a marketing organisation, but it soon became clear that sustainable tourism development needed to underpin the marketing of the route. The STPP, together with the N12TRA, has therefore embarked on more workshops, which will now happen at regular intervals along the route. We invite as many different stakeholders as possible, and we like to include the business chambers, local tourism associations, local government and tourism stakeholders, special interest groups e.g. community development forums and conservation organisations as well as

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STAKEHOLDER COMMUNICATION

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businesses in the tourism value chain and the larger communities. In some towns (especially those that we have visited before 2014 when the N12TRA partnership was established), we have gone through a number of workshops and we have gone through a number of iterations in understanding the local context. Our workshops are interactive and while it is important for the STPP to convey key messages, it is even more important for us to understand local challenges and local strengths and to get to know the local people. Currently, our workshops broadly cover topics such the value of tourism, the value of tourism grading and service excellence, the minimum standard for responsible tourism (SANS 1162:2011), the STPP resource efficiency programme, the power of research, the value of collaboration with local communities and the value of

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sharing information. In some towns we will place more emphasis on tourism grading, or resource efficiency or local community business support. It all depends on the town and the local context. A few years, ago, we were still trying to explain the concept of sustainable tourism, so we have really moved forward a distance in getting to the point where we now have specific programmes and solutions in place for each town. And each time we visit, we help facilitate the next steps. But the key question is: How do we turn these repetitive and interactive discussions into reality and how do we create implementation programmes which are unique to each situation? The STPP Tourism DartboardTM shows that collaboration is needed amongst at least 18 government departments in order to make one tourism business function properly. All


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the departments have to work at the three key of government levels (local, regional and national) and needs to work together with private businesses The answer to the success and sustainability of tourism is collaboration. And as we have found through our years of experience, not only in the STPP, but in other industries, the key to collaboration, is to have those face-to-face interactions with the very people who will effect change. We also need champions. We usually find local champions who have been working tirelessly for years to gain everybody’s cooperation. This is not an easy task. The champions are the ones who help shape the local industry, and the less competitive and the more collaborative their approach, the more successes we all achieve. Through our workshops and interactions, we unearth beautiful stories and beautiful places which need to be developed so that local people can financially benefit from tourists coming to hear the stories and experience the places. National government, provincial government and local government need to understand that tourism is one of the keys to job creation. Before a town embarks

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on investing anything into tourism, they need to engage with all the people that live in the town. The business chamber or association, the local authorities and—more importantly— the local community. Small businesses create employment. They may not make a profit, but they do employ people. Employed people have pride. They share with their families. Those families share with other families. A hundred rand goes a long way. The same hundred rand can go around a town a few times. The local communities may not be rich, but as is the case with Medellin, they become real citizens whose basic needs have been met and who have a real future. If we collaborate, work on a single vision, commit to the journey and share successes, we can tackle issues and barriers one by one, and focus our attention more and more on the positives instead of fighting the negatives. Together we can build a sustainable tourism industry. Act Responsibly, Grow Sustainably is the STPPs motto! [1] http://colombiareports.com/medellin-not-violentenough-for-dangerous-city-ranking/

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PROFILE • On-site first aid • Managing the scene – for both staff and guests • Managing the media – limiting reputational damage with accurate reporting • Consulting with doctors • Communicating with all stakeholders • Activating and coordinating appropriate assistance e.g. Dispatching ambulance – ground or air • Arranging guarantees of payment wilderness education groupand in insurance southern Africa provides a privileged • Preparing and for rareHospitalization opportunity to learn from • Post-operative carenature that remains in the incredible raw • Africa. Managing potential litigation claims An opportunity to rewildorthe human spirit, a spirit that is nowadays dictated to Find someone whoincan do this all and byme brightly-lit screens a technological era. manage your business and I will arrange the necessary spandex with capewith andaundies on For many, spare time is filled whatsapp themessage, outside because willand be instagram. worthy of facebook,they twitter superhero Yet, do status! we ever look up and see who is With all how due the respect to isyour operations passing, weather changing, what andmood teams the isground theon world in on a and day? considering It seems we theare way we think act under stressful switched off toand our surroundings, drawn circumstance, into gadgets.I don’t believe many have the capacity to deal with thenature scenario (or would Enter: EcoTraining’s courses run in want to) whenareas in actual factThis they should be wilderness in Africa. wilderness is focusing onyet thesoremaining and leaving so quiet loud. Theguests gaps of boredom thisand up silence to a network of trained professionals. once filled by electronic beeps • The Typesreplaced of Incidents: are now by drum-beats for the • Emergency medical early wake-up alarm incidents followed by activities • Personal injuries/fatalities and learning all day in the bush. Watching • lions, Accidents (motor vehicle, quad-bikes, elephants, buffalo and studying their boating etc.) behaviour, bird-watching, identifying tracks, • trailing Assaultsleopard and Robberies or baboon. Pausing for • silences Natural disasters fire etc.)energy of filled with(Flood, the excitable the wilderness. Core services to that subscribe to: It is now you become aware of • the Telemedical languageconsultations of nature and with that, you • learn Incident management plan creation about the critical life skill - situational • awareness, Remote management rescue one’s and which begins of to prickle medicalWhere staff am I, what is around me, what senses. • does Medical thatevacuations sound come from? Situational • awareness Post traumatic risk assessments heightens senses, it connects you • to Media management the world you live in. • Legal liability management

So …Why do You need Incident Management Services? • Because people’s lives and wellbeing depend on the right decisions being made • Because it is better to professionalize your management of critical incidents. • Because dealing with emergencies situations is beyond your scope of work • Because your business and its reputation is at stake • Because you are seriously exposed to liability when critical incident EcoTraining’s courses occur are based in • Becausecamps the cost liabilityreserves can nowthat easily unfenced in of wildlife exceed R100 million have real ecological appeal, large wildlife • Because it’s not worthCourse takingparticipants the chance species and biodiversity. get to understand why certain insects, As you willand appreciate, it isinnot one ways specific mammals birds behave certain action that willThey mitigate risk but rather a at certain times. learn this because they combination that will reduce your exposure live amongst the wildlife on course. The at the end of the day. Therehave are running a network humble comfortable camps of specialists out there that hotexperts and coldand water; no electricity - paths andyou can team to better manage your dining areasuparewith lit with lanterns; there are riskfans, and no provide you with peace of mind. no air conditioning, and certainly Usetelevisions. them. no It is a 10 km drive to get SATIB24 is one critical mobile signalCrisis onceCall a week. Thesuch evenings incident servicecrawling with an end with management course participants insurance ONLY star-gazing available to SATIB into their component beds after some or clients. It forms integral our African after getting to an know each part otherofaround a presence and can be coupled with medical flickering campfire. emergency evacuation policies that can cover Nationalities attending the courses range guests, staff or as both. Critical from countries far and wideincidents as Jordan,impose the a threat ofBermuda, loss - something Bahamas, China, withbad the happening majority that may cost life,from limb, andAfrica, money, of students hailing South theloss UK, of reputation, or asset damage the USA andproperty Europe. Most students’ ages or business interruption. Management range from 18 to 34 and are lookingof forthese a situations our specialist team minimises career or aby meaningful educational gap year.the lossIt and maximises the we outcome. It is about seems like the more get connected taking the “luck factor” out of incidents and in our virtual worlds, the more disconnected doing the things stack the odds in your we become withthat ourselves, with people favour. Theourfield of litigationThe hasAfrican changed and with environment. somewhat with liability onerous wildlife nourishes yourbecoming soul andanslows threat the to allspeediness markets and for this reason down of your mind. Andwe offer additional support by taking the learn load off when you intimately engage with and your shoulders incidents about wildlife, by youmanaging become the aware of yourand controlling exposure. It isand your responsibility responsibility to care for help save its and this place onwill ourultimately planet. ensure the sustainability of your business.

DIGITAL DETOX IN AFRICA’S WILDERNESS

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THE INTERNATIONAL LABOUR ORGANISATION SCORE PROGRAMME

Monde Nyangintsimbi


STAR GRADING SYSTEMS

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he Tourism Grading Council of South Africa (TGCSA) is the only officially recognized organization that authorizes accommodation establishments to display Quality Stars when marketing their tourism establishments. Operating as one of the business units of South African Tourism (SAT), the TGCSA assures the standard of quality of accommodation and conference venues throughout South Africa through its stated vision: ‘To establish a recognizable and credible globally benchmarked system of quality assurance for accommodation and MESE (Meetings, Exhibitions and Special Events) experiences, which can be relied upon by visitors when making their choice of establishment’ This is achieved by literally “putting the stars where they belong”. The TGCSA provides a rigorous framework and process for the quality assurance that is continuously sought after by tourism products seeking to showcase their products in this vibrant industry which contributes to an increase in consumer confidence, thus ensuring the country’s international competiveness as a tourism destination of choice. The first star grading scheme was started in Great Britain in 1912 resulting from the increasing popularity of the motor car which resulted in people traveling on overnight visits in their own country. The initial purpose was to inform travelers of basic facilities that could be expected. Today, grading has broadened its focus to cover the guest experience as a whole and it is used in more than 70 countries. It is implemented by a variety of different public and private sector organizations or a combination of both. Star grading is a global symbol of quality assurance for tourists. Many a tourist make their choice of accommodation or conference facility based on the establishment’s star grading.

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Explanation of Star Grading Assessments in South Africa. 1 STAR  Acceptable quality in the overall standard of furnishings, service and guest care. Clean, comfortable and functional accommodation. 2 STARS  Good quality in the overall standard of furnishings, service and guest care. 3 STARS  Very good quality in the overall standard of furnishings, service and guest care. 4 STARS  Excellent comfort and quality. High standard of furnishings, service and guest care. 5 STARS  Outstanding quality, luxury accommodation (matching best international standards). Highest standard of furnishings, flawless service, meticulous guest care. According to the South African Tourism’ Domestic Indicators report, there were 5,7 million domestic trips taken in Q3 2015 (July – September 2015), which represents a 12% increase compared to the 5,1 million trips taken during the same period in 2014. Similarly, the incidence of travel increased during this period from 4.8% to 5.5%. The average spend per trip increased by approximately 7% from R950 in Q3 2014 to R1,010 in Q3 2015. Alongside the increase in average spend, the increase in total trips resulted in an increase in total spend to the tune of 20% from R4,9 billion in Q3 2014 to R5,8 billion in Q3 2015. During the same period, the TGCSA had just on 5 200 star graded establishments, the majority of which were beneficiaries of this increase in domestic travel.


SOUTH AFRICA’S SHINING STARS Ever wondered what the star insignia behind the counter of your favourite hotel, B&B or self-catering chalet actually means? Well, those stars are probably the reason why it’s your favourite. As the TGCSA, the Tourism Grading Council of South Africa, we have checked in and checked out over a thousand hotels, guest houses and B&Bs to ensure that when you book a room at a star-graded institution you get exactly what you expect. So, when you pay for all the bells and whistles you can rest assured that’s exactly what you’ll get.

We are the only officially recognised organisation that authorises accommodation establishments to display Quality Stars. Whether you want to get your establishment graded, you want to find a top-class graded establishment or you want to learn a bit more about the TGCSA visit tourismgrading.co.za today.


STAR GRADING SYSTEMS

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The future of Star Grading Systems Integration of online traveler reviews into classification systems There is nothing quite as powerful as knowing how to make the most—the absolute most—of the social media and global travel lifestyle and review websites to grow your tourism business. As tourist arrivals to South Africa show significant growth, it makes an enormous amount of sense for tourism businesses to arm themselves with the information that will enable them to grow along with arrivals to this destination. According to the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), guest reviews and hotel classification systems serve important and complementary purposes; whereas hotel classifications concentrate on objective, amenity-based elements, guest review systems lend more focus to the perception of service-related elements. This integration of guest reviews into hotel classification can yield financial gains while meeting customer needs and expectations. A report jointly prepared by UNWTO and Norwegian Accreditation, an agency of the Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries of Norway, through its QualityMark Norway programme, looks into how hotel classifications and online guest reviews can be incorporated to reduce the gap between guests’ expectations and experiences. The report shows that a refined and integrated model, whether through full integration or in parallel, is expected to have positive financial impacts as consumer confidence in hotel classification increases purchase intention. The emergence of user-generated content reviews has revolutionized the travel decision-making process as travellers are increasingly dependent on online guest

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reviews to make their purchase decisions. As online travel-related searches are on the rise, hotel classifications and guest reviews have complementary roles in the search process. Data shows that before making an online hotel reservation, consumers visit on average14 different travel-related sites with about three visits per site, and carry out nine travel-related searches on search engines. Official hotel classifications are often used by consumers as a filter while guest reviews are key in taking a final decision. In view of these trends, the South African star grading system has recently implemented a pilot project called Tourism Analytics Programme ( TAP). This programme takes the classification process to the digital/social sphere, and entails integration of content from some key online travel review website such as TripAdvisor, Bookings.com and Trivago into the TGCSA’s grading system. This innovative development presents major opportunities for the hospitality industry. The insights from the TAP programme enables the TGCSA assessors to offer holistic assessments of accommodation and conferencing establishments. In turn, establishments have access to insights that enable them to understand service or quality shortcomings within their own establishments. The integration of the reviews into the classification system also provides an opportunity for a credible and transparent adjudication of the national recognition awards programme, the Lilizela Tourism Awards. Establishments that offer outstanding service and quality offering, are recognized and rewarded through the Awards and receive extensive profiling through South African Tourism.


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Responsible Tourism and Star Grading According to the Australian Tourism insights on Sustainable Tourism, by making sustainability a focus and promoting their sustainability credentials, tourism businesses can increase bookings from ‘greensavvy’ tourist. These tourists increasingly make purchasing decisions based on opportunities to minimize their own social and environmental footprints. Tourism businesses can respond by undertaking initiatives such as waste minimization and recycling, as well as water and energy saving, which in turn help reduce operating costs. These businesses typically attract and retain valuable staff by adopting policies that meet with employee values and concerns. Furthermore, they can develop a competitive advantage by establishing and promoting sustainable business practices as a differentiator. Establishments that implement sustainable initiatives increase long-term profitability by putting plans in place now that will create savings in the future such as minimising transport costs that will continue to rise as fuel becomes more expensive. In developing the revised grading criteria and minimum requirements back in 2010, the TGCSA recognized the significant impact responsible environmental and business practices would have on graded establishments. Consumer research conducted by the South African Tourism Research department, indicated that most travelers from source markets (UK, India, US, China, Germany and Netherlands) were likely to book into an establishment with responsible environmental and business practices. In implementing the criteria and minimum requirements, establishments that have responsible tourism initiatives are recognized through the allocation of additional points in their star grading

STAR GRADING SYSTEMS

assessment. This therefore means, if two similar establishments with similar furniture, fittings and amenities were to apply for a particular star grading level, the one with responsible environmental and business practices would get additional points on their grading assessment score thus potentially placing them in a higher star grading level. The TGCSA has commenced its triennial review of the grading criteria and minimum requirements. It is expected that responsible environmental and business practices will be a major discussion point during the consultation process and possibly affect the outcome of the criteria review. This can only bode well for the industry and travelers alike. List of references • http://cf.cdn.unwto.org/sites/all/files/ pdf/online_guest_reviews_and_hotel_classification_sytems_an_integrated_approach.pdf • http://www.tourism.australia.com/ industry-advice/sustainable-tourism. aspx • The South African Grading Assessor Association, TGCSA Annual Assessor Conference, 2015

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DID YOU KNOW?

Rob Trautmann and Niki Glen


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y [Niki Glen] impression of Rob is that he is one of the humblest people I have ever met. As evidenced by his personal profile he is passionate and involved and never lets a moment go by to roll up his sleeves and work hard at what he believes in. When you get to know him a bit better, you discover that he not only has a vast knowledge of tourism in South Africa, but he loves to share this knowledge. He has over the years collected interesting facts and trivia, which he shares at events and meetings when he is addressing and inspiring audiences. This has become a signature of Rob, and when he is a speaker, people expect to hear one of his “Did you knows”. I have included a few below, but if you do not give him a time limit, he will continue with these ad infinitum.

Did you know …?

It makes you wonder, hey? Now you know why I am passionate about the N12 Treasure Route. (Rob Trautmann, 2015) In 2000, Rob identified a need to promote Potchefstroom as a city site on the internet in order to try and increase the volume of tourists that travel down the route. He therefore established the Potchefstroom website (www.potchefstroom.co.za), which is focused on promoting most of the Potchefstroom hospitality industry to the world. It also has a section that promotes all other product owners, from manufacturing to services to the arts. This website soon became the business directory of Potchefstroom, and is still one of the most active online sites that promotes Potchefstroom.

• The N12 route is 1350km long; • The N12 route shares more than 30 cities and towns in this 1350km ; • The N12 route runs from coal to gold to diamonds to uranium to caves and ostriches and nearly into the sea; • The N12 route links city-to-city; • The N12 route is very close to the Vredefort Dome World Heritage Site; • The N12 route passes the Kimberley Big Hole; • The N12 route is toll-free; • The N12 route is malaria free route; • The N12 route is in a good condition; • The N12 route has lovely stop over places along the route; • The N12 route is only 60km from the Taung Skull and 45 km from the Cradle of Humankind; • In the 400 km N12 stretch between Kimberley and Three Sisters, there are more than 400 windmills visible from the road; • If one tourist travels the N12 route per day, we will generate R3 000 in direct income per day; • If a thousand tourists travel the N12 route per day, we will generate R3 million in direct income per day; • If a thousand tourists a day travel the N12 route for a year, we will generate more than a Billion Rand direct income per year; • Do you know how many jobs we can create in our rural areas?

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From 2001, as funds became available, the same concept was used to develop city or town websites for the North West Province all along the N12 national road. These include Carletonville, Ventersdorp, Klerksdorp, Orkney, Stilfontein, Hartebeesfontein, Wolmaransstad, Bloemhof and Christiana. It became evident that there was a need to further develop these sites under the N12 Treasure Route North West banner, as the N12 Treasure Route become a known brand. As time passed, the reference to “North West” disappeared, and the soon the N12 Treasure Route website was on its way to promote tourism and business along the entire N12 route. In 2010, after the Vredefort Dome was listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a website to promote the Vredefort Dome as a tourist destination was established. Now, more and more such sites are coming online: where members of the local communities who are meant to benefit from the tourism treasures along the route are given opportunities to gain market access. The websites not only promote the towns, cities and sites as tourism destinations, but they act as business directories where members of the communities along the route can list their business and contact details for free. This is done to support the larger community to advertise their own businesses on the internet, therefore providing desperately needed market access. Now tourists can find information about tourism products, and consumers and businesses can find information on suppliers and services. BUT, as we have learnt previously, “tourism is everybody’s business”[1], so the websites create platforms where sectorial boundaries crumble and where the consumer becomes the tourist, the tourist becomes the business supplier and the business supplier becomes the consumer. All events on the city or town

N12 ROUTE

calendars are placed free of charge, and the placing of news on the websites has become a draw card for newspapers. In addition, Facebook and Twitter for towns, cities and sites are up and running. The N12 Treasure Route website (www.n12treasureroute.com) covers all cities and towns from the start of the N12 at eMalahleni past Delmas, through Johannesburg, through to Potchefstroom, south east to Kimberley, past Victoria West to join the N1 Route at Three Sisters, where just after Beaufort West, it splits to carry past Dysseldorp onto Oudtshoorn and finally to the end of the route in George. This is primarily a tourist site to promote the hospitality industry along the route, but also has places of interest and emergency service details. A recent addition to the suite of online platforms is an Android App, available from Google store and on www. n12treasureroute.mobi. The app helps tourists find places to stay, play and eat as well as the cleanest ablutions available for the tired traveller. There is a lot more to tell about the work that Rob has done, and the impacts he has made the tourism industry of South Africa, along the N12 route, in the North West Province and in Potchefstroom. But what needs to be said is that Rob is a role model for South Africans and for tourism industry players. Rob does not have to do all these things, he wants to. We need more people like Rob who are willing to work tirelessly at contributing to economic growth and poverty alleviation using tourism as the vehicle. There is no longer time to sit around and wonder what is going to happen of we don’t solve problems, and Rob has realised this a long time ago. [1] Refer to Volumes 1 – 3 of the Responsible and Sustainable Tourism Handbooks Volumes 1-3, available on www.alive2green.com

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PROFILE

MANAGING INCIDENTS – ARE MONATE WEDDINGS, YOU ACTING RESPONSIBLY? CONFERENCE & SPA

BY ANDRÉ DU TOIT

M

How you manage incidents is critical for those onate Game Lodge is a haven of involved and indeed sustainability of your peace andthe tranquility just waiting business. However, statisticsLocated gathered to be discovered. anduring easy 2 over 5000 cases that the capacity hour drive fromshow O.R. Tambo Airport, close of to tourism businesses to deal with critical Nylstroom/Modimolle, makes it theincidents perfect andvenue accompanying exposures has or proven to be for a weekend escape corporate a gap of its own. breakaway. Most rely on staff and assistance companies to manage incidents andof evacuations. Whilst Relax their in luxury in one our 26 modern, these are often carried out equipped with acceptable open-plan en-suite rooms with all outcomes, the potential exposures amenities to minefield make yourof stay as comfortable and thatenjoyable have been escaped enair-conditioned route is terrifying. as possible. Each unit There’s a lot more toDSTV, it andaright now,electronic whether is equipped with mini-bar, youdigital have realized it or notand - you are exposed!The safe, hairdryer coffee-station. It is important to decorated understand that we rooms are tastefully in simplistic cannot when and where an incident tonespredict with décor elements to remind you of willthe happen, who betothere to dealoutside, with it bushveld thatwill waits be explored andwhile whatthe thesuperior outcomequality will be. Every linen andincident towels, is different in its type of injury, tempts you tonature, linger a location, little longer. number people, available resources etc.,has so ita Forofthe business traveller each room is important manage accordingoutlets to principles desk fittedto with multi-functional to keep andyou notconnected. predetermined protocols. Don’tand usea The lodge also offers Wi-Fi checklists, resources. Don’t decide on your wirelessuse telephone system in every room. emergency response planand ahead of time; decide Ideal for executives honeymooners are what you need to do when you understand Shingwedzi Lodge and Skukuza Lodge –what two is happening. Treat each risk with as unique. It’s okay superior units—decorated a sophisticated to be abstract andChinese vague before an incident and blend of both and Colonial antiques, SPECIFIC duringprivate one. splash pools on the deck. and offering How weinthink is the crux ofwhere everything. Indulge an environment pampering We all guilty of hindsight and are attention to detail is absolute.bias as it reassuresNous excursion of our actions. Even if something is complete without a does go wrongmeal. we tend to believe it could’ve memorable At Monate Game Lodge been if we hadn’t done XYZ. Asto a result we theworse dining experience is designed tantalize seldom go back analyze incidents, we just your taste budsand – specializing from venison to forge ahead and lose–out on ainprecious vegetarian dishes served differentlearning settings opportunity. such as our unique, natural cave, in the bush Itorisaround a fact that arecamp pronefire. to For positive bias the staff lodge a special because of their role offer within the staff-guide-guest occasion we also a picnic basket, to enjoy relationship andsetting as a result tend to chooseview. the in a romantic with an unsurpassed more positive option when given two.

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Anchoring once a decision has been2000 made it The private (i.e. game reserve is set in almost is very difficult to open change course) makesofthis hectares of bush, plains andjust a variety worse, regardless information interesting koppies.ofItthe is home to lion, received. buffalo, If furthercrocodile, symptoms made apparent hippo, zebra, andthemselves giraffe as well as a they may beof ignored because decisionwith to see large variety antelope. Birdlifethe is prolific, the incident through already Monate Game Lodgehad being only been 10 kmmade. from two characteristics common theAnother Nylsvlei Reserve (a RAMSAR site), which is to individuals in tourism are: Africa’s bird species. home to 46% of Southern • Premature closureis–also jumping conclusions. Monate Game Lodge proudlytorecognized ActionFriendly orientation – tending toby takeBirdlife practical a• Birder Establishment action instead of waiting for someone else South Africa. to dooff oryour provide instruction. Sometimes Start day with a breathtaking sunrise,this can be the dangerous the skills or admire golden as sunset, fromand theexpertise back incident management not be present. ouringame viewing vehicles. may Our professional rangers aim in making your experience an Hospitality staff a very action unforgettable andhave enjoyable one,powerful by providing orientation information and are some of the worst educational on both fauna and at premature Both canfrom haveone detrimental flora. Enjoy aclosure. drink and snack of our effects in the coursepoints, of incident management. spectacular vantage and simply soak in the honest and theyou fact is theThese beautyare of nature, as ourtruths rangers show that… as much of our breathtaking gem as possible. • It is a rare person who is genuinely calm whilst responding to a threatening incident • It is a rare person who consistently makes good decisions under those circumstance • Nobody is naturally equipped to function in a multitask, multivariable rapidly changing stressful environment and those that choose to, are even rarer. • Everybody has limits. Exceed those and performance drops. Physiological and mathematical fact. DON’T EXPECT your PEOPLE to manage incidents – EVER – they need HELP from EXPERTS. This is what is required in order to manage an incident and ensure the best outcome. • Gather information about the incident – get accurate data/ask the right questions


PROFILE • On-site first aid • Managing the scene – for both staff and guests • Managing the media – limiting reputational damage with accurate reporting • Consulting with doctors • The Communicating Monate Bushwith Spa all is astakeholders new addition to • the Activating appropriate offerings,and withcoordinating a variety of spa treatments assistance e.g. Dispatching – being offered. Enjoy a full rangeambulance of treatments ground or air of your visit, or enjoy a relaxing as the highlight • massage Arranging guarantees payment and during your leisureoftime at the lodge. insurance option you choose, you’re sure to Whichever • leave Preparing Hospitalization feelingfor relaxed and rejuvenated. • Post-operative Extra activitiescare include guided bush walks • and Managing potential litigation orsomething claims clay pigeon shooting, or opt for less active and lounge around one of the two Find me someone who can thisalso all soak and sparkling swimming pools. Youdo could manage yourstress business I will the away your in theand Jacuzzi, or arrange enjoy a drink necessary spandex withis cape and on at the bar. The lounge a haven ofundies peace and thequiet outside they willwith be aworthy of if youbecause want to hide away book, and superhero status! the bar area is a buzz of activity on a weekend Withthe allsport due on respect yourtelevision. operations with the bigto screen and teams onGame the ground and aconsidering Monate Lodge offers state of the theartway we think and–act under stressful conference centre situated close to the circumstance, I don’t believe many have the lodge, for the discerning delegate to enjoy capacity to deal of with scenario (or would the tranquility thethe bush whilst conducting want to) when actual factatmosphere. they shouldThe be business in ainproductive focusing on the remaining guests and leaving this up to a network of trained professionals. • The Types of Incidents: • Emergency medical incidents • Personal injuries/fatalities • Accidents (motor vehicle, quad-bikes, boating etc.) • Assaults and Robberies • Natural disasters (Flood, fire etc.) Core services to subscribe to: • Telemedical consultations • Incident management plan creation • Remote management of rescue and medical staff • Medical evacuations • Post traumatic risk assessments • Media management • Legal liability management

So …Why do You need Incident Management Services? • Because people’s lives and wellbeing depend on the right decisions being made • Because it is better to professionalize your management of critical incidents. • Because dealing with emergencies situations is beyond your scope of work centre can accommodate all seating styles to Because of your and itsbreakaway reputation is a• maximum 120business delegates, with at available. stake The conference centre includes areas • Because you are seriously exposed to liability fixed data projectors and screens, a plug-andcriticalair-conditioning incident occurand WiFi. This playwhen AV-system, • Because the costand of setting liabilityiscan easily malaria free location also now ideal for exceed R100 million teambuilding, which can be customized to suit • Because it’s not worth taking the chance individual needs. Weekend weddings with exclusive use As you premises will appreciate, is not one specific of the are alsoit popular. Natural action thatunder will amitigate risk Fig but rather ceremonies Marula or Rock Tree, and a combination that willarereduce your exposure Bush Boma Receptions favourite choices for at the end“Iof memorable do’the s”. day. There are a network of experts and Monate specialists out there Come visit Game Lodgethat andyou can team up to better manage your experience ourwith superb customer service, risk andhospitality provide and youtrue with peaceoffering. of mind. heartfelt bushveld Use them. Crisis Call is one such critical For SATIB24 more information and reservations contact: incident management Telephone: +27 14 718 7000 service with an insurance component ONLY available to SATIB E-mail: info@monatelodge.com clients. forms an integral part of our African Website:Itwww.monatelodge.com presence and can be coupled with medical emergency evacuation policies that can cover guests, staff or both. Critical incidents impose a threat of loss - something bad happening that may cost life, limb, and money, loss of reputation, property or asset damage or business interruption. Management of these situations by our specialist team minimises the loss and maximises the outcome. It is about taking the “luck factor” out of incidents and doing the things that stack the odds in your favour. The field of litigation has changed somewhat with liability becoming an onerous threat to all markets and for this reason we offer additional support by taking the load off your shoulders by managing the incidents and controlling exposure. It is your responsibility and this will ultimately ensure the sustainability of your business. THE TOURISM HANDBOOK

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TRANSFRONTIER CONSERVATION COLLABORATION

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N3 GATEWAY – VIEWS ON SUSTAINABLE TOURISM

Matthew Drew


N3 GATEWAY’S REVISED STRATEGY

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hen looking at sustainability, the N3 Gateway’s Revised Strategy 2016 -2018 focusses on the three pillars of environment, society and economy and it is in this light that that the association’s catalytic projects have been developed. These projects have also been developed in order to address key priorities such as transformation and enterprise development.

The N3 Gateway Research Report (November 2013) found that of the approximately 1500 businesses along the route, over 60 percent fell into the accommodation category and that none of the other business categories made up more than 10 percent of the balance. This highlights the challenge that the route and tourism in general faces. In order for tourism to become truly sustainable there must be broader beneficiation than is currently the case. What also needs to be recognised is that the rate of transformation needs to be sped up. Looking at the categories of businesses along the N3 corridor, it is noticeable ownership of assets such as land and buildings provide an easier entrance into the sector. However for those that don’t own assets, the fact that there is such an imbalance in the tourism product supply chain, coupled with a demand for more things to do, means that there are gaps and

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opportunities in categories where the barriers to entry are lower, for example in the activity and tour operations categories. Adventure tourism is one of the fastest growing segments globally. The South African adventure tourism industry is still very informal and there is little research available. However, in the South Africa Adventure Industry Survey, 2014 by Dirty Boots, a number of interesting figures are mentioned. These include the fact that 11 million people partook in South African adventures and roughly R4.6 billion was generated by the industry in 2014. As the report states, ‘’this is a substantial portion of the travel industry international inbound and domestic travellers.’ In terms of emerging markets within the adventure tourism industry, mountain biking that presents a good opportunity for the development of sustainable tourism. Sustainable Tourism has particular relevance in rural areas which have retained their cultural and environmental heritage value as this provides the essence of an authentic tourism experience.

The N3 Gateway believes that in order to unlock the tourism potential of many of these areas, sectors such as adventure tourism, food tourism and cultural tourism need to be considered and appropriate plans developed. There are a growing number of examples along the N3 corridor of where such tourism has developed


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and is flourishing. These include routes such as the Liberation Heritage Route, Battlefields Route and destinations or venues such as the Karkloof Mountain Biking Trails which are located in the heart of the Midlands Meander, KwaZulu-Natal. These trails are becoming an increasingly interesting case as they have resulted through partnerships between local communities, Karkloof Mountain Biking, Sappi Limited and other private landowners in the region. Karkloof Mountain Biking hosts events as well as recreational riders on the trails and in their Economic Impact Assessment of the 2015 Karkloof MTB Festival, Tourism KwaZulu-Natal estimated that the direct economic impact of the event was R7.8 million. In addition, the trails attract an average of 400 recreational or social riders per month and TKZN will be carrying out an Economic Impact Assessment of this element of mountain biking in the area. The TKZN study will also hopefully link into the proposed job creation and enterprise development plans for the trails. The N3 Gateway in partnership with Sappi has developed a project titled The Adventure Tourism Incubator which has the potential to create a number of temporary jobs with the main outcome being a team of qualified trail builders, bike guides, mechanics and tour operators. The utmost consideration will be given to environmental legislation and the beautiful natural areas through which the trails pass.

N3 GATEWAY’S REVISED STRATEGY

Another of the N3 Gateway’s planned sustainable tourism initiatives is the Merchandising Project. The motivation for this project came from the huge success of tourism mascots worldwide but a specific case study was conducted on a character called Kumamon. This little black bear was used to create awareness of the tourism offerings in the Kumamoto region of Japan. The N3 Gateway has developed our very own mascot called Namu. He is a meerkat that loves to travel and enjoy all kinds of adventures such as birding, hiking, mountain biking and off-roading. Although Namu forms an integral part of the N3 Gateway’s Revised Strategy, the Merchandising Project entails the manufacturing of Namu merchandise using local craft co-ops and small black owned businesses. The benefits to these co-ops and small businesses would be skills development, business training and mentorship, as well as an opportunity to become involved in the tourism sector and our route. The Adventure Tourism Incubator and Merchandising Project are just two examples of how the N3 Gateway is trying to address sustainable tourism and key issues such as transformation, enterprise development and the conservation of our natural and cultural heritage. If these pilot projects are a success, they will hopefully create avenues for further SMME development and a more inclusive sector. As always the key to successful development is identifying gaps in the product supply chain and ensuring the there is adequate demand. All too often in South Africa and in particular the eco, cultural and adventure tourism segments the demand factors are not adequately addressed, resulting in wasted resources and perhaps even more damaging, disgruntled communities who were to be amongst the intended beneficiaries.

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Attention should be given to making the current tourism asset base and stakeholders more sustainable but going forward it will be important to gain a clearer understanding of our asset base and how this can be leveraged and shaped to provide a broader set of sustainable benefits. If we carry on doing business as usual, the challenges of job creation, transformation, enterprise development will remain insurmountable but if we become more knowledgeable through greater research and if we collaborate and build the right partnerships, South Africa has immense potential and could become a leader in sustainable tourism.

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The Kimberley Club Boutique Hotel The Kimberley Club offers 21 en-suite bedrooms tastefully decorated to recreate the ambience of a bygone era. Facilities include all the mod cons one would expect of a four-star boutique hotel. The Club boasts a members’ bar, a lounge and dominoes room, an à la carte restaurant, a ladies’ bar, three dining facilities, a reading room and a billiards room. It is the ideal venue for functions, weddings and conferences.

Tel: 053 832 4224 | Fax: 053 832 4226 | 72 Du Toitspan Road, Kimberley info@kimberleyclub.co.za | www.kimberleyclub.co.za


PROFILE

MANAGING DESERT & INCIDENTS – ARE YOU ACTING RESPONSIBLY? DELTA SAFARIS

BY ANDRÉ DU TOIT

How you manage incidents is critical for those involved and indeed the sustainability of your business. However, statistics gathered during over 5000 cases show that the capacity of tourism businesses to deal with critical incidents and accompanying exposures has proven to be a gap of its own. Most rely on staff and assistance companies to manage their incidents and evacuations. Whilst these are often carried acceptable ith over 30 out yearswith experience in outcomes, the minefield authentic of potential Botswana exposures providing that have been escaped en &route is terrifying. safaris, Desert Delta Safaris is There’s a lot more to itprotection and right now, whether committed to the of Botswana’s younatural have realized it or not - you are exposed! heritage and securing the long term It is important totourism understand that we sustainability of the industry for our cannot when and where an incident local predict communities. will happen, who&will beSafaris thereportfolio to deal with it The Desert Delta brings andtogether what thesome outcome will be. Every of Botswana’s mostincident historic is different in itslodges, nature,located location,predominantly type of injury, and iconic number of people, available resources etc., so it within renowned game reserves and is important to manage according to principles national parks. and not predetermined protocols. Don’t use checklists, use resources. Don’t onofyour Camp Moremi: Situated on decide the edge the emergency ahead time; decide Xakanaxaresponse Lagoonplan in an areaofknown for its what you need togame-viewing, do when you understand what spectacular Camp Moremi is happening. Treat African each risksafari as unique. It’s okay offers a classic experience in to be abstract and vague before an incident and Botswana’s worldrenowned Moremi Game SPECIFIC during one. Reserve. How we think is the crux of everything. We areXakanaxa: all guilty ofWith hindsight as it reCamp a primebias location on assures us of ofour Eveninif the something the banks theactions. Khwai River heart of does wrongGame we tend to believe could’ve thego Moremi Reserve, CampitXakanaxa been donecamps XYZ. Asthat a result we is worse one ofif we thehadn’t few safari offers seldom goan back and analyze incidents, we just guests authentic, year-round Okavango forge ahead lose out safari on a precious learning Delta landand and water experience. opportunity. ItCamp is a fact that staff are prone toexclusive positive bias Okavango: A unique, and because of their roleAfrican within safari the staff-guide-guest eco-conscious camp situated relationship and asNxaragha a result tend to This choose the on the remote Island. hidden more positive option when given two.

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Anchoring once a decision been made it treasure, in(i.e.the heart of thehas permanent is very difficult to change just makes Okavango Delta, assurescourse) its guests of anthis worse, regardless of the information received. If unparalleled year-round water wilderness further symptoms made themselves apparent experience. they may be ignored because the decision to see the incident through had already made. Xugana Island Lodge: With anbeen expansive Another two characteristics common to deck and al fresco dining area overlooking individuals in tourism are: the vast Xugana Lagoon, Xugana Island Lodge • Premature closureof– jumping to conclusions. takes full advantage its permanent water • Action tending to take practical location inorientation the heart of–the Okavango Delta. action instead of waiting for someone else to doSafari or provide instruction. Sometimes Savute Lodge: Made famous by thethis can be dangerous theSavute skills and expertise unpredictable flow ofasthe Channel. in incident management may not viewing be present. Savute enjoys some of the best game in Botswana with Savute Safari Lodge ideally Hospitality staff have a very powerful located on the edge of the famed Channel.action orientation and are some of the worst at premature closure. BothHaving can have detrimental Chobe Game Lodge: received the effects in the coursecertification of incidentinmanagement. highest eco-grading Botswana, These are the honest truths and Chobe Game Lodge is leading the the wayfact in is that… sustainable tourism initiatives. The lodge’s • It isenvironmental a rare person project who is has genuinely calm latest seen the whilst of responding to game a threatening incident inclusion both electric drive vehicles • Itboats is a rare person whofleet. consistently makes and to their activities good decisions under those circumstance • Nobody is naturally equipped to function in Leroo La Tau: Overlooking the Makgadikgadi multitask, rapidly Pansa National Parkmultivariable from the opposite bankchanging of the stressful environment and those that choose Boteti River, Leroo La Tau enjoys diverse wildlife to, areas even sightings wellrarer. as the chance to witness the • Everybody has migration limits. Exceed second largest zebra in Africa.those and performance drops. Physiological and mathematical fact. each property offers Owing to their location, a unique safari experience while at the same DON’T EXPECTtheyour PEOPLE service to manage time providing personalised for incidents – EVER – they HELP from which Desert & Delta Safarisneed is renowned. EXPERTS. When booked in combination, our lodges This is what required in order to manage offer guests theisopportunity to experience an incident ensure the best outcome. the immenseand diversity of Botswana’ s expansive • Gather information about the incident – get natural wilderness. accurate data/ask the right questions


THE AIR TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY’S RESPONSE TOWARDS MITIGATING CLIMATE CHANGE: THE CASE OF IATA

Prof. Kevin Mearns


MITIGATING CLIOMATE CHANGE

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INTRODUCTION Climate change is becoming a central concern which is influencing many aspects of our lives on a daily basis. In an attempt to address this global phenomenon all spheres of life have to make a concerted effort to mitigate and reduce our contribution to this potentially catastrophic occurrence. The tourism industry is no exception. Tourism has the potential to make huge contributions to reducing its contribution towards CO2 and Green House Gas (GHG) emissions, especially the airline industry. This article investigates some of the airline industry’s responses towards climate change mitigation. These initiatives are planned and implemented by the International Airline Transportation Association. Tourism is a major global phenomenon which is highly sensitive to climate change but is at the same time a major contributor to climate change which could have significant impacts on natural and manmade attractions worldwide (UNWTO & UNEP, 2008). Tourism has become a natural part of life for millions of people harbouring the expectations of becoming tourists at least once a year for their annual vacation if not more frequently. It is difficult today to imagine a world without tourism. In order to truly understand the phenomenon of tourism it has to be defined in order to appreciate what it actually means. Tourism is largely based upon the offerings provided by destinations and the natural environment and can be based on business or leisure needs. If tourism it is not managed carefully and sustainably, it is in danger of becoming a self-destructive process destroying the very resources on which it is based. In the same way as tourism is directly responsible for contributing to climate change, the tourism industry will be negatively affected by changing climatic conditions. The tourism industry therefor has a responsibility to

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make a concerted effort to reduce its impact on climate change in order to reduce the negative repercussions of climate change. Worldwide, tourism is estimated to be directly responsible for 5% of energy related CO2 emissions (UNWTO & UNEP, 2008). Although this may appear to be relatively small, when compared to other industries its relative size is substantially greater. Strasdas (2013, p.212) shows that tourism’s CO2 emissions are greater than that of the chemical industry. Within the tourism industry the CO2 and Green House Gas (GHG) emissions are unevenly distributed. Seventy-five percent of emissions from tourism is attributed to transportation, of which air transportation accounts for 40%, automobile transportation 32% and other transportation source are responsible for 3% of emissions. Accommodation establishments are responsible for 21% of emissions while tourist activities contribute 4% (UNWTO & UNEP, 2008).

TOURISM AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Tourism has grown rapidly over the last 100 years to become one of the largest global economic sectors and a significant contributor to national and local economies. It is estimated that the tourism industry employs more than 130 million people worldwide and makes capital investments in excess of US$400 billion annually (UNWTO, 2015). According to the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) (2015) the number of international tourist arrivals shows a substantial growth from 25.3 million arrivals in 1950 to 1.138 million in 2014. The UNWTO (2014) estimates that worldwide, international tourist receipts have grown from US$2.1 billion in 1950 to US$1 159 billion in 2013 and more than US$ 3.1 billion is earned every day through international


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MITIGATING CLIOMATE CHANGE

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tourism. This shows the incredible rate of tourism growth. The UNWTO Tourism 2020 Vision (UNWTO, 1998) forecasts that international arrivals are expected to reach 1.6 billion by the year 2020. Of these, 1.2 billion will be interregional and 378 million will be long-haul travellers. It is also predicted that tourist arrivals will grow by an average of 4.1% a year until 2020, while receipts from international tourism will increase by around 6-7% annually. These predictions have been surpassed year after year despite economic downturns and international terror attacks (UNWTO, 2014; 2014). The UNWTO (1998) indicates that tourists will become increasingly environmentally conscious and will base their selection of destinations on the destinations environmental quality. These changes in the market forces, as well as the move towards more environmentally sensitive and sustainable forms of tourism, have led to significant changes in tourism. Between 1995 and 2007, it is estimated that international tourism in emerging and developing markets grew at twice the rate of industrialized countries (UNWTO, 2007). Developing countries have to consider as extremely important the tourism development-climate change nexus as these countries are potentially highly vulnerable to climate change and highly economically dependent on tourism (Scott, Gรถssling & Hall, 2012b). The argument may be made that for the tourism industry to significantly reduce its contribution to climate change all long haul flights should be stopped in order to limit the impact on climate on the one hand. On the other hand; many poor countries across the world are heavily dependent on these long haul travellers to create jobs and reduce poverty (Scheyvens, 2007; Peeters & Eijgelaar, 2014). According to Scott, Hall and Gรถssling (2012a) there is very limited knowledge of the capacity of current tourism operators and

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MITIGATING CLIOMATE CHANGE

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communities to adapt to the possible changes associated with climate change. Scott et al. (2012a) state that there is a low confidence in the current understanding of the how climate change would actually impact on tourism. Some of these impacts may result from changes in climatic conditions, changes in vegetation composition and the associated shifts in ecosystems, the disappearance of some attractions such as winter sports attractions and glaciers, while other areas may experience a lengthening of tourism seasons. According to Scott et al., (2012a, p. 221) there is also a new kind of tourism that

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has resulted from envisaged climate-induced environmental changes namely ‘last chance tourism’. This is where tourists want to visit a destination before it is ‘lost’ as a result of climate change. This indirectly results in additional GHG emissions that may lead to additional climate change leading to the quicker ‘disappearance’ of these destinations. The most common examples of ‘last chance tourism’ include low-lying islands such as the Maldives islands, visiting glaciers and seeing polar bears in the wild. The next section discusses some of the initiatives that have been introduced by the


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airline- industry to lower its carbon footprint and reduce CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions (GHG).

THE INTERNATIONAL AIRLINE INDUSTRY’S RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE

Even though the Airline industry is estimated to contribute between 2 and 5 % to global carbon and other GHG emissions, it’s an industry making big strides to improve its environmental performance. The airline industry, through the International Air Transport Association (IATA), has launched three ambitious initiatives to address the airline industry’s impact on climate change (Peeters & Eijgelaar, 2014). The International Air Transport Association (IATA) is the global trade association for the airline industry. IATA has 250 member airlines comprising 84% of total air traffic in the world. These 3 programmes are the IATA Environmental Assessment (IEnvA) programme; Biofuels and alternative fuels programme and the Carbon offset programme.

The IEnvA Programme.

The IATA Environmental Assessment (IEnvA) Programme is an environmental management and evaluation system designed to assess and improve the environmental performance of airlines. The IEnvA is a stringent environment assessment programme based on recognised international environmental management system such as ISO 14001. IEnvA seeks to introduce sustainability standards that cover all operations of an airline including air quality and emissions, noise, fuel consumption and efficient operations, recycling, energy efficiency, sustainable procurement and biofuels amongst others. This programme also offers access to industry best practices, simplified

MITIGATING CLIOMATE CHANGE

environmental reporting, automated audit software, access to airport environmental database, peer-reviewed mitigation tools and expert support (IATA, 2016c). The programme recognizes that airlines have varying environmental management capacities and experience for the adoption of environmental considerations thus the programme has 2 stages of recognition. Stage 1 is for planning and compliance and Stage 2 recognizes implementation and review of the programme. South African Airways (SAA) along with Finnair became the first two airlines to achieve Stage 2 status on the IATA Environmental Assessment Programme (Wood, 2015).

Biofuels and alternative fuels programme

The Biofuels and alternative fuel programme of IATA aims to significantly reduce the carbon footprint over the next few decades and to develop a long-term, sustainable alternative for petroleum-based jet fuels. As part of this programme IATA member airlines have committed to a 1.5% per annum improvement in fuel efficiency on average between 2009 and 2020, to have carbon neutral growth from 2020 and a 50% net emissions reduction in 2050 using 2005 as a baseline. In order to achieve these ambitious targets, the airline industry has to seek cooperation with the entire supply chain of aviation industry partners to develop and improve aircraft technology, operations and infrastructure as well as agricultural and government sectors to make significant investments in the development of sustainable biofuel feedstock and processing facilities. The airline industry has played an instrumental role in advancing technical certification for biofuels which can now be used on passenger flights. The first commercial flights using biofuels were achieved in 2011 (IATA, 2016a).

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Carbon offset programme Carbon offsetting involves the “neutralization” of an individual or an aircraft’s carbon emissions by investing in carbon reduction projects. Carbon offsetting is a short-term measure to mitigate unavoidable carbon emissions and encourages carbon neutral development. Over 30 IATA member airlines have already introduced carbon offset programs either integrated into their websales engines or to a third party offset provider. This IATA programme provides standardization and independently validated offset programs.

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The calculation of carbon has also been standardised to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) methodology supplemented with actual airline carbon data (IATA, 2016b). In a study by Peck and Hedding (2014) investigating the willingness of tourists in South Africa to pay carbon tax to offset their contribution to climate change. It was found that tourists were willing to pay the carbon tax as long as their contribution was regulated and used effectively. Global warming is set to endanger the natural systems and biodiversity which


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serve as the very basis of tourism in many developing countries. This could in turn result in detrimental effects on the welfare of communities which are dependent on tourism as a means of livelihood. It is critical that the examples that are being implemented by the Airline industry are emulated in all industries and organisations worldwide to collectively reduce CO2 and other GHG emissions. Although these initiatives are a step in the right direction everybody has to make a concerted effort to reverse the causes and mitigate the effects of global warming and climate change. References • International Air Transport Association (IATA) (2016a). Alternative fuels. Available from: http://www.iata.org/ whatwedo/environment/Pages/ alternativefuels.aspx (Accessed on 20 February 2016). • International Air Transport Association (IATA) (2016b). Carbon Offsets. Available from: http://www.iata.org/whatwedo/ environment/Pages/carbon-offset.aspx (Accessed on 20 February 2016). • International Air Transport Association (IATA) (2016). IATA Environmental Assessment. Available from: from http:// www.iata.org/whatwedo/environment/ Pages/ienva.aspx (Accessed on 20 February 2016). • Peck, L. & Hedding, D.W. (2014). Tourist perceptions of air travel and climate change: an assessment of the polluter pay principle in South Africa. African Journal of Hospitality, Tourism and Leisure. 3(1), 1-16. • Peeters, P.M. & Eijgelaar, E. (2014). Tourism’s climate mitigation dilemma: Flying the rich and poor countries. Tourism Management, 40 (15), 15-26. • Scheyvens, R. (2007). Exploring the tourism poverty nexus. Current issues in

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tourism, 10, 231-254. Scott, D., Gössling, S. & Hall, C.M. (2012a). International tourism and climate change. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 3 (3):213-232. Scott, D., Hall, C.M. & Gössling, S. (2012b). Tourism and climate change, Impacts, mitigation and adaptation. London: Routledge. Strasdas, W. (2013). Ecotourism and the Challenge of Climate Change: vulnerability, responsibility and mitigation strategies in K.Bricker, R Black & S Cottell (eds) Sustainable tourism and the Millenium Development Goals: Effecting Positive change, 209-230. United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) (1998). Tourism 2020 Vision. Madrid: United Nations World Tourism Organisation. United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) (2007). Tourism will contribute to solutions for Global Climate Change and Poverty Challenges. Press release. Madrid: United Nations World Tourism Organisation. United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) (2014). Tourism highlights 2014 edition. Madrid: United Nations World Tourism Organisation. United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) (2015). World Tourism Barometer, Volume 13, January 2015. Madrid: United Nations World Tourism Organisation. United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) & United Nations Environmental Programme (2008). Climate change and tourism: Responding to global challenges. Madrid: United Nations World Tourism Organisation. Wood, I. (2015). Planet-friendly flying: SAA achieves next stage of Environmental Assessment Programme. Sawubona SAA Inflight Magazine, February, 30.

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GEOTOURISM EXPLORER: WHAT IS IT AND WHAT WILL IT MEAN FOR SOUTH AFRICA?

Dr François Bédard


GEOTOURISM

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GEOTEX: WHAT IS IT? Each year, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), member of the World Bank, like many other development agencies in the world, invests millions of dollars in tourism projects. Aware that capacity building of stakeholders within a destination is essential for maximizing its investment in the tourism sector, the Multilateral Investment Fund (MIF), which is part of IDB, signed an agreement in 2012 with the World Centre of Excellence for Destinations (CED) in order to develop an innovative solution to meet this objective. The solution is known as Geotourism Explorer or GEOTEX. Geotourism Explorer (GEOTEX) is an innovative platform for strengthening the capacity of stakeholders within a destination. The implementation of the GEOTEX platform is performed at the local or regional level by CED in cooperation with one or more than one training and research institution serving the destination. The role of local partner is twofold: (i) to develop content adapted to the reality of the community, and (ii) to act as a liaison with tourism stakeholders in the destination. CED is responsible for the continuous development of GEOTEX, and for the sharing of knowledge and best practices among the different destinations in the world using the platform. GEOTEX is comprised of two basis tools: a self-assessment tool, and an online training tool. The self-assessment tool is designed to allow tourism stakeholders to perform a selfassessment of their knowledge on a range of priority issues for the destination. The online training tool is designed to strengthen the capacities of destination management organizations (DMOs), including trainers and educators, DMO officials, and micro,

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small and medium tourism enterprises (MSMEs). On demand, a third tool can be added to GEOTEX: an entrepreneurship tool designed to assist entrepreneurs seeking to start a micro or small tourism business or to strengthen their existing business.

BACKGROUND

GEOTEX finds its roots in both the Pyramid of Adaptation to New Technologies model and the System of Measures for Excellence in Destinations (SMED). Pyramid of Adaptation to New Technologies The Pyramid of Adaptation to New Technologies, developed by Professor François Bédard, represents the three basic features necessary for an adaptation to new service technologies: training, acquisition and use (see Fig. 1). The “Training in New Technologies” feature is at the top of the pyramid in order to highlight its strategic importance in a knowledge-based society. The “Acquisition of or Access to New Technologies” and the “Use of New Technologies” features are at the base of the pyramid. The arrows linking the different aspects illustrate how their relationships are organized. The pyramid is framed by four synonyms—partnership, alliance, group, consortium―illustrating the different types of associative structures that are formed and joined by an increasing number of companies in the era of e-commerce and e-business. Fig. 1 – Pyramid of Adaptation to New Technologies (Bédard, 2001) Training : The term “training” is used here in a broad sense and includes awareness, monitoring and dissemination of knowledge related to new technologies. In a world that is continually changed by new technologies, knowledge acquisition and manpower training occupy a central role in companies wanting to remain competitive.


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Companies owe it to themselves to integrate new employees who have been trained and educated in the new technologies and to offer new technologies training programs for employees already hired. Training and the related strategic anchors of a knowledge-based society (e.g. sensitization, dissemination, technology watch) must be part of a company’s regular activities. Acquisition of New Technologies : Another important facet of the adaptation pyramid involves the acquisition of new technologies. Several questions can be asked: How much of the budget must a company devote to the acquisition of new technologies? Among all the technologies, which will really meet the company’s needs? Which supplier offers the best price/

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quality ratio for technological products and solutions? How often must computer equipment be updated or replaced? Should the purchased technological products be generic or custom-made? What are the advantages of being part of a group or network that provides technological solutions? These questions raise some of the main issues involved in acquiring new technologies. Use of New Technologies : The “use” aspect relates to the uses that companies make of new technologies. Technologies are generally applied to either internal or external uses. Internal operations include back-office operations such as management and control; external operations include marketing and front-office activities (e.g.

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distribution, promotion, advertising, building customer loyalty). Internet-related technologies are currently considered as the most strategic in the new economy of the 21st century. It should be pointed out that tourism and travel products now rank first in consumer purchases over the Internet. Framework of the Pyramid of Adaptation to New Technologies : The Pyramid of Adaptation to New Technologies is framed by four words—partnership, group, alliance, consortium—each expressing a type of associative structure. This framework illustrates the current trend for companies to join forces so that they can better face the challenges of the new economy.

SYSTEM OF MEASURES FOR EXCELLENCE IN DESTINATIONS (SMED)

Currently, destinations, ever increasing in number, are each trying to carve out their place as a preferred tourist destination at the national and international level. We are also witnessing a growing diversity of practices, on the part of travellers as well as by professionals responsible for managing destinations. In response to these new trends, destinations are challenged to continually develop new ways to remain competitive. Given the nature of the industry, the situation is even more complex for destination managers. Tourism is recognized as a crossroads discipline as it appeals to practices from various fields of expertise (for example management, urban planning, environmental science, geography, anthropology, sociology and social psychology, economics, etc.). These practices are based on theories and knowledge, whereas the players or stakeholders are absorbed in the action (for example destination management organizations, hotels and other types of

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tourist accommodation, travel agencies, tour guides, transportation companies, attractions, etc.). In addition to the diversity of knowledge to be integrated, destination professionals, together with a large number of other actors, are operating in this industry without a forum for dialogue to help them assess their practices and define a common plan of action. This challenge calls for the development and deployment of a system for formulating customized measures for a destination which could strengthen its market position and comply with the principles of sustainable tourism development. The System of Measures for Excellence in Destinations (SMED) is an initiative of the World Centre of Excellence for Destinations (CED)—a non-profit organization founded in 2006 with the assistance of the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), which is dedicated to the research and creation of tools to promote sustainable tourism development for destinations around the world. SMED is based on a set of principles inspired by work done on sustainable tourism development by large international organizations, including UNWTO, the National Geographic Society, UNESCO, the International Council of Monuments and Sites, and the United Nations Development Programme. SMED was designed as a multi-purpose tool: As a diagnostic tool, it outlines a tourist destination as concise and as complete as possible for a given point in time. As a progress tool, it highlights the strengths and weaknesses of the destination, which encourages stakeholders of the destination to adopt concrete measures to maintain or improve that performance. Stakeholders include the destination management or marketing organization, local businesses (in particular micro, small and mediumsized tourism enterprises), public sector (i.


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e. municipal authority, departments and ministries involved in the tourism sector), education institutions offering programmes in tourism, technology and service providers, investors, and finally, but not the least, residents who, according to the geotourism concept, are both key actors (welcome aspects) and beneficiaries of the tourism industry. As a management tool, it provides advice to take action for raising the level of excellence and for conducting follow-ups of the evaluation. As a collaboration tool, it acts as a catalyst for mobilizing stakeholders of a destination around a strategy and a common goal for developing a sustainable yield for the destination. As a market positioning tool, it reveals the distinctive characteristics and qualities of the destination, which allows the destination to increase its competitiveness in the market and refine its brand strategy. As a comparative analysis tool, it can serve as a comparison between destinations or with the global average of destinations, thus serving as a repository of best practices and experiences available to SMED partners.

GEOTOURISM

Finally, it is a communication tool, in that it identifies the assets that a destination can use in its communication strategy for addressing target audiences and the media.

GEOTEX: WHAT WILL IT MEAN FOR SOUTH AFRICA?

Among the beneficiaries of GEOTEX in South Africa are: (i) tourism stakeholders, (ii) training and research institutions, and (iii) development banks or other development agencies. By using GEOTEX, tourism stakeholders (i.e. Destination Management Organizations and their members) send a strong message to development banks or other development agencies that they are committed to strengthening their capacities. GEOTEX adds value to each component of training and research institutions: teaching, research and services to the community. Finally, by strengthening the capacity of tourism stakeholders, GEOTEX contributes to maximizing development banks or other development agencies’ return on investment.

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PROFILE

MANAGING INCIDENTS – ARE NEETHLINGSHOF YOU ACTING WINE ESTATERESPONSIBLY?

BY ANDRÉ DU TOIT

Where manincidents and nature hand in hand Anchoring (i.e. once a decision has been made it How you manage is criticalwork for those is very difficult to change course) just makes this involved and indeed the sustainability of your to produce the finest wines business. However, statistics gathered during worse, regardless of the information received. If over 5000 cases show thatEstate the is capacity further symptoms madeCabernet themselves eethlingshof Wine a place of of of Cabernet Sauvignon, Franc,apparent Petit tourism businesses deal with incidents they may ignored because the decision to see rare beautytowhere mancritical and nature work Verdot andbeMerlot. incident through hadin already been made. and accompanying exposures hasthe proven to be theOther hand in hand to produce finest wines. wines included the collection are: a gap its own. twoacharacteristics common to Theofestate is steeped in history, dating back over TheAnother Six Flowers, Chenin Blanc, Sauvignon Most rely on and assistance companies to Blanc individuals tourism are:white blend, with and in Chardonnay 300 years andstaff continues to balance nature and • Premature closure –Gewürztraminer jumping to conclusions. manage their incidents evacuations. Whilst splashes of Viognier, and winegrowing in the and Western Cape’s glorious • Action orientation – tending to take practical these are oftenWinelands. carried out with acceptable Weisser Riesling adding rich aromatics. The Stellenbosch outcomes, the minefield of potential exposures lastaction ofStory waiting for someone wine ininstead the Short Collection honourselse thatWhen have been escaped route terrifying. to do or provide instruction. Sometimes Charles Marais en and his iswife Maria Maria Magdalena Marais. The Maria is a Noblethis be dangerous as Weisser the skillsRiesling and expertise There’s a lot more to it the andfarm rightwas now, whether purchased the land, then known Latecan Harvest made from and youashave realized it or (the not -Dance you are in incident management may notbouquet be present. De Wolvendans ofexposed! the Wolves). Sauvignon Blanc and has an appealing It is important understand that any we of dried apricots and honey, combined with a While there’s littletochance of sighting cannot predict when where an incident perfect Hospitality staff have asweetness very powerful action mystical wolves hereand today, the eco-sensitive balance between and acidity. willapproach happen, who will be there deal with it orientation and areonsome of the to viticulture hastoreaped huge Marginal vineyards the estate haveworst been at andrewards what the outcome will be.inEvery incident prematureand closure. Both have detrimental which are celebrated winemaker De uprooted returned tocan natural vegetation, effectsthan in the course of incident management. is different in sitsacclaimed nature, location, type of injury, Wet Viljoen’ Short Story Collection of rather being replanted, allowing for the number people, resources etc., so of it creation Theseofare the honest truths and the fact is wines.ofThe Shortavailable Story Collection, a portfolio natural wilderness corridors across is important to manage according tohistory principles that… reserve wines, celebrates both the and the farm. Of the estate’s 470 hectares just • Ithectares andconservation not predetermined is a rareare person is genuinely calm under who vineyard which is yet successes protocols. of the estate.Don’t use 185 checklists, resources. Don’t decide on your whilst responding to a threatening “Theuse Short Story Collection was born with another example of Neethlingshof’ s holisticincident and • It is a rare emergency plan ahead of time; decide persontowho consistently makes The Owlresponse Post Pinotage, ” explains Viljoen. “We sustainable approach viticulture. what you need to dothe when you understand what good decisionsisunder circumstance wanted to bring biodiversity and history of Neethlingshof part those of Distell Luxury • Nobody is naturally equipped to function is happening. Treatthe each risk” As as unique. It’s okay the estate into wines. vice-chairman of Wines, a collection of superlative quality, award- in to be vague before an incident and winning a multitask, multivariable rapidly estates changing theabstract Pinotageand Association, The Owl Post Pinotage wines from several boutique SPECIFIC during favourite one. stressful environment and those that choose is a particular for Viljoen, whose Estate situated in and around the Cape Winelands. How we think is thebagged crux ofaeverything. are even rarer. about Neethlingshof Pinotage 2014 also place in the 2015 Forto, more information • Everybody We of hindsight haswww.neethlingshof.co.za, limits. Exceed those and ABSAare Topall10guilty Pinotage Awards. bias as it re- and its wines, visit assuresThe us owl of our actions. Even something Physiological 021 883 8988 ordrops. make contact on www.and posts, erected to ifattract these callperformance does go wrong we tendinto to believe it could’ve mathematical fact. nocturnal predators the vineyards, are facebook.com/neethlingshof (or via Twitter @ been worse we hadn’tofdone XYZ. As a result we NeethlingshofW). just one ifexample Neethlinghof’s holistic seldom go back and analyze to incidents, weWith just DON’T EXPECT your PEOPLE to manage and sustainable approach viticulture. incidents – EVERat–retail theyoutlets neednationwide, HELP from forge ahead and lose outrenosterveld on a precious learning The tracts of endangered plantations wines, available opportunity. EXPERTS. attracting plenty of indigenous birdlife, caracals are found on many restaurant wine lists and can Ithave is a recently fact thatmade staff are positive is what istorequired orderpurchased to manage theirprone hometohere too. bias alsoThis be delivered your doorinwhen an incident and the at best because of their role within staff-guide-guest Theis elusive cat isthe celebrated in The online through theensure Vinotèque thisoutcome. link: www. • Gather information about the incident – get relationship and as a result tend to choose the vinoteque.co.za/collections/neethlingshof Caracal, an elegant Bordeaux-style red-blend more positive option when given two. accurate data/ask the right questions

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CARBON OFFSET PROGRAMMES

The Neethlingshof Short Story Collection D E W E T V I L J O E N, C E L L A R M A S T E R AT N E E T H L I N G S H O F, CONTINUES TO CREATE WINES WHICH PAY TRIBUTE TO THE SKILLS AND DETERMINATION OF ITS FOUNDER, MARIA MARAIS. HER DEEP LOVE OF THE L AND IS CELEBRATED A N D C L E A R LY E V I D E N T I N T H E R E S TO R AT I O N O F T H E FARM AND ESTATE TO ITS ORIGINAL NATURAL SPLENDOR B E AU T I F U L LY C A P T U R E D BY T H E S H O R T S TO RY CO L L E C T I O N. THESE WINES ARE A CELEBRATION OF OUR COMMITMENT TO SUSTAINABILIT Y AND AN ABIDING EXPRESSION OF OUR DEEP LOVE OF THE L AND.

Not for Sale to Persons Under the Age of 18. THE TOURISM HANDBOOK

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SOUTH AFRICAN SOLAR CHALLENGE AS CATALYST FOR TOURISM Annalie van Vuuren


SOUTH AFRICAN SOLAR CHALLENGE

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he Sasol Solar Challenge is an event that brings engineering to the test. Teams are made up of university students from across the world who build solar powered vehicles. They participate in an event that takes them across the whole of South Africa. The first South African Solar Challenge took place in 2008 and since then the event has grown and improved by leaps and bounds in terms of team participation, public response, awareness and interest. It is a two yearly event making 2016 the fifth since its inception. In this event solar powered cars are driven across the country with the aim of completing challenging distances each day, using only solar energy. The solar vehicles represent the pinnacle of electric vehicle and solar technology research. In October 2015 two South African teams, who made their debut in the Sasol Solar Challenge, qualified for to the World Solar Challenge in Australia. The University of North West team and the UKZN teams managed to finish in 11th and 13th place respectively. They were the first Solar Electric Vehicles (EVs) from Africa to Compete in this prestigious event, which crossed Australia

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from Darwin to Adelaide over a distance of 3022km.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

In South Africa, we have a great need for to develop Engineers and Technical skills. The Sasol Solar Challenge focuses on reaching the youth by encouraging them to take up the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects. By showing them what can be accomplished with these subjects, young people get motivated in that direction. It is estimated that more than 2000 students from around the country have been involved in the various teams over the years since 2008.

Students taking part in the Solar Challenge gain experience and learn to work


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SOUTH AFRICAN SOLAR CHALLENGE

Students building a solar car

together in multidisciplinary teams. They become part of cutting edge technology and innovation in a secured environment; testing and stretching their skills and knowledge to the utmost. Other than the engineering students, journalism, hospitality and communication students also become part of this solar challenge teams. Students from all disciplines are roped in to handle PR and marketing as well as logistics, which require careful planning. Students competing against each other with their solar cars

GREEN EVENT

The Solar Challenge created a baseline in the 2014 event to evaluate the carbon footprint with the aim of reducing it in future events. The information gained is also used as a means of educating the communities and teams on their carbon footprint. The Solar Challenge Sustainability Program focuses on:

• Stabilizing greenhouse gases: carbon emissions reduction, reduce CO2 emissions; • Sustainable water use; • Affordable energy services. Currently our main sponsor for the administration of the event is Sasol. In 2014, the event organizers achieved accreditation for the Sustainability Program from the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA). This International Environmental Certification Framework was introduced by the FIA in July 2012. The framework aims to assist motor sport stakeholders worldwide to measure and enhance their environmental performance. It is based on ISO 14001:2004, ISO 14064-1:2006, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol, and more. Only three international motorsport events managed to receive certification so far. The Sasol Solar Challenge also won the MSA Environmental Award for

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2014. The Solar Challenge, South Africa is a FIA event. By focusing on being a green event we attract the green community all over the world to not only follow, but attend the Solar Challenge in person. In addition, we see ourselves as leaders in green events in South Africa.

SUSTAINABLE TOURISM OPPORTUNITIES

The route for the South African Solar Challenge changes every year. The reason for that is quite simple: we want the teams to experience another part of this wonderful country every time they visit South Africa. This also ensures the family members tagging along every time are able to experience new scenery and activities. The objective of the Sasol Solar Challenge is to take the event to the next level in order to greatly increase international participation. We would like solar teams from all over the globe to embrace not only our technical challenge but also the amazing experiences

2016 Solar Challenge Route

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of our country. South Africa’s solar challenge is one of many that happens worldwide and it is growing tremendously in spectator value. The Sasol Solar Challenge 2016 starts on the 24th of September and ends the 1st of October. A 2000 km long route to be completed over 8 day stages, approximately 250 km to complete every day, with an optional loop for each day to add as much distance as possible. The loops are from 50km to over 100km each and you can drive it as many times as you want. The result is a distance race instead of a speed race; so the team who covers the largest distance in the 8 days and manages to complete all stages, wins. The route also contains some steep hill climbs like mountain passes. We anticipate that some teams may want to drive between 500km and 700km per day, completing about 6000km over the entire race. Towns, villages and communities along the route benefit from the challenge—not only does the challenge bring fantastic


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spectator and entertainment value, but it also brings more businesses to local tourism businesses. It is interesting to note that the World Solar Challenge in Australia is sponsored by the Australian Tourism Authority. With around 50 teams and over 1000 participants from all over the world, it makes sense. For the South African Solar Challenge, we currently estimating 20 teams with about 400 participants from various countries around the world, including Japan, Cyprus, Turkey, Hungary, The Netherlands, Belgium and the USA. Every race participant brings along 5 to 10 team members and in many cases, family and friends tag along. These numbers exclude the PR, media and families joining the teams. While the race

SOUTH AFRICAN SOLAR CHALLENGE

is underway, the non-racers need to be fed, entertained and have a place to sleep. Most of the teams arrive in South Africa almost a month before the event and leave a month after the event. For most of the team members and families attending this event, this is their first time visiting South Africa. They make a special effort to see the country and experience South Africa. The challenge significant injects millions into the local South African economy. The following are some of the scenes captured during the 2010, 2012 and 2014 Solar Challenge Events. Where ever the vehicle stops, crowds gather to see them, and everyone is interested in the technology represented by the event.

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PROFILE

MANAGING INCIDENTS MOHOLOHOLO – THE – ARE YOU ACTING RESPONSIBLY? EXPERIENCE OF A LIFETIME

BY ANDRÉ DU TOIT

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How youhe manage incidents is critical forCentre those Wildlife Rehabilitation involved at andMoholoholo indeed the sustainability of your contributes to business.the However, statistics gathered during conservation of endangered over 5000 cases show that the capacity of species and the rehabilitation of injured tourism deal with critical incidents and businesses poisoned to wildlife. Moholoholo also andfacilitates accompanying exposures has proven to be a number of successful breeding a gap of its own. programmes. Most rely on staff andshadow assistance to Situated in the of companies the majestic manage their incidents evacuations. Whilst “Maripeskop”, our and unique rehabilitation these are isoften outanimals with acceptable centre homecarried to many and birds. outcomes, minefield exposures The the centre has of a potential successful Serval thatBreeding have been escaped en bred routeand is terrifying. Project. Having releases There’s a lot more to it and right now, whether you have realized it or not - you are exposed! It is important to understand that we cannot predict when and where an incident will happen, who will be there to deal with it and what the outcome will be. Every incident is different in its nature, location, type of injury, number of people, available resources etc., so it is important to manage according to principles and not predetermined protocols. Don’t use checklists, use resources. Don’t decide on your emergency response plan ahead of time; decide what you need to do when you understand what is happening. Treat each risk as unique. It’s okay to be abstract and vague before an incident and SPECIFIC during one. How we think is the crux of everything. We are all guilty of hindsight bias as it reassures us of our actions. Even if something does go wrong we tend to believe it could’ve been worse if we hadn’t done XYZ. As a result we seldom go back and analyze incidents, we just forge ahead and lose out on a precious learning opportunity. It is a fact that staff are prone to positive bias because of their role within the staff-guide-guest relationship and as a result tend to choose the more positive option when given two.

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Anchoring (i.e. once decision been they made it over 160 back intoathe areashas where is verypreviously difficult tobecome change course) have extinct.just makes this worse, regardless of the information Wherever possible rehabilitatedreceived. birds If further symptoms made themselves and animals are returned to the wildapparent and they may beare ignored because the decision to see those who not so fortunate due to the the incident hadtheir already been made. nature and through extent of problems are Another two characteristics common used for educational talks to the, many to individuals tourism people whoinvisit eachare: year. Our tours are on • awareness Premature closure – jumping to conclusions. an basis and are to awaken us to • Action – tending the criticalorientation situation our wildlifetois take in practical action instead waiting someone We invite you toofcome and for share a uniqueelse to do or provide experience with theinstruction. animals of Sometimes Africa . . . . . this can be dangerous as the skills and expertise in incident management may not be present. Hospitality staff have a very powerful action orientation and are some of the worst at premature closure. Both can have detrimental effects in the course of incident management. These are the honest truths and the fact is that… • It is a rare person who is genuinely calm whilst responding to a threatening incident • It is a rare person who consistently makes good decisions under those circumstance • Nobody is naturally equipped to function in a multitask, multivariable rapidly changing stressful environment and those that choose to, are even rarer. • Everybody has limits. Exceed those and performance drops. Physiological and mathematical fact. DON’T EXPECT your PEOPLE to manage incidents – EVER – they need HELP from EXPERTS. This is what is required in order to manage an incident and ensure the best outcome. • Gather information about the incident – get accurate data/ask the right questions


PROFILE

• On-site first aid • Managing the scene – for both staff and guests • Managing the media – limiting reputational damage with accurate reporting • Consulting with doctors • Communicating with all stakeholders • Activating and coordinating appropriate assistance e.g. Dispatching ambulance – or air CampMountain View Forestground CampForest Accomodation and full catering for 22 Accomodation for 28-plus peopl • and payment and Accomodation catering forguarantees 22 people at full the catering footof of the Drakensberg people at the foot Arranging of thefullDrakensberg B&B, Guided bird and Birding and guided game walks wildlife bush walks, night drives Birding and guided game walks insurance • Wildlife Preparing for Hospitalization Rehabilitation Centre Daily tours • Post-operative care Successful breeding programmes • Managing potential or claims Management course for gamelitigation farming ●

So …Why do You need Incident Management Services? • Because people’s lives and wellbeing depend on the right decisions being made • Because it is better to professionalize your Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre management of critical incidents. Daily tours Successful breeding programmes • Because dealing emergencies Management course for with game farming situations is beyond your scope of work Ya Mati 5x luxurious chalets on the bankand of the its Blydereputation River. • Because your business is Self-catering or full catering at stakeWedding facilities for up to 120 people • Because you are seriously exposed to liability when critical incident occur • Because the cost of liability can now easily exceed R100 million • Because it’s not worth taking the chance ●

For more info and bookings: As Forest you will appreciate, it is not Centre: one specific Camp & Rehabilitation Mountain View action that will mitigate risk but rather a Find me someone who can do this all and Tel: +27 (0)15 795-5236 ı Fax: +27 (0)15 795-5333 For more info and bookings: ● Accomodation for 28-plus peopl MountainI view: Cell: 082 907 5983 Forest Campyour & Rehabilitation Centre: Tel: +27the (0)15 combination 795-5236 Fax: will +27reduce (0)15 795-5333 ● B&B, that your exposure manage business I will arrange full catering and ● Guided bird and wildlife bush walks, night Ya Mati: Cell: of 072the 191 2024 / 084 3000 Cell: drives at907 the5983 end day. There are511 a network necessary spandex with Mountain cape and view: undies on082 Fax: +27 (0)12 348 4926 +27 (0)12 348 4926 Ya Mati: Cell: 072 191 2024 / 084 511 3000 I Fax: of experts and specialists out there that you the outside because they will be worthy of Ya Mati E-mail: moholo@worldonline.co.za E-mail: moholo@worldonline.co.za ●

can team up with to better manage your superhero status! www.moholoholo.co.za www.moholoholo.co.za With all due respect to your operations risk and provide you with peace of mind. and teams on the ground and considering Use them. the way we think and act under stressful SATIB24 Crisis Call is one such critical circumstance, I don’t believe many have the incident management service with an capacity to deal with the scenario (or would insurance component ONLY available to SATIB want to) when in actual fact they should be clients. It forms an integral part of our African focusing on the remaining guests and leaving presence and can be coupled with medical this up to a network of trained professionals. emergency evacuation policies that can cover • The Types of Incidents: guests, staff or both. Critical incidents impose • Emergency medical incidents a threat of loss - something bad happening Centre • Personal injuries/fatalities thatWildlife may costRehabilitation life, limb, andprogrammes money, loss of Daily tours Successful breeding Management course for farmingdamage or • Accidents (motor vehicle, quad-bikes, reputation, property orgame asset Ya Mati business interruption. Management of these boating etc.) 5x luxurious chalets on the bank of the Blyde River. • Assaults and Robberies situations by our specialist team minimises the Self-catering or full catering Wedding facilities for up to 120 people • Natural disasters (Flood, fire etc.) loss and maximises the outcome. It is about Forest Camp Mountain View taking the “luck factor” out of incidents and Accomodation and full catering for 22 Accomodation for 28-plus peopl services to subscribe to: Guided bird and doing the things that stack the odds in your people at theCore foot of the Drakensberg B&B, full catering Birding and guided game walks wildlife bush walks, night drives • Telemedical consultations favour. The field of litigation has changed • Incident management plan creation somewhat with liability becoming an onerous • Remote management of rescue and threat to all markets and for this reason we medical staff offer additional support by taking the load off • Medical evacuations your shoulders by managing the incidents and For more info and bookings: • Post traumatic risk assessments controlling exposure. It is your responsibility Forest Camp management & Rehabilitation Centre: Tel: +27 (0)15 and 795-5236 I Fax: +27ensure (0)15the 795-5333 • Media this will ultimately sustainability Mountain view: Cell: 082 907 5983 • Legal liability management of your business. Ya Mati: Cell: 072 191 2024 / 084 511 3000 I Fax: +27 (0)12 348 4926 ●

● 5x luxurious chalets on the bank of the Blyde River. Self-catering or full catering ● Wedding facilities for up to 120 people

E-mail: moholo@worldonline.co.za

www.moholoholo.co.za

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TOURISM AS A TOOL TO UPLIFT COMMUNITIES

Laura Schenk


UPLIFTING COMMUNITIES THROUGH TOURISM

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“As one of the largest and fastest growing sectors of the world economy, tourism makes vital contributions to employment generation, poverty reduction, women’s empowerment, environmental preservation and peace building” (United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon)

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ot many people around the world are aware that tourism can be used as a tool for improving damaged natural areas and uplifting impoverished communities. Few people are aware that over the past three decades, communities have been supported and affected by community-based tourism (CBT ). CBT changes the way people think about tourism: instead of a select few profiting from the riches that tourism can bring to an area, many of the poorest communities around the world can benefit collectively. The main characteristics of CBT include 1) maximizing profits for investors is not the main focus 2) more attention is given to the impacts that tourism has on community and environmental resources and 3) it emerges from a community development strategy, where tourism is used as a tool. REST (Responsible Ecological Social Tours Project) has provided principles of communitybased tourism, showing that it is important that the community has ownership of tourism and the community members are involved. When this happens the quality of life of community members will be improved because the community earns money, becomes more self-sustaining and the community pride is promoted. Another benefit of community-based tourism cited is that it can promote environmental sustainability. This is achieved through for example local farming, worm gardens and recycling consciousness. CBT aims to preserve the character and culture of

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the area and community, which can be challenging when tourists enter isolated rural areas. Cross-cultural learning is very important aspect of CBT. Both the host and the tourist can learn from each other and enjoy the interaction. In this interaction both sides have to respect cultural differences and human dignity, although cultures and ideas may differ. Lastly, there has to be a fixed percentage contributed to the projects and the benefits have to be distributed fairly. (REST Thailand, 2007)

THE IMPACTS OF CBT—CASE STUDY

The importance of community-based tourism is seen in a case in Masakala Guesthouse located in Masakala, Southern Drakensberg and is part of the Mehloding hiking trail. This project was funded in 2000 by the National Department of Tourism, the Department of the provincial and local governments, the Alfred Nzo Municipality and Thina Sinako. At the moment there are two “rondawels” with single, double or dormitory style. All profits made from the operations of the guesthouse are distributed within the local community. As the project is still relatively young, profits are still relatively low. However, the guesthouse also generates jobs within the community in areas such as the kitchen, housekeeping and guiding. Local community members sell vegetables to the guesthouse, beer to the tourists and a small craft market attracts additional tourist spend. Other locals


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indirectly benefit from tourism: in order to promote tourism in the area, government is investing in improving road and water infrastructure. It is important for the success of this CBT initiative, however, that tourists are informed and updated about their contribution to the local community. Tourists also need to be made aware of possible negative impacts and risks: while they do find it important to contribute, they are not always aware of the best approach to contributing to communities through their travels.

RISKS

With implementing CBT initiatives there are a few risks that have to be considered. For example, when tourism becomes a success and tourism volumes to an area increases, cultural preservation comes under threat. Tourists should not expect artificial, choreographed interactions, and locals should not be led to believe that this is what is expected. The experience for both host and tourist must be authentic, sensitive and respectful. CBT projects need to be based on good institutional arrangements and solid business principles to become self-sustaining. In the research conducted by Mitchell and Muckosy (2008), 200 CBT projects were reviewed. CBT accommodation providers on average only had a 5% occupancy, which meant that the projects were heavily dependent on donor funding to remain viable. CBT projects are often still dependent on donor funding after 5 years of operation, and many projects collapse when the funding stops. The main reasons cited for this included poor market access and poor governance. Further, with increased tourism activity, increased volumes of waste are produced. This requires closer planning, as many rural villages do not yet have proper systems in place to process the waste. As a result,

UPLIFTING COMMUNITIES THROUGH TOURISM

community members resort to burning waste, which presents health hazards and is not environmental friendly. To manage this, greater educational interventions and better systems will be required. (de Vries et al., 2015). Lastly, communication remains a challenge. It is hard to communicate with many of the CBT projects because many of them do not have access to the internet or have functional mail address and contact details. Alternative means of communication need to be found and hosts need to be made aware of how critical it is to success of their business to be contactable and to respond to queries timeously.

SUCCESS CRITERIA

In research conducted by Goodwin and Santilli (2009), a few recommendations are made in order to improve the success of a CBT project. These recommendations include that CBT projects need to better report on the outcomes of the initiatives to funders and donors, that better market research is done and that markets are large enough to ensure economic sustainability through adequate occupancy rates. Funders should review their CBT investments with a comparative approach to assess the preconditions for success of a CBT project. Project investment decisions should be based on expected outcomes, impacts on local economic development and poverty reduction. (Goodwin & Santilli, 2009). REST Thailand created a few indicators for a successful CBT projects. These include conducting feasibility studies in cooperation with the community, setting vision and objectives with the community, developing a plan to prepare the community to manage tourism, developing an organizational management framework, training guides, developing a marketing plan, launching a pilot and monitoring and evaluating the

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process on an ongoing basis. (REST Thailand, 2007). When a success is created and rural communities can be economically self sustaining, CBT can contribute to the upliftment of the poorest of the world. More and more tourists see their trip as a way to enrich themselfes and the destination. References •

• •

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de Vries, N., Binnendijk, S., Schenk, L., Gravekamp, A., & van der Linden, K. (2015). Research report: Masakala guesthouse/Mehloding hiking trail. Haarlem. Goodwin, H., & Santilli, R. (2009). Community-Based Tourism: a succes? Mitchell J & Muckosy P (2008) A misguided quest: Community-based tourism in Latin America ODI Opinion 102 REST Thailand (2007). Community Based Tourism Handbook: Principles and Meaning

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RISKS FACING TOUR OPERATORS – AND HOW TO MANAGE THEM

Budget Insurance


RISK MANAGEMENT

12

A

s a tour operator, you’re in the business of creating memories, encouraging relaxation and conjuring excitement. Sometimes though, and through no fault of your own, a dream holiday can turn into a disaster. Are you covered?

According to Ken van Sweeden, Professional Liability Risk Manager at Budget Insurance: “If the holiday package or tour that you have arranged for a customer does not go exactly as planned because of, for example, supplier negligence, injury, disease, illness, booking errors, loss, theft or worse—your customer could lay a charge against you. With this in mind, it’s crucial for tour operators to be prepared for every possible eventuality.” Preparing for worst case scenarios involves a carefully considered risk assessment exercise. The best way to start this risk assessment is to picture yourself at the beginning of the trip as if you were the customer, and then go through each aspect of the tour. The risk assessment could include the following elements: • Clothing: What type of clothing and footwear is required for the trip? • Security: How many tour guides are required to ensure that your customers remain safe and secure while on holiday? • Transport: Are the transport suppliers insured? Are seat belts provided? • Health: What is the likelihood of your customer’s contracting a disease while on holiday like malaria? • Medical Facilities: Where is the closest hospital at any given point on the tour and how will you get your customers there safely and quickly?

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• First Aid: Do your tour guides have first aid training? • Accommodation: What are the health & safety standards at the accommodation you plan to use? • Food: How is the food your customers will be eating prepared? Will it be stored in a safe and hygienic manner? • Telecommunications: Will your tour guide be able to make swift contact with emergency services if needed? • Local Customs: Are there any local customs your customers should be advised on? • Minors: Are your tour guides qualified and able to take care of children on the trip? • Attitude: Are you tour guides helpful and always obliging? Your risk assessment should be documented and retained on file in a safe place, with regular checks made to ensure that it is kept up to date. This assessment is a vital piece of evidence for the defence of claims, and is often required by both your own insurer and the third party insurers. It is also worthwhile to keep the insurance details of all your suppliers on hand. First-hand experience is extremely important and there is no substitute for seeing things with your own eyes. If you cannot travel to the destination yourself, only rely on recommendations from trustworthy and reputable third parties—those that uphold your own high standards. “In the event of a serious claim or fatality, lawyers will place particular attention to the reason you decided to use certain suppliers. They’ll also look into whether or not you made every effort to ensure that they are a


12

reputable company. With this in mind, make sure that you record all recommendations and suggestions as you may have to defend your choices if a claim is brought against you,” says van Sweeden. When it comes to optional excursions, these are generally outside your of ambit of control and would not normally be subject to your risk and liability exposure. You should therefore make it very clear to your customers that participation in any activity which has not been pre-booked and paid for through you, is done so entirely at their own risk. It’s advisable to confirm this in writing wherever possible. “All tour guides employed by you should be made aware that while they may recommend a local activity or restaurant, they should not take any money or make any bookings on behalf of your customers because in doing so, they could potentially make you liable if something goes wrong,” advises van Sweeden. Keep in mind that in the event of an injury or illness, your customers can submit a claim within in a three year period. As such, make sure that you advise your insurer of any incident, which may later give rise to a claim. “Pay attention to minor injuries. This does not mean that you should complete a full incident report every time someone trips, but it is advisable to record the incident nonetheless. The incident should be brought to the attention of your insurance company or broker as soon as possible so that they can assess whether any action needs to be taken,” says van Sweeden. Ultimately, it’s always best to err on the side of caution. Being a risk aware tour operator will help protect your business

RISK MANAGEMENT

from the threat of future litigation from disgruntled customers. For More information contact us 0861 043 741 budgetinsurance.co.za/businessinsurance

Ken van Sweeden has been underwriting and developing liability products in the South African insurance market for some thirty years. The last eighteen years he has specialised in Directors and Officers Liability after successfully launching the first D&O product sold domestically in South Africa. He joined Budget Insurance firstly as a consultant in May 2012 and then as a permanent employee on the 1st July 2012. He is responsible for the underwriting and development of the Professional Liability suit of products that began with the launch of the Errors & Omissions (Professional Indemnity) product (4th March 2013). This was followed by Directors and Officers Liability in August 2013. Ken is an Associate of the Insurance Institute of South Africa by examination and a member of both the Institute of Directors of Southern Africa and the Professional Liability Underwriters Society (PLUS) in the USA.

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STORYTELLING: A COMPELLING CASE FOR LOCAL COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT – N12 TREASURE ROUTE

OJ Tshamboko and Laura Schenk


N12 TREASURE ROUTE: COMMUNITY

13

“After nourishment, shelter and companionship, stories are the thing we need most in the world.”- Philip Pullman.

T

he N12 Treasure Route (N12TR) stretches all the way from eMalahleni (Witbank) in Mpumalanga to George in the Western Cape, covering approximately 1350 km and cutting through 5 provinces, linking city to city. The N12TR offers an excellent alternative driving route to the N1, which has become extremely busy and congested over the past decades as increasing volumes of holiday makers and traders use the road to travel between Johannesburg and Cape Town. The N12TR is generally in good condition and offers a treasure trove full of unexplored and underdeveloped tourism attractions all along the route. Whether travellers want to take a slow drive over short distances or need to travel between specific towns on the route, the route offers enormous development potential. It is the less preferred route for companies who want to get goods to Cape Town fast and for hasty travellers who want to dart down to their destination to relax. The route instead appeals to the tastes of the “new aged tourists”, in other words, tourists who travel more frequently, who are exposed to more choices via the internet and who spend more time reaching their destinations. New aged tourists are more critical and astute, because they have travelled far and wide and have wide ranging experiences. They are not in a hurry, and can easily get “stuck” if the offering provides enough interest in further discovery—they are more flexible with their travel arrangements to allow for more spontaneity. They are generally more aware of the environmental, social and economic impacts of their travels and they seek authenticity through experiencing real places,

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interacting with real people and gaining insights into real cultures. Their interests include cultural experiences, intellectual stimulation and sports or activities (Boniface & Cooper, 2009). New aged tourists are inspired by wanderlust, rather than sunlust. The N12TR presents excellent opportunities to meet the needs of the new aged traveler who is keen to discover the undiscovered. Telling stories which tackle sustainability challenges and support successful business narratives along route presents excellent means of immersing the new aged traveler in the richness of history, culture and natural environment along the route. Storytelling is a powerful tool that will communicate the vision of the route while providing “safe” and neutral ways to convey information from one culture to another. Cultural information exchange is inevitable when a tourist visits a destination, but the receptiveness of both host and tourist to these exchanges are what will make the tourism experience successful and contribute to the sustainability of the route. Stories can provide subtle information about different values, beliefs and behaviours. They create opportunities to “level the playing field” amongst different cultures and languages and build new perspectives, which allow for greater interaction and collaboration amongst people to create memorable experiences. Stories have the ability to turn dreams into memories. For the N12 Treasure Route Association (N12TRA), storytelling provides an effective format to assimilate the cultural, historical and natural beauty of the five provinces it cuts through and build new perspectives that unify the provinces in the eyes of the traveler, whether local or international. The N12TRA provides an excellent platform


13

to help create tourism jobs and SMME businesses while contributing positively to Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth along the route. The N12TRA and partners facilitates the development of the N12 TR. The ultimate aim of the N12TRA is to ensure that local communities along the route benefit from the development of the route, while the route itself becomes a world class sustainable tourism destination. As a starting point, the N12TRA will lay the foundation of sustainable development through initiating a mass scale change management process, which move through stages during which the unaware becomes aware, buys in, participates, collaborates, drives and champions the N12TRA vision and mission, i.e.: Vision: To be the top Tourism Route and one of the top five travel destinations in South Africa which benefits all communities along the N12. Mission: To tell a fresh story of South Africa through new eyes that attracts visitors to experience the N12 Treasure Route and which travellers take home to family and friends to cherish forever.

N12 TREASURE ROUTE: COMMUNITY

Captivating stories that appeal to the new age traveler will create new opportunities for the N12 TR, building on current strengths that the route already possesses. The stories along the N12 TR are twofold: 1) stories of the past, captivating the imagination of the traveler and stimulating the need to discover more and 2) stories of the present, which include the traveler and the positive impacts of tourism on local societies and nature. These stories, if conveyed to each audience in the right format, provide the stimulus for participation from the host communities along route while at the same time increasing the demand for visiting the route. The N12 TRA has embraced story telling as one of the main methods through which to gain greater participation from the communities along the route. South Africa has been endowed with some of the most spectacular natural and cultural heritage in the world. There is no doubt that tourism is one of the most critical industries for economic success of the country. However, the country is also home to many spectacular failures, where tourism development has been

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done without the inputs of the local host communities. As a result, we sit with many “white elephants” – one species that we would not mind becoming extinct. The process of capturing stories and using these to help create authentic tourism experiences provides an excellent opportunity to not only extract new gems, but also to gain much greater participation and resulting beneficiation. This allows N12 TR to actively engage in storytelling through a targeted process. The process will source stories through a variety of mediums for example the stories of the elders could be recorded or stories could be expressed through music, dance, art and poetry. In this way, stories are extracted in a fashion that suits individual preferences while providing different formats to present back to the audience, i.e. the traveler. In 2016, N12 TR communities will tell a stories like they have never done before. The N12 TRA will use story telling as a means to invite people from along the route to provide their own insights that could then be integrated into tourist offerings as part of itineraries, which include activities, accommodation, transport, cultural visits and so forth. Local people are invited to provide their perspectives on how to engage the traveler in an authentic and respectful conversation which provides insights on what makes locals unique and which generate demand from travelers – the new aged travelers. Some examples include Poetry, Drama and Praise Poetry and Storytelling through Music. “If you tell me, it’s an essay. If you show me, it’s a story.” —Barbara Greene Five South African provinces, ten district municipalities and forty-eight local municipalities along N12 TR will be asked to enter a Storytelling Competition. This concept has already been piloted successfully in Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality in the North West Province. Provincial teams

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will be formed to compete at the national competition. The five provinces will compete in telling their own stories from each province in a way that aligns to aims of the N12TRA. The winning provincial team will become the N12TRA ambassadors, taking direct responsibility to ensure N12 Treasure Route becomes the route preferred destination of choice. The N12TRA aims to grow this competition to eventually provide support to help incubate each of the entrepreneurial story tellers, thus allowing for the growth and development of tourism along the route. The competition also provides incentives for participation in the efforts of the N12TRA. This in turn will provide data and information on the lesser known hidden treasures and bring to the fore the unique authentic tourist experiences – the hidden gems – of the N12TRA. The N12TRA sees the story telling competition as a pivotal project for the larger N12 TR development, as it will allow for the identification of tourist treasures that would otherwise have remained undiscovered. This aligns with international best practice in sustainable tourism development, which leans strongly toward development that puts the value of tourism back into the hands of the communities who should benefit from tourism, as is showcased through e.g. community based tourism, inclusive tourism, heritage tourism and ecotourism. “It’s clear that this is where all parts of the meetings equation need to work together to achieve the desired result. The distinctions between organiser and supplier are far less important than the overall goal of documenting and delivering the kind of value proposition that will ensure the ongoing relevance of meetings as a key element in driving the process of storytelling on many different fronts. So let’s start working together to become better storytellers and we’ll all benefit from the results.” Rod Cameron


Golden Leopard Resort is a chain of 3-Star Graded resorts that offers affordable accommodation to the keen Outdoor Enthusiast. The Pilanesberg National Park is home to Golden Leopard Resorts; Both Manyane and Bakgatla Resorts offer the keen outdoor enthusiast superb accommodation in Chalets, Tents, well equipped Caravanning and Camping facilities, Conference facilities, Dormitories (Bosele school camp) and Bush braai lapa. • • • • • • •

Contact numbers- Manyane Resort Tel: 014 555-1000 Tel: 014 556-8500 – Bakgatla resort Fax: 014 555-1048 Fax : 014 556-8585 – Bakgatla resort E-reservations@goldenleopardresorts.co.za Web: www.goldenleopardresorts.co.za

Cooke’s Lake -Mafikeng Situated at the capital of the North West Province Mahikeng * A perfect Venue for Wedding, Theme Parties and conferences • Cookes Lake Facility • 10 Rooms • Restaurant(max 100pax) • Large Conference room(max 300) • Small conference rooms (max 10-�20pax) • Tel: 018 381 6380 6019 • Fax: 018 381 1007 • Fax to email: 086 583 6524


LIST OF CERTIFIED ESTABLISHMENT:HERITAGE SA

EASTERN CAPE Kuzuko Lodge Game Lodge / Hotel Silver Class Addo National Park, Addo (042) 235 1037

Storms River Adventures Attraction Silver Class Storms River (042) 280 3588 GAUTENG PROVINCE Birchwood Hotel & Convention Centre Hotel Gold Class OR Tambo International Airport (011)897 0000 Centurion Lake Hotel Hotel Silver Class Centurion (012) 643 3632 DaVinci Hotel and Suites Hotel Gold Class Sandton Square, Sandton (011) 292 7000 National Zoological Gardens Attraction Gold Class Pretoria (012) 328 3265 The Michelangelo Hotel Hotel Gold Class Sandton Square, Sandton (011) 282 7000 The SAB World of Beer Attraction Gold Class Newtown, Johannesburg (011) 836 4900 Limpopo Province Baleni Cultural Camp Cultural Lodge Silver Class Giyani (015) 781 0690

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Blouberg Camp Cultural Lodge Silver Class Blouberg (015) 781 0690

Buffelshoek Camp Cultural Lodge Silver Class Manyaleti Game Reserve (015) 781 0690 Funduzi Camp Cultural Lodge Silver Class Tshivhase, Limpopo (015) 781 0690 Mafefe Camp Cultural Lodge Silver Class Tshivhase, Limpopo (015) 781 0690 Modjadji Camp Cultural Lodge Silver Class Modjadji Cycad Reserve (015) 781 0690 Motswari Private Game Reserve Game Lodge Gold Class Timbavati Private Game Reserve (015) 793 1718 Mtomeni Camp Cultural Lodge Silver Class Letaba Ranch (015) 781 0690 Mutale Falls Camp Cultural Lodge Silver Class Makuya Park (015) 781 0690 Nszhaka Camp Cultural Lodge Silver Class Manyaleti Game Reserve (015) 781 0690 Nthubu Camp Cultural Lodge Silver Class

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Waterberg (015) 781 0690

Mpumalanga Krugerpark Lodge Hotel / Lodge Gold Class Hazyview (013) 737 5000 Tsitsikamma Backpackers B&B Lodge Silver Class Tsitsikamma National Park (042) 281 1868 NAMIBIA Swakopmund Hotel – Namibia Hotel Casino Silver Class Swakopmund, Namibia +264 64 410 5200 Windhoek Country Club Resort Hotel / Casino Silver Class Windhoek, Namibia +264 61 205 5200 NIGERIA The Wheatbaker Hotel Hotel Silver Class Lagos, Nigeria +234 1 277 3560 Northern Cape !Xaus Lodge Game Lodge / Hotel Silver Class Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park (021) 701 7860 North West Bakubung Bush Lodge Game Lodge / Hotel Gold Class Pilanesburg National Park (014) 552 6000 Kwa Maritane Bush Lodge Game Lodge / Hotel Gold Class Pilanesburg National Park

(014) 552 5100

Maropeng Cradle of Mankind Attraction Gold Class Muldersdrift, Krugersdorp (014) 577 9000 Maropeng Hotel Hotel Gold Class Muldersdrift, Krugersdorp (014) 577 9000 Sterkfontein Caves Attraction Gold Class Muldersdrift (014) 577 9000 Tshukudu Lodge Game Lodge Silver Class Pilanesberg National Park (014) 552 6266 WESTERN CAPE Cape Grace Hotel Hotel Gold Class V&A Waterfront, Cape Town (021) 410 7100 Duinepos Chalets Guest House Silver Class Langebaan (022) 707 9900 Ellerman House Hotel Gold Class Bantry Bay, Cape Town (021) 430 3200

La Fontaine Guest House Guest House Silver Class Franschhoek (021) 876 2112 Table Mountain Aerial Cableway Attraction Silver Class Table Mountain National Park, Cape Town


LIST OF CERTIFIED ESTABLISHMENTS:GREENLEAF (021) 487 5528

Tenikwa Wildlife Awareness Centre Attraction Silver Class Plettenberg Bay (044) 534 8170

The Commodore Hotel Hotel Gold Class V&A Waterfront, Cape Town (021) 415 1000 Two Oceans Aquarium Attraction Platinum Class V&A Waterfront, Cape Town (021) 418 3823 V & A Waterfront Company Attraction Platinum Class V & A Waterfront, Cape Town 021) 408 7612 Villa Rosa Guest House Silver Class Sea Point, Cape Town (021) 434 2768 Zambia Ila Safari Lodge Game Lodge Silver Class Kafue National Park +260 976 366 054

Grean Leaf Eco Standard Certified Date and Expiry Date City Lodge Hotel Group Certified—18/07/2014 Expiring—17/07/2016

City Lodge Airport Barbara Road City Lodge Bloemfontein City Lodge Bryanston City Lodge Durban City Lodge Fourways City Lodge Grand West City Lodge Hatfield City Lodge Hotel At OR Tambo Airport City Lodge Katherine Street City Lodge Lynnwood City Lodge Morningside City Lodge Pinelands City Lodge Port Elizabeth City Lodge Umhlanga City Lodge V&A Waterfront Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group Park Inn Sandton Hotel 05/11/2016 04/11/2016 Radisson Blu Hotel Sandton 05/11/2014 04/11/2016 Radisson Blu Hotel Waterfront 15/04/2014 14/04/2016 Radisson Blu Hotel Addis Ababa 06/02/2015 05/02/2017 Radisson Blu Hotel Port Elizabeth 16/03/2015 15/03/2017 Radisson Blu Hotel Maputo 16/03/2015 15/03/2017

Shamwari Hospitality Bayethe Lodge 02/03/2014 01/03/2016 Eagles Crag lodge 02/03/2014 01/03/2016 Longlee Manor 04/05/2014 03/05/2016 Rippons Safari lodge 04/05/2014 03/05/2016 Villa Lobengula Lodge 04/11/2016 05/11/2016 Three Cities Royal Palm Hotel 19/03/2014 18/03/2016 Sanbona Game Reserve Dwyka Tented Camp 19/12/2014 18/12/2016 Gondwana Lodge 19/12/2014 18/12/2016 Tilney Manor 19/12/2014 18/12/2016 Tour Operator Tourvest Destination Management 12/08/2015 11/08/2017

Radisson Blu Hotel Dakar 28/04/2015 27/04/2017 Park Inn by Radisson Cape Town Foreshore 12/06/2015 11/06/2017

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FAIRTRADE TOURISM CERTIFIED LIST

South Africa

Activities !Khwa ttu San Culture and Education Centre Birds of Eden Calabash tours De Zalze Golf Club Dyer Island Cruises Fundani Tours Jukani Wildlife Sanctuary Lebo’s Soweto Bicycle Tours Marine Dynamics Shark tours Maropeng Monkeyland Primate Sanctuary Ocean Blue Adventures Para Taxi Tandem Paragliding Southern Right Cherters Stormsriver Adventures: Tsitsikamma Canopy tours The Voortrekker Monument Uthando (Love) South Africa White Shark Projects Backpackers Bulungula Lodge Coffee Shack Backpackers Lebo’s Soweto Backpackers Mdumbi Backpackers Sani Lodge Backpackers The Backpack Guest Houses Antrim Villa Bartholomeus Klip Farmhouse De Zeekoe Guest Farm Hog Hollow Country Lodge Jan Harmsgat Country House Kungwini Guest House and Conference Centre Kwagga’s Pride Guest house Whalesong Lodge Hotels Leriba Hotel and Spa Mercure Bedfordview Mercure Hotel Nelspruit Mercure Hotel Randburg Mercure Midrand Montagu Country Hotel Oude Werf Spier Thabo Eco Hotel The Peech hotel Townhouse Hotel Vineyard Hotel Lodges, Camps & Game Reserves !Xaus Lodge Camp Figtree Kololo Game Reserve

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Kwalata Leshiba Wilderness Madi a Thavha Mountain Lodge Mashovhela Lodge – Morning Sun Nature Reserve Motswari Private Game Reserve Pakamisa Lodge Sabi Sabi Private Game Reserve Safari Lodge Three Trees at Spioenkop Umlani Bushcamp Volunteering Volunteer Africa 32 Degrees South

Mozambique Activities Casa Babi/ Odyssea Dive Centre Kuvuka Café Machilla Magic Guest Houses Casa Babi/ Odyssea Dive Centre Hotels Bahia Mar Lodges, Camps & Game Reserves Bushhouse Camp Amoureux Iharana Bushcamp Saha Forest Camp Salary Bay Tsara Camp


LILIZELA TOURISM AWARDS 2015 WINNERS

Eastern Cape Cape St Francis Beach Break CATEGORY: Self-catering Shared Vacation 4/5 stars Island vibe CATEGORY: Beach Experience 4/5 stars Island Vibe Jeffreys Bay Eastern Cape CATEGORY: Beach Experience 4/5 stars

Khol Newman Bed and Breakfast CATEGORY: Exempted Micro Enterprise (EME) Under 5M 3/5 stars Sibuya Game Reserve-River Camp CATEGORY: Game Lodge 4/5 stars SRA—Tsitsikamma Canopy Tours CATEGORY: Action & Adventure CATEGORY: Action & Adventure The Oyster Box Beach House CATEGORY: Self-catering Exclusive Tsitsikamma Canopy Tours CATEGORY: Qualifying Small Enterprise (QSE) R5M—R45M Free State De Stijl Gariep Hotel CATEGORY: Hotel 4/5 stars

Liz at Lancaster Guesthouse CATEGORY: Guest House 4/5 stars

Sun International Group CATEGORY: Large Enterprise Over R45M Terrylin Backpackers CC CATEGORY: Backpacking & Hosteling 3/5 stars Tso’s Butchery and Fast Food CATEGORY: Culture & Lifestyle Ulysses Tours & Safaris cc CATEGORY: Tour Operators Kwazulu-Natal Access2africa Safaris CATEGORY: Lilizela Universal Accessibility Award : Experience General CATEGORY: Lilizela Universal Accessibility Award : Experience Mobility CATEGORY: Lilizela Universal Accessibility Award : Experience Hearing Happy Hippo Lodge & Backpackers CATEGORY: Backpacking & Hosteling Rain Farm Game and Lodge CATEGORY: Lodge 3/5 stars Stayeasy Pietermaritzburg CATEGORY: Hotel 2/5 stars

Letsatsi Game Lodge CATEGORY: Lodge 4/5 stars

The Oyster Box Hotel CATEGORY: Lap of Luxury CATEGORY: Hotel 5/5 stars

Gauteng CSIR International Convention Centre CATEGORY: Meetings, Exhibitions and Special Events (MESE) 4/5 stars

Limpopo Michael Keith Jones CATEGORY: Nature Guide

Holiday Inn Johannesburg CATEGORY: Lilizela Universal Accessibility Award: Accommodation General 4/5 stars Hyde Park Villas CATEGORY: Bed & Breakfast 5/5 stars

Nelson Maphaha CATEGORY: Culture Guide Patong Guestlodge CATEGORY: Country House 3/5 stars Vuwa Lodge CATEGORY: Guest House 3/5 stars

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LILIZELA TOURISM AWARDS 2015 WINNERS Mpumalanga 115@Casambo CATEGORY: Meetings, Exhibitions and Special Events (MESE) 5/5 stars Badplaas A Forever Resort Chalets CATEGORY: Self-catering Shared Vacation 3/5 stars Blyde Canyon A Forever Resort Caravan Park CATEGORY: Caravan & Camping 3/5 stars Esther Mahlangu Exhibition Mpumalanga CATEGORY: Roots & Culture God’s Window CATEGORY: Scenic Beauty Inyati Game Lodge CATEGORY: Wildlife Encounters Kgarebana Boutique Bed and Breakfast CATEGORY: Bed & Breakfast 2/5 stars Pine Lake Inn CATEGORY: Hotel 3/5 stars Simeliza Tours CATEGORY: Culture Villages

Road Lodge Potchefstroom CATEGORY: Hotel 1/5 star

Western Cape Atlantic Point Backpackers CATEGORY: Backpacking & Hosteling 4/5 stars Bushmans Kloof Wilderness Reserve & Wellness Retre CATEGORY: Lodge 5/5 stars De Doornkraal Historic Country House CATEGORY: Country House 4/5 stars Dibiki Holiday Resort CATEGORY: Caravan & Camping 4/5 stars GOLD Restaurant CATEGORY: Culture & Lifestyle Grand Dedale Country House CATEGORY: Country House 5/5 stars Marine Dynamics Tours CATEGORY: Marine Adventure Ocean View B&B CATEGORY: Bed & Breakfast

Tintswalo Safari Lodge CATEGORY: Game Lodge 4/5 stars

Orange Grove Farm CATEGORY: Self-catering Exclusive

Umlani Bushcamp CATEGORY: Game Lodge 3/5 stars

Soli deo Gloria CATEGORY: Lilizela Universal Accessibility Award : Accommodation Mobility 4/5 stars

Northern Cape Koekais Guest Farm CATEGORY: Self-catering Exclusive 3/5 stars

The River Siding CATEGORY: Self-catering Exclusive

Oleander Guest House CATEGORY: Guest House 5/5 stars North West Rio Hotel Casino Convention Resort CATEGORY: Meetings, Exhibitions and Special Events (MESE) 3/5 stars

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Villa Tarentaal CATEGORY: Bed & Breakfast 4/5 stars


INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

On the cover

Overlooking the Indian Ocean and Umhlanga’s iconic lighthouse, The Oyster Box is one of the country’s most popular luxury hotels. From the breathtaking ocean views and exceptional cuisine to the rich collection of artwork, exquisite décor and the award-winning Spa …The Oyster Box stands in a class of its own. With 86 individually appointed rooms and suites, The Oyster Box is perfect for personal retreats, private meetings and events of celebration.  The range of accommodation options tailors for the needs of every guest; from individual travellers, to honeymoon couples and families. Leading practises in eco-tourism have been incorporated to create an environmentally respectful hotel. The Oyster Box's unique combination of venue offerings, cuisine and accommodation makes this one of the country’s most sought after hotel properties. The Oyster Box T:

+27 (0) 31 514 5000

F:

+27 (0) 31 514 5100

E:

info@oysterbox.co.za

W: www.oysterboxhotel.com Media contact: Tumbleweed Communications – Joanne Hayes M:

+27 (0)83 627 7249

F:

+27 (0)86 514 7729

E: tigerjo@iafrica.com

COMPANY Aquila Private Game Reserve Canvas and Tent Manufacturing (Pty) Ltd Coastlands Hotel and Resorts Cross Roads Hotel Desert and Delta Durban West Tourism Eco Training Eningu Clayhouse Lodge Fedhasa

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PAGE 46-47 141 72-73 139 88-89 144,IBC 64-65 143 28, 30-31


42137/RSTH/R1

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Wolwedans Boulders Camp

Explore the world of unique outdoor experiences with the master of canvas From desert to bush, seaside to mountain retreat, our luxurious tents are designed to live in any location, no matter how remote or extreme. Renowned for conceiving, manufacturing and building high-end quality tents for the safari and luxury travel markets, our visionary team combines years of experience with an exceptional understanding of client needs in order to fashion unique and innovative tented accommodation across the globe. Added to this, we can also advise you on camp planning, flooring and decking, décor as well as plumbing. Let’s work together to create your sensational outdoor escape!

Contact us on (012) 671 1073 | (036) 634 1902 A Canvas and Tent company www.bushtecsafari.co.za | info@bushtecsafari.co.za


INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

COMPANY Fly SAA

Gautrain Management Agency

PAGE 91 1

Heritage-The Environmental Management Agency

19

ITB Asia

14

Kurland Hotel Le Franschhoek Hotel & Spa Moholoholo

126-127 24 114-115

Monate Game Lodge

78-81

Mozambique Tourism

38-39

Regional Tourism Organisation of South Africa

6-9

South African Tourism Association

10

Sustainable Tourism Partnership Programme

16

Sunny Adventures

2-3

Swaziland Tourism Authority

54-57

Telesure Investment Holdings

OBC

Tourism Grading Council of South Africa

69

Triple Orange

26

WTM Africa

142

THE TOURISM HANDBOOK

4


Space Space and and tranquillity; tranquillity; creativity, style creativity, style and and inspiration; archaeology Space and tranquillity; and tranquillity; Space and tranquillity; inspiration; archaeology and art; fine food and good creativity, style and creativity, style and inspiration; creativity, style and and art; fine food and good company… inspiration; archaeology inspiration; archaeology archaeology and art; fine food company…

art; food fine food and good and and art; fine and good

and Lodge good company… Eningu –company… Eningu company… –- The The Lodge in in the the Kalahari Kalahari

Eningu The Lodge in the Eningu –- The Lodge the Eningu - –-The Lodge ininKalahari theKalahari Kalahari

Eningu is a window on the Kalahari, a creative view from a place of wonderful Eningu is a window on the Kalahari, a creative view from a place of wonderful style and beauty; a lodge imbued with warmth, handcraft and art, nestled in camel style and beauty; a lodge imbued with warmth, handcraft and art, nestled in camel Eningu is a window on the Kalahari, a creativeof view from a place of wonderful thorn savannah, where the last rocky outcrops the central Namibian highlands Eningu is a iswindow onthe the Kalahari, a creative from a from place aofplace wonderful thorn savannah, where outcrops ofview the central Namibian highlands Eningu a window onlast therocky Kalahari, a creative of wonderfu style andjagged beauty; a lodge imbued with warmth, handcraft and art, nestled in are camel dip their backs into deep red sands, creating theview gentle ripples that the style and beauty; a lodge imbued with warmth, handcraft and art, nestled in camel dip style their and jagged backs into deep red sands, creating the gentle ripples that are the beauty; a lodge imbued with warmth, handcraft and art, nestled in came thorn savannah, wherethe thelast lastrocky rocky outcrops outcrops of of the first dunes of thewhere Kalahari. thorn savannah, the central central Namibian Namibian highlands highlands first dunes of the Kalahari. thorn savannah, where the last rocky outcrops of gentle the central Namibian highland dip theirjagged jaggedbacks backs intodeep deep red sands, sands, creating creating the the dip their into red gentle ripples ripples that that are are the the dip their jaggedLodge, backs situated into deep sands, creating 70km the gentle that are th Eningu Clayhouse onred Farm Peperkorrel, from ripples the Airport, first dunes the Kalahari. first dunes of the Kalahari. Eningu Clayhouse Lodge, situated on of Farm Peperkorrel, 70km from the Airport, first dunes of the Kalahari. offers nine private, individually styled guest rooms, a swimming pool with offers nine private, individually styled guest rooms, a swimming pool with whirlpool, a rooftop sundeck, a lounge, and outdoor dining areas, Eningu Lodge, situated on Peperkorrel, 70km from from theAirport, Airport,an EninguClayhouse Clayhouse Lodge, situated on Farmindoor 70km the whirlpool, a rooftop sundeck, a lounge, indoor and outdoor dining areas, an Eningu Clayhouse Lodge, situated on Farm Peperkorrel, 70km from the Airpor archery range, a wine cellar, a souvenir shop and much more. offers nine private, individually styled guest rooms, a swimming pool with offers nineaprivate, individually styled guest swimming pool with archery range, wine cellar, a souvenir shop androoms, much amore. offers nine private, individually styled rooms, adining swimming pool wit whirlpool, a rooftop indoorguest andoutdoor outdoordining areas, whirlpool, a rooftopsundeck, sundeck,aa lounge, lounge, indoor and areas, an an Bookings: whirlpool, rooftop sundeck, a shop lounge, indoormore. and outdoor dining areas, a archery range, aawine cellar, a souvenir and much Bookings: archery range, a wine cellar, a souvenir shop and155 much more. Phone: +264 64 464 144 / Fax: +264 64 464

kalahari creative kalahari kalaharicreative creative

Phone:cellar, +264 64a464 144 / Fax: +264and 64 464 155 more. archery range, a wine souvenir shop much info@eningulodge.com / www.eningulodge.com info@eningulodge.com / www.eningulodge.com Bookings: Phone: +264 64 464 144 / Bookings: Fax: +264 64 464 155 info@eningulodge.com / www.eningulodge.com

Phone: +264 64 464 144 / Fax: +264 64 464 155 info@eningulodge.com / www.eningulodge.com

Lodge direct: Tel +264 62 581 880 • PO Box 11558 • Windhoek • Namibia Bookings: Phone: +264 64 464 144 • Fax: +264 64 464 155 info@eningulodge.com • www.eningulodge.com


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Tourism Handbook Volume 4