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Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Volume 66, No. 5

Visitors highlight free speech limits on campus Visitors wishing to formally express ideas or beliefs, hand out pamphlets or demonstrate in any way are not allowed to stray very far from the Rock in the Stratton Quadrangle. They are limited to a 20foot radius from the Rock, which encompasses SIUE’s designated public forum or “the free-speech area.” Recent visitors Ruth and David Woroniecki were surprised to be told to stop handing out their fliers and CDs when they stepped on campus last week without permission. “This is a public university. Usually it’s not a problem,” Ruth Woroniecki said. “We’re not soliciting anything. We’re not selling anything. We just want to talk to the students.” The Woroniecki family, which includes five other siblings, travels around the world together, making stops at college campuses and other locations to spread the message that “Jesus is not a church or a religion.” Ruth Woroniecki said she had not yet encountered a public university that limited her ability to communicate the message to just one area of the campus. The need for a designated space to exercise freedom of speech comes from negative experiences with visitors in the past, according to Director of Administrative Services Bob Vanzo. “They were at entrances to buildings and sometimes they

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actually got in the way of things that were going on in certain buildings,” Vanzo said. “It just seemed to be a better idea to put some order to it and say, ‘Yes, you can come here and speak,

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but we prefer that you do it in a centralized location.’” The Rock was designated in 2010 as the public forum and a list of rules and expectations for visitors was published in the

“Demonstrations on University Property” policy. The policy states that the university cannot discriminate expression or demonstration based on content. It is only the

time, place and manner of the expression that is controlled, which is the same policy Southern Illinois University Carbon| pg.2

School of Engineering teams up with Department of Defense New program will allow students to work alongside Department of Defense The School of Engineering is entering a deal that will allow students and faculty to work with the U.S. Transportation Command at Scott Air Force Base.

program will be looking for more efficient ways the command can complete its missions. Cem Karacal, associate dean of the School of Engineering, said the deal will help students get a chance to see operations from a different angle. “The students will get to see way more of an application of their studies than they can in the classroom,” Karacal said. “It is a huge

It is a huge operation, and they will be provided with the chance to see how U.S. military logistics work.

USTRANSCOM is a unified, functional combatant command of the Department of Defense. The three-year deal will allow for multiple disciplines in the school to observe and work with USTRANSCOM information technology and supply chains. Those participating in the

operation, and they will be provided with the chance to see how U.S. military logistics work.” The idea behind the project is that it will benefit both SIUE and USTRANSCOM. While students will be given the chance to advance their ideas and innovations, US| pg.3

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2 // The Alestle FREE SPEECH | from pg.1

dale follows. One of the few differences between the two universities’ policies is that Carbondale has two designated areas. At SIUE, visitors must ask permission by filling out a form, which requires giving a brief description of what they plan to do, before they can use the freespeech area. “No matter what it is, we have never turned anything down because it is, after all, a

Thursday, Setpember 12, 2013

needed to tell students to move out of the designated area in which Darrell had requested permission to speak. Police were also needed to escort Darrell to his car when he left an hour early, feeling unwelcomed by the students who surrounded him at the Rock. The students expressed equal feelings of hostility from Darrell, especially after he expressed his view that most of humanity is already condemned because of their hatred toward God. Condemnation, though, is

No matter what it is, we have never turned anything down because it is, after all, a freespeech area. Bob Vanzo

free-speech area. We just know that in some cases, we have to be a little more proactive than in others,” Vanzo said. Vanzo said he and campus police, who receive a copy of each form requesting the space, watch out for speakers who intend to bring up controversial topics. Police are always notified and remain in a “standby status,” but usually only intervene after a complaint is made. When evangelist Keith Darrell visited campus for the third time last fall, he received such strong opposition and hostility from students that police were

specifically listed in the “Demonstrations on University Property” policy as being a form of expression that is allowed. Other forms include welcome, approval, solicitation, protest, mass meeting, procession, picketing or occupation of premises and distribution of non-commercial written materials. In response to the tense encounter between Darrell and students, Vanzo and the university attorneys amended the policy. Vanzo said, now, if a speaker is being disruptive or not following the policy by leaving the

Evangelist Keith Darrell drew a crowd of students and started a heated discussion last fall when he reserved the freespeech area at the Rock to express his views on religion and morality.

Rock area or insulting students and staff who do not agree with the speaker’s opinion, for example, he or she can be asked to leave. In addition, if that speaker were to file another request to use the free-speech area, the university could deny it. In Darrell’s case, although the amendment was made after his visit, the actions that took place that day are taken into account. “We’ve got history on him now so if he were to file, which he has not, to come back, most

likely we would say no,” Vanzo said. “Those decisions are made in consultation with me, the attorneys and the police.” In the Woronieckis’ case, they were the subject of complaints from a few students, according to Vanzo. “They just showed up. We didn’t know they were out there until we started getting complaints,” Vanzo said. “People can just show up and do whatever they want. It’s a big campus. They can do that without our knowledge but we always find

| Alestle file photo

out about it because there usually are complaints or people questioning whether they’ve got the approval to be out there.” Ruth Woroniecki said they did as they were told and waited to speak with Vanzo about continuing to exercise their expression. “The cops just came out and told us to stop,” Ruth Woroniecki said. “They were just doing their job.” Lexi Cortes can be reached at acortes@alestlelive.com or 650-3530. Follow @lexi_cortes.

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Thursday, September 12, 2013

The Alestle // 3

| from pg.1

TRANSCOM will look to student ideas for practical application. “The hope is we will be able to construct new and innovative approaches that in the end are able to reduce costs for them,” Karacal

voluntary partnerships, and we can easily choose to work on new and promising concepts together as we go forward,” Beutel said. With such a large operation, SIUE will have the chance to use students from a variety of fields in the School of Engineering. The

If [USTRANSCOM sees] we can help, then they will come to us to do more for them.

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USTRANSCOM will be actively looking to put student ideas into work to help them understand the feasibility and risk of new techniques. School of Engineering Dean Hasan Sevim said both sides are excited about the opportunities this can provide. “It can be mutually beneficial. It will be a great opportunity for our students, and I am enthusiastic about the potential for growth in the program,” Sevim said. USTRANSCOM Chief Technology Officer Rob Beutel has also shared his enthusiasm for the project and the mutual benefits that come from these partnerships. In a press release, he said the agreement will allow for a flexible relationship and the study of any aspect of logistics. “Both sides benefit from these

school will also be able to provide the research chances to both undergraduates and graduate students. “No specific program will be placed in this program,” Karacal said. “As they need new ways of conducting business, we will look to help them achieve their goals.” In the partnership, USTRANSCOM will be providing the students with access to selected information and federally-operated logistic systems. Since the program can have real-world results, success means the chance for SIUE to do more work with USTRANSCOM and its operations. “If they see we can help, then they will come to us to do more for them,” Sevim said. "

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4 // The Alestle

we’re looking for news

Thursday, September 12, 2013

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An officer issued a state citation to Roger Jones Jr. for expired registration on Circle Drive near Bluff Hall Circle.

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An officer issued a state citation to Blair Bardelmeier for expired registration at South University Drive and South Circle. Sept. 5 An officer issued a state citation to Shantel R. Rogers for speeding 59 mph in a 25 mph zone. The offense occurred on North University Drive at P2 Road. Officers responded to reports of a male and a female in the quad that were soliciting and yelling at people and being generally disruptive. They did not have authorization to be there. The officers explained they would need to get a permit to be on campus. The two subjects stopped what they were doing. The officers remained in the area to make sure they did not start up again. An officer issued a state citation to Tyler Daugherty for speeding 61 mph in a 45 mph zone. The offense occurred on South University Drive at Stadium Drive. A student called the Financial Aid office and became angry and abusive over the phone. The clerk ended up hanging up on him because he would not calm down. A few minutes later she received a call from a male and she believed it was him. He asked how late she was open and stated he was on his way. Officers responded as a precautionary measure. Sept. 6 An officer responded to 429 Cougar Village for a report of a male and female screaming at each other. Officers made contact with the couple. The altercation was verbal only. A female resident in Cougar Village reported that at approximately 2:25 in the morning, a black man attempted to get into their apartment. An officer issued a state citation to Ahmad K. Evans for speeding 40 mph in a 25 mph zone. A written warning was also issued for expired registration. The offenses occurred on South University Drive at P2 Road. Sept. 7

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An officer issued a state citation to Benjamin F. Alexander for speeding 42 mph in a 25 mph zone. The offense occurred at South University Drive at P2 Road. A caller stated he was in a verbal argument with his girlfriend earlier and wanted an officer to make contact with her. An officer located the female on Cougar Lake Drive and escorted her to Bluff Hall. An officer issued a state citation to Casey D. Shank for speeding 43 mph in a 25 mph zone. The offense occurred on South University Drive at P2 Road. An officer issued a state citation to Kaitlin M. Flinn for speeding

45 mph in a 25 mph zone. The offense occurred on North University at P3 Road. An officer issued a state citation to Brianna M. Garner for disobeying a stop sign. The offense occurred on South Circle Drive at Lot C. Sept. 8 A caller said he was concerned for his brother who was visiting and had not been seen or heard from for a few hours, and his cell phone was located by a third party. Officers checked the area and, in the meantime, the subject returned home. An officer arrested Lamar A. Jones, 21, for driving while suspended. A written warning was also issued for improper lane usage. The offense occurred on North University Drive at Cougar Lake Drive. Jones was transported to the police department to be fingerprinted, photographed and processed. He was released with a notice to appear. An officer issued a state citation issued to Trae F.J. Walters for expired registration on Cougar Lake Drive at North University Drive. An officer issued a state citation to Hanxiang Jin for speeding 46 mph in a 25 mph zone on North University Drive at P2 Road. Sept. 9 An officer issued a state citation to Danielle M. Daniels for expired registration. The offense occurred on South University Drive at Stadium Drive. An ris officer responded to the Mor University Center regarding an active fire alarm. The officer advised the alarm was activated due to the motor in an elevator. The Edwardsville Fire Department was dispatched. A building engineer advised the elevator would be taken out of service. There was no fire or smell of smoke, but possibly damage to the elevator. An officer issued a state citation to Hamlet H. Ogando for failure to yield to emergency vehicle. The offense occurred on South University Drive at Stadium Drive. An officer took a phone report from an Edwardsville resident who stated that her son was being photographed by two middleaged men in an SIUE white cargo van while driving on Route 157 earlier today. Sept. 10 Officers responded to a report of a man shooting a rifle just off a bike trail south of the campus. It was reported by a subject who had been riding on the bike trail, who said everyone was turning around and coming back on campus for fear of being shot. No contact was made and no shots were fired while officers were in the area. An officer issued state citations to Kailah Moseley for speeding 59 mph in a 45 mph zone and no proof of insurance. The offenses occurred on South University Drive at Stadium Drive.


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Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Turkish people stand against loss of democracy Today, Istanbul is the largest city in Turkey, with a population of 16 million. Just like every single big city in the world, Istanbul has a park that people can take a break from the frustration of the city crowd whenever they want. Its name is Gezi Park. However, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has been in the office for 10 years, decided to destroy Gezi Park in order to build a shopping mall in the center of Istanbul in June 2013. That caused many Turkish people to protest.

Letter to the Editor Protestors made tents in Gezi Park and slept in them in order to prevent destruction of the park. Those protesters were literally shelterless, defenseless and all alone in those tents. After sunrise the following day, protesters in the tents woke up to find police attacking them. Policemen assaulted those innocent people in the tents by using tear gas and pressurized water. Disproportionate force was used in order to draw away the protesters from Gezi Park. People were hit by truncheons. Even birds went away from the park. Turkish citizens and even the world became very angry at the authority of the Turkish Republic. After the horrible attack of policemen on innocent protesters, new protesters showed up and protested stronger and

louder. They were unstoppable. New protesters also used Twitter and Facebook to organize protests and communicate with each other. New protesters reacted back severely because the government treated people in the same harsh way whenever protests took place throughout Erdogan’s 10-year leadership. Police put the student protesters in jail even though they only made posters and shouted slogans. Objective mass media and social media were threatened and people were scared to write about what actually happened. When someone or any corporation tried to tell the truth about the mistreatment by the government, they were blamed as disbelievers, strikers and terrorists by partisan media which was controlled by the government. Partisan media also said government was doing a “perfect job.” People had kept silent while their leader pandered to a conservative group as a way to gain seats in parliament and keep power. In 2002, the political party of Erdogan misused religion as a way to get more votes in the election. They succeeded, and they had 49 percent of the country’s votes eventually. 49 percent allowed Erdogan to have more than half of the parliament seats according to the Turkish democratic system. Therefore, he could do anything he wanted. After being victorious in elections, Erdogan’s party shifted the system of education in order to raise religious support. The party

was so tolerable to its voters, despite being so strict to other beliefs and opinions. Especially in last five years of Erdogan’s leadership, Turkey did not have democratic features. Some political writers and teachers ended up losing their jobs because they criticized the government. Turkey began to lose its democratic features in Erdogan’s ongoing leadership. Indispensable features of democracy, such as showing tolerance to criticism, independent judiciary, independent media, being respectful to religious beliefs of people, private lives and trying to understand opposing ideas, were forgotten as time went on because of the government. Imperious, bossy and one-man-centered control showed up quite slowly. Erdogan basically turned into the dictator of the country until the incidents in Gezi Park. Gezi Park was not only about the protection of nature. It was the tipping point of the Turkish people who stored up all of the anger to authority’s actions. For 10 years, people put up with Erdogan’s mistreatment, but finally Gezi Park was the last straw. The protest was a catalyst, yet also a simple and beautiful step that brought the cheer that Turkish people wanted for a long time. It also showed that Turkey would not accept a dictatorship and it became a hope for the future of democracy. $

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Wrestling returns to proper place in the Olympic Games

About the Alestle:

Last Sunday, the International Olympic Committee voted to keep freestyle and Greco-Roman wrestling in the Olympics, reversing the committee’s decision made seven months ago to eliminate the sport after the 2016 Olympics.

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Have a comment? Let us know!

Ben Levin Reporter Wrestling is a sport so old that it was an event in the ancient Olympic Games and was a feature sport in the first modern Olympic Games held in Athens in 1896. If it had been removed from the Olympics, it could have been a sad end to a great sport. While World Wrestling Entertainment matches are shown weekly on national television, competitive wrestling, such as

Greco-Roman, does not get the same kind of coverage. If wrestling was to be removed from the Olympics, the sport itself might die off, becoming only an anecdote in history books. A wrestling match is an event that every sports fan can appreciate. It is just two men entering a battlefield, fighting for the respect of their peers, fans and every nation around the world. More than 100 nations have had a wrestler compete in the Olympics, with 54 of those nations having medalists. Countries like Macedonia and Lebanon have only a few medals to their name, and all but one is in wrestling. That is what the Olympics are about. The Olympic Games allow smaller countries to send representatives to show the world what they have to offer athletically. Wrestling is cheaper than sports with a lot of equipment, like hockey, and thus more available to athletes from poorer countries.

Many countries, big or small, have representatives in wrestling because it is not a team-oriented sport. Kurt Angle, a 1996 gold medalist in freestyle wrestling from the United States, has been trying to save the world of Olympic wrestling. Angle has said that the International Olympic Committee needs to keep wrestling because it exemplifies all of the competiveness an Olympic athlete is supposed to have. Wrestling, an extremely physically demanding sport, was in the original Olympic Games and will remain in them because it displays what an athlete should be. Wrestlers display the strength, tenacity and heart that every athlete can admire. It is not leaving the Olympics and should not leave because there might not be any Games without it. "

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Should wrestling continue to be an Olympic sport? Answer our poll at www.alestlelive.com!


6 // The Alestle

Lifestyles

Questions or comments regarding this section? Contact the Lifestyles Editor at 6503531 or lifestyles@alestlelive.com.

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Thursday, September 12, 2013

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SIUE drag show for beginners is still a crowd- pleaser Less than a week after Delta Lambda Phi’s seventh annual drag show, the guys are already planning ways to attract and entertain audiences next year. Senior psychology major and President of Delta Lambda Phi Anthony Maier, of Springfield, said that a lot of preparation goes into it. “We start preparing a year in advance. We have actually started preparing for 2014,” Maier said. “About six months out, we contact all of the performers and come up with a theme. It’s kind of spread out but intricate all at once in little spurts.” Maier said the fraternity uses banners, flyers and university television to attempt to get the interest of freshmen and other new students on campus. He said he believes some students come to the drag show, which was originally created as a way to have an LGBT event on campus, to experience something new. “I don’t think most students have ever been to a drag show, so they might not know what to expect,” Maier said. “This is not a typical drag show. It’s a little watered down. It’s a beginner’s drag show.” Maier said the performance helps show people what Delta Lambda Phi is about. “I think just coming out and having a good time and just being who you are, and enjoying the performance says a lot about who we are. We try to be as welcoming as we can to everybody regardless of their history,” he said. Maier described the drag queens and

kings as very “grandiose”, flamboyant and bitchy. All of these characteristics could be found in the host of the night’s entertainment, Siren. Siren, a loud, profane drag queen, has been part of the fraternity’s drag show since it began seven years ago. Coming out in a bright orange wig, a short dress and tall heels, Siren yelled obscenities, told comedic stories and verbally hassled crowd members who would try to stand up to her. If a technological malfunction occurred, Siren would make a quick joke to get the audience laughing. If a member of the crowd heckled her, she would snap back at them, staying in character the entire time. While that was all in good fun, Siren

dressed,” Siren said. Along with the preparation for the day, Siren said in the time it has taken to get her 11-year act together, she has continued to change and improve her style. “Every day I do drag is a new day. I never stop working on stuff. I never stop evolving my look. I never stop trying new things,” Siren said. “It’s all about a lot of shopping and how you put things together. I’m very into putting total looks together from other pieces.” Siren brought with her a diverse group of drag queens. Paris Amor and Chasity Amor gave the crowd strong, athletic performances filled with aerobic moves that prompted many in the crowd to throw dollar bills on stage. Suzy Cydal had a more punk act, dancing to “Smells Like Teen This is not a typical drag Spirit” by Nirshow... It’s a beginner’s drag vana. But the queens were not show... the only ones dancing at the show. Sum Yung Wang, a drag said that the show took a lot of time to or- king, came out dancing to “Semi-Charmed ganize. Life” by Third Eye Blind in a leather jacket “I started getting ready [four hours be- and skinny jeans. Unlike the dances of the fore the show] today. After I got out of the drag queens, he ran and hopped around, on shower I shaved, which didn’t take long be- and offstage, like many popular male percause I had done drag the day before. After formers do today. Wang, who is transitioning to become that I take about an hour to an hour and a half for makeup and 15 to 30 minutes get- a male, said that some issues arise for him ting all of the body padding on and getting that do not for the drag queens.

“Facial hair is the biggest thing. I can’t really grow my own facial hair. I started my physical transition a year and a half ago so my facial features have changed with the testosterone. It’s been a struggle at times,” Wang said. Wang, the only drag king in the event, said he did not have trouble becoming a king due to a large drag king scene in St. Louis. He did say it has been difficult for people to understand that he is a drag king, a role usually performed by women, and a male. “It’s gender performance. Just because I go out there and dress as a man, it doesn’t mean that outside of drag I identify as a female. Some other drag kings may but I don’t,” Wang said. “For me, this is gender expression that doesn’t coincide with my gender identity.” As a transgender performer, Wang said he believes he is making a statement. He said he feels that, in a way, he is educating people. Junior political science major Austin Banks, of St. Louis, said she enjoyed the show very much. “I enjoyed the energy and definitely the stage presence of not just the queens but of the master of ceremony, Siren. She was very engaging. She came down off of the stage, into the crowd and talked to people and sat on laps. It made the show a far better experience,” Banks said.


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Thursday, September 12, 2013

The Alestle // 7

Tiffany Eickhoff crowned queen of the Miss Division in the national Miss Amazing Pageant | Photo courtesy of Tiffany Eickhoff

SIUE student makes history as first-ever national Miss

Amazing winner KAREN MARTIN

Alestle Lifestyles Editor

A pageant that celebrates women and girls with disabilities was held at the national level for the first time, and senior speech communication major Tiffany Eickhoff, of St. Louis, who has cerebral palsy, won in her division. “I never thought I would ever be in a pageant, much less a state or national one,” Eickhoff said. The Miss Amazing Pageant is a nonprofit organization that empowers women and girls by teaching them social and public speaking skills through the various competition activities. Originally, Miss Amazing Pageants were only held at the state level. This year, however, enough states competed for the organization to hold a national competition. Eickhoff said the Missouri Miss Amazing Pageant, held in March, was her first competition. She took home the queen’s crown on her first try. She went on to compete at the national level and won again. The Miss Amazing Pageants include a series of activities including interviews with judges, formal introductions on stage, a talent show and an evening wear show. Eickhoff demonstrated her martial arts skills by breaking a wooden board with her hand on stage. The “Today Show”, that was covering the pageant, filmed Eickhoff performing her talent and showed it on-air. “The ‘Today Show’ was there all day Friday because we had different activities,” Eickhoff said.

What makes Eickhoff amazing is not limited to the pageant. She has been working with speech communication professor Duff Wrobble on an Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities project studying accessibility on campus. Wrobble said their research yielded a paper that is being published and a day in the life video

ment Conference at Texas A&M University,” Wrobble said. The video compared the experience of Eickhoff performing a certain task with an able-bodied student. “It not only showed how much quicker it was, but it also showed the differences in what somebody with a disability has to do in order to do them,” Eickhoff

Tiffany Eickhoff at the Missouri Miss Amazing Pageant. |Alestle file photo

that captures some of the obstacles Eickhoff, and others with disabilities, face on campus. “We did a study. She collected almost all of the data for it, and we presented at the National Assess-

said. “One of the things was just getting to class and waiting for the elevator and going on and off the elevator. The time it took to get to class, it can be very time consuming.”

Her work on campus provided other helpful results for people with disabilities. Wrobble said she lobbied for a door opener on campus to give her easier access to his department. Junior special education major Rachel Stroud, of Bismarck, is Eickhoff’s best friend and also knows the obstacles Eickhoff faces every day. Stroud said she knows how long it takes for Eickhoff to perform certain tasks, and time is something most people take for granted. “Last spring semester she had to do an over-the-phone-interview with a couple of family members and then she had to take that recording and type out her transfers,” Stroud said. “I went over it a couple times and kind of worked through those. What would have taken her six hours for a 30 minute interview to type out, we had knocked out in an hour.” Because Stroud has been close to Eickhoff and understands her struggles, Eickhoff’s victory at the National Miss Amazing Pageant sent her to tears. “I watched her, which was the most emotional thing ever. I never cried so hard when she won,” Stroud said. “I’m so proud of her. I can’t imagine the courage it would take for even me to get up on stage, and she did it with no problem.” To watch the disability project video, visit vimeo.com and search disability awareness project 2012. Eickhoff’s clip on the “Today Show” can be seen by visiting www.today.com. Karen Martin can be reached at kmartn@alestlelive.com 650-3525.


Sports

Questions or comments regarding this section? Contact the Sports Editor at 650-3524 or sports@alestlelive.com

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The Alestle // 8

Thursday, September 12, 2013

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The SIUE men’s basketball team’s 2013-14 nonconference schedule will pit the Cougars against a variety of teams from conferences such as the SEC, Pac-12 and Atlantic 10. Forrester said the tough, early nonconference games should benefit the Cougars later in the season.

the NCAA Division I Men’s Tournament last year. SIUE faces Central Arkansas on Nov. 16 at the Vadalabene Center. The Cougars will then be traveling to the West Coast to play four games. Three of the games will be played in the Portland State Tournament from Nov. 22 to Nov. 24 against UC Davis, Portland State and Loyola, respectively. Two days later,

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“We want to challenge our players with teams from a variety of conferences to help prepare us for [Ohio Valley Conference] play,” Forrester said. “It is, top-to-bottom, one of the most challenging schedules we have had in recent years.” The Cougars will have an exhibition game on Nov. 4 against Greenville in the Vadalabene Center. From there, the Cougars will travel to SEC country to take on the Arkansas Razorbacks on Nov. 8 in Fayetteville, Ark. The schedule does not get any easier from there, as the Cougars will return home to face the Saint Louis Billikens five days later, who are coming off of a trip to the third round in

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SIUE will wrap up their West Coast stint with a game against the PAC-12’s Oregon State Beavers. Forrester said they realize what they are getting themselves into with the early portion of the schedule. “We are playing tough teams right off the bat, and we must be able to put ourselves in positions to win the games,” Forrester said. SIUE begins its OVC schedule on Jan. 2 when they host Morehead State. On Jan. 4, Eastern Kentucky will visit the Vadalabene Center, wrapping up the Cougars’ first weekend of play in 2014. The first conference game on the road for SIUE is on Jan. 9 against Jacksonville State in

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Thursday, September 12, 2013

9 // The Alestle

The SIUE men’s soccer team played two games in the Hurricane Classic in Oklahoma this weekend, first against Southern Methodist University and then hosts Tulsa. The Cougars beat SMU 1-0 Friday, making this season the second in a row in which SIUE has started 3-0. However, the Cougars fell 2-0 Sunday to Tulsa. Junior forward Christian Volesky, the leading scorer for SIUE, said both teams had a chance to win the game: ‘... In the end, [Tulsa was] able to convert on those chances.’

|  Alestle file photo

Men’s soccer loses final game in Oklahoma, falls to 3-1 EVAN MEYERS Alestle Reporter

The men’s soccer team split a pair of matches this week at the Hurricane Classic in Tulsa, Okla. It was the first time the Cougars had been defeated this season and brought the team’s overall record to 3-1. Starting the weekend with a win, the team shut out Southern Methodist University on Friday. Junior forward, and reigning Missouri Valley Conference Offensive Player of the Week, Christian Volesky scored the only goal for SIUE, bringing his season total to four. Senior goalkeeper John Berner contributed two saves, as he was able to post his second consecutive shutout. SMU registered more shots

secured a 2-0 victory. “Both teams had chances to win, but in the end, they were able to convert on those chances,” Berner said. After an evenly contested first half, both teams went into the locker room without having scored a goal and neither team looked to have an advantage. “I think we came out and played a better first half than them, but we couldn’t manage to score off our opportunities,” Volesky said. However, Tulsa was able to come out and make the most of an opportunity early in the second half and, in the 55th minute, scored on an eight-yard chip-in. Later in the second half, SIUE received its first red card of the season, and was forced to

It is nice to win the individual accolades, but that’s not why we came here. John Berner

Senior goalkeeper

than SIUE, but was only able to manage two shots on goal. Head Coach Kevin Kalish said he credits his team’s work ethic as a huge part of keeping SMU from getting quality shots. “Everyone out there is a hard worker,” Kalish said. “We want to go out there and win every game, and they know the kind of effort that it is going to take.” The win was the third in a row for SIUE, and marked the second consecutive year the team started the season with three victories. In the team’s second match of the weekend, SIUE was up against the hosting team: No. 22 Tulsa. Despite SIUE once again holding its opponent scoreless in the first half, Tulsa scored two goals in the second half and

play a man down after Volesky was charged in the 70th minute. Tulsa took advantage of having the extra man and scored its second goal 15 minutes after the penalty. “It is always harder when you have to try to play catch up with a team, and being a man down just makes things even more difficult,” Volesky said. Despite the loss, Kalish said he was still impressed with the performance of his team. “Overall our performance was good, but little moments can mean a lot when you are playing quality teams,” Kalish said. “They can learn from this experience and use it to help motivate them as we move forward this season.” At the conclusion of the

tournament, three of the Cougars were named to the Hurricane Classic AllTournament Team. Sophomore Justin Bilyeu joined Volesky and Berner on the team, as all three were recognized for outstanding play. “It is nice to win the individual accolades, but that’s not why we came here,” Berner said. “The most important thing

in the end is picking up the victory.” With a record of 3-1, the team is still getting recognition from the NCAA, as it received 51 votes in this week’s poll. With the victory over SIUE, Tulsa moved into the 13th spot in the national rankings. Next for the Cougars is the home-opener against Cincinnati. Last season, SIUE went 7-1 in its

home matches. “We pride ourselves in playing well at home,” Berner said. “We get a little extra push from having the home crowd behind us.” The match will be at 8 p.m. Friday at Korte Stadium. Evan Meyers can be reached at emeyers@alestlelive.com or 6503524. Follow @ronninixx.


www.alestlelive.com

The Alestle // 10

Thursday, September 12, 2013

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What starter Shelby Miller was able to do with 6 2/3 scoreless innings Tuesday night against Milwaukee made sure the Cardinals’ first hit of the game was the only hit they needed. How he did it could be even more important. After a season searching for this kind of feel and efficiency, the rookie righthander showed a more varied and nuanced assortment of pitches as he threw the Cardinals to a 4-2 victory against the Brewers at Busch Stadium. Miller had a new look for his fourth start against Milwaukee, but the same success as he matched Brewers starter Wily Peralta zero for zero through five innings. Matt Holliday’s two-run home run with two outs in the sixth inning snapped Peralta’s nohit bid and catapulted Miller to the victory. “He’s been a guy who has been groomed to be a big-game pitcher in my opinion,” manager Mike Matheny said. “He’s had a lot of pressure on him from the day he signed and before that. He needed to be a front-line guy. He came out and continued to improve ... and [showed] he’s willing to change and adapt and do what he needed to do.” While Holliday’s home run put the Cardinals ahead and a run and RBI from slugger Matt Adams later in the game gave the Cardinals’ needed cushion, the power behind their four-game winning streak is pitching. ! The first-place Cardinals’ fourth consecutive victory came with the team’s fourth consecutive quality start. This is not a coincidence. This is a proof. Since Friday, Cardinals starters have allowed one run in their past 26 2/3 innings, and their revival has come at the same time as the Cardinals return to the lead in the National League Central. Miller (13-9) was the third consecutive starter to go at least six innings without allowing a run at all, and he plunged his home ERA to 1.76. “Our success and our struggles have been tied to the starting pitching we’re getting,” Matheny explained over the weekend. “We understand that. We’re working out the kinks.” Miller, 22, had glitches to correct as he posted a 4.55 ERA in August and became increasingly reliant and exposed by his fastball. Unable to put innings or batters away, his pitch count bloated and only once in six August starts did he get an out in the seventh inning. The splits aligned for success Tuesday. At Busch, Miller had a 1.92 ERA in the previous 13 and a 7-3 record. In three previous starts against the Brewers this season, Miller was 2-0 with a 1.47 ERA and 21 strikeouts in 18 1/3 innings. Milwaukee manager Ron Roenicke lauded Miller’s fastball in April, saying it hits “92 mph, and the way we’re swinging at it looks like 100.” Fastball-happy at times, Miller showed a more well-rounded assortment Tuesday to throw the Brewers off the scent of his heater. Miller adjusted his grip slightly on his changeup, opening up his index finger and shifting it over. The result was an off-speed pitch that had more run and more reliability to it. He also mixed in his new toy, a cut fastball and a breaking ball that he has spent this season trying to fine-tune in the bullpen. “I felt like the breaking ball

was better,” Miller said. “The cutter — even though I missed with some of them, it still ended up finding a way to miss the bats. My breaking ball hasn’t been as sharp as we want it to be. It was better this game.” During a 10-pitch at-bat against Miller in the seventh inning, Brewers outfielder Caleb Gindl saw five breaking balls. He struck out on one in the dirt. Brewers leadoff hitter Norichika Aoki, one of the toughest batters in the majors to strike out, was fivefor-nine in his career against Miller. He made it a point going into the game to change his approach with the lefthanded-hitting Aoki, and that meant he and Yadier Molina changed his pitch usage. In the fifth inning, Miller struck Aoki out for the second time in the game with a sequence that included two 88-mph cutters, including one Aoki whiffed on. In the third inning, Aoki took Miller’s new-grip changeup for a called strike three. “It was a little different approach,” Matheny said. “He wasn’t blowing stuff past guys. He was doing more of what we talked about he needed to do to be more efficient. ... It comes down to execution. It’s not that he hasn’t been trying to use those pitches. They just haven’t felt good coming out of his hand. If you don’t have much confidence in them ... your defense mechanism is to go straight to what’s working. He did a nice job of finding a feel for it.” Matheny let career numbers guide his hand when it came to the lineup, and he had plenty of success to choose from against Peralta (9-15). From Pete Kozma’s three hits in five at-bats to Matt Carpenter’s four hits in six at-bats vs. Peralta, the Cardinals’ lineup entered the game 18-for-39 (.462) against the Brewers righty. Naturally, he held them without a hit for 5 2/3 innings. The Cardinals did not get a runner safely to second until Carpenter trotted past it in the sixth inning when scoring on Holliday’s 19th home run. Carpenter drew a one-out walk from Peralta to put the inning in motion. Center fielder Carlos Gomez robbed a base hit from Jon Jay to keep Carpenter at first base with two outs. Holliday had previously fouled a series of pitches off his left leg, a habit that has bruised him in the past several weeks. He has a new shinguard on order, he said. In his sixth-inning at-bat, Holliday jumped the first pitch, lining it into the left-center seats. Adams scored on Carpenter’s RBI single in the seventh and Adams drove home a run in the eighth for a 4-0 lead. That was enough protection as Edward Mujica allowed a two-run homer in the ninth to set the final score. “We’ve got to continue winning games,” Holliday said. “It all starts with the starting pitching. They’ve given us zeroes early in the game.” The starting rotation has a scoreless streak of 22 2/3 innings going into tonight’s game, which Lance Lynn has. The righty has lost five consecutive decisions. Like Miller he’s searching for a different approach. “These guys have all kicked it up a gear,” Matheny said. “The last four starts have been pretty impressive to watch. I’m excited to watch the fifth one.”

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www.alestlelive.com

Thursday, September 12, 2013

11 // The Alestle

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| Alestle file photo

Women’s basketball ’13-14 season schedule released BEN LEVIN

Alestle Reporter

The young SIUE women’s basketball team will have a challenging start to the season as they open at Missouri and then play three days later at Kansas. Head Coach Paula Buscher said she likes the early challenge for her team and believes the games will make the Cougars better prepared for their Ohio Valley Conference season. Senior guard Vallerie Finnin, one of only two seniors on the team, said the team is ready for the challenges. “I’m looking forward to our first two games against Mizzou and Kansas,” Finnin said. “I think those will be two good games that will challenge us and make us better. I’m looking forward to see how we do against them, especially in those arenas.” Along with Missouri and Kansas, Buscher said she believes playing against Delaware in the University of Central Florida Classic down in Orlando will be a tough game, but so will many of the team’s games. “We have a lot of tough games on the schedule,” Buscher said. “The key thing for us is to put players in situations where

they can succeed early and often.” Finnin said that there is not one particular game the team is most excited about. However, she believes the Missouri and Kansas games will be exciting because she knows people will be watching to see how they do. “We look forward to every game. Our goal is to win against whoever we’re playing,” Finnin said. The team’s first conference game is on Dec. 28 at home against Belmont. Finnin said she is ready for the tough conference games the team will have this season. “UT-Martin won last year so they will be a challenge, but we beat them both times we played them last year,” Finnin said. “Eastern Illinois is always a good challenge for us. They always give us a good game. We give them a good game as well.” Before starting their regular season against Missouri, the Cougars play an exhibition game at 7 p.m. Nov. 5 against Lindenwood at the Vadalabene Center. Their first home game is at 4 p.m Nov. 16 against Kansas City. Ben Levin can be reached at blevin@alestlelive.com or 650-3524.

SIUE women’s basketball 2013-14 schedule Nov. 5 Lindenwood (exh.) 7 p.m.

Dec. 28 Belmont*

2 p.m. 

Nov. 10 at Missouri

TBA

Jan. 4

E. Kentucky*

4 p.m. 

Nov. 13 at Kansas

7 p.m.

Jan. 6

Morehead St.*

7 p.m. 

Nov. 16 Kansas City

4 p.m. 

Nov. 20 UIC

7 p.m. 

Jan. 11 at Tenn. Tech*

4 p.m.

Nov. 26 IPFW

7 p.m. 

Jan. 13 at Jax State*

7 p.m.

Jan. 18 Murray State*

4 p.m. 

Jan. 20 Austin Peay*

7 p.m. 

Jan. 25 at UT Martin*

4 p.m.

Jan. 27 at SE Missouri*

7 p.m.

Feb. 1

at E. Illinois*

4 p.m.

Feb. 3

NJIT

7 p.m.

Feb. 8

UT Martin*

UCF Thanksgiving Classic Nov. 30 at Delaware 11:30 a.m. Dec. 1

at TBD

11:30 a.m.

Air Force Classic Dec. 6

at Wyoming

5:30 p.m.

Dec. 7

at Air Force

5:30 p.m.

Dec. 14 at IPFW

TBA

4 p.m. 

Feb. 10 SE Missouri*

7 p.m. 

Feb. 15 at Austin Peay*

4 p.m.

Feb. 17 at Murray State* 7 p.m.

12 p.m.

Feb. 24 at Tenn. State*

7 p.m.

Dec. 19 at Western Illinois 7 p.m.

March 1 Eastern Illinois*

4 p.m. 

Dec. 17 at Drake

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