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31 May - 2 June 2016

AFRICAN CAPITAL CITIES SUSTAINABILITY FORUM

SUSTAINABILITY

WEEK

GET READY TO PUT IDEAS IN MOTION

HOSTED BY:

REPORT

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CONTENTS

WEEK

Conference Outcomes and Way Forward Executive Summary Speakers

In partnership

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SUSTAINABILITY

Declaration On Advancing Sustainability In African Cities Representation Mayoral Banners

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW TUESDAY 31 MAY: PLENARY • Presentations by leading speakers • Technical keynote inputs • Mayors’ Sustainability Shares • Engagement with visiting mayoral delegations • Mayors’ Cocktail function WEDNESDAY 1 JUNE: • SABC Morning Live Broadcast • Tour: The Green Mile • Parallel technical seminars / conferences / debates: • Green Building

• • • • •

Sustainable Energy Day 1 Food Security Transport & Mobility Green Business Sustainability in Mining

THURSDAY 2 JUNE: • Tour: Tshwane Food and Energy Centre in Bronkhorstspruit & Kwaggasrand Material Recovery Facility • Climate change debate

CONFERENCE OUTCOMES AND THE WAY FORWARD Extract from the Close Out Speech given by the Executive Mayor We hereby reaffirm our commitment to advancing the Tshwane Declaration 2015 and further commit to accelerate action through: • We will establish a collective think tank of common initiatives that we will present at COP22 being hosted by the City of Marrakesh in December 2016. • We undertake to measure our city’s carbon emissions and establish a baseline Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory in each city. • We will jointly engage with development agencies and other international partners that have a focus on and interest in local government to garner support for climate resilience programmes. • Establish clear partnerships with the private sector for investment in bankable projects.

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• Convene a platform conducive for technical engagements and to develop a clear implementation programme for our cities, focusing primarily on the Sustainable Development Goals and in particular Outcome 11: Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable • In support of this technical panel, we undertake to submit the names of City representatives to the ACCSF secretariat, which is currently hosted by the City of Tshwane • We re-confirm that the City of Tshwane will host the ACCSF 2017 and that between now and June 2017, a process of selecting the next host city for 2018 will be undertaken in preparation for an announcement during ACCSF 2017. To this effect, we would welcome interested cities to indicate their willingness to host ACCSF 2018.


Ambassador Bene M’Poko & Hastings Chikoko

ACCSF

Christophe Nuttall, Cllr Kgosiento Ramakgopa, Ambassador Bene M’Poko & Hasings Chikoko

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LIST OF ATTENDING MAYORS AND DELEGATES

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Row 1: Freddy Mbonimpa Emile Nakombo Joelle Tottin Subesh Pillay Kgosiento Ramakgopa Julia Bono Christopher Mbanga Wadzanai Vhutuza Row 2: Julien Akue Mohamed Traore Fatoumata Maiga Jocelyn Zinsou Mamadou Sidibe Moussa Sow Hastings Chikoko Clara Mvogo Row 3: Mohamed Sadiki Trophius Kufanga Maxon Zeleza Benito Jones Tagba Atafeyinam Edgar Mvele Christian Auge Cheikh Gueye Kagiso Thutlwe Bonaventure Mamfoumbi Koffigan Hukiporti Deputy Minister Andries Nel Muesee Kazapua Christophe Nuttall

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On 31 May 2016, the City of Tshwane hosted the second African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, after its launch the year before on 23 June 2015 at the CSIR International Convention Centre. The forum was attended by 40 representatives from 20 African Capital Cities, with a further audience in excess of 450 delegates from a range of sectors, all with the shared interest in the leadership role that capital cities can play in promoting sustainability in urban centres. The voices of the international and domestic community representing local government were well represented by C40, ICLEI, UNDP, African Embassies and National Department of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs with each giving their endorsement of Forum and congratulating Cllr Ramokgopa on its establishment. Speakers individually set out from their own perspectives on the international and African economic, environmental, developmental and institutional contexts around which the Forum had been staged, in so doing also highlighting how apt and timeous it was. The contextual backdrop given was from a perspective of two distinct discourses: that of the developmental City, and that of climate change and sustainable development. In so doing it illustrated very clearly that, internationally, these two discourses have essentially merged, and therein lies the simple genius of the thinking behind the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum. The speakers also emphasised the synergies between the Sustainable Development Goals (in particular Outcome 11) and African Union Agenda 63 and the goals and objectives of the Forum. A predominant South African perspective drew attention to the compelling need to address the sustainability of cities against the historic backdrop of the apartheid urban design, with a framework being provided by the recently released Integrated Urban Development Framework, giving further credence to the Forum’s opportune timing and objectives. Mayors and mayoral representatives from visiting cities shared their unique situations as well as recent histories, ranging from stable and internationally connected cities such as Rabat to Monrovia and Juba, the world’s newest capital city.

REGISTRATION SUMMARY REGISTRATIONS BREAKDOWN Day 1

774

Day 2

361

Day 3

230

Estimated non registered delegates

100

MEDIA VALUE SUMMARY AVE VALUE

PR VALUE

PRINT

R 925,693.17

R 2,777,079.51

ONLINE

R 2,777,862.03

R 8,333,586.09

BROADCAST

R 3,488,814.10

R 10,466,442.30

TOTAL:

R 7,192,369.30 R 21,577,107.90

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What emerged most starkly, however, was not how different their challenges were but rather how similar. In many cases speakers presented on current and recent sustainability related projects and - while they differed greatly in terms of scale, sophistication, and objective - the message was the same: “We want to share and we want to learn.” A highlight from among the technical inputs came from the City of Barcelona in the form of its mobility plan, which has the potential to fundamentally change the city. The following key learnings emerged: cities can be fundamentally changed and, in order to do so effectively, it is essential to bring in the professionals who have the necessary skills to formulate the strategy and implement the plan; it is important to commit to your plan in spite of resistance from those who may be inconvenienced in the short term. What came through strongly was also that cities should not lack ambition, but set ambitious and progressive plans and targets, then set about achieving these. Mayors also expressed their desire to act decisively in order to form key strategic partnerships and called for investment and access to the funding to enable them to implement projects. In answer to this challenge, a number of speakers emphasised the availability of funding, with R20 effectively challenging the cities to bring through bankable projects, assuring the Forum that technical and financial support would be available to facilitate such projects. The R20 goal was in fact to facilitate 100 such projects by COP22 in November. A key outcome was the unanimous expression that from an international, African and South African perspective, the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum has merit, locus and purpose. This purpose is to advance the sustainable development of African cities by capital cities assuming a leadership position in this regard. Practically, this will happen through the roll-out of multiple related projects in capital cities, and through the ongoing sharing of lessons and best practice across this network, and to record and revisit these actions annually through the Forum, which will be staged in different cities across the network into the future. ACCSF Conference Plenary


SPEAKERS Official opening of the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum Programme Director: Cllr Subesh Pillay, MMC: Economic Development, City of Tshwane Cllr Pillay personally welcomed the visiting mayors, their mayoral delegations and keynote speakers on what was the final day of Africa Month. Mr Bene M’Poko, Ambassador of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Dean of the Diplomatic Corps Opening remarks Mr M’Poko highlighted the fact that African cities are facing major challenges, but added that the forum represented a collective commitment to address these challenges. He emphasised the need to strive to create liveable cities that represent a safe and comfortable home for those who live in them, and to become places that welcome people and allow themto feel safe and wishing to return. Challenges include high rates of unemployment, crime and environmental issues, all of which leave mayors in the unenviable position of having to address these enormous challenges. The forum called upon everyone present to work together and share experiences as that would be the most practical way to move forward. He reiterated the fact that rural areas should not be overlooked as they also need to be sustainable in order that people might choose to live in those areas as well. The other mayors were also challenged to stand as candidates to host this event in future years. Cllr Parks Tau, Executive Mayor of the City of Johannesburg Topic: Trends arising from the recent Afri-Cities Summit and other international platforms requiring attention of African Capital Cities Cllr Tau placed urbanisation in the context of international discussions and spoke on various trends displayed by cities and about the climate change interventions discussed during the AfriCities Summit. Its main theme was “Shaping the future of Africa with the people: the contribution of African local authorities to agenda 2063 of the African Union”. This is an indication that cities have initiated intensive programmes regarding sustainability in a broader perspective. Urbanisation challenges were outlined with a focus on redesigning cities, especially in South Africa where there is a commitment between governments and all stakeholders to realise sustainable

Ambassador Bene M’Poko

Cllr Subesh Pillay urban development. The Integrated Urban Development Framework released by the Department of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs was praised for calling for a “new deal” for South African cities based on the 3Cs growth model (compact, connected and coordinated). Initiatives to develop national urban policies in countries such as Malawi and Burundi were welcomed and applauded. UN Habitat’s African Urban Agenda Programme (Urban Agenda), together with the African Union’s Agenda 2063 (Agenda 2063), were noted for providing the direction and inspiration needed to tackle poverty and unemployment at the same time as seeking solutions to create a prosperous continent. This is only possible if there is effective multilevel governance and deliberate engagements with other sectors of society. The United Cities and Local Governments of Africa, the UCLGA, have put forward a proposal for a Charter in Decentralisation as a mechanism to ensure closer links with Heads of States and Ministers to ensure the smooth implementation of the African Urban Agenda, the Agenda 2063 and other multi-lateral agreements. These include the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), the Paris Outcome and the New Urban Agenda (the document set to come out of Habitat III this October). Africa needs strong capital cities – be it administrative or financial capital cities - that are on a par with leading cities around the world. The Paris Outcome has implications for cities and local governments. In December 2015, the historic Paris Agreement was concluded at Le Bourget, with tools available such as the Compact of Mayors. The world is now well on its

The City of Tshwane Metro Police Choir

Cllr Parks Tau

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way to cushioning the devastating effects of climate change thanks to the implementation of mitigation and adaptation actions at local level. The New Urban Agenda: at the recent Local Government Hearings on Habitat III, the general sentiment expressed in relation to Vision 2030 was that strengthening of governance was required across all levels. Local governments and cities emphasised that Habitat III is not only about the SDG 11, but that other goals have an urban element to them and, in light of these global developments, stronger mechanisms for financing urban development are required (in line with paragraph 34 of the Addis Ababa Action Agenda). Through the New Urban Agenda it is proposed that a single urban agenda will harmonise the SDGs, the Paris Agreement, and access to finance. For the way forward: we stand at an opportune time in 2016 as African Cities and, indeed, as cities across the globe, with leadership from the UCLG and the New Urban Agenda. Cllr Tau quoted the United Nations’ Secretary General, Mr Ban Ki-moon, who said, in 2012: “Local is global and global is local. The road to sustainability runs through the world’s towns and cities. By building sustainable towns and cities, you will build global sustainability”. Hastings Chikoko, Regional Director for Africa C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group Message of Support: Sustainability leadership from megacities in Africa Mr Chikoko expressed thanks and congratulations on behalf of C40 to the City of Tshwane for convening representatives from the capital cities in Africa in order to discuss ways of making our administrative capitals sustainable. He also thanked them for the leadership role they had provided on sustainability as well as the global leadership role taken by the City of Tshwane to lead the C40 Transit Oriented Development Network of Cities. In offering some words of support based on the experience from the African megacities that are part of the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, Mr Chikoko began by sharing his personal belief that the narrative of Africa is changing: According to the 2016 African Economic Outlook report, “Africa’s growth in real GDP is estimated at 3.6%, higher than the 3.1% for the global economy and 1.5% for the Euro area, and Africa remained the world’s second-fastest growing economy after East Asia. In 2015, sub-Saharan Africa grew faster than the continental average, at 4.2%”. He added that the African Union’s Agenda 2063 is a bold

Celia Njenga

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commitment to an agenda for the Africa that Africans want to see, and that it would work collaboratively to achieve this along with its international cooperating partners. However, if not effectively managed, climate change threatens to alter the natural capital and systems on which Africa’s economic and social development depend. Should the continent’s economic progress not seriously take into consideration the anthropogenic factors causing global warming, then the consequences would be potentially catastrophic. A low-carbon development pathway should, therefore, be an integral part of the ‘Africa-rising’ movement, which put into context the importance of meetings and summits between key stakeholders and role-players. Agenda 2063 seeks to achieve a “prosperous Africa based on inclusive growth and sustainable development” and “with climate resilient economies and communities”. This is necessary to climate-proof Africa’s economic and urban growth. Mr Chikoko further provided an overview of how C40 megacities in Africa are responding to the challenges facing them and offered some insight into what African Capital Cities can learn from these cities: It is important to make bold commitments and to hold each other accountable to achieving those commitments: • Megacities in Africa are taking actions to address climate change while, at the same time, also learning from and benchmarking with other cities on the continent and around the world. • Through city-to-city collaboration and benchmarking, C40 megacities in Africa have joined other cities globally in implementing sustainability activities that are of a world-class quality and standard. • The Climate Action in Megacities Report indicates that megacities are taking decisive action by investing in sustainability actions. The report indicates that 64% of actions are funded by the cities’ own budgets or savings. • In addition, cities are increasingly finding innovative financing mechanisms to address climate change. A good example is the City of Johannesburg’s green bonds project, which won the global 2015 C40 Climate Leadership Awards. • C40 megacities are also investing in staffing for sustainability activities and have assigned sustainability roles to staff within the city government, thereby indicating the commitment cities are making to address issues of sustainability. For example, the host of the Sustainability Forum, the city of Tshwane, has its own sustainability unit placed within the Office of the Executive Mayor. • Megacities in Africa are ensuring access to the best

The Green Mile Tour

Hastings Chikoko


available data for planning and measuring the impact of sustainability actions – and the difference between a city having a sustainability programme and actually being more sustainable can be proven through measurement and reporting. • Megacities in Africa are influencing change through high-level city diplomacy on sustainability at international levels. Megacity Mayors from Africa have been part of the conversation at global levels, helping to shape decisions on how sustainability can be arranged against the imperative to grow our economies, reduce poverty, create jobs and improve the quality of life of our people. He added that if these objectives are achieved then meaningful contribution would be made to the Sustainable Development Goals – especially SDG 11 and the AU’s Agenda 2063. The mantra ‘Africa-rising’ could then truly be celebrated and they would achieve ‘the Africa we want to see’. In closing, he highlighted the value of the Summit being held so soon after the signing of the Paris agreement, as that afforded mayors the opportunity to discuss sustainability with their peers and other stakeholders. Areas of major concern included a focus on limiting the temperature increase to 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels (recognising that this would significantly reduce the risks and impacts of climate change); a focus on increasing the ability to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change and foster climate resilience; and a focus on making finance flows consistent with a pathway towards low greenhouse gas emissions and climate-resilient development. Cllr Kgosientso Ramokgopa: Executive Mayor – City of Tshwane Address by the host Mayor: Appropriate policies and frameworks for African urban growth Cllr Ramokgopa personally welcomed the representatives of African Capital Cities, stating that the assembly was in keeping with the various commitments that were made at the inaugural gathering that had been held the previous year. He commented that the gathering had itself been convened in recognition of cities’ innumerable challenges and referencing commitments set out in the Tshwane Declaration. He recalled how they had pledged their support of these programmatic commitments, understanding perfectly well that, between the current reality and the actual realisation of these goals, there would be many obstacles to overcome in these endeavours, but that it was important to hold true to the spirit and guidelines of the Constitutive Act of the African Union. The first task noted for the Forum was to assess where all the capital cities were in relation to the formative processes of the African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum, and to draw a balance sheet of all achievements and challenges in building the combined new initiative in the past 12 months. The need to meet challenges head on was also stressed (in the face of added challenges such as the financial crisis), but he added that it was essential not to lose sight of the imperative to transform African cities to bring about equitable and egalitarian order, as that is what lies at the heart of this initiative. Without formal and substantive cooperation, the continent stands no chance of reaching the luminous summit of a humane, just and equitable continent in which human worth is judged by precepts and standards that affirm the humanity of each and every person. The

entire African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum initiative seeks to promote ideals of humanism, egalitarianism and solidarity, and for these programmes and undertakings to materialise requires not just leadership in general, but also a particular brand and style of leadership – an inclusive, facilitative, accountable and synergistic leadership that elevates the finest talents and qualities embedded within our communities. After the 2015 Forum there was a clearer idea of the challenges facing mayors and their cities, as well as what it will take to significantly surmount them. This would serve as a starting point towards achieving a sustainable developmental trajectory on the continent. Whether or not all stakeholders succeed, and whether or not they also all give it their best effort, will be attested to by the history that will unfold in the coming decades. Deputy Minister Andries Nel, Deputy Minister, Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs Address by the Deputy Minister Mr Nel expressed his thanks to all present by reciting key lines from the African Union Anthem, and emphasising the importance of cities as roots that feed the “African Tree of Life”. He stressed how this serves as a reminder of what Nelson Mandela had said in terms of how the architectural remains of the African city of Carthage speak of Africa’s contribution to the formation of the condition of civilisation. He referenced United Nations research that indicated that in 1950, a total of 30% of the world’s population lived in urban areas, today the figure is 54%, and is set to rise to 66% by 2050. He added that a further

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The Green Mile Tour

two-and-a-half billion people will be added to the world’s urban population by 2050, with 90% of this increase taking place in Asia and Africa. In fact, Africa is expected to be the fastest urbanising region between 2020 and 2050. In light of this anticipated population growth, it is essential to note that Africa currently only has only three megacities (cities with a population of more than 10 million), namely Cairo, Kinshasa and Lagos. It is projected that three more megacities will be added by 2030, namely Johannesburg, Luanda, and Dar es Salaam. Most of the fastest-growing cities with a population of less than 1 million people are also located in Asia and Africa. He stressed how the growth and management of urban areas must be guided in ways that unleash the potential of our cities and towns, adding that, in South Africa, there remains a need to reverse the legacy of apartheid-created spatial injustice. Ensuring that these most rapidly developing cities in the world develop sustainably is of vital importance, not only for the African continent, but also for the planet as a whole. To facilitate mobility and efficiency in the integration and densification process, land policies, infrastructure investments, and market-based energies require coherent policy frameworks with a primary focus on generating inclusivity and social cohesion through such endeavours. Consequently, there is a need for well-developed policies that promote integrated and sustainable urban development, failing which the continent will continue to face the downsides of urbanisation. This African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum brings together the ingenuity, the experience, the expertise and the commitment to find African solutions to African challenges, although there are also global challenges. The forum provides all stakeholders and role-players with a valuable opportunity to share and learn from one another, allowing for the exchange of ideas and experiences in terms of appropriate policies, design ingenuity, innovation, technical proficiency, robust implementation mechanisms and adequate infrastructural investments. He highlighted that, in doing so, effect is given to the injunction of the AU Agenda 2063 that must develop “an African approach to development and transformation, learning from the diverse, unique and shared experiences and best practices of various countries and regions as a basis of forging an African approach to transformation”. The Forum took place at an opportune time for this discussion internationally, continentally and nationally. The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) recognise the importance

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of urban areas. Goal Eleven of the 17 SDG’s is “making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable”. AU Agenda 2063 recognises that “cities and other settlements are hubs of cultural and economic activities, with modernised infrastructure, and people have access to affordable and decent housing including housing finance together with all the basic necessities of life such as water, sanitation, energy, public transport and ICT”. One of Agenda 2063’s key objectives is to “provide opportunities for all Africans to have decent and affordable housing in clean, secure and well planned environments”. It proposes that this objective should be achieved through the following four measures: 1. Providing access to affordable and decent housing to all in sustainable human settlements; 2. Ensuring effective and territorial planning and land tenure, use and management systems; 3. Ensuring balanced development of all human settlements while embracing a rural urban continuum; 4. Improving the livelihoods of the great percentage of people working and living in slums and informal settlements. Implementing these objectives will require, in the words of South Africa’s National Development Plan, for a country to do three things: - Clarify and relentlessly pursue a national vision for spatial development; - Sharpen the instruments for achieving this vision; - Build the required capabilities in the state and among citizens. Mr Nel set out the National Government Framework emphasising that “we must say what we mean, and we must mean what we say, and most importantly we must do what we say we will do. Theory without action is empty, action without theory is blind”. Mr Nel listed the undertakings made at the first ACCSF last year and challenged participants to act on these undertakings. He then finally expressed his best wishes for the deliberations ahead. TECHNICAL PRESENTATIONS Kobie Brand, Director of ICEI Africa Role of African cities in supporting international climate agreements Kobie Brand emphasised the fact that urban centres are good locations for innovation and incubation, adding that it was essential to build the urban fabric over the next 40 years so that it can occupy at least twice the size of what we have now. Cities need mandates and frameworks but these are not always clear. That said, she stressed that cities also need to stand up for themselves in order to both pioneer initiatives as well as to join others and to connect and lobby for the role of local government. People are also realising the importance of cities when it comes to climate discussions, although cities need to demonstrate where and how they can make a difference. The new SDC’s must include cities and should allocate resources to local government. She added that ICLEI will continue to engage with leading cities to assist them with measurements according to indicators, in addition to finding innovative finance solutions, and she called on all mayors to join this movement. She encouraged cities as a group to come on board as these activities and goals form part of a continuous loop, and from these types of forums, action follows and real projects flow.


Jordi Farrando, Former General Secretary, International Union of Architects Case study: a new mobility plan for the city of Barcelona With his perspective of life on a different continent in the City of Barcelona, but having experienced many of the same problems, he stressed the importance of not focussing on the details but rather on the necessary ideas to find common ground. As an architect and urban designer, he believes in spacial planning as the basis for solving many urban challenges and cited the fact that, even though Barcelona is not a massive city (1.7 million inhabitants), it is a compact city and forms part of a larger metropolitan area that is home to 3.5 million people. The city sought to address two challenges: traffic congestion and insufficient public space. Traffic congestion has caused enormous problems for human and environmental health in terms of GHG emissions and air pollution respectively, and the intensive use of streets by private vehicles has resulted in a major problem for the authorities in Barcelona. A key consequence of this is poor air quality (smog) which can often be seen hanging over the city, as is the case with many cities around the world. This has resulted in Barcelona failing to meet both EU and WHO targets for air quality. Some 3 500 deaths can be attributed to these factors annually, and these (in addition to many other healthrelated issues) might have been avoided. Public spaces in Barcelona are very compact, which is a good thing as the city does not have much public space. There are very few green spaces in Barcelona, in fact far below WHO standards in this respect. Sustainability is a key objective of their plan, which calls for a modal shift to small, sustainable modes of transportation to reduce air and noise pollution and a switch towards renewable energy sources. Following the hierarchy of Pedestrian–Bicycle–Public Transport–Goods and Services–Private cars, the goal is to reduce private vehicle mobility by 21%; to increase the number of public transport journeys by 3%; bicycle journeys by 75%; and pedestrian journeys by 10%. In order to ensure that the road infrastructure serves the city and its citizens, several actions/interventions were planned: • Public transport: The historic transport network is complicated and intertwined (colloquially referred to as a “spaghetti network”) which is neither logical for transport users nor sustainable. The proposed plan involves switching to an Octagonal System – with route choices determined by direction, in other words, north, east, south or west. Commuters would be able to travel anywhere with, at most, one interchange. This rational system would be easy to follow, resulting in shorter routes and a reduction in total

Kobie Brand

mileage covered across the system, which would result in a reduction in pollution. • Bicycles: The introduction of bicycle lanes are a key component of the project and are intended to reach 65% of the population. • Super blocks: These are an amalgamation of about nine central city blocks, each of which is cordoned off and freed up internally through a park and walk/ride approach. All streets may still be used for all modes of transport but only during the specific time slot allocated for a particular mode. Apart from decongesting these areas, moving to the super blocks model could free up space at the corners of the super blocks and these could become interesting public spaces. It is envisaged that approximately 120 intersections could become available and could be dedicated as public space for pedestrians. Super blocks thus have the potential to increases the current allocation of 75 hectares of public space in Barcelona by 10 hectares and would make walking in the city easier and safer. Mr Farrando concluded by reaffirming his belief that the design and shape of cities is an important consideration in establishing a better quality of life for inhabitants. Celia Njenga, Head, Sub-Regional Office and Regional Programme Coordinator, Southern Africa United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) Perspectives on urban sustainability in the African context Africa is increasingly being seen as a continent in transition, in part because of its high levels of urbanisation and a population with a high proportion of young people. The World Bank has stated that the fastest growing economies are in Africa and this growth is being led by cities. Africa can leapfrog to best practices and technologies and avoid following the high-impact path of the developed world. Politically, more local government authorities appear to be influencing decisions and strategies. A lot of progress has been made since 1992, with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by world leaders officially coming in to force in early 2016. Ms Njenga highlighted some images and messages from the UN Environment Assembly in respect of related priority objectives: Poverty; Education; Health; and Environment – and the SDGs offer an integrated approach to follow in tackling these challenges. It is necessary to look at the current state of the environment. The key message in this regard is that there is enormous unfinished business in respect of resource efficiency, and it is imperative that local government shows the leadership required to ensure living standards are raised. A paradigm change is needed

The Green Mile Tour

Jordi Farrando

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in order to move to more sustainable and safer environments. The importance of linkages should be considered with more compact and more connected cities enabling multiple modes of transport. A more integrated approach is required and different stakeholders should engage each other to break administrative silos within cities. A key question people ask is, “what are the characteristics I must address for my city to be more sustainable?” It starts with a strategy, which plans key infrastructure, taking into account environmental factors and the economy and offering local opportunities for the private sector especially SMMEs. Cities should enable micro businesses. In society, people are key and they are moving to the cities in search of a higher standard of living. This raises the issue of resilience as informal settlements are highly vulnerable. Resource efficiency is also a key aspect of sustainable cities. Another focus should be business dialogue – how do city leaders enable businesses in a city? How can corporate players achieve the profits they need and how does being good corporate citizens help their bottom line? Local government, however, still lacks the skills to access finance and policies should be created to enable this. It is important that local government leaders remain informed and are networking in order to learn from each other. Christophe Nuttall, Executive Director, R20 Regions of Climate Action R20’s vision and role in assisting local government to develop and communicate low-carbon and climate-resilient economic development projects for African Capital Cities R20 was established to support the implementation of green infrastructure and is part of an alliance of cities and regions, companies and the finance sector. It has been determined that sub-national authorities need bankable projects promising a return on investment in order to access green infrastructure funding. R20 runs an accompanying programme advancing projects within the following three categories: LED street lights Waste management Renewable energy. R20’s goal is to challenge role players to implement innovative projects. It wants citizens to have better living standards, access to electricity, access to water, etc, and believes that the policies and technology exist. There is, furthermore, financing available and willing investors. A hurdle is it can be difficult for the private sector to work together with government and R20 seeks to trigger the “magic” required to stimulate a broad roll-out of projects by connecting the dots between public policy, technology

Christophe Nuttall

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and finance. R20 has worked to achieve this alignment, and this is starting to pay dividends as it has just signed an $80m, 50MW PPA in Mali and this will be followed by a similar project in Senegal. R20 triggered the implementation of LED-street-light projects in Brazil by covering the initial costs such as feasibility studies. It showed that the projects could have a seven-year return on investment through lower energy consumption and lower maintenance costs (than for conventional lighting). R20 is also keen to work with South African cities, and will be working with ICLEI to roll out the 100 Projects initiative, which seeks to pursue low-hanging fruits in key sectors. Funders have committed to cover feasibility studies and to launch 100 projects by COP 22. In terms of local government, the intention is to raise $100-billion and in order to access this money, bankable projects are required. This means ensuring a return on investment, and a 10-20% equity investment. SUMMARY OF MAYOR’S SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP SHARES AND PROJECTS (Extract from the Executive Mayor’s Close Out Speech) Rabat, Morocco is demonstrating leadership and innovation in the implementation of renewable energy programmes and has set a tangible target of 52% of clean energy by 2030. Dakar, Senegal is responding to climate change challenges through a number of resilience and adaptation programmes. Of importance is a micro-gardening project, which has multiple sustainability benefits that include food security, water conservation and community development while acting as carbon sinks. This project is well linked to the Tshwane project on the establishment of Agro-politan centres, therefore providing an excellent platform for shared learning. Monrovia, Liberia has a special focus on community-based enterprises to address the dual challenge of waste management and high unemployment and is actively seeking to lower the transmission rates of communicable diseases. Bamako, Mali has an innovative public engagement programme termed “the environmental protection brigade” aimed at ensuring that communities are jointly involved in pertinent environmental development projects like canalisation, sustainable water management programmes and drainage systems. Juba, South Sudan as the newest city in the world has managed to identify development challenges and prioritised the development of green infrastructure. This presents an excellent platform for the city to leap-frog and implement innovative construction solutions that will ensure resilience and long-term sustainability. Bujumbura, Burundi as a relatively small city with just over

Jubula Band

Deputy Minister Andries Nel


Mayor of Windhoek, Muesee Kazapua, Cllr Kgosientso Ramokgopa & Peter Ndoro at the TNA Business Briefing on SABC2 Morning Live one million inhabitants, is implementing a successful tree planting programme aimed at reducing river overflow and to support climate adaptation and mitigation by providing a much-needed carbon sink. Lome, Togo is tackling the issue of climate change adaptation through the use of marine sand to build catchment areas for coastal protection and flood prevention. To ensure reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, the city is reducing the number of private vehicles in urban centres by introducing and promoting the use of public transportation. Porto-Novo, Benin is rolling out a solar-powered-streetlighting programme and a semi-mechanised integrated waste management project. Sao Tome, Sao Tome and Principe is focusing on an intensive outreach programme on integrated solid waste management that incorporates recycling as a main intervention, targeting students and community members. Libreville, Gabon has a Green City Project that includes carbon sequestration and beautification through tree planting as well as the creation of a network of small and medium-sized enterprises in the green economy. Bangui, Central African Republic is focusing on ‘Light for All’, a project initiated by the city to address urban security in sensitive neighbourhoods and which includes provision for an additional 500 streetlights that are solar powered. Windhoek, Namibia has a policy intended to formalise informal settlements with location planning and connection plans for services. In dealing with severe drought the City has implemented new technologies and best practices. Lusaka, Zambia is focusing on an urban renewal programme and upgrading of slums to address rapid population growth in urban areas. Lilongwe, Malawi is strengthening its response to inclusive urban governance and management. This will be done through partnerships and stakeholder engagement to ensure buy-in in terms of sustainable infrastructure development. Maseru, Lesotho is addressing environmental sustainability by building a green city through a multi-billion rand solar project in partnership with private investors. Some of

the projects developed by the city include a solid-wastemanagement project, retrofitting of street lights from conventional to solar, community gardens, and cleaning of the city by technical staff and councillors. Harare, Zimbabwe plans to transition to a world-class city by 2025 through the development and implementation of green projects in partnership with the private sector. 14 000 Solar street lights will be installed on the major roads and airports by 2017 to improve security. Renewable energy for cooking and lighting will be generated via a biogas plant. Mbabane, Swaziland in response to challenges of unemployment, poverty and HIV/Aids, is stimulating economic growth through greening initiatives that support market-led businesses and improved understanding of environmental sustainability. Community members will be empowered to take advantage of economic and market opportunities. Compost from waste material is being produced by communities and has created a sizeable market in the city. Gaborone, Botswana is planning to build green by diverting funds earmarked for coal purchases for electricity to building sustainable green houses. The project will be implemented through partnerships with the private sector. This will also assist in driving sustainability initiatives throughout the city. DAY 2 ACTIVITIES Summary of the Business Briefing on SABC2 Morning Live During the second day of Sustainability Week, the TNA Media Business Briefing was broadcast live for two hours to over three million viewers tuned into South Africa Broadcasting Corporation’s (SABC’s) Morning Live programme. SABC presenter, Peter Ndoro, conducted a panel discussion on sustainability in African Capital Cities with the following representatives: • Cllr Kgosientso Ramokgopa, Executive Mayor of City of Tshwane in South Africa, • Cllr Stephen Wani Michael Kaya, Mayor of Juba City in South Sudan • Ms Clara Doe Mvogo, Mayor of the City of Monrovia in Liberia and Chair of the Monrovia City Council

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• Mr Muesee Kazapua, Mayor of the City of Windhoek in Namibia • Mr Benito Jones, Mayor of Mbabane in Swaziland • Ms Kobie Brand, CEO of ICLEI Africa The guests shared ideas on how to develop more sustainable cities as well as empower and educate those living in those cities. The Green Mile Following the Business Briefing the mayors were escorted by electric vehicle from the CSIR campus to the Union Buildings. The event, billed as The Green Mile, involved 20 electric vehicles driving in procession through the streets of the City as a symbolic acknowledgement of the City of Tshwane’s commitment to low-carbon mobility. Having calculated the carbon footprint for the City of Tshwane for the past three years, the City has come to appreciate the fact that, after coal powered electricity, the transport sector is the second-biggest source of carbon emissions. It is thus incumbent on the City to institute multi-pronged climate mitigation interventions, in a view of reducing these transport-related emissions. The Green Mile was highlighted part of this solution may be a shift to electric vehicles. The Exhibition Tour After the Green Mile, mayors were escorted on a tour of exhibition highlights. DAY 3: TECHNICAL TOURS The mayors were taken on a tour of the City of Tshwane’s sustainable projects: 1. Tshwane Food and Energy Centre in Bronkhorstspruit contributes to the city’s food security through livestock production and to its energy security by using photovoltaic solar power. 2. Bio2Watt Biogas Plant uses organic waste from livestock and other sources of bio waste within the city to produce bio gas, from which electricity is generated. This electricity from renewable sources is then fed into the City of Tshwane grid and used by BMW’s manufacturing facility, elsewhere on the grid. 3. Kwaggasrand Material Recovery Facility is a multi-purpose recycling facility being developed by New GX Enviro Solutions and Logistics, a waste, environmental management and bulk logistics service provider currently providing waste management services to the City of Tshwane. The Kwaggasrand facility is made up of three components: a material recovery facility with recyclables processed from a free-bag system distributed by the city to residents; a

Exhibition

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The Green Mile Tour composting facility where green waste will be shredded and turned into organic compost; and a buildingrubble recycling facility where building rubble will be turned into aggregate. These three waste streams make up approximately 65% of the waste that is disposed at landfills.

Materials Recovery Facility Tour

Exhibition


DECLARATION ON ADVANCING SUSTAINABILITY LEADERSHIP IN AFRICAN CITIES, 2015 We the Mayors of African Capital Cities, gathered at the City of Tshwane, The Capital City of South Africa, from 23 to 25 June 2015, hereby declare to advance sustainability within the African continent through ground-breaking initiatives. • Noting the current global challenges that threaten growth and development in our cities, especially those related to climate change, global economic slowdown, trade facilitation, connectivity, land degradation caused by mining activities and water shortages. • Committing to convene annually as leaders of Capital Cities in Africa to take stock of our progress and consolidate our positions in urban sustainability. • Accepting the Offer by the City of Tshwane to Host the next annual gathering during their sustainability week conference in June 2016. • Realising the unique role of capital cities in providing leadership for other local authorities within country boarders; • Recognising the importance of partnerships and collaborative efforts in the implementation of sustainability programmes; • Further recognising that, while we look towards international policies and national legislative prescripts for policy directives, real action can only happen at a local sphere of government. • Aware of the increasing rate of urbanisation, especially in African Cities, and the need to design sustainable urban development solutions that take advantage of this growing trend. We therefore commit to lead in advancing the following city sustainability priorities: • The enhancement of infrastructure in our capitals to allow for connectivity and ease of doing business within the African Region; • Collaboration with Green Building Councils in Africa to transform our built environment due to its important role in ensuring resilience at times of disasters, especially natural disasters; • Full utilisation and investment in our most precious resource – our people, in implementing sustainability projects; • Focus on the Food-Water-Energy nexus to effectively address the developmental challenges posed by this nexus; • Investment and focus on sustainable transport and connectivity to allow for freedom of movement within urban and rural spaces, especially to centres of economic activity; • Jointly leverage on mechanisms for sustainability financing to ensure that investments in urban infrastructure secures sustainable economic growth within the carrying capacity of the planet’s systems and resources; • Prioritise reduction of informal settlements which are a visible sign of urban poverty by improving access to basic services like clean water, electricity, health services and urban food production programmes; • The effects of climate change are converging in dangerous ways. Cities are contributors to climate change and, at the same time, cities and towns are heavily vulnerable to climate change. We will learn from each other in implementing both climate change mitigation and adaptation programmes; • Transition our cities towards a green economy that will ensure the provision of basic services and secure local economic development, while preserving natural resources, stimulating employment creation and industrial activity; • Focused waste management that encourages recycling programs aimed at diverting large amounts of materials from landfill sites, the development of Energy from Waste sites and gas extraction processes. Leapfrogging technology in this area could yield maximum economic benefits; • Enhanced advocacy and participation in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change processes, especially the upcoming 21st Conference of Parties (COP 21) in Paris from 1 to 12 December 2015; • Coordinated approach towards the implementation of the Global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), to be adopted by the United National General Assembly in September 2015.

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REPRESENTATION

The audience of some 300 delegates from public and private sector, professional practice, civil society, and academia, were engaged and participated in the interactive aspects of the programme. Guests of honour from the African Capital Cities mayors and their high-level entourage represented over 40 people.

MAYORAL DELEGATIONS FROM AFRICAN CAPITAL CITIES IN ATTENDANCE Designation

Name

Surname

Capital

Country

Municipality Councillor

Mamadou

Sidibe

Bamako

Mali

Official in the direction of Fatoumata International Affairs in the City of Bamako

Maiga

Bamako

Mali

Mayor

Emile Raymond Gros

Nakombo

Bangui

Central African Republic

Permanent Secretary of the Association of Municipalities of the Republic of Central Africa

Jean-Bosco

Abderamane

Bangui

Central African Republic

City Councillor

Landing

Sanyang

Banjul

Gambia

Mayor

Freddy

Mbonimpa

Bujumbura

Burundi

Communication Officer

Candide

Katzatsa

Bujumbura

Burundi

Mayor of the District of Dieuppeul Derklé

Cheikh

Gueye

Dakar

Senegal

Councillor

Sow

Moussa

Dakar

Senegal

Mayor

Kagiso Calvin

Thutlwe

Gaborone

Botswana

Town Clerk

Mpho

Mathe

Gaborone

Botswana

Mayor

Christopher Lovemore

Mbanga

Harare

Zimbabwe

City Representative

Wadzanai Annie

Vhutuza

Harare

Zimbabwe

Mayor

Stephen Wani Michael

Kaya

Juba

South Sudan

Public Relations Officer, Juba City Peter Mendasuk Elias Council

Danga

Juba

South Sudan

First Deputy Mayor of the sixtieth Wilfried Ghislain district

Issiembi

Libreville

Gabon

Communication Adviser to the Mayor of Libreville

Christian

Auge

Libreville

Gabon

Fourth Deputy Mayor

Julien Florent

Assoumou Akue

Libreville

Gabon

Director of the Decentralised Cooperation

Edgard Mesmer

Mvele

Libreville

Gabon

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Designation

Name

Surname

Capital

Country

Director General of Environment Affairs of the City of Libreville

Bonaventure

Nzigou Mamfoumbi

Libreville

Gabon

Mayor

Willie Edward

Chapondera

Lilongwe

Malawi

Chief Executive Officer

Maxon Moza

Zeleza

Lilongwe

Malawi

Special Delegate of the 2nd District of Lome

Koffigan Gabienu

Hukporti

Lome

Togo

General Secretary of the Municipality

Tagba Atafeyinam

Tchalim

Lome

Togo

Acting district officer

Trophius

Kufanga

Lusaka

Zambia

Town Clerk

Alex Masechaba Theordora Mwansa

Lusaka

Zambia

Mayor

Masechaba Theordora

Makong

Maseru

Lesotho

Town Clerk

Mantai Augustina

Phaila

Maseru

Lesotho

Councillor

Sikhumbuzo Trevor

Dube

Mbabane

Swaziland

Mayor of Mbabane

Benito

Jones

Mbabane

Swaziland

Maintenance Engineer

Makhosazane Precious

Zikalala

Mbabane

Swaziland

City Planner

Thulani Mlungisi

Maphalala

Mbabane

Swaziland

Mayor

Clara

Doe Nvogo

Monrovia

Liberia

Mayor

Bono

Julia K

Monrovia

Liberia

Coordinator of Decentralised Enagnon Joelle Sylvie Akodjenou Tottint Cooperation Mireille

Porto Novo

Benin

First Deputy Mayor

Jocelyne Solange Julie

Zinsou

Porto Novo

Benin

Mayor

Mohammed

Sadiki

Rabat

Morocco

Chief of International Affairs Division Karim

Benhammou

Rabat

Morocco

Councillor

Dos Santos Vera Cruz

Sao Tome

Sao Tome

President of the District Assembly Amancio of Agua Grande

De Castro De Oliveira Sao Tome Viegas

Sao Tome

Mayor

Kazapua

Windhoek

Namibia

Manager: Mayoral Support and Christopher External Relations

Eita

Windhoek

Namibia

Urban Planner-Sustainable

Narikutuke

Naruses

Windhoek

Namibia

Councillor

Igniatus

Semba

Windhoek

Namibia

Councillor

Ananias

Niizimba

Windhoek

Namibia

Gualter Nelson

Muesee

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CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC – BANGUI

Sustainability Related Project: Light For All Light For All is a project initiated jointly by the Ministry of Energy and the municipality of Bangui, with financial support from the Chinese Embassy in CAR. This project is set within the framework of a research study that is aimed at defining a lasting solution to the multiple problems of electricity supply that face Bangui. One of the aims of the project is to promote the gradual return of security into sensitive neighbourhoods that have been shaken by the recent community conflict. An additional objective is to promote the use of solar energy and to encourage households to make use of this energy source for their daily activities. The project will be replicated throughout the city in order to help address the lack of electricity supply, which has proven to be a limiting factor in the development of the Central African Republic in general, and particularly to the capital city of Bangui. On average the solar irradiation is 5kWh/m2 per day across the entire territory. The North-East of the country (along with many parts through the central regions) benefits from daily sunshine which, according to regions and seasons, ranges from between 10 to 12 hours a day, a factor which makes the development of photovoltaic electricity highly feasible. A further initiative is the installation of solar street light projects in several neighbourhoods of Bangui, with a total of 500 streetlights being installed in sensitive areas of the capital. These areas include the 3rd, 4th and 5th districts. RAYMOND EMILE GROS NAKOMBO Mayor of Bangui Nakombo has been engaged in business from a young age. Born in Berberati MambéréKadéï on 3 December, 1956, he studied economics and management at the Academy of Economic Sciences Bucharest, Romania. Nakombo has held various positions in the private and broader public sector. He was Deputy Director General of the MoroccanPopular Central Bank (BPMC), as well as managing director of the company Exploitation of Tobacco-Central Cameroon (CETAC), based in Gamboula.

Bangui city size: 67km Population: 622 771

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PORTO-NOVO – BENIN

Sustainability Related Project: Waste in Porto-Novo The City of Porto-Novo produces 137 tonnes of waste daily, of which 40.48% is collected by non-governmental organisations (NGOs), with 13.46% of the waste transported to the Landfill Technical Center that has been built about 30km outside of the city. That waste is composed of more than 68% of organic and plant materials, sand and inert materials, with plastic making up 14% and paper and cardboard accounting for 2.5%. Waste management is, therefore, one of the issues for a sustainably green and clean City of Porto-Novo. Firstly, it appears that in the region of 50% of this waste comprises recoverables such as recyclables, compost and backfilling materials. To achieve this the city - in collaboration with the Lyon Urban Community and the French Development Agency (AFD) –initiated the establishment of a semi-mechanised sorting and waste-recycling unit. The project budget is estimated to be €500 000. Sanitation in the city and improving urban mobility To ensure that the city is able to withstand flooding during the rainy season, several street paving and sanitation initiatives are executed each year. These include the construction of large underground sewers or open pit and gutter installations. The flow of rainwater and wastewater has been facilitated by the installation of a central gutter system in all lanes. These lanes are also populated with trees and are lit, with auxiliary equipment such as fire hydrants and traffic signs have been installed. The “Porto-Novo, Green City” project plans to involve the city in an area of approximately 13 hectares, located close to the lagoon in the historic area of Porto-Novo.

EMMANUEL DJIMA ZOSSOU Mayor of Porto-Novo Born on 23 September, 1955, in Port-Novo, Zossou is a graduate in computer engineering who has held various positions of political and professional responsibility, he was elected Mayor of Porto-Novo, the capital of Benin, on 28 July, 2015.

Benin City size: 1281km² Population: 264 320

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GABORONE – BOTSWANA

Sustainability Related Project: Solar Energy The Botswana Government has assigned its research and innovation arm (Botswana Institute of Technology Research and Innovation – BITRI) to investigate innovative and sustainable ways of operation. As part of this initiative, the Gaborone City Council – in conjunction with the Botswana government – have decided to intensify and harness solar energy as a means to reduce the dependence on coal-powered electricity generation. This is primarily to take advantage of Botswana’s geographical position as well as its excellent solar regime. Secondly, over the last few years Botswana (along with a number of other countries in Southern Africa) have been experiencing a very serious shortage of electricity. In order to operationalise this, the City Council has collaborated with BITRI to develop and implement a technology that would work efficiently for the country. The Gaborone City Council signed a Memorandum of Agreement with BITRI in November 2014. This agreement wasaimed at building inhouse experience in order to facilitate the extension of the project to the rest of the city and, thereafter, throughout the rest of the country.

KAGISO CALVIN THUTLWE Mayor of Gaborone Councillor for Village ward in Gaborone Central Constituency, Mr Kagiso Calvin Thutlwe was elected unopposed as Mayor of Gaborone in 2014. Previous Occupation: Safety Technician at WBHO (2011 to 2014) Qualifications: Degree in Environmental Science and English Date of Birth: 05/08/1984 Family: He was born in Mahalapye village and has lived in Gaborone with his family for the past 31 years.

Gaborone city size: 169 km² Population: 2 230 900

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BUJUMBURA – BURUNDI

Sustainability Related Project: Education The government recommends that all children of schoolgoing age should attend school. In order to facilitate access to education for all, various initiatives have been undertaken, including free school fees at primary school level, while school officials and local authorities are required to work in order to make school environments safe areas where learners can achieve personal growth fulfilment. In Bujumbura there are now 31 public and 127 private schools catering for primary school education, with 68 public schools and 97 private schools that are able to accommodate lower secondary school level students. There are 40 public schools and 87 private schools, three public and 58 private secondary schools. At the level of higher education, there is a graduate school and a public university, six private universities as well as 10 institutions catering for higher learning. To meet the need for school infrastructure in the basic school programme, the local government built 143 classrooms during the course of the last two years. Some of these facilities are suitable for all categories of learners, including children with disabilities. As a result of these activities, the community is sensitised to contribute, either by making a donation in terms of building materials or through a cash contribution. It also organises awareness sessions for all education stakeholders based on the importance of inclusive education.

FREDDY MBONIMPA Mayor of Bujumbura Mbonimpa graduated from the Faculty of Physical Education and Sport at the University of Burundi and has been Mayor since September 2015.

Bujumbura city size: 86,50km² Population: 11 509 840

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MORONI – COMOROS

MOHAMED DAOUDOU Mayor of Moroni Daoudou attended the University of Dunkerque and University of Lille. He has a Masters and a Post Graduate Diploma in Commerce, Economy of Development and Economy Intelligence. He served with the Customs Services and the Department of Finance in Comoros from December 2009 to October 2011, and as Supervisor of the Department of Finance in Comoros from June 2011 to the present day. He is also currently the Manager of the City of Moroni, a position he has held since June 2007.

Comoros City size: 1,800km2 Population: 54 000

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LIBREVILLE – GABON

Sustainability Related Project: The Preservation of The Environment Local sustainable development is a major concern for the current Office of Libreville Municipal Council. It is also the top focus of the Libreville Local Development Plan, and includes Mission 1 Program #3 on the Environment and Local Climate Plan. This project is part of the greening policy of the Gabonese capital and is led by the current Municipal Council Office in Libreville. 1) T he preservation of the environment •The project helps to fight against pollution, including greenhouse gas effects. •The planting of trees and flowers ensures that the city is beautified, in addition to becoming better oxygenated by neutralising the carbon gases and other releases from motor vehicles that circulate in the city. 2) A  significant social impact •The project promotes the development and empowerment of young men and women involved in its implementation. •It helps to fight against unemployment, street crime and social insecurity. •It facilitates public awareness of the beauty and value of nature. •T he public-private partnership allows for better social mobilisation in terms of the struggle for the preservation of the environment, in addition to sustainable development. 3) A  major economic impact • The project requires the mobilisation of nearly 300 million CFA francs, 500 000 Euros or $750 000. • It has helped in creating a network of small- and medium-sized enterprises that specialise in the green economy.

ROSE CHRISTIANE OSSOUKA RAPONDA Mayor of Libreville Raponda graduated from the School of Economics, where she specialised in Public Finance. She is a former Budget Minister and Managing Director of Banque de l’Habitat du Gabon. She has come through the ranks in the General Directorate of The Economy, occupying positions such as Vice Director and Counsellor to the Director.

Gabon Population: 797 003

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BANJUL – GAMBIA

Sustainability Related Project: Drain excavation and rehabilitation There is evidence that coastal forests and trees provide some coastal protection, and that the clearing of coastal forests and trees has increased the vulnerability of coasts to erosion. Some areas have already experienced natural calamities, and the city undertook to clean the drainage and sewage systems to facilitate the easy flow of wastewater into the main canal. The city council partnered with numerous stakeholders in the country, including the National Water Electricity Company (NAWEC), National Disaster Management Agency (NDMA) and the National Environment Agency (NEA). This assistance has included designing plans for sustainable programs to mitigate against further effects such as floods and helping to ease the water flow from the city’s drainage system. Together with the National Disaster Management Coordinating Unit, the Council provides working materials, in addition to a number of incentives that are used to engage the youth as well as ward development committees. This includes the support of ward councillors in the cleansing of numerous buried drains in the city of Banjul, which occurs months before the rains start. This exercise is also done in preparation of the rainfall season to prevent flooding. COMMUNITY-BASED INFRASTRUCTURE AND LIVELIHOOD IMPROVEMENT PROJECT Participatory needs assessment conducted in eight wards in relationship to the community-owned infrastructure sub-component of cilip. This project was designed to support Local Government Authorities in Gambia in the development of communitybased public infrastructure within the regions. All local government authorities were required to pay a counterpart contribution of 5% of the project cost. This project enabled Banjul to implement 50 solar energy streetlight installations within Banjul North, Albert Market and Ndanganbi, the latter being a small settlement on the outskirts of the City of Banjul. The project has saved the Council from high electricity bills in addition to providing residents with sustainable security lighting. DR ALH ABDOULIE BAH Lord Mayor of Banjul Elected Lord Mayor in April 2013, he attended Leman ST. School between 1960 and 1964, after which he went to the Bathurst Town Council Secondary School. In 1979 he became a councillor of Campama ward. He spent nine years in council as Chairman of Parks and Cemeteries and was also a member of the General Purpose Committee and Town Twinning Committee.

Banjul Population: 42 326

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MASERU – LESOTHO

Sustainability Related Project: Economic Development Project Maseru’s Council resolved to award seed-capital of R10 000 per ward on a competitive basis. This programme is targeted at the youth, who are expected to come up with projects of their choosing, which the council will consider financing. This project could realise SDG 1 and 7 (poverty eradication and job creation) as well as additional objectives. The second project is a joint initiative between the Government of Lesotho, UNDP and the EU (the latter through a Local Development Grant). Through this initiative councillors are expected to come up with projects of their choice, which would have an impact on any of the seventeen (17) Sustainable Development Goals. Some of the current projects currently being implemented have already been awarded to some of the municipal wards.

MASECHABA MAKONG Mayor of Maseru Councillor Makong was born on 14 June 1960 in Qacha’s Nek. She matriculated in 1984 at Maseru Day High School. Her work experience spans a number of disciplines, from working as a Sales Manager at Frasers Lesotho (a large departmental store in the 1970s) until the early 1990s. She then joined the civil service, where she worked in the Statistics Department as a Data Collector, a Supervisor and a Data Capturer, owing to her commitment and dedication.

Lesotho City size: 138 km² Population: 531 998

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MONROVIA – LIBERIA

Sustainability Related Project: The Fight Against Plastic Proliferation The Monrovia City Corporation (MCC) – in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the United Nations Children Education Fund – created a market-oriented operating space for viable business practices to take place in waste-plastics collection in the streets and around the communities of Monrovia. The EPA provided the required enabling regulatory environment, while UNICEF made available the seed capital and the MCC engaged several high schools in Monrovia to collect plastic during the busy holiday season from December 15, 2015 to January 15, 2016. The campaign was called “Operation Attack Plastic”, and students were given all the necessary tools and protection gear required to collect plastic in their communities in exchange for cash prizes and certificates of participation. The students collected over 9 524 tons of plastic. The success of “Operation Attack Plastic” was the catalyst needed to look at the possibility of creating jobs in addition to income-generation through the establishment of small businesses. The Mayor invited three small business owners from three of the largest market areas to copy the solid waste Community-Based Enterprise (CBE) model to start collecting plastic as a money-making business. They were trained to use the CBE business approach, given five-star motorised cycles and large plastic bags to collect plastic to sell to the only company using recycled plastic to make plastic products. The three plastic CBEs are already hiring unemployed unskilled labourers to assist with collecting plastic, selling the plastic and sharing the revenue with the workers and the MCC. From the income generated from the CBEs, additional motorised five-star cycles will be purchased, as well as additional CBEs created. There are three major outcomes from this program: 1) the removal of plastic from the environment; 2) the creation of jobs; and 3) the generation of income to improve the lives of some of the most impoverished and unskilled residents of Monrovia. CLARA DOE MVOGO Mayor of Monrovia Clara Doe Mvogo is the Mayor of the City of Monrovia, Liberia, and Chair of the Monrovia City Council. During the Ebola Virus Disease crisis she served as Co-Chair for the Montserrado County Incident Management System for Ebola, and also as Chair of the Medical Waste Management System for Ebola Response Committee.

Liberia city size: 97,036km² Population: 1 101 970

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LILONGWE – MALAWI

Sustainability Related Project: Strengthening Responsive Urban Governance and Management This 15-month long project is expected to entrench citizen participation in local governance by supporting regular town hall meetings in the City. Residents are expected to take an active role in engaging with their Councillors and all relevant duty bearers in order to ensure that the vision of the City is shared with its residents. The intention is also to ensure that the latter have a greater say in the management and running of the Council. The Council and CCODE continues working towards enhancing capacity building of all City governance structures intended to advocate and institutionalise citizens’ push factors in order to demand reforms for effective urban development. URAC complements project activities through lobbying and advocacy. The project is implementing the following activities: i) C apacitating local governance structures through the provision of trainings to Ward Committees, Block Leaders and Local NGOs. ii) Round-table discussions through town hall meetings and citizen forums. iii) E nsure access to information: land audits, participatory budgeting, advocacy with MPs and public awareness meetings. WILLIE CHIPONDERA Mayor of Lilongwe Willie Edward Chipondera was born at a Mission hospital in the City of Blantyre on 6 July, 1946. He is an accomplished expert in education planning and worked with the Government until his retirement in 1987. He joined the private sector as an administrator for 20 years before he entered politics in 2010 as a member of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party. He became an elected Mayor for the City of Lilongwe soon after the first tripartite elections in 2014. Currently he is serving his first two-year term as the Mayor of the City of Lilongwe. He has a passion for environment management and infrastructure development.

Lilongwe city size: 2 378 hectares Population: 1 077 116

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BAMAKO – MALI

Sustainability Related Project: Bamako Technical Note On The Draft Rankings Sites An inventory tool and knowledge of the state of locations reserved for public facilities in the District of Bamako (their state of occupation, their intended service and effective vocation) was completed in 2012 as a “system geographic information“ for the regional management of urban planning and housing of Bamako In total, 1 600 spaces reserved for public facilities in six municipalities of the District of Bamako were georeferenced. This included public facilities such as public squares and green spaces, in addition to administrative facilities, equipment for sports and cultural events, the worship facilities, economic facilities, school facilities, social facilities including health facilities. The most numerous are public facilities (public squares, parks, transit depots and parking) and school facilities and the places worship (mosques). It emerged that 26% of the locations were still vacant of any occupation in December 2014.

ADAMA SANGARÉ Mayor of Mali Adama Sangaré holds a Masters in Private Law from the National School of Administration of Mali and a Masters in Business Administration from the School of Sciences and the University of Quebec in Montreal. He started his career as an applicant lawyer in the Chambers of Ousmane Dicko, then moved to Inspector of Social Security to the General Directorate of INPS. He has directed the city of Bamako since 6 July, 2007.

Mali City size: 1 240 000 km² 480 000 sq mi) Population: 18 082 928

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RABAT – MOROCCO

MOHAMED SADIKI Chairman of the City of Rabat Sadiki is a member of the Regional Secretariat of the PJD in Rabat, a member of the National Council of the party and an adviser to the common Agdal Riad Mohamed Sadki. He is a graduate of the Mohammadia School of Engineers and President of the Association of Engineers of the PJD. He previously held the position of director of Redal, a company responsible for the delegated management of liquid sanitation and the distribution of drinking water and electricity in Rabat.

Morocco City size: 117 km² Population: 34 803 076

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WINDHOEK – NAMIBIA

Sustainability Related Project: New Land-Use Project During the layout design process of the proposed subdivision of Erf 19, Okuryangava Township, special effort was taken to maintain the predominant residential land-use found in the area. In a similar fashion, other land uses currently taking place in the project area were also accommodated in the design where possible. An assessment of existing land-use in the immediate surrounding area also helped greatly in deciding on which land-uses to forgo as well as which to retain in Onyika. The following new land uses are proposed for Onyika: Twelve single “Residential” zoned erven, with a density of one dwelling unit per 300m², are provided to accommodate households within the Onyika Informal Settlement that can afford formal housing and that are also willing to purchase single residential erven. • The Remainder of Erf 19, is reserved for street. • No business-zoned erf is provided in the area because businesses that cater for the needs of the local community operate within the immediate surroundings. However, small-scale business opportunities such as home shops and home occupation will be allowed and supported through relevant council policies. MUESEE KAZAPUA Mayor of Windhoek Born in Windhoek in 1980, Muesee Kazapua’s passion for civic responsibility arose at the tender age of eight years in 1988 in Windhoek’s Katutura suburb, when he joined the SWAPO Party Pioneers Movement, the ruling SWAPO Party’s children’s platform. Muesee gathered his political acumen by attending SWAPO Party public lectures, rallies, seminars and meetings. While at Augustinium Secondary School, Muesee joined the Namibian National Student Organization (NANSO) in 1996. He secured his SWAPO Party membership card when he reached the age of 18 years and he has been an active member of the Party’s Youth League ever since.

Windhoek city size: 5,133 km2 Population: 2 319 119

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SÃO TOMÉ – SÃO TOMÉ AND PRÍNCIPE

EKENEIDE DOS SANTOS Executive Mayor of São Tomé Dos Santos studied Public Administration Management at the University of DeVry Brasil and worked as an advisor for Ricardo Aquinto from the University of Coimbra Alta and Sofia. Dos Santos is currently the Executive Mayor of São Tomé.

São Tomé Population: 194 011

31


DAKAR – SENEGAL

Sustainability Related Project: Develop a Climate Energy Plan (PCET) 1) Hydraulic Project and Landscaping Water Retention Basin Grand Yoff This project involves building a large sewage and rainwater receptacle pool to capture floodwater. It requires innovative thinking to combine aesthetics with functionality. The project is systemic and integrative in that it combines various areas such as mobility, management of rainwaters, as well as the urban environment and socioeconomics considerations. OBJECTIVES: •Minimise exposure to flooding. •Create a recreational space for the benefit of the population. •Create a place of conviviality and exchange between various neighbourhoods and communities within Dakar. •Contribute to urban mobility. •Raise awareness on the management of the urban environment. 2) Project to develop a territorial Climate Energy Plan (PCET) The goal of PCET is to improve urban governance of the City of Dakar for energy and ecological transition in order to strengthen it’s resilience to climate change. Dakar aims to reduce its emissions of greenhouse gases. PCET aims to provide decision-makers with a vision and an action plan for the mitigation of and adaptation to climate change through a platform for exchange and learning, in addition to the implementation of pilot projects such as compliance with a centre of Gerontology and Geriatrie. Thermal renovation of this centre will enable the development of thematic health and thermal comfort features. KHALIFA ABABACAR SALL Mayor of Dakar The former Minister of Economy, Ababacar Khalifa Sall has been the Mayor of Dakar since April 2009, and was recently re-elected in June 2014. He is also the President of UCLGA, and the Secretary General and President of AIMF Cities Alliances.

Dakar Population: 15 574 007

32


MOGADISHU – SOMALIA

Sustainability Related Project: Build your country: For the People, by the People The Municipality of Mogadishu (MoM), Howl-wadag District Authority (in partnership with local Bakaare Market Traders) successfully renovated the main Howl-wadag Road. This 1.5km long, 12m wide road is located in the heart of the business district of the Bakaare Market, making it the largest market in Somalia and one of the biggest in East-Africa. The students of Somali University raised $100 000 to fund the 1.2km extension of this road from Hawl-Wadag Junction to Sayidka Junction. The Municipality of Mogadishu took this initiative further by implementing additional essential infrastructural projects, including the extended 2.7km-long, 20m-wide Dan-Wadaagaha road in the Wadajir-District Rehabilitation area. This is an important road as most of the city’s labour force is transported to work along it – and it is also located in the Wadajir district, which is one of the more densely populated districts of the city. The success is due to the greater coordination and a well-defined project implementation process, which includes the formation of an oversight committee nominated by the community and a seven-member committee comprising representatives from professional groups, community elders, regional groups, youth groups and women’s organisations.

ABDIAZIZ ELMI ALI Deputy Mayor of Mogadishu Abdiaziz Elmi Ali was born in Mogadishu on 2 February, 1968. He completed his primary study at Mohamed Warsame Primary School in 1982 and his secondary schooling at Mohamed Ahmed Ali Secondary School in 1985. He went on to study at Somalia’s SIMAD University and now has Bachelor of Computer Science degree.

Mogadishu city size: 2,576 km2 Population: 420 938

33


JUBA – SOUTH SUDAN

Sustainability Related Project: Improvement of Water Supply System • Juba presently has a water treatment plant (WTP) capacity of 7 200m3/day, while in operation. • The Juba Water Supply Master Plan (JWSMP 2009) estimated that the maximum daily water demand for Juba City was 62 600m3/day in 2015, and that it will be 116 500m3/day in 2020 and 202 800m3/day in 2025. • Currently Juba has a safe water supply deficit of 60%, meaning that the current facilities provide water to only 40% of its population. The project consists of the design, construction, installation and commissioning of a Water Treatment Plant and Water Distribution System, with the following scope of works: • Water Intake Facility 11 880m3/day • Water Treatment Plant 10 800m3/day • Concrete Service Reservoir 5 000m3 • Transmission Network 5 000m • Main Distribution Pipeline 19 035m and Secondary Distribution Pipeline 33 223m • Water Tanker Filling Stations 8No. zones • Public Tap Stands (Kiosks) 120No. Once rehabilitation is finished then the capacity of the Juba WTP will be 18 000m3/day and will be able to service the needs of more than 400 000 new beneficiaries, meeting 60% of current population. STEPHEN WANI MICHAEL kaya Mayor of Juba Cllr Stephen Wani Michael Kaya has served as the Mayor of Juba since 2015, before which he was the Juba Country Commissioner and the Director of Operations, Office of the President of the Republic of South Sudan. He is currently enrolled in a Bachelor of International Relations and Diplomacy at Cavendish University in Kampala, Uganda.

Juba Population: 372 410

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MBABANE – SWAZILAND

Sustainability Related Project: The Replication of the Salo/Mbabane Project Two years after its inception this project (aimed at sustainable environmental management and income generation) had capacitated more than a thousand (1 000) community members from low-income communities or informal settlements. The initial target set was for two hundred (200) members to be engaged. More than nine hundred (900) climate smart gardens were established by the community members, against an initial target of 200 gardens. The project had targeted 400 kilograms of compost to be produced by the communities, and the communities ended-up producing more than 3 000 kilograms of compost. Some of the compost was used in their Climate Smart Gardens and some was packaged and sold. Four hundred and eighteen (418) people were trained in producing commercial products using reusable waste material, many of whom are actively producing these products. The original intention was to train two hundred (200) people. These individuals are being supported to enable them to produce through facilitating access to raw materials and access to finance, as well as through the establishment of cooperatives and through access to markets. This project included the establishment of dry toilet sanitation units for demonstration, in addition to establishing recycling centres using locally available materials. Benito Jones Mayor of Mbabane Mayor Benito George Jones is in his second term as a Councillor. He was elected a Councillor in 2009 and elected Mayor in 2013. He is currently the Chairman of the Swaziland Local Government Association (SWALGA) and is a self-employed businessman and qualified HIV/AIDs Councillor.

Swaziland City size: 17,364km² Population: 1 018 449

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DODOMA – TANZANIA

Sustainability Related Project: Waste Management Sustainable Cleaning Strategies To date we have 15 CBOs collecting waste material from households and transporting this to collection points throughout the city. The municipality has an obligation to collect the garbage from the collection points and to transfer it to the main dumping site in Mbwanga, which is located roughly 13 kilometres outside the city. Municipalities face high-level shortages of the working tools required to keep our city clean all the time, and this is due to a lack of essential equipment such as vehicles, tractors and so on. This situation has been exacerbated by insufficient budgetary support from the central government. However, the Dodoma municipality emerged as the fourth-cleanest municipality among the 19 municipal councils assessed during the 2014/15 financial year. With assistance from the World Bank, the government has succeeded in securing funds to support our municipality in terms of the refurbishment of tarmac roads and the construction of a new modern dumping site at Chidaya, the construction of which has been completed. Basing on the current waste generation rate of 250-300kg per day (along with the projected population growth), the landfill design period/life-span is 18 years, while the dump life-span is 30 years. We therefore anticipate that our municipality will be able to sustain its solid waste management for a period of time, during which plans for the future will be implemented. As we are going to embark on using the new dump, we are required to train our CBOs who collect waste material from households. Such training is essential in order to start separating the waste so that we can start managing our city’s waste in an environmentally friendly and income-generating manner, by recycling this solid waste. Two CBOs have already started and they have developed to the point where they are forming another group that will assist with separating and selling scraps from the solid waste collected.

JAFFAR MDEGELA MWANYEMBA Mayor of Dododma Born 21 February 1954, Cllr Myanyemba graduated in 1975 and joined the Water Department in the city of Arusha. He went on to act as Sports Officer and subsequently Stadium Manager at Jamhuri Stadium, before ultimately being appointed Board Member of Special National Olympic Committee. His political career began in 1999 when he was appointed Deputy Mayor..

Dodoma City size: 2,576 km2 Population: 410 956

36


LOMÉ – TOGO

Sustainability Related Project: Lomé Sustainability Project Faced with major issues and challenges such as urbanisation and climate change, the Municipal Governance has set Lome the target of striving to become: 1) A  city of adaptation to flooding. The measures involved include regular dredging of all lagoon water bodies as these are the natural outlets for rainwater drainage. 2) A  city of energy transition The aim in this respect is to become a city of economic energy that maximises the use of renewable energy.

ADMIRAL ADEGNON Mayor of Lomé Admiral Fogan Kodjo Adegnon has been Mayor of the City of Lomé since 30 October 2009. Born in Lomé on 13 December 1954, he is married and the father of three children. A General Officer of the Navy since 2007, he was Chief of Staff of the Togo Navy from 1997 to 2008. He has been the CEO of the Port of Lomé (PAL) since 2005 and the Chairman of the Board of the Lomé Transport Corporation (SOTRAL) since 2009.

Lomé City size: 123km2 Population: 930 000

37


LUSAKA – ZAMBIA

Sustainability Related Project: Solid Waste Management Apart from dividing the city into franchise districts in planned areas where franchise contractors collect waste and transport it to an engineered landfill (and Community Based Enterprises then collect that waste in unplanned settlements), waste recycling companies have come on board and are slowly getting well established. the city is also in the process of establishing a waste recovery facility at the engineered landfill called Chunga. Foxdale Court, one of the developers, is piloting a Waste Recovery Facility that will be replicated in many other locations once it has been profiled. Briefly these are some of the stories that make up the sustainability story of Lusaka City. Aside from the construction projects, there is also a vibrant programme targeted at the Elimination of Mother to Child Transmission (eMTCT) which aims to reduce the HIV-infection rate down to zero by the year 2030, under the 90 90 90 target.

ALEX MWEWA Town Clerk Educated at the University of Zambia and Cavendish University, Mwewa has a Bachelor of Arts degree in addition to his Master of Arts (Public Administration and Social Service Professions, Business Administration). He also has a diploma in Urban Economic Planning and a certificate in Change Management Communities.

Lusaka City size: 360 km² Population: 15 933 883

38


HARARE – ZIMBABWE

Sustainability Related Project: BioGas The introduction of sustainable environmental practices in Harare through the practical introduction of the concept of separation of waste at source. A sustainable concept for a biogas-based waste management system (including the use of biogas and biogas sludge) is developed and introduced in an exemplary way. Heat derived as a by-product from the generator will be used for heating water in the heat exchanger. This water will be used to supply paid public hot showers that will be erected for use by the local community – who do not have hot water in their hostels – and to generate revenue. Biogas sludge fertiliser is an additional by-product that will be sold to the public. Biogas will be sold to private customers for use in cooking. A renewable source of energy is established through the installation of a biogas electricity generator. The proposed 200kVA generator will be able to supply two blocks of flats, each of which could have a housing capacity of 100 units. The power produced will be sold to the ZETDC power utility company through a power purchase agreement. CHRISTOPHER LOVEMORE MBANGA Deputy Mayor of Harare Mbanga was born on 12 September, 1943, and is a veteran politician and civic and social administrator, including being a former member of Parliament and Chief Whip of the Zimbabwe/Rhodesia Government in 1979/80. He was Chief of Staff to Morgan Tsvangirai with the Movement for Democratic Change and was elected Councillor for Ward 8 (Highlands). He has been Deputy Mayor of Harare since 2015, is a member of St. John Ambulance and also operates a chain of supermarkets.

Zimbabwe City size: 960.6 km² Population: 15 787 680

39


SUSTAINABILITY

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13-15 JUNE 2017

African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum Report 2016  
African Capital Cities Sustainability Forum Report 2016  
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