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VOL. LXIX, NO. 1

SUMMER 2004

Published for alumni, parents and friends of Albion College

Uncovering nature’s secrets

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John Porter, ’53, calls for “cultural sea change” in public education .................... 11

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Commencement brings smiles despite stormy weather ........... 12


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Knowledge quest N. VANDERSAL PHOTO

Albion’s young alumni are making their mark in science For decades, Albion has been known for producing health care professionals and research scientists who are leaders in their fields. Now a new generation of Albion alumni is at work—making their own discoveries in science and medicine. Take Kelly Jenkins, ’93, who leads his research team at Pfizer in analyzing potential health risks associated with new drug compounds. And Pamela Riggs-Gelasco, ’89, a chemistry professor at the College of Charleston who investigates enzyme reaction mechanisms with applications in bioremediation and pharmaceuticals, and Joy Stuckey Doan, ’95, who explores the interaction between disease-causing microorganisms and the immune system as a biology faculty member at Bethel University in Minnesota. Then there are computer scientists Michelle and Mary Beth Hribar, both ’91: Michelle heads a group developing numerical software at Cray Computing and Mary Beth, a professor at Oregon’s Pacific University, works on the mathematics behind parallel processing. You will learn

A specialist on spider behavior, Eileen Hebets tracks down her subjects in places as diverse as this Puerto Rican cave and the sky islands of southeastern Arizona. “The cave,” she notes, “is an amazing one, with thousands of bats roosting in it during the day and hundreds and hundreds of amblypygids [spider relatives] on the walls. The amblypygid species is pretty large too, measuring at least 2-3cm in body length.”

about the impressive achievements of other Albion researchers on the following pages. Also highlighted in this issue are two Albion geolo-

Eileen Hebets, ’94

gists, the late J Harlen Bretz, 1905, and Julie BrighamGrette, ’77. Both have contributed important insights in their field. In the coming months, we will continue to cover the work of our alumni (as well as current students and faculty) in our online feature, “Science Explorations,” at: www.albion.edu/scienceexplorations/. And for a glimpse of the future of science at Albion, take a look at the back page of this issue for photos of our science complex renovation and expansion project, now under way.

By Jake Weber If you’ve seen the movie, Spider-Man, then you can picture where biologist Eileen Hebets, ’94, works every day, as Peter Parker’s laboratory strongly resembles Hebets’ own. That’s no accident—she consulted with the film’s set designer who was creating the lab. “It’s pretty authentic—they even copied the drill holes I put in the top of my cages,” says Hebets. “They’ve got the same books on the bookshelves, and I sent them things like our old cricket boxes, which you can see scattered on the set.” And what Hebets does, and learns, in her lab is hardly less amazing than Peter Parker’s adventures. Ten years after her graduation from Albion, Hebets continues to study the same research subjects she had as an undergraduate—only now, she’s working as an assistant professor at one of the country’s premier institutions, the University of California, Berkeley. Hebets was hired there this past academic year, with a primary charge to pursue her research in the evolution of communication, specifically in wolf spiders (in the American South), jumping spiders (in Arizona), and another bizarre order of arachnids, amblypygids (in Central America). “The easiest place to start looking at communication is between the sexes, to see how males communicate with females, to attract them for mating,” says Hebets. “Sexual cannibalism makes these spiders a

great system to study, because the pressure is so high for these males to be good at what they’re doing.” Within the related spider species Hebets studies, the spiders’ mating behaviors are similar, with males “courting” females, who will eventually accept only one partner. These males, however, have developed different communication styles—visual, “seismic” and a combination of the two—for courting females of their species. In her lab, Hebets manipulates these various signals to see which are more and less important to the females. The results of these experiments are then compared to evolutionary relationships between species. Hebets believes she will eventually identify a pattern of communication development that parallels the species’ genetic evolutionary path. Even in these simple spiders, she already knows that communication, and not just proximity or “instinct,” is critical to the mating process. “In the wild, males mature several weeks earlier than females . . . so they spend a lot of time [courting unreceptive females],” says Hebets. The immature females learn and remember what they see from the males, and later, when ready to mate, these females show a marked preference for suitors who look and behave most like the males they encountered earlier. While spider behavior is fascinating in its own right, says Hebets, “I’m really interested in what my (continued on p. 4)

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research can tell us about humans and how they perceive and process signals” from different sources. While human neural systems are profoundly more complex than spiders’, Hebets notes that various types of communication, in different combinations, have differing effects on humans—just as they do on spiders. “Presumably, nervous systems are set up in similar ways across the animal kingdom, and, if you can learn about a simple system like spiders, you could potentially learn a lot about what’s happening in more complex animals,” she concludes. Hebets originally came to Albion hoping to become a marine biologist, but an invertebrate zoology class with Gail Stratton (who now teaches at the University of Mississippi) and an invitation to join her professor in field research changed her mind. Hebets and Stratton (who still do research together) spent the summer of Hebets’ junior year videotaping wolf spider courtship displays in Mississippi. Day after day, they would capture behavior on tape that no one had ever seen before. “It blew me away that there was so much out there that was completely unknown,” Hebets recalls enthusiastically. “I was potentially the first person in the world to see the courtship display of this species. . . . I realized that in this area of research, if I chose correctly, anything I did would be new, and that was exciting.” She continued her research on spiders while earning an M.S. at the University of Cincinnati and a Ph.D. at the University of Arizona, and then as a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University, where her work was supported by the National Institutes of Health. She still spends much of her summers in Arizona, Mississippi, Puerto Rico and Costa Rica, strapping on a headlamp and prowling the forests at night. “It was pretty scary at first,” says Hebets, recalling her first night in Costa Rica, when she stumbled into a colony of leaf cutter ants and sustained several hundred bites on her feet and ankles. “But I love the forests at night now . . . with all the little spider eyes shining out of the bushes.” Hebets recently traveled to the Florida Keys, to check out some amblypygids (close spider relatives), and was amazed to find a species that can breathe underwater. “These animals trap air in their cuticle, and can stay down for 24 hours without coming back up. . . .” She was the first to document this behavior. And there are more breakthrough discoveries to come. “There’s so much we don’t know. . . . I’ll never run out of things to explore.” Eileen Hebets and Gail Stratton share one more Albion connection: both did graduate study at the University of Cincinnati under the guidance of spider expert George Uetz, ’68. Hebets went on to earn a Ph.D. at the University of Arizona in 2002.To learn more about Hebets’ research, go to: espm.berkeley.edu and search under “Faculty/Staff Directory.”

(Right) As a senior scientist at Philips Research in Leuven, Belgium, Jacob Hooker helps design the eversmaller, faster transistors that go into new generations of computer chips. The chips, laid out on silicon wafers like the one shown in his left hand, make possible “smart” cell phones and hundreds of other consumer electronic devices.

Jacob Hooker, ’91 By Jake Weber “To change a car so it causes less pollution, you could make it more aerodynamic, or you could put in a hybrid engine, change the road surface, or do something entirely different,” says materials engineer Jacob Hooker, ’91. “Answers are pretty easy to find—the right answer is the tough one.” He uses this analogy to help explain the wideranging challenges he faces in his own specialty, transistor technology. A senior scientist with Philips, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of consumer electronics and their components, Hooker plans and performs experiments and coordinates research activities for developing brand-new materials for the computer chips that have become integral to every aspect of our modern society. No matter the product or the manufacturer, explains Hooker, computer chips are mostly “built” from transistors, tiny electronic building blocks pieced together to accomplish a variety of tasks. Whether they’re used to store data, send or receive signals, or translate computer code to screen displays, transistors are basic to all computer devices. On a certain basic level, Hooker says the difference between, say, a cordless phone receiver and a cell phone that can play movies is simply the number of transistors each contains. Specifically, Hooker’s expertise lies in the technology of “gate electrodes,” tiny pieces that turn electricity off and on within transistors. The pressure to innovate is constant, he says. As Hooker and his teams create smaller and faster transistors, product designers “can put more than 10 million transistors into some

devices,” he notes. Those millions of transistors still need to run for hours on a couple of AA batteries, even as they perform increasingly complex tasks. Then, as consumers demand faster, smaller, “smarter” products, the designers turn back to Hooker, and the search begins again. “The typical life cycle of a transistor design is two to three years, so you’re always working on new technology. I do a lot of coordinating to make sure things are done on time,” says Hooker. “The rewarding part is being able to take all this information and all this work and feel like you’re coming to a solution. I like the dynamism of working in industry.” Hooker’s interest in engineering led him originally to choose Albion with the intention of following the 3-2 engineering program. He discovered, however, that the liberal arts model provided other opportunities he couldn’t pass up. He majored in chemistry, and, in chemistry professor Dennis Gaswick, he says he found a “mentor who gave me a lot of good guidance.” Not only did Gaswick work with Hooker on grantfunded student research on campus, he encouraged Hooker to do an off-campus semester at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. After earning his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering at Northwestern University and completing a postdoctoral fellowship in Paris, France, Hooker accepted a job with Denmark’s Risoe National Laboratory, developing artificial muscles for robotic hands. With Philips Research, a subdivision of Philips Electronics, since 2000, he worked first in the Netherlands and now is in Leuven, Belgium. Although he had never left North America before moving overseas, Hooker has discovered an appreciation for Europe’s multiculturalism. “Working on the edge of technology, you have to do a lot of collaboration [with other researchers], because research is getting so expensive and complex,” J. HOOKER PHOTO


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A. LUUKANEN PHOTO

he says. He now speaks French and some Dutch and Danish, and works on the campus of the Interuniversity MicroElectronics Center (IMEC), a Flemish research institute, where only 60 of some 1,200 people are Philips employees, and more than 500 are non-Belgian. “Each company has a different corporate culture, and you have to consider that when you organize teams,” he continues. “It’s some work to optimize differences without creating conflicts, so you can push the research without wasting your resources.” In addition to coordinating research projects within Philips, Hooker works with researchers at companies, universities and technical institutes across Europe, helping them to plan and conduct research “that’s relevant to us, but that they can also publish,” he says. “Sometimes this gives us at Philips a competitive advantage by having access to the best tools and technologies, allowing us to bring products to market more quickly.” While computer chip technology is a long way from reaching its limits, Hooker is already looking to his own future beyond research. Now he often serves in an advisory capacity to Philips Research managers as they set funding and prioritize future projects. “I find that I like project planning and doing road-mapping and strategy,” he says. “I’m interested in the challenge of working to predict the future.” Recipient of a Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1996, Jacob Hooker holds five patents with several pending, and has over 30 publications and conference proceedings. He and his wife, Fay Dunkerley, have one child.

Aaron Miller, ’95 By Sarah Briggs In his lab at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, Colo., Aaron Miller, ’95, is engaged in a research effort that he believes may someday rival the World War II-era Manhattan Project in terms of its scope. The research is described under the broad label of quantum information sciences, and, according to NIST, if their scientists are successful, it likely will represent the “next Information Age.” Calculations that might literally take decades on today’s computers, if they could be done at all, could be done in only months on a quantum computing system, Miller says. His research group is focusing on developing the devices needed to assist the transmission and reception of the encrypted data that can be processed on quantum computers. His recent work has focused on the development of an ultra-sensitive photon-counting detector—essentially a monitor for the light energy carrying data along fiber optic cable— that will allow quantum systems to achieve a level of security in communications that is not possible with today’s technology. “[Our] single-photon detector is the most sensitive in the world,” he explains. “Within the next year, we expect to be able to perform the first demonstration of perfectly secure telecommunication channels over distances of 100 km in collaboration with the Los Alamos National Laboratory.” The U.S. Department of Defense is one of the leading backers of the research, for the possibilities it offers for securing classified information, but applications might also be developed in the banking industry,

Miller notes. He predicts that it could take 10 years for quantum information systems to become fully operational. Miller began his work on advanced light detection systems while a doctoral student at Stanford, and, as he searched for postdoctoral research opportunities in 2001, he discovered NIST was looking at some of the same questions he had been studying. At the time, no one had developed a light detector that had the precision needed for quantum communications systems. Miller saw his opening, joined NIST’s Electronics and Electrical Engineering Laboratory, and has convinced the National Research Council and the Defense Department to fund his work, to the tune of $3-million over the last three years. He has since been named a staff scientist with that lab. At NIST, Miller says, “we’re pushing the forefront of measurement technology. . . . In our division [we] build the pioneering instruments that enable us to do the precise measurements that we were never able to do before.” Miller’s NIST colleagues include some of the nation’s leading physicists, including a few Nobel Prize winners, and he also collaborates with scientists at other government laboratories and major universities. The best days, he says, are those when he and his co-workers can shut themselves off for a few hours to brainstorm new directions for their research. “I really enjoy it here. . . . NIST allows us a fair amount of freedom over what we research, and yet we also get the institutional backing of an immense organization with a lot of scientific clout.” Miller says he wants to continue to “push the envelope” in his field, and currently is looking ahead to work on some more practical applications that require advanced detectors such as locating weapons concealed on airport travelers and battlefield imaging systems. His interest in the experimental aspects of research began at Albion in projects on three-dimensional displays and atomic physics conducted with College

Aaron Miller stands in front of the world’s most sensitive photon counter, an instrument he helped develop at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The silver cylinder is the cryogenic refrigerator that houses NIST’s advanced light detectors. This system is capable of cooling the devices to only a fraction of a degree above absolute zero to enable ultra-precise optical measurements. physics professors David Kammer and David Seely, respectively. “The faculty were always available and were very good mentors,” he recalls. He eventually completed majors in both physics and mathematics. In their upper-level courses and in their research experiences, students were encouraged to follow wherever their curiosity led them, Miller says. That’s an approach he still values. The two questions that matter most to him in any job, he says, are: “Am I learning? Am I being productive?” It appears the single-photon detector is only the first of the innovations we can expect from Aaron Miller. Says Albion’s David Seely: “I think he’s going to be right in the center of this country’s applied physics discoveries.” Aaron Miller earned a Ph.D. in physics at Stanford University in 2001. His publications include articles in Physical Review, Applied Physics Letters, Journal of Applied Physics, and Astrophysical Journal. He is married to Holly Buege Miller, ’96, and they have one daughter. For more information on Aaron Miller’s work, go to: www.nist.gov/public_affairs/factsheet/ quantum.htm.

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PHOTO COURTESY OF J. BRIGHAM-GRETTE

Where the past is prologue Geologist’s research gives clues on global warming By Jake Weber

Since 1998, geologist Julie Brigham-Grette, ’77, and her co-researchers have traveled three times to Elgygytgyn Lake in northeastern Siberia to take water samples and sediment cores from the lake bottom, as part of an effort to track past arctic climate change. (Above) Brigham-Grette collects lake water from a 130-meter depth for radiocarbon dating and chemical analysis. (Below) The team uses a floating platform to obtain sediment cores from the lake floor. The cores taken so far provide clues on climate change over the past 300,000 years.

“It’s like walking around with a bull’s-eye on your forehead,” says geologist and paleoclimatologist Julie Brigham-Grette, ’77, describing how it feels to carry $60,000 in cash halfway around the world on her less-than-intimidating 5’6” frame. But those bundles of cash are also her lifeline, given that there’s no ATM in the northeastern Siberian frontier where she conducts her research, and, besides, “no one trusts the banks.” Likewise, MasterCard simply won’t do for hiring the helicopters and buying the supplies for her 11-person crew during their summer stay in Russia. After nearly eight summers spent in northeastern Siberia since 1991, Brigham-Grette is adept at handling subzero temperatures, price-gouging entrepreneurs and J. BRIGHAM-GRETTE PHOTO suspicious government officials. The National Science Foundation, which provides major funding for her research, classifies it as “risky.” “But if we’re successful the scientific payoff will

be great,” Brigham-Grette enthuses. “I’m convinced on a personal level . . . it’s worth the risks.” The payoff Brigham-Grette is searching for lies at the bottom of Chukotka’s Elgygytgyn Crater Lake. While today August temperatures at her research site can drop well below freezing, roughly 3.6 million years ago, when a meteorite impact created the lake, this region above the Arctic Circle was considerably warmer. What is now a widespread tundra landscape was forested in the past by a diversity of trees, and the entire Arctic lacked sea ice. “Ever since the meteor hit, this lake has been collecting sediment, recording the climate history via plant pollen and other organic material that has fallen into it as well as through changes in the sediment chemistry,” Brigham-Grette explains. “It’s a record of 3.6 million years of climate change in one spot. That absolutely gets my heart rate up.” During the summers of 1998, 2000 and 2003, Brigham-Grette spent anywhere from one to three months as the chief American scientist on an American-German-Russian research team taking pilot sediment cores and water samples from the lake bottom. The longest cores taken so far are nearly 15 meters in length. Brigham-Grette pitches her tent either on the ice or on the shore of the lake, eats a lot of onepot meals of pasta or rice and shares in the duties of operating the heavy equipment used to extract sediment cores from a lake floor that is both highly compacted and difficult to access. (The lake is 175 meters deep or nearly as deep as the Washington Monument is high.) Nonetheless, she says, core collection is the easy part of the process. Weather permitting, the team spends only a few weeks collecting several hundred samples of water and sediment. Several weeks more are devoted to getting the samples out of the country, due to the bureaucratic red tape she confronts each time. Once back in the U.S., Brigham-Grette and her graduate students spend months examining the samples, sorting out fossils, identifying organic materials and doing numerous chemical analyses. The results are compared with colleagues’ research worldwide, both to ensure that certain readings are consistent, and also to create a more detailed picture of regional climate change.


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“No one is going to fund this research [in the future] if we can’t prove we know what we’re talking about,” she says. Over the past six years, Brigham-Grette and her colleagues have managed to sample and analyze sediment from the past 300,000 years, but BrighamGrette is determined to drill another 350 meters to the original lake bed—a multimillion-dollar undertaking given that the site is 250 kilometers from the nearest airport on the edge of the East Siberian Sea and cannot be accessed by road. The necessary drilling equipment will require a platform so heavy that it can only be used in the dead of winter, when the lake ice is a minimum of 6-7 feet thick. The drilling platform will then have to be completely enclosed and kept above freezing in contrast to temperatures of –25o to –35o C outside. Because the time window between late-winter accessibility and early-spring warming is so short, drilling will operate around the clock, requiring multiple work crews, which must all live at the site. Every last ton of equipment, supplies and personnel will be brought in via helicopter or sled—and not a single ounce of collected material will leave the country before Brigham-Grette completes the usual mountain of permits. Brigham-Grette is confident, however, that she can and will find funding for this next venture, as the work she is doing has ramifications far beyond simply expanding our understanding of the past. “Right now, there’s about 370 ppm of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and the earth has not experienced anything like this naturally in over 400,000 years,” she explains. As researchers try to determine the potential impact of this elevated carbon dioxide level on global warming, it’s instructive to look at climate change in the past, as Brigham-Grette is now doing. In fact, geologists and climate modelers have to look back more than 13 million years to get to the carbon dioxide levels we have now. Studying previous warm periods in the earth’s history will help reveal how the atmosphere and the oceans work together to maintain a habitable planet. Although the earth has gone through many warming and cooling cycles, the rapid rate of warming today is unlike anything scientists have measured in the recent past. The potentially long record of climate from Elgygytgyn Lake will allow Brigham-Grette and her colleagues to study rates of arctic climate change over a number of different climate cycles. Looking at the bigger picture, her work will contribute to strategies for assessing the vulnerability, adaptability and sustainability of societies to various rates of potential climate change. As impressive as Brigham-Grette’s research accomplishments are, it’s even more noteworthy that this research is only one focus of her busy life. Professor and associate department chair of geosciences at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Brigham-Grette teaches hundreds of undergraduates each year, as well as working with numerous master’s and doctoral candidates. And she also holds leadership roles in several professional associations. Curiously, she never planned to be a professor, much less a geologist, when she arrived at Albion College as a freshman in 1973. “I had to look up ‘geology’ in the dictionary that first week of orientation, because I needed a science course, and I didn’t know what geology was!” she says with a smile. With that memory in mind, Brigham-Grette teaches an oceanography class that she helped create specifically to attract undergraduates who have “science phobia.” She explains, “In oceanography, you have the chemistry, the physics, the biology and the geology of the oceans all in one course, and students learn the basic sciences they tried to avoid in high school. This

exposes them to the idea of hypothesis testing and makes them more science literate, so when they’re in the voting booth and have to make choices, they have something to fall back on. That to me is like a mission.” And while she is passionate about taking science to non-scientists, Brigham-Grette insists it’s just as important for scientists to appreciate the different ways of thinking in fields outside their usual realm. “If I could say anything to the students today, it would be that they should take classes in subjects they’ve never studied, learn things they don’t think they want to learn. I may not recall 95 percent of what I learned in my art and religion classes, but the ideas I was exposed to are integrated into my thinking, and are very valuable to me today.” Brigham-Grette says she “hates being cold,” and misses her family, but next summer will find her in Siberia or on a related project in the Bering Strait region once again. “Paleoenvironmental reconstruction

is about long stretches of time,” she smiles. “It may take me awhile to get this project done, but I’m confident we will do it eventually. You have to be an optimist to do this type of research.” Over her desk Brigham-Grette keeps a short quote from St. Francis of Assisi that reads: “First do what is practical, then what is possible, and suddenly, you are doing the impossible.” Julie Brigham-Grette, ’77, is president of the American Quaternary Association, chair of the International Science Steering Committee of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Program on Past Global Change, a member of the National Science Foundation’s Office of Polar Programs Advisory Board and a fellow of the Geological Society of America. A 2003 recipient of Albion’s Distinguished Alumni Award, Brigham-Grette and her husband, Roger, are the parents of two sons. She holds a doctorate in geology from the University of Colorado-Boulder.

After the flood How a theory once called ‘preposterous’ has shaped modern geology By Jake Weber This past May marked the sixth anniversary of Larry Taylor’s last day of teaching at Albion College. To call him “retired,” however, would be inaccurate. A glaciologist who during his paid career did research in Antarctica, Alaska, Greenland and the Great Lakes, Taylor has devoted his ersatz retirement to research in “his own backyard,” around Albion. In a further ironic twist, this research ultimately comes from one of modern geology’s most influential thinkers, a man educated in Taylor’s “own backyard,” at Albion College. J Harlen Bretz, after graduating from Albion in 1905 and earning a Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, spent much of the 1920s mapping and studying topography from western Montana to eastern Washington. Without benefit of aerial photographs or satellite imaging, Bretz was able to perceive gigantic patterns in the landscape that he labeled “the channeled scablands.” “The scablands include giant potholes, abandoned waterfalls and ripple marks, the kind you see on the floors of streams, except these ripple marks are up to 50 feet high, with distances between them of hundreds of feet, and continue for 10 or 20 miles,” says Taylor. Based on his studies, Bretz postulated that much of the Pacific Northwest had been engulfed in “outburst floods.” Starting about 15,000 years ago during the last Ice Age, massive ice dams, Bretz said, had periodically built up and then given way, scouring the landscape with millions of gallons of water and debris. Bretz’s peers, including some former students, responded with almost universal scorn; at the 1927 meeting of the Washington (D.C.) Academy of Science, his flood hypothesis was dismissed as “preposterous,” and his credibility challenged. Not

until the mid-1960s were other researchers, using advanced photography and mapping technology, able to demonstrate that Bretz’s hypothesis was superior to the accepted explanation (that the areas in question had been formed by a slow, steady flow of water). In 1979, more than 50 years after being denounced as a “crackpot,” the 96-year-old Bretz received the Geological Society of America’s most prestigious award, the Penrose Medal. (continued on p. 8) J. GOLDSMITH PHOTO

Geologist J Harlen Bretz, Albion 1905, pictured at Mount Rushmore in 1949, would later earn the Geological Society of America’s highest honor, the Penrose Medal.

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“Current Mars mapping uses Bretz’s models,” notes Taylor, explaining that they’re an analog for Martian geographic patterns. Bretz’s work has great import for scientists tracking the earth’s present geology, too. Iceland, the Alps, the Himalayas and southeastern Alaska, among others, Taylor says, “all have icedammed lakes and lakes trapped beneath glaciers which periodically produce outburst floods. . . . [Geologists are] interested in studying outburst floods because they are a potential hazard in the world today.” Closer to home, Taylor and his colleague, University of Toledo geologist Tim Fisher, are collecting evidence that south-central Michigan was also once engulfed in outburst flooding. Shortly after Bretz’s death in 1981, a local gravel company began excavating gravel pits near Albion, and Taylor realized that boulder beds seen on the pit walls reflected the flood patterns Bretz had described. In the 1990s, Taylor was approached by Fisher, whose graduate research was built, in part, on Bretz’s theories. ALBION COLLEGE ARCHIVES PHOTO

Bretz drew this map of the channeled scablands in the state of Washington without benefit of satellite photos and other modern technology. Published in 1923, it proved to be a remarkably accurate representation of the area that was scarred by massive glacial floods more than 12,000 years ago. M. ARVOY PHOTO

“Albion gave me my start—especially Professor Barr,” wrote Bretz of his days on campus. In the back row, Bretz is at far right, Barr at far left. Over the past two years, Taylor and Fisher have published articles on Michigan’s glacial floods in two leading professional journals. As a scholar of Bretz’s life and work, Taylor also contributed to a future “Nova” television documentary on Bretz. In this 99th anniversary of Bretz’s graduation year, Taylor is pleased that the pioneering geologist’s legacy is still closely intertwined with the College. “Bretz was a loyal alumnus with fond memories of college days,” says Taylor, noting that Bretz was an equally enthusiastic supporter of the Geological Sciences Department, which Taylor founded in 1964. “Almost weekly, he would send me articles that he clipped out of journals, relating to geologic processes.” Bretz’s clippings became a resource file which Taylor’s students utilized for many years, and his large rock collections, since donated to Albion, are still used today in geology lab sessions. His larger boulders are on display in the science complex courtyard. After a 33-year teaching career at the University of Chicago, Bretz retired to Homewood, Ill., where he hosted numerous student and faculty visitors from Albion College, serving lunch and playing “name that rock” with the students. “He had a great basement,

with a wine cellar hidden behind a bookcase,” recalls Taylor. A lover of practical jokes, Bretz was especially fond of challenging students to find the wine cellar—meanwhile locking them in the basement. “The door had a secret lock, attached to a cord which ran along the banister—you had to find where the rope was hidden, and pull the rope,” laughs Taylor. “The students would be down there for 20 minutes, trying to get out.” Following Bretz’s example again, Taylor has no plans to even consider getting out of the field. “Geologists become geologists because they’re fascinated by the earth around them. . . . It’s not just a profession.” Studying the earth and how it was formed is always a challenge, he says. “Bretz loved the challenge. He just loved it.”

Larry Taylor, professor emeritus of geological sciences, arranged for the move of more than a dozen geologically significant boulders from Bretz’s Illinois home to Albion’s campus in the mid-1970s. The boulder in the foreground was once part of a billionyear-old outcrop of metamorphic rock in Ontario and was transported by glaciers to northern Illinois.


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Pacesetters Fifty years after their Albion graduation, Cedric and June Dempsey still run in high gear D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

By Sarah Briggs Cedric and June Luke Dempsey, both ’54, began their married life as Albion College seniors 50 years ago in converted World War II barracks housing on Porter Street. This past April, they found themselves living on campus once again—this time to inaugurate the newly created Dempsey Professorship. While their Albion housing was a little less “rustic” this time around, they still found much that felt familiar in and around the College. “There’s a feeling of coming back home,” June comments, noting that they ran into many of their former professors—Keith Moore, Ewell “Doc” Stowell, Howard Pettersen, Betty Beese, Char Duff and Morley Fraser, among them— during their stay. “They remember us as students—I don’t believe this happens at large colleges and universities. Faculty came here and they stayed . . . they stayed to teach and be part of the community. Their loyalty was to the College, not just to their field. They built marvelous programs here.” The Dempseys still laugh about those early days at 1217 E. Porter St. As they remember it, there was no sound-proofing between apartments, which meant everyone got to know their neighbors extremely well, and all of the residents were treated to the rumble of the 80 trains that passed by daily on the nearby railroad tracks. But the price was right: just a dollar a day, which the Dempseys paid out of Ced’s earnings as a sports referee. And the friendships formed then with other Albion married students have continued, in many cases, over the past five decades. The Dempseys stayed on in Albion after graduation, with Ced starting out as an assistant coach for the Briton football and basketball programs and head tennis coach (he later became head coach for basketball and cross country and dean of men) and June teaching fourth grade at Dalrymple School. What they also remember from their Albion experience is how the students’ talents and aspirations were shaped and encouraged by their professors. It was expected that women would have careers beyond the home, June says. “I never ever felt that the males on campus were pushed academically more than the females. . . . I felt that we were all equally challenged, and that the expectations were as high for us as for the men.” Ced, an 11-time letterwinner in three sports while a student, notes that he played on one of the first racially integrated sports teams at Albion. At a time when it was uncommon to do so in intercollegiate athletics, head basketball coach Walt Sprandel actively recruited African-American players like John Porter, ’53, Arnold Pinckney, ’52, Charlie Frost, ’52, and Maurice Fowler, ’52, all of whom would later join Ced in Albion’s Athletic Hall of Fame. And, Ced adds, Sprandel served as a mentor to all of them, propelling them into careers in educational administration, business, the ministry, and public service. While public school integration had already begun in Albion when June started her teaching career, she

recalls that change still did not come easily in the years immediately following the May 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision. She especially remembers the time a white parent challenged the alphabetical seating arrangement that placed her child next to an African-American student. June saw no reason to change the seating assignments, and her decision was upheld by the school principal. The Dempseys have continued to promote diversity throughout their careers. During his tenure as athletic director at the Cedric and June Luke University of Arizona, Ced Dempsey, both ’54, made it a priority to returned to Albion as increase the number of visiting professors this women and minorities on past spring. his staff, and hired the first female head trainer and the first female head strength coach in a Division I athletic program. As president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), he insisted that the association staff should mirror the institutions it served in terms of both race and gender. He tripled the number of minority staff members (to 24%) and nearly doubled (to 49%) the number of female administrative staff members during his eight years at the NCAA’s helm, and he made sure that diversity existed at all levels of the organization including the executive management team. As dean of the University of Arizona’s Extended University and Summer School, June co-founded a program serving underrepresented students that has since been recognized as a model nationwide. The Academic Preparation for Excellence Program (APEX) provides mentors to minority junior and senior high school students as they prepare for college. APEX, now in its 20th year, works with students from 60 Arizona schools. June also regularly recruited women for leadership roles. “The women tended to be more creative and innovative in designing new programs,” she notes. The Extended University staff was eventually 90 percent female. Students learn through interacting with people who are different from themselves, Ced maintains. “Without some kind of program where we bring people of diverse backgrounds together, our nation will have great difficulty maintaining democracy.” This belief that an appreciation for diversity must be learned early has led to the Dempseys’ involvement in the Citizenship through Sports Alliance, offering educational programs on citizenship and non-violence in 17,000 American high schools. The Dempseys also

President of the NCAA from 1994 until his retirement in 2003, Cedric Dempsey was instrumental in the move of the NCAA national office to Indianapolis in 1999 and the negotiation of championship rights agreements with ESPN and CBS that will generate $6.2-billion over 11 years. Prior to joining the NCAA, he was director of athletics at four institutions: University of Arizona, University of the Pacific, San Diego State University and University of Houston. He holds a doctorate from the University of Illinois. A charter member of Albion’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 1989 and a Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, Dempsey also received an honorary doctorate from the College in 1995. He gave the commencement address at Albion in 1995 and 1997. June Dempsey earned a doctorate at the University of Houston and is a recognized leader in the field of developmental education. An elementary school teacher early in her career, she went on to several roles in higher education administration. She was director of developmental education at San Joaquin Delta Community College (Calif.), assistant director of the Diagnostic Learning Laboratory at the University of Houston and dean of Extended University and Summer School at the University of Arizona. She was named a Woman of Distinction in 2003 by Alpha Xi Delta sorority. Involved in three sports while an Albion student, June is also an Athletic Hall of Fame inductee. She is a past member of Albion’s Alumni Association Board of Directors and now serves on the steering committee for the LIBERAL ARTS AT WORK capital campaign. She will receive a Distinguished Alumni Award at Homecoming 2004. At Albion, the Dempseys have led fund-raising efforts for improvement of academic programs and sports facilities, including the Elkin R. Isaac Track and the women’s softball field. The Cedric W. and B. June Luke Dempsey Endowed Professorship will recognize outstanding teaching and research and will be located in the College’s Fritz Shurmur Education Institute.

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facilitated a partnership between the Citizenship through Sports Alliance and Israel’s Ministry of Sports to bring these same programs to Israeli students. The partnership has made possible exchanges between high school-aged youths from the U.S. and Israel. For these efforts, the Dempseys received the Partners for Democracy Award in 1999 from the America-Israel Friendship League (AIFL). June currently serves on the AIFL executive board as a vice president and has traveled to Israel to see the

programs in operation. “Citizenship through Sports is now in every school in Israel,” she notes. Since retiring in January 2003, the Dempseys have devoted more of their time to travel and to their family. Ced continues to work as a consultant, advising universities and colleges as well as international sports associations. He recently has been asked to meet with Brazilian sports administrators to assist them in creating their own version of the NCAA. The Dempseys will also continue their visiting professorship at Albion in the fall, working with

students interested in sports management in the Carl A. Gerstacker Liberal Arts Institute for Professional Management and the Physical Education Department and with prospective teachers in the Fritz Shurmur Education Institute. “The students [we have met] are so articulate,” June says. “I am impressed with the student body. We have some very dynamic young people on this campus.” Ced adds, “Albion is in good hands. It has strong leadership. . . . There’s a very positive atmosphere here.”

Isaac Symposium panel examines challenges to Division III athletics How to keep the “student” in “student-athlete” was a key question for the alumni and staff who engaged in a panel discussion on “Athletics and the Liberal Arts College: Past, Present, and Future” April 13 as part of Albion’s Elkin R. Isaac Student Research Symposium week. “The 20th and 21st centuries produced a dramatic shift [in how the world views athletics],” President Peter Mitchell, ’67, said, in his opening remarks.

“Amateur athletics has been replaced by Jerry Maguire’s cry of ‘Show me the money!’ Preserving the values of Division III athletics is a continual challenge.” Others included on the panel were: Cedric Dempsey, ’54, past president of the NCAA; June Luke Dempsey, ’54, former higher education administrator; symposium namesake Elkin “Ike” Isaac, ’48, former Briton coach and athletic director; David Neilson, ’66, Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association commis-

sioner; Lisa Roschek, Briton head coach for women’s soccer and associate athletic director; and Troy VanAken, executive assistant to the president for athletics and vice president for information technology. Thomas Schwaderer, ’56, also participated in the evening program. The panelists looked at the past and present state of small-college athletics and at the current challenges to the traditional Division III philosophy. (For more on the Isaac Student Research Symposium, see p. 11.)

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(Left) David Neilson, ’66, Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association commissioner and former All-American quarterback for the Britons, talked about some of the recent steps the NCAA has taken to reform Division III athletics, including improved alignment of college admissions and athletic recruitment policies and reductions in the length of playing and practice seasons. “Our MIAA standard is stricter than the NCAA’s,” he noted. “[The reform package] puts us on a more competitive footing with other Division III schools.”

(Above left) Symposium namesake and former Briton coach and athletic director Elkin “Ike” Isaac, ’48, framed the central issue for the panel discussion: “Only one question is paramount: Can a serious student compete in the current Albion athletic program without jeopardizing his or her academic or professional mission? Changes in the Division III format— national championships, expanded schedules, lengthened seasons—have so impacted the academic mission of quality colleges that careful assessments and analysis of ongoing programs are critical. The Albion legacy of which I have been a part nurtured world-class professionals—doctors, lawyers, academics, social and political leaders. To either jeopardize students’ academic mission or to expand program parameters so extensively as to discourage their participation is the same exploitation of which Division I schools are guilty.” (Above center) Drawing on his experience in coaching and athletic administration, retired NCAA president Cedric Dempsey, ’54, (second from left) discussed the trends that influenced sports during the last half of the 20th century. “We saw the Eastern Europeans begin an approach to sport that changed it dramatically. They began to identify young people at a very early age and put them into sports schools so they could be the best in the world. [The focus then became] what it took to be a champion in a particular sport rather than using sport for development of the total person.” Dempsey also noted that Division III collegiate sports have been influenced by the same pressures for increased revenue and prestige that have been evident in Division I today.

A three-sport athlete at Albion and now an advocate for international youth sports programs, June Luke Dempsey, ’54, noted that participation in athletics builds leadership skills and commitment. She particularly encouraged young women to enter the fields of education and athletic administration. “The opportunities for you are wide open,” she said. “Remember that you have the potential to be a leader, and not just at the local level. . . . Get as many degrees as you can, and aim for those top jobs.”


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Grant builds community connections By Jake Weber

Senior Taurean Wilson was among the education students in attendance at this year’s Elkin R. Isaac Lecture, offered by John Porter, ’53 (right), who served as an educational adviser to four U.S. presidents. They are pictured with President Peter Mitchell. kicked off the week’s events. (For more on the panel, see p.10.) The symposium With grace, humor and insight, Isaac Symposium keynote speaker included a full day Gloria Steinem reflected on the contributions the modern women’s devoted to presentamovement has made in increasing civil rights in American society. tions by 76 students on their original research, scholarship and creative activity, with topics ranging from pre-Columbian archaeology to bioterrorism, genetic cloning and self-portraiture. In addition, more than 100 students were recognized by the faculty for academic excellence during the Honors Convocation. Porter stressed the need for public By Jake Weber education reform during his Isaac Lecture on Intellectual curiosity, academic excellence and “Educational Leadership for the 21st Century,” drawing on the ideas in his new the free exchange of ideas were all celebrated book of the same name. Porter argued that during April’s Elkin R. Isaac Student public education must undergo a “cultural sea Research Symposium. On successive evenings, John Porter, ’53, former president of change” in addressing the accountability of the entire system to educate all students, as Eastern Michigan University, gave the 2004 well as its methods of ensuring that more Elkin R. Isaac Lecture, and then feminist students complete successful high school writer Gloria Steinem offered the symposium careers. keynote address. A panel discussion on Contending that “this sea change in public athletics and the liberal arts college, featuring education is important to preserving democsymposium namesake Elkin “Ike” Isaac, ’48, racy and the sustaining of our social order,”

Symposium challenges current thinking

he called on schools to continually track improvements in the learning environment and student performance, and on parents and the community to provide mentors for all students. Porter has 50 years’ experience as an educational leader, policymaker and consultant at the local, state and national levels. “An Evening with Gloria Steinem” unified a capacity crowd in Goodrich Chapel in a lively examination of applying knowledge and education to activism and the greater good. With grace, humor and insight, Steinem touched on the history of feminism from the 1970s to the present and the contributions the women’s movement has made in increasing civil rights in American society. Steinem said feminism today should expand its scope to include advocacy for environmental protection, greater political responsibility and world peace. She encouraged the students in the audience to consider their role in supporting feminism and feminist causes. “If you want a satisfying future, you have to start now,” she said. “If you look back 30 years and see how far we’ve come, and then look that distance into the future . . . you’ll get an idea of what the future can look like. There’s no turning back.”

One of Albion’s strongest coalitions has been recognized for its enthusiasm and innovation with a $14,500 grant from the Michigan Humanities Council (MHC). Kids ‘N’ Stuff children’s museum, the Albion Public Library and Albion College’s Whitehouse Nature Center and Education Department will use the grant to develop “Culture Quest: Myths, Legends and Reality,” a multi-part program that will benefit many facets of the Albion community. Albion’s $14,500 award is one of the largest grants ever awarded by the MHC, which was impressed with the program’s “diverse interactive elements to involve children and adults in learning about the history and culture of Albion and the world cultures that influence this region,” said MHC executive director Janice Fedewa. This summer, an Interactive Culture Camp integrates activities at three sites—Kids ‘N’ Stuff, Whitehouse Nature Center and the Albion Public Library—into a fun educational experience focused on local history and culture. An archaeological dig is among the activities planned at the Whitehouse Nature Center. A highlight of the grant will be the Culture Quest Exposition Sept. 18, during the Albion community’s annual Festival of the Forks. The exposition will bring together folk artists, cultural interpreters and performance artists, as well as numerous hands-on activities. Then later in the fall, the Albion College Education Department will help develop Kids ‘N’ Stuff displays and materials, along with presenting programs at the museum to local schoolchildren. “The local community is very excited about Culture Quest,” said museum director Elizabeth Schultheiss. “I can’t wait until September.”

Three earn top service awards Three Albion students were among the state’s top community service leaders recognized by Michigan Campus Compact (MCC) this spring. Iain Charnley received an Outstanding Community Impact Award, Becky Smith a Commitment to Service Award and Meghan Caswell a Heart and Soul Award. The Albion students were chosen from a nomination pool of several hundred students from colleges and universities across the state. According to MCC, all three students received their awards for “outstanding commitment to community service throughout their college careers.” Charnley’s award is the highest honor in the state for students doing community service as part of their college education. “I am thrilled that the exceptional service leadership provided by Iain, Becky and Meghan is being recognized across the state of Michigan,” President Peter Mitchell said. “With their very significant involvement in the Greater Albion community, including work with Habitat for Humanity, Albion’s public schools and the revitalization of our

downtown, these three Albion College students represent the best of the tradition of Liberal Arts at Work. To an impressive degree, they have invested their intellect—and their compassion—in service to the community of Albion.” Caswell, a May graduate in psychology, was involved for her entire four years at Albion as a member and leader in the College’s Student Volunteer Bureau, volunteering for and organizing such projects as Walk for Warmth, CROP Walk, Special Olympics and Make A Difference Day. A junior biology major, Charnley has been instrumental in building bridges between the College and the community as a leader of Habitat for Humanity and through service on the Albion Health and Wellness Action Team, the Albion/Homer United Way Fund Allocation Board and Albion Interfaith Ministries. A May graduate in political science, Smith is the first Albion College student to serve as a board member of the Albion Downtown Development Authority and was also involved with Student Volunteer Bureau.

Members of Sigma Nu fraternity celebrate a victory in a “Charity Bowl” basketball game they held on campus in April vs. Delta Sigma Phi. The event raised over $9,000 for the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation. President Peter Mitchell took center stage at halftime to run a “Price Is Right” contest that added to the day’s proceeds.


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(Left) University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman, considered one of the most influential leaders in higher education today, was the commencement speaker.

Commencement

2004 The first students to begin and end their college careers in a new century, Albion’s Class of 2004 included 331 graduates. The May 8 commencement ceremony was held in the College’s Bernard T. Lomas Fieldhouse. National opinion pollster Robert Teeter, ’61, received an honorary doctor of humane letters degree during the ceremony. President Peter Mitchell (at right) also used the occasion to announce the creation of the Robert M. Teeter Research Fellowship in the Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service. (Ed. note: Bob Teeter passed away June 13 after a long battle with cancer. See p. 21 for further information about his life and work.)

The Class of 2004 now heads on to graduate study at institutions including the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, the University of Michigan Medical School and Law School and the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine, and to careers with employers such as PricewaterhouseCoopers, GMAC, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Peace Corps and Teach for America.

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They’re retired in name only

your attitude—to expand your ways of thinking and your expertise,” says Machek, who was named Albion College Outstanding Teacher of the Year in 1982. “For example, I taught a First-Year Seminar which included a lot of writing, and had I been at a big school I

Editor’s note: Albion’s newest faculty emeriti, Frank Machek (art/art history) and Martha O’Kennon (mathematics/computer science), may have officially retired from teaching at Albion College, but neither would consider themselves “retired.” As you will see in the accompanying profiles, both have a full agenda of activities for this next stage of their lives. They were honored for their distinguished (and creative) teaching and scholarship during Albion’s May commencement ceremony.

(continued on p. 21)

Martha O’Kennon, mathematics/computer science By Jake Weber

Frank Machek, art/art history By Morris Arvoy Shortly before they graduated in 1997, art majors Kimmi Dukes and Jill Parsons St. John had T-shirts printed with the favorite sayings of one of their professors. The T-shirt, inscribed with Frank Machek’s “words to live by for Albion College artists,” contains such memorable gems as, “Did you know you can work outside of class on this?”, “It’s not terrible,” and the almost laudatory, “See what you can do when you try?” The sayings belie the undeniable truth about Machek, who retired in May from Albion’s Art and Art History Department after 37 years: To generations of Albion students and faculty, Machek has been a beloved mentor, colleague, artist and friend who will be missed by all whom he touched. “I like Frank Machek very much—he’s one of my very favorite professors,” says Jason Kennedy, ’05, who has taken five courses taught by Machek. “One of the first things you notice about him is that he’s got an incredibly dry, sarcastic sense of humor, but it’s very endearing. While you’re working he might look at your art and say, ‘That has a chance—now don’t screw it up.’ When he comments on your work, you know that he’s evaluating it as to where he thinks it has strong potential to go, and he’s providing you

Frank Machek, who has more than five dozen commissioned portraits to his credit, now plans to delve into abstract art and photography. the best possible advice for your level of ability.” After earning his M.F.A. degree from Cranbrook Academy of Art, Machek arrived at Albion in 1967 and joined a department that was then headed by the man whose name was on the art building, Vernon Bobbitt. The Bobbitt Visual Arts Center had opened the previous year. The Chicago-area native, who was department chair for 15 years starting in 1976 when Bobbitt retired, says the Art Department at Albion has always been strong, and has grown over the years to include still photography, computer art and video art, as well as a full-fledged art history major. Machek notes that before two full-time art historians were added to the faculty, the studio art professors took turns teaching art history courses. “Teaching at a liberal arts college encourages you—or forces you, depending on

It’s an understatement to say that mathematician Martha O’Kennon has multiple talents. Among other things, the computer science specialist has taught courses in the humanities as well as the sciences, has a working knowledge of an early Indoeuropean, an African, an Asian and a Native American language, is an artisan weaver and proficient guitarist and—by popular demand—has become a professional paper sculpture artist. The rewards from these wide-ranging accomplishments have been plentiful—and satisfying. “If you get to do something you love, that’s the gift,” O’Kennon says, noting that these achievements, as well as her reputation for being “colorful,” stem from her determination to follow her passions. Her interest in linguistics and languages compelled O’Kennon to study in these areas even as she earned degrees in mathematics and began a university teaching career. Sanskrit and computer science may seem odd bedfellows, but “in math and in linguistics, you’re trying to find some pattern.

If you can find a pattern that works and is reproducible, you can build on it,” explains O’Kennon. “And there is something so beautiful in the process of finding the pattern.” O’Kennon was therefore in an ideal position to learn Chinese when she broke away from teaching mathematics to spend two years teaching computer science at Hefei Polytechnic University. She developed enough proficiency that she later successfully taught several courses in beginning Chinese at Albion. On her return to the U.S. in 1985, O’Kennon joined Albion College’s faculty in large part because of the College’s liberal arts emphasis and international programs. “Before I came to Albion, I was at big schools and people didn’t value much that happened outside of their department,” she recalls. “I was really glad to get back to a small place, where you could get to know everybody and butt in to other people’s conversations.” In the early 1990s, O’Kennon eagerly seized the opportunity to participate in Albion College’s faculty exchange program with South Africa’s University of Cape Town and teach in the Academic Support Program for (continued on p. 21) D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

Mathematician Martha O’Kennon will pursue her interest in creating “pop-ups” –elaborate 3-D paper creations that she now markets in Albion and elsewhere.


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Republican strategist Robert Teeter dies Robert Teeter, ’61, died of cancer on June 13, 2004, at his home in Ann Arbor. President of the Ann Arborbased Coldwater Corp. at the time of his death, Teeter was a pioneer in the development and practice of modern public opinion research. Shortly after graduating from Albion, Teeter joined George Romney’s Michigan gubernatorial campaign. This experience led him in 1967 to a position at Market Opinion Research (MOR), where he first was director of the political research division and then president. In 1989, Teeter founded Coldwater Corp., a business consulting and research firm that conducts the NBC News/Wall Street Journal national polling program, in addition to providing strategic planning consultation to senior executives. Teeter served in a senior position in the presidential campaigns of Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan, and as the national campaign chairman for President George H.W. Bush in 1992. Nearly half of the nation’s incumbent Republican governors and U.S. senators were also among his clients. He was a member of the Board of Directors of UPS, Visteon Corp., Kaydon Corp. and the Bank of Ann Arbor, and of the

executive committee of the Albion College Board of Trustees. Teeter received an honorary doctor of humane letters degree at Albion’s commencement this past May. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Carter Teeter, ’63, a son, John, a daughter, Katherine, and two brothers, Philip Teeter and John Teeter, ’67.

Machek

department. He has clearly been a mentor to us all. We look to him to help us find middle ground, and he always has a solution for us when we need one. We all respect him as an artist, but also as a teacher.” As a young faculty member learning the ropes when Machek was department chair, Chytilo noted that Machek was the “perfect mentor.” “He was always available to talk yet he never imposed anything on you,” she says. “He let me make my own mistakes, and I was able to learn from them.” Machek will not be at a loss for things to do in retirement. He will pursue his art, as well other interests including carpentry, woodworking and photography. Machek has restored two historic homes in Marshall, and might be persuaded to do more. His travel plans include trips to Prague and southern France. For the past 20 years, he has served as the zoning administrator and a planning commissioner for Eckford Township, where he lives with his wife, Ann. Machek says his art will continue to grow. He has always been interested in textures in art, and in the last few years he has become more involved in creating abstract art by importing base images to his computer, manipulating them in Photoshop, and then working them over in color pencil, graphite and ink. Machek, who has completed more than 50 portrait commissions and countless other drawings and paintings over the years, says, “I’m never bored. . . . I’ve always done work, and I always will.”

(continued from p. 12) probably never would have done that. I think that’s helped me, as well as offered something to the students.” Pinpointing students as the greatest dynamic in his decades at Albion, Machek says that in the 1970s students entered college knowing they wanted to major in art, and art classes were in great demand across campus—so much so that the Art Department held its own pre-registration. Then, he says, art became less popular as a major, and students became majors only after they had taken the classes and enjoyed the experience. Thanks in part to strong recruiting efforts in the past few years, students now are entering with more commitment to art—submitting portfolios and applying for art scholarships. “I think they are more practical and careeroriented now than students were in the late 1960s and ’70s,” he says. “They want to see what the specific reward is going to be for an endeavor. . . . But our students are still hardworking.” Mentoring generations of artists and art majors has long been a hallmark for Machek. Less visible is the mentoring he has done for his department colleagues. As an accomplished portraitist and the one constant at Bobbitt almost since the building opened its doors, the dean of Albion art professors has earned the strong admiration of his colleagues. “Frank has great guidance and wisdom, and we all benefit from that,” says Lynne Chytilo, professor and chair of art and art history. “Frank is the driving force of the

To honor Bob Teeter’s long service as a trustee and Visiting Committee member for the Gerald R. Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service, the Visiting Committee has established the Robert M. Teeter Student Research Fellowship Endowment in the Ford Institute. For more information, contact: Ben Hancock, vice president for institutional advancement, 517/629-0242, or e-mail bhancock@albion.edu.

The Teeter legacy Some of Robert Teeter’s colleagues and friends offer their remembrances below. Bob Teeter embodied the commitment to civic engagement that is at the core of the liberal arts tradition. He used the critical thinking and problem-solving skills he learned as an undergraduate both to forge a life of meaning and purpose and to improve the quality of life for others. There’s no question that his pioneering work in public opinion research set the standard in his field. His contributions as a

wise counselor to our nation’s top leaders, including four U.S. presidents, are welldocumented. Less well known, but equally valued within our campus community, was his sage advice as a member of our Board of Trustees. Bob Teeter was a role model for me and all Albion alumni, a true citizen of the world. Peter Mitchell, ’67 President, Albion College I had the good fortune of knowing Bob Teeter as a fellow trustee of Albion College and as a consultant to me and the External Affairs leadership team at NYNEX (now Verizon), and, I’m proud to say, we became very good friends. His commitment to excellence was evident in all of his relationships. You could count on Bob’s loyalty and on counsel that was always measured, direct, based on fact and logic, and ethically sound. Bob helped shape so many strategies and policies in politics, business and at Albion, yet he seldom stood in the limelight. His ego didn’t demand personal attention. He was a team player dedicated to the mission. Since Bob’s passing, people have commented on how down-to-earth he was even though he worked with some of the most important people in the world. They credit the Midwestern values that he never lost. I believe that Bob’s Albion education helped those values mature and become the solid foundation for a life we now praise and honor.

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One of democracy’s great American practitioners was lost last week with the death at age 65 of Bob Teeter. . . . A product of a classic Midwest small town, Coldwater, Mich., equipped with a first-class liberal arts education from Albion College, he was as brimming with idealism as many political operatives are drenched in cynicism. He also had a sunny disposition and a sense of humor that savored the rich, feisty characters in politics more than the grim strivers. . . . Over the years we probably shared as many dinners and conversations about politics as I enjoyed with any operative in either party. Every time, my perspective was changed—and improved—by something he said. . . . For him, what counted was good government—and the integrity of the candidates he helped. . . . He searched for and found people who cared about public service and not just about enhancing a career. David Broder Syndicated Columnist, Washington, D.C. (From the Washington Post) Bob Teeter was one of my closest friends. We have known each other and worked together for more than 30 years, and he will be sorely missed. Bob Teeter has been the single most important Republican strategist for many of us who have spent a career in public life. He was a wise and thoroughly decent man; our political system works better today because Bob was part of it.

William Ferguson, ’52 Trustee, Armonk, N.Y.

Richard Cheney Vice President of the United States Washington, D.C. (From the Detroit News)

O’Kennon

President’s Advisory Council on Intercultural Affairs Award for her contributions to promoting diversity on campus. “What made Dr. O’Kennon an exceptional professor for me was her excitement not only about mathematics but about life,” says Michelle Hribar, ’91, a professor of computer science at Pacific University. “She always had some new topic she was eagerly investigating. . . . I think she encouraged that in all of her students.” “I had no intention of majoring in mathematics,” continues Hribar, who recalls that many of her classmates decided to become math majors after studying calculus with O’Kennon. “I think all of us remember that 8 a.m. class very fondly and owe Dr. O’Kennon much gratitude for her excellent teaching!” In retirement, O’Kennon looks forward to continuing her translation program development—and will keep up with a new hobby that has gained significant local interest. Reviving a childhood passion for paper and scissors, O’Kennon has spent the past two years creating “pop-ups” –elaborate 3-D paper still lifes, landscapes, and Escher-like worlds that leap out of a flat card. Although she intended the pop-ups solely as something to do in the evenings, O’Kennon now offers them for sale in downtown Albion. “It wasn’t just a matter of style which made Martha such a wonderful educator for me. It was also her interests in so many fields,” says statistician David Barber, ’97, who worked with O’Kennon to move her translation programs to a Web-based language. “Without a doubt she has been one of the most memorable professors Albion College has had.”

(continued from p.12) college-bound African students. She decided to teach herself Xhosa in order to better do her job and learn more about the culture. “I started putting little sentences in the computer,” O’Kennon says. “Every time I’d learn a sentence pattern I’d put that in the computer, too.” By the time she got to South Africa her “little sentences” became the basis of research into computerized language translation that has occupied her time for the last 12 years. Along with the Xhosa translator, which O’Kennon continues to improve, she has established a computer translator for the Native American languages Ojibwe/Odawa, and is starting a project to work on the African languages Pulaar/Fulfulde. While no computer translator is perfect, she says, “you can write a pretty good one, one that’s useful.” Some of the languages O’Kennon works with are “endangered,” and that motivates her as well. “I like the idea of helping to preserve communication,” she says. “These languages are all so different, and if we lose these unique ways that people have learned to communicate, we’re losing a lot.” Closer to home, O’Kennon’s tenure at Albion has been marked by a similar excitement about the diversity of the campus community. She served as the first adviser to the College’s Asian Awareness Group, and has advised the Jewish Student Union (now Hillel) and the Star Trek Club. An enthusiastic supporter of the Gerstacker International House and international students for many years, O’Kennon received this year’s


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S C O R E B O A R D J. MILLER AND R. WEENER PHOTO

Hurdler Nick Morgan wins national championship; baseball and women’s tennis advance to playoffs By Bobby Lee Albion College is a member of the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA) and NCAA Division III. Find Briton sports on the Web at www.albion.edu/sports/ .

Men’s track and field: The third trip to the NCAA Division III Track and Field Championships was indeed the charm for senior Nick Morgan. He broke away from a neck-and-neck field to win the national championship in the 110-meter hurdles with a time of 14.56 seconds. Closing his collegiate career as a three-time All-American, Morgan is the fifth Briton to earn a national title in track and field since 1980. Junior Ivan Meiring achieved All-America status for the second consecutive year when he finished third in the discus, with a school-record throw of 172 feet, 2 inches. Albion placed 13th overall at the championships. For more details, go to: www.albion.edu/sports/ . These successes followed a spring season that saw the men share the league title with Calvin. It is Albion’s first MIAA title since earning a co-championship with Calvin in 1994. The league coaches selected Morgan as the most outstanding runner in the MIAA Championships after he won the 110-meter hurdles for the third consecutive year and raced to first place in the 400-meter hurdles and third place in the 100-meter dash. If the individual titles weren’t enough, Morgan anchored both of Albion’s winning relay squads. Senior Dominic Reid and juniors Adam Schantz and Ryan Williams joined Morgan on the 4x100 relay team. The 4x400 squad consisted of sophomores Ryan Stack and Jerry Krueger, first-year athlete Zachary Silas and Morgan. Three other Britons claimed individual titles and All-MIAA status. Reid sprinted past the field in the 100-meter dash, sophomore Kyle Robinson won the shot put, and firstyear athlete Jason Bowman sailed over the bar in the high jump. Senior Clint Cooper and Meiring were atlarge selections to the All-MIAA squad. Cooper was the runner-up to Morgan in the 110-meter hurdles and third in the javelin. Meiring was the runner-up in the discus throw and third in the shot put. Dave Egnatuk, ’71, completed his 30th season as head coach. For the first time in his career, this spring he was named NCAA Division III Great Lakes Region Men’s Track and Field Coach of the Year. Under his direction, Albion has Egnatuk had 16 MIAA most valuable performers in track, more than 100 All-MIAA selections, seven league records, 31 All-Americans and five NCAA Division III national champions.

Baseball: The Britons won eight of their last nine league contests to surge to a 14-4 league record, their first league title since 1996 and their first NCAA Tournament appearance since 1982. After taking three games each from Olivet and Hope between April 23 and May 2, Albion held a one-game lead over Adrian going into the final week of the season. Albion claimed its championship by sweeping a doubleheader at Calvin by scores of 4-1 and 10-0, with a game two no-hitter by junior pitcher David Seales serving as the exclamation point. Albion battled in both contests in the NCAA Mideast Regional Tournament, but its comeback efforts fell short in a 4-3 setback to the College of Wooster and an 8-4 defeat to Heidelberg College. Junior right fielder Chris Trott was selected to the all-tournament team after collecting four hits in seven at-bats, including a double, a run batted in, and two runs scored. Seales was honored as the MIAA’s Most Valuable Player. In 12 league games as the Britons’ left fielder, he had a .386 batting average with 17 hits in 44 at-bats. In his six league games as Albion’s starting pitcher, Seales posted a 5-1 record with a league-low 1.83 earned run average. In 39-1/3 innings on the hill, he allowed nine runs on 29 hits and 15 walks. Senior third baseman Mike Cieszkowski joined Seales on the All-MIAA first team. Cieszkowski tied for second in the league in batting average, hitting .388 in 18 league contests. He ranked among the league leaders in total bases (32) and runs scored (15). Senior second baseman Mark Flancbaum, Trott and junior pitcher Jonathan Hastings all achieved All-MIAA second team status. Flancbaum posted a .308 batting average with a double, two triples and nine RBI. Trott had a .318 batting average in 18 league games, slugging two doubles and three homeruns with 11 RBI. Hastings chalked up a 5-1 record in the league with a 2.20 earned run average. Scott Carden completed his first season as head coach. The baseball team gave Carden his second trip to an NCAA event this year, as he also serves as an assistant women’s basketball coach at Albion.

Women’s tennis: Head coach Scott Frew warned of parity in the MIAA heading into the season, and that’s exactly the way it worked out: the Britons joined Calvin and Saint Mary’s with 6-1 league records during the regular season. It wasn’t any different in the two-day league championships as Saint Mary’s edged Albion for the league title by a single point in the closest meet ever. Boosted by a fourth-place finish at the Intercollegiate Tennis Association’s Midwest Regional Tournament in April and a challenging non-league schedule, Albion was awarded a berth in the 26-team NCAA Tournament for the second consecutive year. Unfortunately, the women couldn’t keep the momentum going and fell to Washington University in the opening round. First-year athlete Emily Stocker was Albion’s top performer in the MIAA Championships, winning the fifth flight singles bracket and teaming with sophomore

senior, placed third in singles. Swan and junior Jason Ryan were named to the All-MIAA second team at the conclusion of the MIAA Championships. Both players posted 3-2 records against MIAA opponents in dual meets. Scott Frew also coaches the men.

Softball: Albion finished with a 23-13 overall record and an 8-6 mark in MIAA play, tying with Hope College for fourth place in the final regular season standings. Nick Morgan won the 2004 NCAA Division III national The Britons posted championship in the 110-meter hurdles. The senior was also impressive victories, named the MIAA’s most valuable performer for his sterling sweeping doubleheaders performance at the league championships. from NCAA Division II Katie Tornga for a title at second flight institutions Hillsdale and Northwood. doubles. The team was rewarded for its winning Tornga, sophomore Betsy Netherton and season by placing three scholar-athletes on the junior Emily Dumas all turned in runner-up All-MIAA squad. Junior shortstop Sarah finishes in their respective singles flights. Caskey achieved first team recognition for the In doubles, sisters Emily and Karen fourth time in her career (she also earned a Dumas finished second in the first flight. pair of all-league first team awards in Netherton and sophomore Amy Esh placed basketball). Caskey finished sixth in the third in the third flight. MIAA in batting, posting a .395 average with Karen Dumas, a senior, and Tornga were 17 hits in 43 at-bats in league play. She also awarded All-MIAA first team status, while ranked among the top five in the MIAA in onNetherton was an All-MIAA second team base percentage (.477) and slugging percenthonoree. age (.558). Senior outfielder Megan Russell and junior pitcher Michaela Adams were All-MIAA Men’s tennis: The Britons took a step second team selections. In 14 league contests, up the MIAA ladder when they defeated Russell had a .267 batting average with three Calvin, 5-4, in the first league match of the doubles and a triple, and nine RBI. Adams season. Albion went on to post a 3-2 record earned a 4-3 record in seven league starts. She against league competition in duals and tied tossed a no-hitter in the first game of the for third place in the league’s final standings. Britons’ final MIAA doubleheader at Hope First-year player Nate Marshall made an and ended third in the league in strikeouts impact at the MIAA Championships, with 35. Russell was also named a CoSIDA upsetting second-seeded Andy Ruemenapp of Academic All-American (third team). Hope College in straight sets during the Julie Liljeberg completed her second year semifinal round at third flight singles. as head coach. Marshall’s second-place finish was the highest placement for the Britons in the MIAA meet. Women’s track and field: In tying The future looks bright for the Britons as Adrian for third place in the final league sophomore John Fodell and first-year athlete standings, Albion celebrated its best MIAA Hunter Huth both finished third in their finish since 1999. The Britons posted a 3-2 respective singles flights. Dave Swan, a record in league dual meets, and fell just four points shy of placing ahead of Adrian at the B. LEE PHOTO two-day league championship meet. Senior Julie Kamer achieved All-MIAA status for the second year in a row after finishing as the runner-up in the 5,000 meters and placing third in the 10,000 meters at the league championships. Sarah Enfield, a junior, enjoyed an outstanding season throwing the shot put. She started by topping Molly Welch’s 1999 school record with a throw of 38 feet, 6.25 inches at the Dick Small Invitational in Defiance, Ohio, in March, and then pushed her record up to 40 feet, 6.5 inches at Adrian. Albion also saw a pair of sophomores, Deanna Babcock and Heather Kotylo, clear the bar at 8 feet, 6 inches to match Maria Proestopoulos’ school record in the pole vault. Sophomore Katie Tornga was an MIAA Sophomore Kelly Kulka and first-year champion at second flight doubles and the runner Margot McGlothlin also had runnerrunner-up at second flight singles. She up finishes for the Britons at the MIAA achieved All-MIAA first team status. Championships in the triple jump and 400meter run, respectively.


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Grant builds community connections By Jake Weber

Senior Taurean Wilson was among the education students in attendance at this year’s Elkin R. Isaac Lecture, offered by John Porter, ’53 (right), who served as an educational adviser to four U.S. presidents. They are pictured with President Peter Mitchell. kicked off the week’s events. (For more on the panel, see p.10.) The symposium With grace, humor and insight, Isaac Symposium keynote speaker included a full day Gloria Steinem reflected on the contributions the modern women’s devoted to presentamovement has made in increasing civil rights in American society. tions by 76 students on their original research, scholarship and creative activity, with topics ranging from pre-Columbian archaeology to bioterrorism, genetic cloning and self-portraiture. In addition, more than 100 students were recognized by the faculty for academic excellence during the Honors Convocation. Porter stressed the need for public By Jake Weber education reform during his Isaac Lecture on Intellectual curiosity, academic excellence and “Educational Leadership for the 21st Century,” drawing on the ideas in his new the free exchange of ideas were all celebrated book of the same name. Porter argued that during April’s Elkin R. Isaac Student public education must undergo a “cultural sea Research Symposium. On successive evenings, John Porter, ’53, former president of change” in addressing the accountability of the entire system to educate all students, as Eastern Michigan University, gave the 2004 well as its methods of ensuring that more Elkin R. Isaac Lecture, and then feminist students complete successful high school writer Gloria Steinem offered the symposium careers. keynote address. A panel discussion on Contending that “this sea change in public athletics and the liberal arts college, featuring education is important to preserving democsymposium namesake Elkin “Ike” Isaac, ’48, racy and the sustaining of our social order,”

Symposium challenges current thinking

he called on schools to continually track improvements in the learning environment and student performance, and on parents and the community to provide mentors for all students. Porter has 50 years’ experience as an educational leader, policymaker and consultant at the local, state and national levels. “An Evening with Gloria Steinem” unified a capacity crowd in Goodrich Chapel in a lively examination of applying knowledge and education to activism and the greater good. With grace, humor and insight, Steinem touched on the history of feminism from the 1970s to the present and the contributions the women’s movement has made in increasing civil rights in American society. Steinem said feminism today should expand its scope to include advocacy for environmental protection, greater political responsibility and world peace. She encouraged the students in the audience to consider their role in supporting feminism and feminist causes. “If you want a satisfying future, you have to start now,” she said. “If you look back 30 years and see how far we’ve come, and then look that distance into the future . . . you’ll get an idea of what the future can look like. There’s no turning back.”

One of Albion’s strongest coalitions has been recognized for its enthusiasm and innovation with a $14,500 grant from the Michigan Humanities Council (MHC). Kids ‘N’ Stuff children’s museum, the Albion Public Library and Albion College’s Whitehouse Nature Center and Education Department will use the grant to develop “Culture Quest: Myths, Legends and Reality,” a multi-part program that will benefit many facets of the Albion community. Albion’s $14,500 award is one of the largest grants ever awarded by the MHC, which was impressed with the program’s “diverse interactive elements to involve children and adults in learning about the history and culture of Albion and the world cultures that influence this region,” said MHC executive director Janice Fedewa. This summer, an Interactive Culture Camp integrates activities at three sites—Kids ‘N’ Stuff, Whitehouse Nature Center and the Albion Public Library—into a fun educational experience focused on local history and culture. An archaeological dig is among the activities planned at the Whitehouse Nature Center. A highlight of the grant will be the Culture Quest Exposition Sept. 18, during the Albion community’s annual Festival of the Forks. The exposition will bring together folk artists, cultural interpreters and performance artists, as well as numerous hands-on activities. Then later in the fall, the Albion College Education Department will help develop Kids ‘N’ Stuff displays and materials, along with presenting programs at the museum to local schoolchildren. “The local community is very excited about Culture Quest,” said museum director Elizabeth Schultheiss. “I can’t wait until September.”

Three earn top service awards Three Albion students were among the state’s top community service leaders recognized by Michigan Campus Compact (MCC) this spring. Iain Charnley received an Outstanding Community Impact Award, Becky Smith a Commitment to Service Award and Meghan Caswell a Heart and Soul Award. The Albion students were chosen from a nomination pool of several hundred students from colleges and universities across the state. According to MCC, all three students received their awards for “outstanding commitment to community service throughout their college careers.” Charnley’s award is the highest honor in the state for students doing community service as part of their college education. “I am thrilled that the exceptional service leadership provided by Iain, Becky and Meghan is being recognized across the state of Michigan,” President Peter Mitchell said. “With their very significant involvement in the Greater Albion community, including work with Habitat for Humanity, Albion’s public schools and the revitalization of our

downtown, these three Albion College students represent the best of the tradition of Liberal Arts at Work. To an impressive degree, they have invested their intellect—and their compassion—in service to the community of Albion.” Caswell, a May graduate in psychology, was involved for her entire four years at Albion as a member and leader in the College’s Student Volunteer Bureau, volunteering for and organizing such projects as Walk for Warmth, CROP Walk, Special Olympics and Make A Difference Day. A junior biology major, Charnley has been instrumental in building bridges between the College and the community as a leader of Habitat for Humanity and through service on the Albion Health and Wellness Action Team, the Albion/Homer United Way Fund Allocation Board and Albion Interfaith Ministries. A May graduate in political science, Smith is the first Albion College student to serve as a board member of the Albion Downtown Development Authority and was also involved with Student Volunteer Bureau.

Members of Sigma Nu fraternity celebrate a victory in a “Charity Bowl” basketball game they held on campus in April vs. Delta Sigma Phi. The event raised over $9,000 for the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation. President Peter Mitchell took center stage at halftime to run a “Price Is Right” contest that added to the day’s proceeds.


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(Left) University of Michigan President Mary Sue Coleman, considered one of the most influential leaders in higher education today, was the commencement speaker.

Commencement

2004 The first students to begin and end their college careers in a new century, Albion’s Class of 2004 included 331 graduates. The May 8 commencement ceremony was held in the College’s Bernard T. Lomas Fieldhouse. National opinion pollster Robert Teeter, ’61, received an honorary doctor of humane letters degree during the ceremony. President Peter Mitchell (at right) also used the occasion to announce the creation of the Robert M. Teeter Scholarship Endowment in the Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service. (Ed. Note: Bob Teeter passed away June 13 after a long battle with cancer. See p. 21 for further information about his life and work.)

The Class of 2004 now heads on to graduate study at institutions including the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, the University of Michigan Medical School and Law School and the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine, and to careers with employers such as PricewaterhouseCoopers, GMAC the U.S. Department of Energy, the Peace Corps and Teach for America.

D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

They’re retired in name only

your attitude—to expand your ways of thinking and your expertise,” says Machek, who was named Albion College Outstanding Teacher of the Year in 1982. “For example, I taught a First-Year Seminar which included a lot of writing, and had I been at a big school I

Editor’s note: Albion’s newest emeritus professors, Frank Machek (art/art history) and Martha O’Kennon (mathematics/ computer science), may have officially retired from teaching at Albion College, but neither would consider themselves “retired.” As you will see in the accompanying profiles, both have a full agenda of activities for this next stage of their lives. They were honored for their distinguished (and creative) teaching and scholarship during Albion’s May commencement ceremony.

(continued on p. 21)

Martha O’Kennon, mathematics/computer science By Jake Weber

Frank Machek, art/art history By Morris Arvoy Shortly before they graduated in 1997, art majors Kimmi Dukes and Jill Parsons St. John had T-shirts printed with the favorite sayings of one of their professors. The T-shirt, inscribed with Frank Machek’s “words to live by for Albion College artists,” contains such memorable gems as, “Did you know you can work outside of class on this?”, “It’s not terrible,” and the almost laudatory, “See what you can do when you try?” The sayings belie the undeniable truth about Machek, who retired in May from Albion’s Art and Art History Department after 37 years: To generations of Albion students and faculty, Machek has been a beloved mentor, colleague, artist and friend who will be missed by all whom he touched. “I like Frank Machek very much—he’s one of my very favorite professors,” says Jason Kennedy, ’05, who has taken five courses taught by Machek. “One of the first things you notice about him is that he’s got an incredibly dry, sarcastic sense of humor, but it’s very endearing. While you’re working he might look at your art and say, ‘That has a chance—now don’t screw it up.’ When he comments on your work, you know that he’s evaluating it as to where he thinks it has strong potential to go, and he’s providing you

Frank Machek has painted and drawn more than five dozen commissioned portraits during his 37-year career at Albion. the best possible advice for your level of ability.” After earning his M.F.A. degree from Cranbrook Academy of Art, Machek arrived at Albion in 1967 and joined a department that was then headed by the man whose name was on the art building, Vernon Bobbitt. The Bobbitt Visual Arts Center had opened the previous year. The Chicago-area native, who was department chair for 15 years starting in 1976 when Bobbitt retired, says the Art Department at Albion has always been strong, and has grown over the years to include still photography, computer art and video art, as well as a full-fledged art history major. Machek notes that before two full-time art historians were added to the faculty, the studio art professors took turns teaching art history courses. “Teaching at a liberal arts college encourages you—or forces you, depending on

It’s an understatement to say that mathematician Martha O’Kennon has multiple talents. Among other things, the computer science specialist has taught courses in the humanities as well as the sciences, has a working knowledge of an early Indoeuropean, an African, an Asian and a Native American language, is an artisan weaver and proficient guitarist and—by popular demand—has become a professional paper sculpture artist. The rewards from these wide-ranging accomplishments have been plentiful—and satisfying. “If you get to do something you love, that’s the gift,” O’Kennon says, noting that these achievements, as well as her reputation for being “colorful,” stem from her determination to follow her passions. Her interest in linguistics and languages compelled O’Kennon to study in these areas even as she earned degrees in mathematics and began a university teaching career. Sanskrit and computer science may seem odd bedfellows, but “in math and in linguistics, you’re trying to find some pattern. If you can

find a pattern that works and is reproducible, you can build on it,” explains O’Kennon. “And there is something so beautiful in the process of finding the pattern.” O’Kennon was therefore in an ideal position to learn Chinese when she broke from teaching mathematics to spend two years teaching computer science at Hefei Polytechnic University. She developed enough proficiency that she later successfully taught several courses in beginning Chinese at Albion. On her return to the U.S. in 1985, O’Kennon joined Albion College’s faculty in large part because of the College’s liberal arts emphasis and international programs. “Before I came to Albion, I was at big schools and people didn’t value much that happened outside of their department,” she recalls. “I was really glad to get back to a small place, where you could get to know everybody and butt in to other people’s conversations.” In the early 1990s, O’Kennon eagerly seized the opportunity to participate in Albion College’s faculty exchange program with South Africa’s University of Cape Town and teach in the Academic Support Program for (continued on p. 21) D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

Mathematician Martha O’Kennon will now pursue her interest in creating “pop-ups” – elaborate 3-D paper creations that she now markets in Albion and elsewhere.


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S C O R E B O A R D J. MILLER AND R. WEENER PHOTO

Hurdler Nick Morgan wins national championship; baseball and women’s tennis advance to playoffs By Bobby Lee Albion College is a member of the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA) and NCAA Division III. Find Briton sports on the Web at www.albion.edu/sports/ .

Men’s track and field: The third trip to the NCAA Division III Track and Field Championships was indeed the charm for senior Nick Morgan. He broke away from a neck-and-neck field to win the national championship in the 110-meter hurdles with a time of 14.56 seconds. Closing his collegiate career as a three-time All-American, Morgan is the fifth Briton to earn a national title in track and field since 1980. Junior Ivan Meiring achieved All-America status for the second consecutive year when he finished third in the discus, with a school-record throw of 172 feet, 2 inches. Albion placed 13th overall at the championships. For more details, go to: www.albion.edu/sports/ . These successes followed a spring season that saw the men share the league title with Calvin. It is Albion’s first MIAA title since earning a co-championship with Calvin in 1994. The league coaches selected Morgan as the most outstanding runner in the MIAA Championships after he won the 110-meter hurdles for the third consecutive year and raced to first place in the 400-meter hurdles and third place in the 100-meter dash. If the individual titles weren’t enough, Morgan anchored both of Albion’s winning relay squads. Senior Dominic Reid and juniors Adam Schantz and Ryan Williams joined Morgan on the 4x100 relay team. The 4x400 squad consisted of sophomores Ryan Stack and Jerry Krueger, first-year athlete Zachary Silas and Morgan. Three other Britons claimed individual titles and All-MIAA status. Reid sprinted past the field in the 100-meter dash, sophomore Kyle Robinson won the shot put, and firstyear athlete Jason Bowman sailed over the bar in the high jump. Senior Clint Cooper and Meiring were atlarge selections to the All-MIAA squad. Cooper was the runner-up to Morgan in the 110-meter hurdles and third in the javelin. Meiring was the runner-up in the discus throw and third in the shot put. Dave Egnatuk, ’71, completed his 30th season as head coach. For the first time in his career, this spring he was named NCAA Division III Great Lakes Region Men’s Track and Field Coach of the Year. Under his direction, Albion has Egnatuk had 16 MIAA most valuable performers in track, more than 100 All-MIAA selections, seven league records, 31 All-Americans and five NCAA Division III national champions.

Baseball: The Britons won eight of their last nine league contests to surge to a 14-4 league record, their first league title since 1996 and their first NCAA Tournament appearance since 1982. After taking three games each from Olivet and Hope between April 23 and May 2, Albion held a one-game lead over Adrian going into the final week of the season. Albion claimed its championship by sweeping a doubleheader at Calvin by scores of 4-1 and 10-0, with a game two no-hitter by junior pitcher David Seales serving as the exclamation point. Albion battled in both contests in the NCAA Mideast Regional Tournament, but its comeback efforts fell short in a 4-3 setback to the College of Wooster and an 8-4 defeat to Heidelberg College. Junior right fielder Chris Trott was selected to the all-tournament team after collecting four hits in seven at-bats, including a double, a run batted in, and two runs scored. Seales was honored as the MIAA’s Most Valuable Player. In 12 league games as the Britons’ left fielder, he had a .386 batting average with 17 hits in 44 at-bats. In his six league games as Albion’s starting pitcher, Seales posted a 5-1 record with a league-low 1.83 earned run average. In 39-1/3 innings on the hill, he allowed nine runs on 29 hits and 15 walks. Senior third baseman Mike Cieszkowski joined Seales on the All-MIAA first team. Cieszkowski tied for second in the league in batting average, hitting .388 in 18 league contests. He ranked among the league leaders in total bases (32) and runs scored (15). Senior second baseman Mark Flancbaum, Trott and junior pitcher Jonathan Hastings all achieved All-MIAA second team status. Flancbaum posted a .308 batting average with a double, two triples and nine RBI. Trott had a .318 batting average in 18 league games, slugging two doubles and three homeruns with 11 RBI. Hastings chalked up a 5-1 record in the league with a 2.20 earned run average. Scott Carden completed his first season as head coach. The baseball team gave Carden his second trip to an NCAA event this year, as he also serves as an assistant women’s basketball coach at Albion.

Women’s tennis: Head coach Scott Frew warned of parity in the MIAA heading into the season, and that’s exactly the way it worked out: the Britons joined Calvin and Saint Mary’s with 6-1 league records during the regular season. It wasn’t any different in the two-day league championships as Saint Mary’s edged Albion for the league title by a single point in the closest meet ever. Boosted by a fourth-place finish at the Intercollegiate Tennis Association’s Midwest Regional Tournament in April and a challenging non-league schedule, Albion was awarded a berth in the 26-team NCAA Tournament for the second consecutive year. Unfortunately, the women couldn’t keep the momentum going and fell to Washington University in the opening round. First-year athlete Emily Stocker was Albion’s top performer in the MIAA Championships, winning the fifth flight singles bracket and teaming with sophomore

senior, placed third in singles. Swan and junior Jason Ryan were named to the All-MIAA second team at the conclusion of the MIAA Championships. Both players posted 3-2 records against MIAA opponents in dual meets. Scott Frew also coaches the men.

Softball: Albion finished with a 23-13 overall record and an 8-6 mark in MIAA play, tying with Hope College for fourth place in the final regular season standings. Nick Morgan won the 2004 NCAA Division III national The Britons posted championship in the 110-meter hurdles. The senior was also impressive victories, named the MIAA’s most valuable performer for his sterling sweeping doubleheaders performance at the league championships. from NCAA Division II Katie Tornga for a title at second flight institutions Hillsdale and Northwood. doubles. The team was rewarded for its winning Tornga, sophomore Betsy Netherton and season by placing three scholar-athletes on the junior Emily Dumas all turned in runner-up All-MIAA squad. Junior shortstop Sarah finishes in their respective singles flights. Caskey achieved first team recognition for the In doubles, sisters Emily and Karen fourth time in her career (she also earned a Dumas finished second in the first flight. pair of all-league first team awards in Netherton and sophomore Amy Esh placed basketball). Caskey finished sixth in the third in the third flight. MIAA in batting, posting a .395 average with Karen Dumas, a senior, and Tornga were 17 hits in 43 at-bats in league play. She also awarded All-MIAA first team status, while ranked among the top five in the MIAA in onNetherton was an All-MIAA second team base percentage (.477) and slugging percenthonoree. age (.558). Senior outfielder Megan Russell and junior pitcher Michaela Adams were All-MIAA Men’s tennis: The Britons took a step second team selections. In 14 league contests, up the MIAA ladder when they defeated Russell had a .267 batting average with three Calvin, 5-4, in the first league match of the doubles and a triple, and nine RBI. Adams season. Albion went on to post a 3-2 record earned a 4-3 record in seven league starts. She against league competition in duals and tied tossed a no-hitter in the first game of the for third place in the league’s final standings. Britons’ final MIAA doubleheader at Hope First-year player Nate Marshall made an and ended third in the league in strikeouts impact at the MIAA Championships, with 35. Russell was also named a CoSIDA upsetting second-seeded Andy Ruemenapp of Academic All-American (third team). Hope College in straight sets during the Julie Liljeberg completed her second year semifinal round at third flight singles. as head coach. Marshall’s second-place finish was the highest placement for the Britons in the MIAA meet. Women’s track and field: In tying The future looks bright for the Britons as Adrian for third place in the final league sophomore John Fodell and first-year athlete standings, Albion celebrated its best MIAA Hunter Huth both finished third in their finish since 1999. The Britons posted a 3-2 respective singles flights. Dave Swan, a record in league dual meets, and fell just four points shy of placing ahead of Adrian at the B. LEE PHOTO two-day league championship meet. Senior Julie Kamer achieved All-MIAA status for the second year in a row after finishing as the runner-up in the 5,000 meters and placing third in the 10,000 meters at the league championships. Sarah Enfield, a junior, enjoyed an outstanding season throwing the shot put. She started by topping Molly Welch’s 1999 school record with a throw of 38 feet, 6.25 inches at the Dick Small Invitational in Defiance, Ohio, in March, and then pushed her record up to 40 feet, 6.5 inches at Adrian. Albion also saw a pair of sophomores, Deanna Babcock and Heather Kotylo, clear the bar at 8 feet, 6 inches to match Maria Proestopoulos’ school record in the pole vault. Sophomore Katie Tornga was an MIAA Sophomore Kelly Kulka and first-year champion at second flight doubles and the runner Margot McGlothlin also had runnerrunner-up at second flight singles. She up finishes for the Britons at the MIAA achieved All-MIAA first team status. Championships in the triple jump and 400meter run, respectively.


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New board members appointed The Alumni Association Board of Directors has appointed three new members and reappointed three incumbents to a second term. Keith James, ’86, Pamela Gee Royle, ’60, and Carl Samberg, ’89, were the new members named, while Kenneth George, ’90, William Rafaill, ’70, and Susan Sadler, ’77, are continuing on the board. All are filling three-year terms, beginning July 1, 2004. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin Law School, Keith James is an attorney with Masco Corp., a consumer products manufacturer with worldwide distribution. He has authored numerous articles in the employment relations field, conducts in-house training on various employment law topics and serves as a mediator for the Wayne County Circuit Court. The Farmington Hills resident has provided pro-bono legal services to HAVEN, a domestic violence prevention agency, for several years and served on its board. At Albion, he was a member of the Gerald R. Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service and Delta Tau Delta fraternity.

Since graduating from Albion, Pam Royle has taught high school English, worked for public television both in Chicago and St. Louis, and owned and operated a multi-state home care agency. As president of PDR Resources, which she began in 1998 to provide consulting to the home care industry, Royle has recently expanded the company’s focus to include workshops on management and professional development. A resident of Chesterfield, Mo., she has remained involved with Albion by hosting an alumni dinner in St. Louis, working as an admissions volunteer and chairing her class reunion. A resident of St. Paul, Minn., Carl Samberg is director of knowledge management at Fair Isaac Corp., a global provider of modeling and decision management software. He previously was employed as a business consultant with Accenture, where he was involved with on-campus recruiting at Albion. He holds an M.B.A. degree from the University of Minnesota. A former editorial staff member of the Albionian and the Pleiad, Samburg has also attended Albion events in the Twin Cities area.

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Alumni Association Board of Directors Your Alumni Association Board of Directors welcomes your comments. Feel free to discuss your concerns with them at board meetings or at any other alumni gatherings.

Terms expiring in 2005

Terms expiring in 2007

Katherine Jewell Dempster, ’57; South Haven Brian W. Fox, ’73; Lamoille, Nev. Robin L. Gearhart, ’96; Tinley Park, Ill. Kirk L. Heinze, ’70; Mason Louise A. Kirk, ’90; Livonia Michael A. Zamiara, ’87; DeWitt

Keith James, ’86; Farmington Hills Kenneth A. George, ’90; Grand Rapids William S. Rafaill, ’70; Georgetown, Ky. Pamela Gee Royle, ’60; Chesterfield, Mo. Susan J. Sadler, ’77; Bloomfield Hills Carl D. Samberg, ’89; St. Paul, Minn.

Terms expiring in 2006

Ex-officio members

James H. Cox, ’87; Mansfield, Ohio Lyn Ward Healy, ’72; Nashua, N.H. Kenneth B. Hollidge, Jr., ’67; Grand Haven Joshua D. Merchant, ’96; Ithaca Timothy R. Newsted, ’78; Hastings H. Douglas Shepherd, ’98; Traverse City

Peter T. Mitchell, ’67, president, Albion College William K. Stoffer, ’74, alumni trustee Ben E. Hancock, Jr., vice president for institutional advancement Marcia Hepler Starkey, ’74, associate vice president for alumni/parent relations and annual giving Bethany A. Gozdzialski, ’06, president, Student Association for Alumni

Britons in Britain Join the Albion College Concert Choir and fellow alumni in May 2005 for what promises to be a memorable concert tour in Great Britain! George

James

Rafaill

Choir alumni will be able to perform with the current College choir for several performances. Participants will have plenty of free time for sightseeing.

Royle

Sadler

Samberg

All alumni and friends may register for this trip at a specially discounted group rate. For more information, call the Albion College Office of Alumni and Parent Relations at 517/629-0284 or visit our Web site at www.albion.edu/alumni/ .

The power and the grace of ‘Liberal Arts at Work’ By Kirk Heinze, ’70 Member, Alumni Association Board of Directors I say that a cultivated intellect, because it is a good in itself, brings with it a power and a grace to every work and occupation which it undertakes, and enables us to be more useful . . . to the state to which we belong, to the sphere in which we move, to the individuals . . . we successively encounter in life. From “Idea of a University”—John Henry Newman (1852) Among the many pleasures of serving on Albion’s Alumni Association Board of Directors—not the least of which is working closely with many talented, thoughtful and dedicated Briton alumni—there is one activity that serves to underscore Cardinal Newman’s paean to a liberal education.

Each year, we are charged with selecting the Distinguished Alumni Award (DAA) recipients who will be honored at Homecoming Weekend. The criteria are straightforward. Candidates must have demonstrated excellence in two of three general areas: service to profession, service to community, service to alma mater. We generally have 35-40 nominees, and we select five or six recipients. Reading through the nomination materials is a multidimensional experience. First, there is a sense of pride that, as an Albion alumnus or alumna, you are, by association, connected to the aspirations and achievements of the

nominees. There is also a healthy dose of humility in the face of the breadth and depth of the contributions these people have made. Finally, there surfaces just a modicum of envy: “Gee, how did they ever find the time to accomplish so much?” Some of our candidates have made their marks close to home—as close as the Albion community. Others have accomplished remarkable things in distant lands. Some are leaders in their chosen profession; others have devoted a good deal of their time and energy to their communities. Some have made significant contributions to Albion College. Others have served children or the sick and infirm or the disenfranchised and powerless. Some are teachers, coaches, homemakers and physicians. Others are entrepreneurs, artists, government servants and soldiers. Although the materials submitted provide only snapshots of individual lives, you get a

very strong sense that the values inherent in an excellent liberal education have been manifested in rich, meaningful lives of commitment to service beyond self. As this realization takes hold, a rather interesting thing happens—a small epiphany, perhaps. Those initial feelings of humility, envy and pride-by-institutional-association are transformed and elevated. Reading about and reflecting on the nominees gradually lead to a subtle, yet buoyant self-affirmation—a recognition that each of us, in our own way, is leading a life of meaning, service and fulfillment. For, in truth, the DAA nominees are not the noblesse among us; rather, they are a microcosm of many thousands of Albion alumni—they are ultimately the embodiment of a good and noble whole. Hence the power and the grace of Liberal Arts at Work.


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Homecoming 2004 October 22, 23, 24

Friday’s highlights 9 a.m.-11 a.m. Briton Homecoming Bicycle Ride, Sprankle-Sprandel Stadium/“A” Field Biking enthusiasts are invited to participate in a bicycle ride through the countryside of Calhoun and Jackson counties. The cloverleaf design of the bike trails will allow riders to do as little or as much riding as they desire (SAG provided). 9 a.m. Eighth Annual Briton Classic Golf Tournament, The Medalist Golf Club, Marshall Shot gun start at 10 a.m., following registration at 9 a.m. Go to: www.albion.edu/sports/ britonclassic/ for more details. 3:15 p.m. Cross Country Reunion, Sprankle-Sprandel Stadium/“A” Field Members of the 1947-1958 men’s cross country teams will gather together with their families and the current men’s cross country team for camaraderie and a fun run and walk, followed by dinner at Schuler’s in Marshall. 6:15 p.m. Athletic Hall of Fame Dinner and Induction Ceremony, Lomas Fieldhouse, Dow Recreation and Wellness Center Help us honor this year’s Athletic Hall of Fame inductees for their contributions to athletics as students or alumni. This year the induction ceremony will include special recognition for the 10th anniversary of the Britons’ 1994 football national championship. 9:30 p.m. Alumni and Student Bonfire and Pep Rally, Canoe Livery

Saturday’s highlights 9:45 a.m. Distinguished Alumni Awards Reception and Ceremony, Kellogg Center The reception begins at 9:45 a.m. in the Alumni Conference Room, and the ceremony follows at 10:30 a.m. in Gerstacker Commons. Noon Picnic Lunch for Alumni, Faculty and Students, Lomas Fieldhouse, Dow Recreation and Wellness Center

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Homecoming award recipients Albion College will honor the following individuals during Homecoming Weekend for their contributions to and passion for Albion College, their communities and their professions.

Distinguished Alumni Award Athletic Hall of Fame Inductees Herold McC. Deason, ’64 B. June Luke Dempsey, ’54 Mary Ann Stokes Egnatuk, ’76 Richard B. Krueger, ’67 Robert W. Mutch, ’56 Glenn A. Powell, ’58

Noon Men’s Soccer vs. Tri-State (Ind.), “A” Field

Individuals David G. Barrett, ’77 James A. Haskins, ’78 Jennifer A. Kennedy, ’93 Patricia Reed Leeds, ’86 Stephen G. Meads, ’82 Kurt I. Shader, ’80 Steven F. Sheckell, ’92 John E. Walker, ’54

Special Recognition Albert L. Deal J. Robin Hartman Team 1994 Football Team

1 p.m. Football vs. Wisconsin Lutheran, Sprankle-Sprandel Stadium Pre-game festivities include presentation of the Hall of Fame inductees. The halftime program will feature the Homecoming Court, the British Eighth and the Alumni Band. Post-game Physics Department 100th Anniversary Celebration, Epworth Hall All alumni and friends of the Physics Department are invited to attend a post-game reception to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the department’s founding.

• Great Getaways

Saturday Class Reunions For classes ending in “4” or “9,” 1949-1999. Reunion information and locations will be posted on the Web as details become available: www.albion.edu/alumni/ homecoming2004.asp

• Fine Dining

Sunday’s highlights

• Event Tickets

Worship Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church, 9 a.m. and 11 a.m., Wesley Chapel.

• Professional Services

4 p.m. Homecoming Music Concert, Goodrich Chapel

• Albion College Experiences

Football in Oshkosh, b’gosh! All alumni, parents and friends are invited to a football tailgate party Saturday, Sept. 18 prior to the Britons’ contest vs. the University of Wisconsin—Oshkosh Titans at Titan Stadium, 1 p.m. (local time). For more information, call the Office of Alumni/Parent Relations at 517/629-0448 or go to: www.albion.edu/alumni/ events.asp. Watch your mail in August for reservation details.

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• Artwork and Jewelry

These offerings and more will be available through Albion’s new online auction for alumni, parents, faculty, staff and friends. All proceeds from the auction will benefit the College’s science complex renovation and expansion. Bidding starts Sept. 15, but you are welcome to preview the site now to identify your choices and/or to make donations of other items. The auction ends on Homecoming Weekend. You’ll find all the details on our auction Web site.

www.albion.edu/auction/ Sponsored by the Classes of 1954 and 1964


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Class notes deadline

50

The deadline for class notes appearing in this issue of Io Triumphe was April 30, 2004. Notes received after that date will appear in the next issue.

Bob Thompson, ’50, won the Florida state championship in racquetball for his age group. He lives in Sanibel, FL.

56 Class news

Jack Hanford, ’56, contributed a chapter to book, The Destructive Power of Religion, published by Praeger in 2004. He lives in Big Rapids.

35 Estelle Clinefelter Fisher, ’35, is an artist who was listed in Who’s Who in America. She received an award for service to her community in 1987 from the State of Michigan. Estelle also received a certificate of appreciation from the Branch County Genealogical Society in 1991. She was awarded the Certificate of Merit in 1990 for her work as a library volunteer. Estelle has three children and lives in Coldwater.

44 Gloria Sanders Telander, ’44, was inducted into the Recreational Vehicle/ Mobile Home (RV/MH) Hall of Fame, based in Elkhart, IN. She founded Wheelers RV Resort & Campground Guide, based in Elkhart, in 1972. Gloria has also been involved with the Woodall’s Campground Directory and the Trailer Life Directory. She lives in Elk Grove Village, IL.

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60 Carolyn Curtis Everett, ’60, is a retired teacher from Lawrence, KS. Her husband is a retired chemistry professor from the University of Kansas. They spend their time in Venice, FL, from December through April and the remainder of the year in Lawrence. Carolyn can be reached by e-mail at: gwe@ku.edu. Pam Gee Royle, ’60, is the co-author of Ordinary Women—Extraordinary Rules. She has joined forces with Dr. Cheree Carter-Scott (If Life Is a Game, These Are the Rules) and 15 other nationally recognized women. Pam has completed an audio program on life balance for National Seminars Group, the continuing education arm of Rockhurst University in Kansas City, MO. She is currently traveling the country as a motivational speaker. Pam lives in Chesterfield, MO.

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In “Bravo to Britons,” our intent is to highlight the noteworthy, the unusual and the entertaining. We welcome submissions from all quarters. The only requirement is that an Albion alumnus/alumna must be involved in the story. Send your nominations, clearly marked for “Bravo to Britons” to: Editor, Io Triumphe, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224. If an item is not received by the deadline for one issue, it will be held for possible inclusion in the next. The editor reserves the right to determine which submissions are selected for publication. Genevieve Wright Sirey, ’25, celebrated her 100th birthday on July 5, 2003. She teaches an exercise class and helps in the local library. Genevieve has enjoyed doing oil painting since she retired 30 years ago. She lives in Dunedin, FL.

63 Diane Cooper Best, ’63, has just completed her master’s degree through the West Michigan campus of the University of Phoenix in Grand Rapids. Her specialization is reaching at-risk youth. She has taught at both Detroit Job Corps Center and Grand Rapids Job Corps Center. Her action research project for her master’s degree was creating and teaching a class in personal and social responsibility. Currently working on bringing that curriculum to the Internet as a package for schools to use, Diane will also be doing staff training in schools. She and her husband, Ray, have been married for 23 years, and they each have four children by previous marriages. They live in Grand Rapids and can be reached by e-mail at: debest1@comcast.net.

65 Rebecca Warden Slimko, ’65, retired in May 2003 as a professor of English after 36 years at Macomb Community College. She received an award medal for teaching excellence from the National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development, an organization for community colleges based at the University of Texas at Austin. Nominated by a former student, Rebecca also will be recognized in the 2004 edition of Who’s Who Among American Teachers. She lives in Grosse Pointe Park. Joanne Cornell Spencer, ’65, retired in January 2004 after 26 years in the finance department at the Alma plant of Lear Corp. She recently purchased a winter home in Mesa, AZ. Joanne has two sons and a granddaughter. She lives in Alma and can be reached by e-mail at: joannel@chartermi.net.

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73 L.J. Campbell, ’73, was awarded the Community Luminary Award in November 2003 from DTE Energy Foundation for his exemplary volunteerism. L.J. serves as chairman of

the United Way Community Services’ Macomb Advisory Council. He is also an administrator for the city’s Community Development Block Grant Program, and donates his time to a number of other community organizations. L.J. and his wife, Susan Deisley Campbell, ’74, have three sons and a daughter. They live in Roseville.

Gear up for your class reunion! Make plans now to gather with your classmates and friends at Homecoming 2004! You can begin by getting in touch with your reunion chair and finding out what’s in store for this great weekend on campus. See p. 23 for Homecoming highlights, and for periodic updates on Homecoming and the class reunions, go to: www.albion.edu/alumni/homecoming2004.asp .

1949

1974

Chair: Jean Curtiss 734/455-4088 ecurt@earthlink.net

Chair: Pamela Campbell Smith 781/934-6492 ppasmith@adelphia.net

1954

1979

Chairs: Cedric and June Luke Dempsey 858/551-0983 cw.dempsey@sbcglobal.net

For reunion information, call the Office of Alumni/Parent Relations, 517/629-0247 or e-mail: alumniandparents@albion.edu

1959

1984

Chairs: Larry and Sally Klang Robson 616/949-3207 ljrobsonmd@aol.com

For reunion information, call the Office of Alumni/Parent Relations, 517/629-0247 or e-mail: alumniandparents@albion.edu

1964

1989

Co-Chair: Carolyn Aishton 212/838-3744 caishton@nyc.rr.com

Chair: Lori Grigg Bluhm 248/879-5725 bluhm1g@CI.troy.mi.us

Co-Chairs: Denny and Shirley Ruemele Bloomquist 703/406-8034 sbloomqu@aol.com

1994

1969 Chair: Nancy Evans Cash 317/826-8504 nacash@comcast.net

Chairs: Ron and Lesa Galsterer Smith 989/781-2240 Ronlesa@aol.com

1999 Chair: Jennifer Bujdos Lathom 517/203-4259 jlathom@cr-services.com

Steven Newman, ’67, was one of 30 neurologists nationwide selected for the second annual Donald M. Palatucci Advocacy Leadership Forum held in January in Dana Point, CA. Participants receive training in advocacy for health care reform at the local, state and federal levels. An attending neurologist at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Steven lives in Southfield.

71 Linda Arnold MacMillan, ’71, has been named vice president and marketing officer for Maine Bank & Trust in Portland, ME. The bank is affiliated with Chittenden Corp., headquartered in Burlington, VT. She was previously director of development for Maine Maritime Museum, and earned a master’s degree from Syracuse University. Linda and her husband, Bruce, live in Phippsburg, ME, and can be reached by e-mail at: lamvcg@aol.com.

Three former Albion biology majors have become colleagues at Traverse City’s Munson Medical Center Laboratory, a new facility opened in 2002. Pictured are: John Keep, M.D., ’81, pathology; Kay Christman-Eicher, ’70, histology; and Linda London Williamson, ’73, microbiology.


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78 Tim Newsted, ’78, had his name added to the “Wall of Tolerance” at the new Civil Rights Memorial Center in Montgomery, AL. He was given this honor because of his consistent effort to promote Black History Month in his classroom and school. Tim is a fifthgrade teacher at Southeastern Elementary School in Hastings, where he lives. James Pauley, Jr., ’78, recently coauthored a book with best-selling author Charlene Potterbaum. The book is called Granny and the Gay Guy: An Exercise in Unconditional Loving and Lightheartedness. He is an international flight attendant for a major airline. James lives in Granger, IN, and can be reached by email at: jepauley1@aol.com.

79 Carrie Starner Hummel, ’79, was named 2004 Citizen of the Year by the Orange (CA) Chamber of Commerce & Visitor Bureau (OCCVB). She received the award at the 2004 State of the City luncheon held in January. Carrie was selected based on her breadth of service, the value of her contributions to the City and for her exemplification of the ideals which form a strong community. She has served as an OCCVB Ambassador since 1997, and was named Ambassador of the Year in 2000. Carrie earned her master’s degree from Michigan State University. She plays two instruments and is a singer. Carrie and her husband, Philip, have three sons and live in Villa Park, CA.

81 Larry Bowen, ’81, accepted the position of assistant treasurer with The Cleveland Clinic. He and his wife, Juliana, will be relocating from Dublin, OH, to the Cleveland area over the summer. They have four sons. Joan Pentecost Vestrand, ’81, has been named assistant dean for the Thomas M. Cooley Law School’s Oakland University campus. Also an associate professor of law, she is the chairperson

medicine office. James earned his medical degree from Michigan State University and completed his residency at Borgess/Bronson Hospital in Kalamazoo. James joined Horizon Medical as a partnering physician in 1995.

84 Lester Huff, ’84, is a psychiatrist and aerospace medicine specialist filling a commander role at Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada. He resides in North Las Vegas, NV, and can be reached by email at: landrewhuff@pol.net.

87 Kristin Ferguson Bertoia, ’89, has taught early elementary grades in the Plymouth-Canton Schools for 13 years. Her husband, Tony Bertoia, ’87, has worked for Frito Lay Inc. for 14 years, and is currently a regional performance manager. They have been married for almost 15 years. They have two sons and live in Ann Arbor. James Bleicher, ’87, has been named chief executive officer of Horizon Medical PC, a local physicians’ group, in Grand Haven. He will also continue serving his patients in Horizon’s internal

88 Jennifer Scrutton Culbertson, ’88, is the director of marketing for the firm of Templeton & Co., a prominent public accounting and technology consulting firm. She has more than 14 years of product and professional services marketing experience working in the technology, accounting/consulting and engineering industries. Prior to joining the firm, Jennifer was a marketing director for Compuware Corp. in Detroit. She earned her master’s degree from Wayne State University. Jennifer and her husband live in North Palm Beach, FL. Matthew Davis, ’88, is the first vice president and district manager for Bank One. His primary responsibility is running retail banking for Bank One locations throughout Oakland County. Matthew recently relocated from Columbus, OH. He and his wife, Brenda, have two children and live in Rochester.

Sigma Chi reunion on Mackinac Island Members of Albion’s Sigma Chi fraternity from the Classes of 1960 to 1965 have planned a reunion on Mackinac Island Friday-Sunday, Aug. 6-8. The weekend’s activities include opportunities for golf, cycling and other outdoor events. An opening night social event at a West Bluff mansion will take place Friday followed by a Saturday dinner at a downtown restaurant with President Peter Mitchell, ’67, and a Sunday outdoor brunch at a hotel on the harbor. The planning committee, headed by Dennis Cawthorne, ’62, has already received over 80 reservations. For more information and/or to make a reservation, contact Dennis Cawthorne at: Kelley Cawthorne, PLLC, 101 S. Washington Square, Lansing, MI 48933, 517/371-1400; e-mail: dcawthorne@kelley-cawthorne.com. Reservation deadline: July 30, 2004.

Accounting Society Spring Banquet The 2004 Accounting Society Spring Banquet was held on April 21 at Weber’s Inn in Ann Arbor. Approximately 40 students, faculty, alumni and recruiters were in attendance. After a social hour and dinner, the attendees heard an informative talk about the new computerized CPA exam that will begin being offered this year. This year’s scholarship recipients were also acknowledged. The Cracraft Scholarship went to Teresa Reinker who also has the highest GPA in the junior class at the College. The Ernst & Young Scholarships were granted to Monique Swaback, Stephanie Van Assche, James Holms and Louis Salow. The Robert Hetler/PricewaterhouseCoopers Scholarship winners were Christina Anderson, Rebecca Borgman, Elliot Cooper, Megan Cutcher, John Paul Foley, Robin Gorsline and Lisa Leverenz. Alumni present were Jeff Barringer, ’93, Matt Brady, ’02, Stacy Chapman, ’03, Jessica Hillier, ’01, Dan McRitchie, ’02, Piper Metz, ’99, Donald Miller, ’01, Lisa Edison Newland, ’97, Sean Sarsfield, ’01, and Jessica Thomas, ’03.

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Editor’s note: Faith Fowler, ’81, was named a Michiganian of the Year by the Detroit News in recognition of her contributions to the people of this state. Among the 13 other honorees this year were Lee Bollinger and Mary Sue Coleman, the past and current presidents of the University of Michigan; singer Aretha Franklin; General Motors’ chairman and CEO Richard Wagoner; and Rep. John Dingell. This article is reprinted with permission from the Detroit News, May 9, 2004.

The Rev. Faith Fowler: When the road seems to lead nowhere, she provides help for those in need By Kate Lawson Quitter is the last word anyone would use to describe the Rev. Faith Fowler. But after five months, the newly named senior pastor of Cass Community United Methodist Church and executive director of Cass Community Social Services was ready to throw in the towel. The problems with drug abuse, homelessness and poverty coupled with the church’s dire financial straits seemed too much to overcome. But then she got the sign. Two prostitutes—one no older than 15 showed up at her office one night. The older woman shouted, “Get her off my corner, right now!” recalled Fowler. But it wasn’t the competition that made her mad. “She told me when she looked at the girl, she saw herself years ago. She didn’t want the girl to end up like her.” That’s when Fowler knew she was where she was meant to be. In the decade since, Fowler has dedicated herself to giving hope to the homeless outside her door. That first year, Fowler operated on a budget of $900,000; today, it exceeds $3 million. Residential programs have been added, including Safe Haven, Mom’s Place, Mom’s Place Two and Transitional Housing. She also oversees the Activity Center for the developmentally disabled, a vocational training program, East Side Ministries for the mentally ill and the Mobile Outreach Team, which brings help to homeless people on the streets. Then there’s the Scott Center, a $2.4-million renovated complex on Detroit’s west side that opened in 2002. It not only houses Cass’ social services, it’s also home to 42 homeless men with substance abuse problems. Fowler worked tirelessly to make it happen. “She’s relentless in her pursuit of help for those folks who need it and has invested not only her time and talent, but all her worldly possessions in order to serve others,” said John Ashcraft of Troy, who attends Franklin Community Church, one of the many churches that have an association with Cass Community Church. Fowler, who runs in marathons, explained her accomplishments this way: “When you get tired, you just keep running.” In the past year alone, she’s been doing a flat-out sprint. She secured a contract to make 1,200 sandwiches a day for city of Detroit prisoners; that money helps fund the senior Meals on Wheels program. Then when Housing and Urban Development offered money for a shelter for homeless women and their children, Fowler had to find a location and equip it in 30 days. Now it’s the only shelter in Wayne County that allows mothers and children to stay together. (Other shelters require boys older than 10 to be housed with homeless men.) A graduate of Albion College and Boston University School of Theology, Fowler earned a master’s in public administration at the University of Michigan “so I could figure out how to be an administrator, get funding, write grants, handle budgets,” she said. Not one to sing her own praises, Fowler instead rejoices in the voices of the Cass Ambassadors, a group of formerly homeless drug addicts living at the Scott Center. She personally drives the men to locations throughout Michigan to perform at churches and centers. “They have such a tremendous talent, and they’re so great at increasing awareness about the homeless,” she said. “She never seeks the spotlight and is actually uncomfortable when it shines on her,” said Ed Hingelberg, development director at Cass. “But she does it for Cass.”

M. ORTIZ PHOTO

Richard Dart, ’77, is the editor of a new textbook, Medical Toxicology, Third Edition. Richard is the chief of Denver Health’s medical toxicology service. He is also the director of Denver Health’s Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center (RMPDC). Richard holds the McNeil Consumer & Specialty Pharmaceuticals endowed chair for research and education at Denver Health’s RMPDC and is also a professor of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Richard earned his medical degree from Wayne State University School of Medicine. He lives in Denver, CO.

of the law school’s Professional Responsibility Department and serves as director of the school’s Office of Law School Advocate. Joan lives in Farmington Hills.


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Stay in touch! Io Triumphe is providing the following information on retired faculty and spouses to permit alumni to renew contact with these former professors and friends. Dr. Robert Armstrong, 1318 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Kenneth Ballou, 803 S. Superior St., Suite 101, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Ingeborg Baumgartner, 411 Darrow St., Albion, MI 49224 Miss Betty Beese, 1121 Rivers Bend Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Albert Bolitho, 658 E. Minges Rd., Battle Creek, MI 49015 Mrs. Bruce Borthwick (Doris), 515 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Maurice Branch, 29300 Albion Rd., Albion, MI 49224 Mrs. John Cheek (Williemay), 1220 Jackson St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. James Cook, 703 Irwin Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Paul Cook, 118 Bushong Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Mr. E. Scott Cracraft, 499 N. Clark St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. John Crump, 14685 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Dean Dillery, 1205 E. Broadwell, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Robert Dininny, 412 E. Erie St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Clara Dixon, Route FD1, Box 1296, Stonington, ME 04681 Dr. Thomas Doran, 4 Canterbury Lane, Albion, MI 49224 Miss Charlotte Duff, 1133 Rivers Bend Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Sol Elkin, 2104 Georgetown Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48105 Mrs. Wilbur Franklin (Mary Lou), 3905 Glenmere Dr., Youngstown, OH 44511 Mr. H. Morley Fraser, 124-1/2 S. Clark St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Frank Frick, 116 Wilmen Rd., Quincy, MI 49082 Dr. Ronald Fryxell, 926 Maple St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. William Gillham, 289 Martin Rd., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. John Hart, 412 Fitch St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. William Hayes, 504 Linden St., Albion, MI 49224 Mrs. Nancy Held, 1155 Rivers Bend Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. David Hogberg, 15451 28 Mile Rd., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. John Hostetler, 312 Irwin Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Prof. Frank Joranko, 2215 Wellington, Lansing, MI 48910 Dr. David Kammer, 1500 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Mrs. Jean Keller (Betty), 803 S. Superior St., Suite 106, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Sheila Kragness, Box 276, Excelsior, MN 55331 Mr. Melvin Larimer, 139 West Silver Lake Rd. South, Traverse City, MI 49864 Mr. Paul Loukides, 103 Vicar Court, Charlottesville, VA 22901 Dr. Frances Lucas, 1020 S. Superior St., Albion, MI 49224 Jacqueline Maag, 420 S. Hannah St., Albion, MI 49224 Mr. Frank Machek, 9525 21 Mile Rd., Marshall, MI 49068 Dr. Philip Mason, 815 Hall St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Eugene Miller, 12900 Lake Ave., Lakewood, OH 44107 Dr. Keith Moore, 1201 Jackson St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Richard Mortensen, 3366 Ludlow Rd., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Max Noordhoorn, 1801 Independence Blvd. #3, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 Dr. Martha O’Kennon, 312 Burr Oak St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. J. Thomas Oosting, 25 Grouse Lane, Brevard, NC 28712 Dr. Jack Padgett, 1206 Crescent Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. John Parker, 9611 Condit Rd., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Howard Pettersen, 413 Lombard St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. G. Robina Quale Leach, 611 E. Porter St., KC Box 4905, Albion, MI 49224 Mrs. Julian Rammelkamp (Mabel), 416 Linden Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. George Reed, 2608 Edgewater Court, Palmetto, FL 34221 Mrs. Henry Rottenbiller (Eva), 20776 29 1/2 Mile Road, Springport, MI 49284 Dr. Charles Schutz, P.O. Box 501, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Johan Stohl, 420 Allen Place, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Ewell Stowell, 1541 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Anthony Taffs, 908 Cram Lane, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Lawrence Taylor, 1111 Rivers Bend Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. John Wenzel, 840 Deer Park, St. Paul, MN 55116 Dr. John Williams, 411 N. Eaton St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Timothy Williams, 904 Luther Dr., Albion, MI 49224

Stuart Forsyth, ’88, has been promoted to regional president of commercial banking for Republic Bancorp Inc. He began his career at Republic Bank in 1996, and served as community bank president for the Flint region. Stuart has his M.B.A. from the University of Detroit. He lives in Flushing.

Michigan Court of Appeals in 1996-97 and also spent 10 years in private practice, specializing in bankruptcy law, commercial litigation and mergers and acquisitions. He earned his law degree from the Detroit College of Law in 1994.

91 89

Jonathan Lauderbach, ’91, was elected as a managing member of the law firm Currie Kendall, PLC, in Midland. In this role, he will manage the firm’s day-today business affairs. His practice specialty is creditor’s rights and bankruptcy law. Jonathan earned his J.D. from the University of Detroit Law School. He lives in Midland.

Thomas Bres, ’89, is a business unit executive with IBM’s software group. He and his wife, Lisa, have four children and live in East Lansing. Steve Germic, ’89, accepted a position with the English Department at the American University in Cairo. Steve and his wife, Catherine “Cackie” Boomer Germic, ’90, can be reached by e-mail at: cackiebg@earthlink.net.

92

Deborah Lujan, ’89, was made a partner at the law firm of Collins, Einhorn, Farrell & Ulanoff, P.C., located in Southfield. She specializes in general liability defense litigation. Deborah has a daughter and lives in Beverly Hills.

90 E. Todd Sable, ’90, has joined the Detroit office of Clark Hill P.L.C. Todd was a pre-hearing attorney with the

Frederick “Fritz” Goodnow, ’92, is the executive vice president of sales, marketing and product development for IMS Pet Products, Inc. He previously worked for Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., in a global sourcing role. Fritz earned his M.B.A. from the University of Michigan in 1998. His wife, Amy Korpela Goodnow, ’93, owns and operates Heritage Animal Hospital in Bentonville, AR. She earned her D.V.M. from Michigan State University in 1997. They have two children and live in Bentonville.

93 Andrew Karpenko, ’93, opened an ear, nose and throat practice in Monroe. He was trained at Wayne State University in otolaryngology, head and neck surgery. Andrew and his wife, Amy Watts Karpenko, ’95, live in Monroe. David Tanay, ’93, has become an associate at the law firm of Fraser, Trebilock, Davis & Dunlap, P.C. He will practice in the firm’s litigation department. David earned his law degree from Michigan State University, Detroit College of Law in 1996. He previously worked as a senior attorney for the Michigan Department of the Attorney General. He lives in Okemos.

94 Jennifer Maxam Grossman, ’94, is a pediatrician in Midland. She and her husband live in Bay City with their two daughters. Jessica Sorbera McCarthy, ’94, accepted a position as account executive with UPN Indiana WNDY-TV Channel 23. She has relocated to Indianapolis, IN.

Giving that matches your goals Before you complete your estate planning, check our Web site or give us a call. You might be surprised at the number of different ways to help Albion while improving your own tax and income position.

Go to: www.albion.edu/alumni/giving.asp Then click on “Planned Giving.”

Protect Your Loved Ones With a QTIP Trust

Change Affects All of Us, Especially Our Estate Plans

Generosity: Available in Many Sizes

Office of Gift and Estate Planning . 611 E. Porter St. . Albion, MI 49224 advancement@albion.edu . 517/629-0237


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area schools. Jennifer lives in Cleveland, OH, and can be reached by e-mail at: Larimezzo@aol.com.

95 Jennifer Larimer, ’95, is an artist-inresidence with the Dayton Opera in Dayton, OH, where she performs under her professional name of Nichol Larimer. She has performed in productions of The Pirates of Penzance and Rigoletto, and also in outreach shows introducing opera to children in

B R A V O

T O

Gerald “Jay” Snodgrass II, ’95, has joined the Board of Directors of Genesee County Habitat for Humanity. He is the assistant prosecuting attorney for Genesee County. Jay earned his J.D. degree from the University of Notre Dame Law School in 1998. He lives in Burton.

B R I T O N S

Nick Cucinella, ’01, (pictured second from left) is now playing lead trombone for the Temptations with Dennis Edwards (of Motown fame), following several successful years with the funk band, Rev. RightTime and the First Cuzins of Funk. The Temptations are scheduled to record a live concert this summer and will perform in Hong Kong this September. Nick has toured all over the country with the group this past year. “Every show is amazing—it has really been a dream come true,” he says. Nick has also played with The Four Tops and Supremes’ vocalist Mary Wilson in the past year. He lives in Grosse Pointe Park. Alex Carroll, ’03, played the second lead in a forthcoming feature film, The Work and the Glory, recently shot in Tennessee. The movie has a budget of $7.4-million and will be released in 300 theatres across the nation in late 2004 or early 2005. Produced by Manchester Pictures (Salt Lake City), the movie is based on a book series written by Gerald Lund. When he’s not out on location, Alex is living in southern California.

96 Joseph Masvero, ’96, is a financial advisor in Merrill Lynch’s Muskegon Lakeshore office. He is also a certified financial planner and manager. Joseph serves on the boards of Muskegon Rescue Mission, Calvary Christian Schools in Fruitport and Blair Lake Bible Camp near Three Rivers. He lives in Norton Shores. Jason Maxa, ’96, has joined the staff of Orthopaedic Center of Mid-Michigan in Saginaw Township. He previously worked for Physiotherapy Associates in Kalamazoo and Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Landstuhl, Germany. Jason earned master’s degrees in athletic training and as a physician assistant from Western Michigan University.

Six Albion graduates were among the 101 new veterinarians who graduated from Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine in May. Pictured are: (from left) Kristin Mitchell, ’98, Janna Muccio, ’00, Katherine Waters, ’00, Christie Braun, ’98, Kathryn Herbst, ’00, and Daniel VanderHart, ’99.

Remember… class discussions, late night study sessions, great professors, great friends, graduation?

Give the gift of an Albion education The Briton Scholarship Fund Over 90 percent of Albion students receive some form of financial aid. These grants and scholarships come from people like you who value an Albion College education, and they are always needed. The Briton Scholarship Fund is designed to help deserving students attend Albion College. Your gift today will shape a student’s life forever!

Give online at www.albion.edu Albion College Office of Annual Giving • 611 E. Porter St. 517/ 629-0448 • Fax 517/629-0566

Building the Albion legacy in your family If you are already part of a historic family involvement with Albion College, or if you’d like to start such a tradition in your family, here are two benefits that will be of interest: ■ Albion College will waive the $20 application fee for any legacy student who applies for admission. ■ A $1,500 Alumni Grant will be awarded to all incoming students whose family includes at least one Albion alumna/alumnus (sister, brother, father, mother, grandparents). This grant, offered without regard to financial need, is renewable for all four years. To qualify, the student simply needs to indicate his or her family’s alumni status when submitting the application. Please contact the Admissions Office at 800/858-6770 for more information.

Albion, MI 49224

Summer/Fall Admissions Visit Programs The following Admissions Visit Day programs offer an excellent opportunity to introduce a promising high school student to Albion College. We also welcome individual campus visits at any time, and will design interviews and a campus tour based on the student’s interests. Just call 800/858-6770 or visit our Web site at www.albion.edu/ admissions/campusvisit/ to make all arrangements.

June 28 July 9 July 23 October 1 October 15 October 29 November 6 November 19 December 4

General Visit Program General Visit Program General Visit Program Ford Institute/Gerstacker Institute Pre-Health Program Science/Technology Program General Visit Day Fine Arts/Humanities Program General Visit Day


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98 Janine Jacob, ’98, became a partner with the law firm of Daniel, Vaughan, Medley & Smitherman, P.C., in Danville, VA. She has been with the firm for three years, practicing general civil litigation and insurance defense. She and her husband, Scott Wall, reside in Martinsville, VA.

02 Mustapha Cheaib, ’02, is working as an intern for Justice Michael J. Obus of the Supreme Court of New York. He worked on the Tyco trial, in which the ex-CEO and CFO were accused of reaping $600-million from Tyco. He is finishing up his second year at Columbia Law School and will be joining the New York office of Proskauer Rose this summer. He lives in New York City.

99 Ann Marie Schultz, ’99, has been admitted to The Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute for the fall 2004 semester. She is a student at the Michigan State University-Detroit College of Law. Ann lives in Port Huron.

00 Brian Longheier, ’00, moved to Holland, OH, and accepted a position in the Toledo Office of TNS-NFO, a multinational market research firm. He was previously employed as a market research analyst with Photo Marketing Association in Jackson, MI. Adam Pringle, ’00, is playing professional football in the National Indoor Football League for the Oklahoma Crude. He has been nominated and selected as defensive player of the week two out of four weeks. He lives in Oviedo, FL. Kathleen Surowiec, ’00, has joined the Bloomfield Hills office of Dykema Gossett. She will work with the firm’s Employment Practice Group. Kathleen’s practice will focus on labor and employment matters. She earned her law degree from the University of Notre Dame. Kathleen lives in Farmington Hills.

03 Ed Epp, ’03, is working on his master’s degree in hydrogeology at Syracuse University. He lives in Syracuse. Amy DeRouin, ’03, made the dean’s list and the honor roll in her first term of study at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Lansing.

Weddings Don Haffner, ’72, to Carol Benson on Aug. 9, 2003 in Birmingham. Don is the studio director at Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic’s Michigan Unit. Carol is a librarian at the Royal Oak Campus of Oakland Community College. She is also a volunteer at Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic. They live in Beverly Hills and can be reached by e-mail at: haffhere@sbcglobal.net. Scott Cooley, ’89, to Lenore Dunkel on Aug. 2, 2003 in Grand Blanc. Alumni in attendance included Richard Cooley, ’57, father of the groom, and bridesmaid Courtney Cooley Breaugh, ’91, sister of the groom. Scott is a technical writing consultant. Lenore is the rental operations manager for a property management company. They live in Grand Blanc and can be reached by email at: scottcooley@ameritech.net. Duncan Pankopf, ’93, to Krista Topolski on July 4, 2003, in Estes Park, CO. Duncan earned an M.B.A. degree

from the University of Denver. He is a business development manager at Ford Motor Co. in Denver. Krista is an assistant vice president of business banking at Wells Fargo, Denver. They live in Denver, CO. Scott Casteele, ’95, to Stephanie Moore on Nov. 1, 2003 at Goodrich Chapel. Albion alumni in the wedding party included Marc McDonald, ’95, Chuck Pinter, ’96, Brian Myers, ’97, Tim Todd, ’97, Brian Vermeulen, ’97, and Brad Brown, ’96. Scott is the athletic director for Fowlerville Community Schools. Stephanie is an office administrator for Starr Commonwealth. They live in Mason. (See accompanying photo.) Matthew Essell, ’95, to Jennifer Tunney on June 21, 2003 in Holt. Matt earned his master’s degree from Michigan State University. He is an English teacher at Holt Junior High School. Jennifer is a kindergarten teacher at Springport Elementary School. They live in Lansing. Erin Schrump, ’95, to Joshua Silver on Jan. 11, 2004 in Delray Beach, FL. They live in Boynton Beach, FL. Elizabeth Miller, ’96, to Andy Williams on May 25, 2003 in Chicago, IL. Elizabeth works for the Social Security Administration. Andy works for the City of Chicago. They live in Chicago, IL, and can be reached by e-mail at: emwilliams74@sbcglobal.net. (See accompanying photo.) Colleen Anger, ’99, to Kevin DeLacy on Aug. 23, 2003 in Port Huron. Colleen is a dentist at Sandusky (MI) Dental Care. They live in Fort Gratiot. (See accompanying photo.) Nicole Hoagland, ’99, to Robert Emens on Oct. 10, 2003 in Brookline, MA. Nicole works for Boston Private Bank & Trust Co. Robert works for GW & Wade. They live in Brookline. Lee Hull, ’99, to Robert Moses, ’99, on Aug. 30, 2003. They live in Chicago, IL. (See accompanying photo.) Jason Klein, ’99, to M. Elizabeth Scales on Feb. 6, 2004. Albion alumni in attendance were Andrew Lefevre, ’98, Rudy Webb, ’99, Michael Boyle, ’99,

Ben Geerling, ’98, Brian Grant, ’99, Eric Righetti, ’00, Jeff Weeks, ’99, Valerie Skaleski Weeks, ’01, Dave Conger, ’00, Ed Lampton, ’99, Ricardo Cotto, ’99, and Matt Topie, ’99. Jason is a senior account manager at Lear Corp. in Warren. Elizabeth, a University of Florida graduate, is an account executive for Lovio George Inc., a Detroit marketing firm. They live in Royal Oak. Kelly Maciejewski, ’99, to Brian Biggs on Jan. 17, 2004 in Walled Lake. Kelly is a forensic biologist at the Illinois State Police Forensic Science Center in Chicago, IL. Brian is a first-grade teacher. They live in Villa Park, IL. Suzanne Porter, ’99, to Scott Moser on June 14, 2003 in Plymouth. Suzanne is a database analyst/Web developer for the University of Texas. Scott works as a software developer for IBM. They live in Austin, TX. (See accompanying photo.) Jessica Steed, ’99, to William Unger on Aug. 2, 2003 in Traverse City. Jessica earned her master’s degree from Aquinas College. She is a fifth- and sixth-grade teacher at Oak Park Elementary School in Traverse City. William is a consultant with Ollar Consulting Ltd., Traverse City. They live in Traverse City. Jessica Kelm, ’01, to Kevin Keto on June 21, 2003 in Iron Mountain. Jessica is attending Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. Kevin is employed at the Menominee County Sheriff’s Department. They live in Menominee. Tara Simonds, ’01, to Mason Conner on May 10, 2003. They live in Grand Rapids. (See accompanying photo.) Gareth Beaty, ’02, to Angela Fritts on Sept. 21, 2003 in Grand Ledge. Gareth is employed by Deloitte and Touche. Angela is employed with Proctor Financial Insurance. Marnie Harte, ’02, to Sean Hackney, ’02, on Dec. 20, 2003 in East Lansing. Marnie is a second-year law student at the University of Richmond. Sean works in the corporate offices of Circuit City. They live in Richmond, VA. Jennifer Wolf, ’02, to Nathan Piwowarski, ’02, on May 17, 2003. (See accompanying photo.)

News for Albionotes Io Triumphe welcomes your news about promotions, honors, appointments, marriages, births/adoptions, travels and hobbies. You may reach us in any of the following ways: Web form: www.albion.edu/alumni/io/io_form_news.asp E-mail: classnotes@albion.edu U.S. mail: Editor, Io Triumphe, Communications Office, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224. Be sure to include your full name, class year, address and telephone number in your message.

Baby Britons Matthew Louis on Dec. 28, 2003 to Roselyn and Mark Datte, ’80. He joins big brother Stuart, 11. The family lives in Maple Grove, MN, and can be reached by e-mail at: markdatte@yahoo.com. Justin Merle on Feb. 16, 2004 to Carol and Jeffrey Loch, ’84. He joins big brothers Jarrod, 6, Jordan, 4, and Jason, 3. They live in Celebration, FL.

Matilda Louise on Jan. 9, 2004 to Dave and Jennifer Searles Thomas, ’87. She joins siblings Marley, 11, Maxwell, 9, and Mitchell, 5. The family lives in Australia. Charlotte Joy on Feb. 3, 2004 to Cynthia Weisenauer Witt, ’88. She joins big sister Savannah Grace, 5. Cynthia is a family practice physician with Valley Family Medicine in Prosser, WA. The Witts live in Pasco, WA. Margaret Katherine on Oct. 15, 2003 to David Weider and Ann Finzel, ’89. The family lives in Shorewood, MN. Ava Renee on July 29, 2003 to Mike and Kathy LeGray Risch, ’89. She joins big sister Zoe. Her godmother is Carolyn Kunz King, ’89. The family lives in Redondo Beach, CA. Charles Lester on July 25, 2003 to David Wentworth, ’89, and Elizabeth Jensen, ’90. He joins big brother William, 2. David and Elizabeth are both attorneys practicing in Peoria, IL. They live in Peoria. Nigel Robert on July 31, 2003 to Robert, ’92, and Sheela Welch Allum,’90. He joins siblings Mariah Blanche, 4, and Leif Harker, 2. Albion relatives include aunts Linnea Allum Deitcher, ’90, and Carla Welch Luberto, ’86, and uncle Dominic “Donny” Luberto, ’85. The family lives in Rogers City. Benjamin Edward on Jan. 18, 2004 to Richard Fenton and Mary Beth Hance, ’90. They live in Ellicott City, MD. Rhye William on Jan. 10, 2004 to Todd and Michon Dicks Lince, ’90. Proud relatives include aunt Michele Dicks Freeland, ’85. Michon is a high school teacher in Riverview. Todd is a business agent and organizer for the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. The family lives in Wyandotte. Charlotte Wren on Feb. 21, 2004 to H. Gordon, ’90, and Laura Swan MacMorran, ’92. She joins big brother Drew. Proud relatives include grandparents Jock and Robin Diller MacMorran, both ’64. The MacMorrans live in Redondo Beach, CA, and can be reached by e-mail at: gordon.macmorran@verizon.net. Thomas Robert on Jan. 26, 2004 to Brad and Michelle Calver Newman, ’90. He joins big sister Molly. The family lives in Chicago, IL. Nathan Robert on Oct. 30, 2003 to Bob and Sheryl Nielsen Parrish, ’90. Sheryl is an accountant with the Allegan County Road Commission in Allegan. The family lives in Allegan and can be reached by e-mail at: sherylparrish@hotmail.com. Marcos Alexander on Feb. 6, 2004 to Jorge and Kristin Burns Sanson, ’90. They live in Elgin, IL. Elise Marie on July 14, 2003 to Chris, ’90, and Laura Davio Swartzmiller, ’91. She joins big sister Isabel, 3. The family lives in Howell and can be reached by e-mail at: swartzassoc@comcast.net.


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98 Janine Jacob, ’98, became a partner with the law firm of Daniel, Vaughan, Medley & Smitherman, P.C., in Danville, VA. She has been with the firm for three years, practicing general civil litigation and insurance defense. She and her husband, Scott Wall, reside in Martinsville, VA.

02 Mustapha Cheaib, ’02, is working as an intern for Justice Michael J. Obus of the Supreme Court of New York. He worked on the Tyco trial, in which the ex-CEO and CFO were accused of reaping $600-million from Tyco. He is finishing up his second year at Columbia Law School and will be joining the New York office of Proskauer Rose this summer. He lives in New York City.

99 Ann Marie Schultz, ’99, has been admitted to The Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute for the fall 2004 semester. She is a student at the Michigan State University-Detroit College of Law. Ann lives in Port Huron.

00 Brian Longheier, ’00, moved to Holland, OH, and accepted a position in the Toledo Office of TNS-NFO, a multinational market research firm. He was previously employed as a market research analyst with Photo Marketing Association in Jackson, MI. Adam Pringle, ’00, is playing professional football in the National Indoor Football League for the Oklahoma Crude. He has been nominated and selected as defensive player of the week two out of four weeks. He lives in Oviedo, FL. Kathleen Surowiec, ’00, has joined the Bloomfield Hills office of Dykema Gossett. She will work with the firm’s Employment Practice Group. Kathleen’s practice will focus on labor and employment matters. She earned her law degree from the University of Notre Dame. Kathleen lives in Farmington Hills.

03 Ed Epp, ’03, is working on his master’s degree in hydrogeology at Syracuse University. He lives in Syracuse. Amy DeRouin, ’03, made the dean’s list and the honor roll in her first term of study at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Lansing.

Weddings Don Haffner, ’72, to Carol Benson on Aug. 9, 2003 in Birmingham. Don is the studio director at Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic’s Michigan Unit. Carol is a librarian at the Royal Oak Campus of Oakland Community College. She is also a volunteer at Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic. They live in Beverly Hills and can be reached by e-mail at: haffhere@sbcglobal.net. Scott Cooley, ’89, to Lenore Dunkel on Aug. 2, 2003 in Grand Blanc. Alumni in attendance included Richard Cooley, ’57, father of the groom, and bridesmaid Courtney Cooley Breaugh, ’91, sister of the groom. Scott is a technical writing consultant. Lenore is the rental operations manager for a property management company. They live in Grand Blanc and can be reached by email at: scottcooley@ameritech.net. Duncan Pankopf, ’93, to Krista Topolski on July 4, 2003, in Estes Park, CO. Duncan earned an M.B.A. degree

from the University of Denver. He is a business development manager at Ford Motor Co. in Denver. Krista is an assistant vice president of business banking at Wells Fargo, Denver. They live in Denver, CO. Scott Casteele, ’95, to Stephanie Moore on Nov. 1, 2003 at Goodrich Chapel. Albion alumni in the wedding party included Marc McDonald, ’95, Chuck Pinter, ’96, Brian Myers, ’97, Tim Todd, ’97, Brian Vermeulen, ’97, and Brad Brown, ’96. Scott is the athletic director for Fowlerville Community Schools. Stephanie is an office administrator for Starr Commonwealth. They live in Mason. (See accompanying photo.) Matthew Essell, ’95, to Jennifer Tunney on June 21, 2003 in Holt. Matt earned his master’s degree from Michigan State University. He is an English teacher at Holt Junior High School. Jennifer is a kindergarten teacher at Springport Elementary School. They live in Lansing. Erin Schrump, ’95, to Joshua Silver on Jan. 11, 2004 in Delray Beach, FL. They live in Boynton Beach, FL. Elizabeth Miller, ’96, to Andy Williams on May 25, 2003 in Chicago, IL. Elizabeth works for the Social Security Administration. Andy works for the City of Chicago. They live in Chicago, IL, and can be reached by e-mail at: emwilliams74@sbcglobal.net. (See accompanying photo.) Colleen Anger, ’99, to Kevin DeLacy on Aug. 23, 2003 in Port Huron. Colleen is a dentist at Sandusky (MI) Dental Care. They live in Fort Gratiot. (See accompanying photo.) Nicole Hoagland, ’99, to Robert Emens on Oct. 10, 2003 in Brookline, MA. Nicole works for Boston Private Bank & Trust Co. Robert works for GW & Wade. They live in Brookline. Lee Hull, ’99, to Robert Moses, ’99, on Aug. 30, 2003. They live in Chicago, IL. (See accompanying photo.) Jason Klein, ’99, to M. Elizabeth Scales on Feb. 6, 2004. Albion alumni in attendance were Andrew Lefevre, ’98, Rudy Webb, ’99, Michael Boyle, ’99,

Ben Geerling, ’98, Brian Grant, ’99, Eric Righetti, ’00, Jeff Weeks, ’99, Valerie Skaleski Weeks, ’01, Dave Conger, ’00, Ed Lampton, ’99, Ricardo Cotto, ’99, and Matt Topie, ’99. Jason is a senior account manager at Lear Corp. in Warren. Elizabeth, a University of Florida graduate, is an account executive for Lovio George Inc., a Detroit marketing firm. They live in Royal Oak. Kelly Maciejewski, ’99, to Brian Biggs on Jan. 17, 2004 in Walled Lake. Kelly is a forensic biologist at the Illinois State Police Forensic Science Center in Chicago, IL. Brian is a first-grade teacher. They live in Villa Park, IL. Suzanne Porter, ’99, to Scott Moser on June 14, 2003 in Plymouth. Suzanne is a database analyst/Web developer for the University of Texas. Scott works as a software developer for IBM. They live in Austin, TX. (See accompanying photo.) Jessica Steed, ’99, to William Unger on Aug. 2, 2003 in Traverse City. Jessica earned her master’s degree from Aquinas College. She is a fifth- and sixth-grade teacher at Oak Park Elementary School in Traverse City. William is a consultant with Ollar Consulting Ltd., Traverse City. They live in Traverse City. Jessica Kelm, ’01, to Kevin Keto on June 21, 2003 in Iron Mountain. Jessica is attending Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. Kevin is employed at the Menominee County Sheriff’s Department. They live in Menominee. Tara Simonds, ’01, to Mason Conner on May 10, 2003. They live in Grand Rapids. (See accompanying photo.) Gareth Beaty, ’02, to Angela Fritts on Sept. 21, 2003 in Grand Ledge. Gareth is employed by Deloitte and Touche. Angela is employed with Proctor Financial Insurance. Marnie Harte, ’02, to Sean Hackney, ’02, on Dec. 20, 2003 in East Lansing. Marnie is a second-year law student at the University of Richmond. Sean works in the corporate offices of Circuit City. They live in Richmond, VA. Jennifer Wolf, ’02, to Nathan Piwowarski, ’02, on May 17, 2003. (See accompanying photo.)

News for Albionotes Io Triumphe welcomes your news about promotions, honors, appointments, marriages, births/adoptions, travels and hobbies. You may reach us in any of the following ways: Web form: www.albion.edu/alumni/io/io_form_news.asp E-mail: classnotes@albion.edu U.S. mail: Editor, Io Triumphe, Communications Office, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224. Be sure to include your full name, class year, address and telephone number in your message.

Baby Britons Matthew Louis on Dec. 28, 2003 to Roselyn and Mark Datte, ’80. He joins big brother Stuart, 11. The family lives in Maple Grove, MN, and can be reached by e-mail at: markdatte@yahoo.com. Justin Merle on Feb. 16, 2004 to Carol and Jeffrey Loch, ’84. He joins big brothers Jarrod, 6, Jordan, 4, and Jason, 3. They live in Celebration, FL.

Matilda Louise on Jan. 9, 2004 to Dave and Jennifer Searles Thomas, ’87. She joins siblings Marley, 11, Maxwell, 9, and Mitchell, 5. The family lives in Australia. Charlotte Joy on Feb. 3, 2004 to Cynthia Weisenauer Witt, ’88. She joins big sister Savannah Grace, 5. Cynthia is a family practice physician with Valley Family Medicine in Prosser, WA. The Witts live in Pasco, WA. Margaret Katherine on Oct. 15, 2003 to David Weider and Ann Finzel, ’89. The family lives in Shorewood, MN. Ava Renee on July 29, 2003 to Mike and Kathy LeGray Risch, ’89. She joins big sister Zoe. Her godmother is Carolyn Kunz King, ’89. The family lives in Redondo Beach, CA. Charles Lester on July 25, 2003 to David Wentworth, ’89, and Elizabeth Jensen, ’90. He joins big brother William, 2. David and Elizabeth are both attorneys practicing in Peoria, IL. They live in Peoria. Nigel Robert on July 31, 2003 to Robert, ’92, and Sheela Welch Allum,’90. He joins siblings Mariah Blanche, 4, and Leif Harker, 2. Albion relatives include aunts Linnea Allum Deitcher, ’90, and Carla Welch Luberto, ’86, and uncle Dominic “Donny” Luberto, ’85. The family lives in Rogers City. Benjamin Edward on Jan. 18, 2004 to Richard Fenton and Mary Beth Hance, ’90. They live in Ellicott City, MD. Rhye William on Jan. 10, 2004 to Todd and Michon Dicks Lince, ’90. Proud relatives include aunt Michele Dicks Freeland, ’85. Michon is a high school teacher in Riverview. Todd is a business agent and organizer for the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. The family lives in Wyandotte. Charlotte Wren on Feb. 21, 2004 to H. Gordon, ’90, and Laura Swan MacMorran, ’92. She joins big brother Drew. Proud relatives include grandparents Jock and Robin Diller MacMorran, both ’64. The MacMorrans live in Redondo Beach, CA, and can be reached by e-mail at: gordon.macmorran@verizon.net. Thomas Robert on Jan. 26, 2004 to Brad and Michelle Calver Newman, ’90. He joins big sister Molly. The family lives in Chicago, IL. Nathan Robert on Oct. 30, 2003 to Bob and Sheryl Nielsen Parrish, ’90. Sheryl is an accountant with the Allegan County Road Commission in Allegan. The family lives in Allegan and can be reached by e-mail at: sherylparrish@hotmail.com. Marcos Alexander on Feb. 6, 2004 to Jorge and Kristin Burns Sanson, ’90. They live in Elgin, IL. Elise Marie on July 14, 2003 to Chris, ’90, and Laura Davio Swartzmiller, ’91. She joins big sister Isabel, 3. The family lives in Howell and can be reached by e-mail at: swartzassoc@comcast.net.


I O T R I U M P H E A L B I O N O T E S

Wedding Album See accompanying notes for details.

Scott Casteele, ’95, to Stephanie Moore on Nov. 1, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Jamie Hardenbrook, ’97, Brian Myers, ’97, Tim Todd, ’97, Sean Sims, ’95, and Brad Brown, ’96. (Second row) Brian Vermeulen, ’97, Cevin Cornish, ’95, Kelly Kuras, ’95, Chuck Pinter, ’96, Scott Casteele, ’95, Stephanie Casteele, Mary Beth Revesz, ’95, Marc McDonald, ’95, Jeff Brooks, ’94, Dave Egnatuk, ’71, and Mary Ann Stokes Egnatuk, ’76.

Elizabeth Miller, ’96, to Andy Williams on May 25, 2003. (Left to right) Holly Quick Valovick, ’96, Elizabeth Miller Williams, ’96, Andy Williams, Jennifer Arbogast Keating, ’96, and Dan Travis, ’96.

Suzanne Porter, ’99, to Scott Moser on June 14, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Susan Miller, ’00, Suzanne Porter Moser, ’99, Scott Moser, Carly Wieferich Orris, ’00, and Karen Collins Porter, ’75. (Second row) Kristin Mau, ’98, Melissa Hall Verb, ’98, Allyn Luce, ’00, Jovan Giaimo, ’00, Janna Muccio, ’00, Don Porter, ’71, Fred Porter, ’74, and Art Boley, ’74.

Colleen Anger, ’99, to Kevin DeLacy on Aug. 23, 2003. (Left to right) Jennifer Lantzy, ’00, Katie Drake, ’98, Colleen Anger DeLacy, ’99, Kevin DeLacy, Megan Murphy, ’00, Amy Schreiber Czarnecki, ’99, and Tim Czarnecki, ’00.

Lee Hull, ’99, to Robert Moses, ’99, on Aug. 30, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Brenda Green, ’99, Nora Wiltse, ’99, Sara Robertson Harris, ’99, Becca Sameck, ’99, Jessica Buttiglieri, ’99, Beckie McDowell Richison, ’99, Robert Moses, ’99, Lee Hull Moses, ’99, Aimee Mepham, ’99, Jadon Hartsuff, ’99, and Julie White Philips, ’99. (Second row) Patrick O’Connell, ’99, Trent Harris, ’99, Scott Curtis, ’00, Kevin Shehan, ’99, Bree Bennett, ’99, Kelly Garland, ’99, Ryan Shirey, ’99, and Kirk Myers, ’99. Tara Simonds, ’01, to Mason Conner on May 10, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Matt Giacona, ’01, and Darek Simonds,’00. (Second row) Nicole Macy, ’01, Leah Moeller, ’02, Lori Leszczynski, ’01, Laurel Weinman, ’01, Tara Simonds Conner, ’01, Annie Topie, ’01, Brooke Kilby, ’01, and Carmen Cotto, ’99. (Third row) Bryan Heckman, ’02, Jason Whalen, ’00, T.J. Whitehouse, ’99, Brian Lindsay, ’01, and Chris Thompson, ’00.

Jennifer Wolf, ’02, to Nathan Piwowarski, ’02, on May 17, 2003. (Arms of “A”, left to right) Dana Lee, ’02, Anne Polmanter, ’03, Dick Mortensen (Albion faculty), Rachel Lamphere, ’06, Troy Piwowarski, ’06, Scott Smith, ’00, Jocelyn Jacobs, ’02, Justin Stilwill, ’02, Sara Mann, ’01, Amanda Boye, ’02, Steve Pontoni, ’03, Wes Margeson, ’03, James Davidson, ’02, Tammy Calvin, ’03. (Middle of “A”) Jennifer Wolf Piwowarski, ’02, Nathan Piwowarski, ’02, and Rosemarie Hunt, ’03.

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98 Janine Jacob, ’98, became a partner with the law firm of Daniel, Vaughan, Medley & Smitherman, P.C., in Danville, VA. She has been with the firm for three years, practicing general civil litigation and insurance defense. She and her husband, Scott Wall, reside in Martinsville, VA.

02 Mustapha Cheaib, ’02, is working as an intern for Justice Michael J. Obus of the Supreme Court of New York. He worked on the Tyco trial, in which the ex-CEO and CFO were accused of reaping $600-million from Tyco. He is finishing up his second year at Columbia Law School and will be joining the New York office of Proskauer Rose this summer. He lives in New York City.

99 Ann Marie Schultz, ’99, has been admitted to The Geoffrey Fieger Trial Practice Institute for the fall 2004 semester. She is a student at the Michigan State University-Detroit College of Law. Ann lives in Port Huron.

00 Brian Longheier, ’00, moved to Holland, OH, and accepted a position in the Toledo Office of TNS-NFO, a multinational market research firm. He was previously employed as a market research analyst with Photo Marketing Association in Jackson, MI. Adam Pringle, ’00, is playing professional football in the National Indoor Football League for the Oklahoma Crude. He has been nominated and selected as defensive player of the week two out of four weeks. He lives in Oviedo, FL. Kathleen Surowiec, ’00, has joined the Bloomfield Hills office of Dykema Gossett. She will work with the firm’s Employment Practice Group. Kathleen’s practice will focus on labor and employment matters. She earned her law degree from the University of Notre Dame. Kathleen lives in Farmington Hills.

03 Ed Epp, ’03, is working on his master’s degree in hydrogeology at Syracuse University. He lives in Syracuse. Amy DeRouin, ’03, made the dean’s list and the honor roll in her first term of study at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Lansing.

Weddings Don Haffner, ’72, to Carol Benson on Aug. 9, 2003 in Birmingham. Don is the studio director at Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic’s Michigan Unit. Carol is a librarian at the Royal Oak Campus of Oakland Community College. She is also a volunteer at Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic. They live in Beverly Hills and can be reached by e-mail at: haffhere@sbcglobal.net. Scott Cooley, ’89, to Lenore Dunkel on Aug. 2, 2003 in Grand Blanc. Alumni in attendance included Richard Cooley, ’57, father of the groom, and bridesmaid Courtney Cooley Breaugh, ’91, sister of the groom. Scott is a technical writing consultant. Lenore is the rental operations manager for a property management company. They live in Grand Blanc and can be reached by email at: scottcooley@ameritech.net. Duncan Pankopf, ’93, to Krista Topolski on July 4, 2003, in Estes Park, CO. Duncan earned an M.B.A. degree

from the University of Denver. He is a business development manager at Ford Motor Co. in Denver. Krista is an assistant vice president of business banking at Wells Fargo, Denver. They live in Denver, CO. Scott Casteele, ’95, to Stephanie Moore on Nov. 1, 2003 at Goodrich Chapel. Albion alumni in the wedding party included Marc McDonald, ’95, Chuck Pinter, ’96, Brian Myers, ’97, Tim Todd, ’97, Brian Vermeulen, ’97, and Brad Brown, ’96. Scott is the athletic director for Fowlerville Community Schools. Stephanie is an office administrator for Starr Commonwealth. They live in Mason. (See accompanying photo.) Matthew Essell, ’95, to Jennifer Tunney on June 21, 2003 in Holt. Matt earned his master’s degree from Michigan State University. He is an English teacher at Holt Junior High School. Jennifer is a kindergarten teacher at Springport Elementary School. They live in Lansing. Erin Schrump, ’95, to Joshua Silver on Jan. 11, 2004 in Delray Beach, FL. They live in Boynton Beach, FL. Elizabeth Miller, ’96, to Andy Williams on May 25, 2003 in Chicago, IL. Elizabeth works for the Social Security Administration. Andy works for the City of Chicago. They live in Chicago, IL, and can be reached by e-mail at: emwilliams74@sbcglobal.net. (See accompanying photo.) Colleen Anger, ’99, to Kevin DeLacy on Aug. 23, 2003 in Port Huron. Colleen is a dentist at Sandusky (MI) Dental Care. They live in Fort Gratiot. (See accompanying photo.) Nicole Hoagland, ’99, to Robert Emens on Oct. 10, 2003 in Brookline, MA. Nicole works for Boston Private Bank & Trust Co. Robert works for GW & Wade. They live in Brookline. Lee Hull, ’99, to Robert Moses, ’99, on Aug. 30, 2003. They live in Chicago, IL. (See accompanying photo.) Jason Klein, ’99, to M. Elizabeth Scales on Feb. 6, 2004. Albion alumni in attendance were Andrew Lefevre, ’98, Rudy Webb, ’99, Michael Boyle, ’99,

Ben Geerling, ’98, Brian Grant, ’99, Eric Righetti, ’00, Jeff Weeks, ’99, Valerie Skaleski Weeks, ’01, Dave Conger, ’00, Ed Lampton, ’99, Ricardo Cotto, ’99, and Matt Topie, ’99. Jason is a senior account manager at Lear Corp. in Warren. Elizabeth, a University of Florida graduate, is an account executive for Lovio George Inc., a Detroit marketing firm. They live in Royal Oak. Kelly Maciejewski, ’99, to Brian Biggs on Jan. 17, 2004 in Walled Lake. Kelly is a forensic biologist at the Illinois State Police Forensic Science Center in Chicago, IL. Brian is a first-grade teacher. They live in Villa Park, IL. Suzanne Porter, ’99, to Scott Moser on June 14, 2003 in Plymouth. Suzanne is a database analyst/Web developer for the University of Texas. Scott works as a software developer for IBM. They live in Austin, TX. (See accompanying photo.) Jessica Steed, ’99, to William Unger on Aug. 2, 2003 in Traverse City. Jessica earned her master’s degree from Aquinas College. She is a fifth- and sixth-grade teacher at Oak Park Elementary School in Traverse City. William is a consultant with Ollar Consulting Ltd., Traverse City. They live in Traverse City. Jessica Kelm, ’01, to Kevin Keto on June 21, 2003 in Iron Mountain. Jessica is attending Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. Kevin is employed at the Menominee County Sheriff’s Department. They live in Menominee. Tara Simonds, ’01, to Mason Conner on May 10, 2003. They live in Grand Rapids. (See accompanying photo.) Gareth Beaty, ’02, to Angela Fritts on Sept. 21, 2003 in Grand Ledge. Gareth is employed by Deloitte and Touche. Angela is employed with Proctor Financial Insurance. Marnie Harte, ’02, to Sean Hackney, ’02, on Dec. 20, 2003 in East Lansing. Marnie is a second-year law student at the University of Richmond. Sean works in the corporate offices of Circuit City. They live in Richmond, VA. Jennifer Wolf, ’02, to Nathan Piwowarski, ’02, on May 17, 2003. (See accompanying photo.)

News for Albionotes Io Triumphe welcomes your news about promotions, honors, appointments, marriages, births/adoptions, travels and hobbies. You may reach us in any of the following ways: Web form: www.albion.edu/alumni/io/io_form_news.asp E-mail: classnotes@albion.edu U.S. mail: Editor, Io Triumphe, Communications Office, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224. Be sure to include your full name, class year, address and telephone number in your message.

Baby Britons Matthew Louis on Dec. 28, 2003 to Roselyn and Mark Datte, ’80. He joins big brother Stuart, 11. The family lives in Maple Grove, MN, and can be reached by e-mail at: markdatte@yahoo.com. Justin Merle on Feb. 16, 2004 to Carol and Jeffrey Loch, ’84. He joins big brothers Jarrod, 6, Jordan, 4, and Jason, 3. They live in Celebration, FL.

Matilda Louise on Jan. 9, 2004 to Dave and Jennifer Searles Thomas, ’87. She joins siblings Marley, 11, Maxwell, 9, and Mitchell, 5. The family lives in Australia. Charlotte Joy on Feb. 3, 2004 to Cynthia Weisenauer Witt, ’88. She joins big sister Savannah Grace, 5. Cynthia is a family practice physician with Valley Family Medicine in Prosser, WA. The Witts live in Pasco, WA. Margaret Katherine on Oct. 15, 2003 to David Weider and Ann Finzel, ’89. The family lives in Shorewood, MN. Ava Renee on July 29, 2003 to Mike and Kathy LeGray Risch, ’89. She joins big sister Zoe. Her godmother is Carolyn Kunz King, ’89. The family lives in Redondo Beach, CA. Charles Lester on July 25, 2003 to David Wentworth, ’89, and Elizabeth Jensen, ’90. He joins big brother William, 2. David and Elizabeth are both attorneys practicing in Peoria, IL. They live in Peoria. Nigel Robert on July 31, 2003 to Robert, ’92, and Sheela Welch Allum,’90. He joins siblings Mariah Blanche, 4, and Leif Harker, 2. Albion relatives include aunts Linnea Allum Deitcher, ’90, and Carla Welch Luberto, ’86, and uncle Dominic “Donny” Luberto, ’85. The family lives in Rogers City. Benjamin Edward on Jan. 18, 2004 to Richard Fenton and Mary Beth Hance, ’90. They live in Ellicott City, MD. Rhye William on Jan. 10, 2004 to Todd and Michon Dicks Lince, ’90. Proud relatives include aunt Michele Dicks Freeland, ’85. Michon is a high school teacher in Riverview. Todd is a business agent and organizer for the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. The family lives in Wyandotte. Charlotte Wren on Feb. 21, 2004 to H. Gordon, ’90, and Laura Swan MacMorran, ’92. She joins big brother Drew. Proud relatives include grandparents Jock and Robin Diller MacMorran, both ’64. The MacMorrans live in Redondo Beach, CA, and can be reached by e-mail at: gordon.macmorran@verizon.net. Thomas Robert on Jan. 26, 2004 to Brad and Michelle Calver Newman, ’90. He joins big sister Molly. The family lives in Chicago, IL. Nathan Robert on Oct. 30, 2003 to Bob and Sheryl Nielsen Parrish, ’90. Sheryl is an accountant with the Allegan County Road Commission in Allegan. The family lives in Allegan and can be reached by e-mail at: sherylparrish@hotmail.com. Marcos Alexander on Feb. 6, 2004 to Jorge and Kristin Burns Sanson, ’90. They live in Elgin, IL. Elise Marie on July 14, 2003 to Chris, ’90, and Laura Davio Swartzmiller, ’91. She joins big sister Isabel, 3. The family lives in Howell and can be reached by e-mail at: swartzassoc@comcast.net.


I O T R I U M P H E A L B I O N O T E S

Wedding Album See accompanying notes for details.

Scott Casteele, ’95, to Stephanie Moore on Nov. 1, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Jamie Hardenbrook, ’97, Brian Myers, ’97, Tim Todd, ’97, Sean Sims, ’95, and Brad Brown, ’96. (Second row) Brian Vermeulen, ’97, Cevin Cornish, ’95, Kelly Kuras, ’95, Chuck Pinter, ’96, Scott Casteele, ’95, Stephanie Casteele, Mary Beth Revesz, ’95, Marc McDonald, ’95, Jeff Brooks, ’94, Dave Egnatuk, ’71, and Mary Ann Stokes Egnatuk, ’76.

Elizabeth Miller, ’96, to Andy Williams on May 25, 2003. (Left to right) Holly Quick Valovick, ’96, Elizabeth Miller Williams, ’96, Andy Williams, Jennifer Arbogast Keating, ’96, and Dan Travis, ’96.

Suzanne Porter, ’99, to Scott Moser on June 14, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Susan Miller, ’00, Suzanne Porter Moser, ’99, Scott Moser, Carly Wieferich Orris, ’00, and Karen Collins Porter, ’75. (Second row) Kristin Mau, ’98, Melissa Hall Verb, ’98, Allyn Luce, ’00, Jovan Giaimo, ’00, Janna Muccio, ’00, Don Porter, ’71, Fred Porter, ’74, and Art Boley, ’74.

Colleen Anger, ’99, to Kevin DeLacy on Aug. 23, 2003. (Left to right) Jennifer Lantzy, ’00, Katie Drake, ’98, Colleen Anger DeLacy, ’99, Kevin DeLacy, Megan Murphy, ’00, Amy Schreiber Czarnecki, ’99, and Tim Czarnecki, ’00.

Lee Hull, ’99, to Robert Moses, ’99, on Aug. 30, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Brenda Green, ’99, Nora Wiltse, ’99, Sara Robertson Harris, ’99, Becca Sameck, ’99, Jessica Buttiglieri, ’99, Beckie McDowell Richison, ’99, Robert Moses, ’99, Lee Hull Moses, ’99, Aimee Mepham, ’99, Jadon Hartsuff, ’99, and Julie White Philips, ’99. (Second row) Patrick O’Connell, ’99, Trent Harris, ’99, Scott Curtis, ’00, Kevin Shehan, ’99, Bree Bennett, ’99, Kelly Garland, ’99, Ryan Shirey, ’99, and Kirk Myers, ’99. Tara Simonds, ’01, to Mason Conner on May 10, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Matt Giacona, ’01, and Darek Simonds,’00. (Second row) Nicole Macy, ’01, Leah Moeller, ’02, Lori Leszczynski, ’01, Laurel Weinman, ’01, Tara Simonds Conner, ’01, Annie Topie, ’01, Brooke Kilby, ’01, and Carmen Cotto, ’99. (Third row) Bryan Heckman, ’02, Jason Whalen, ’00, T.J. Whitehouse, ’99, Brian Lindsay, ’01, and Chris Thompson, ’00.

Jennifer Wolf, ’02, to Nathan Piwowarski, ’02, on May 17, 2003. (Arms of “A”, left to right) Dana Lee, ’02, Anne Polmanter, ’03, Dick Mortensen (Albion faculty), Rachel Lamphere, ’06, Troy Piwowarski, ’06, Scott Smith, ’00, Jocelyn Jacobs, ’02, Justin Stilwill, ’02, Sara Mann, ’01, Amanda Boye, ’02, Steve Pontoni, ’03, Wes Margeson, ’03, James Davidson, ’02, Tammy Calvin, ’03. (Middle of “A”) Jennifer Wolf Piwowarski, ’02, Nathan Piwowarski, ’02, and Rosemarie Hunt, ’03.

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Beau David on Feb. 17, 2004 to Raubyn and Reed Barich, ’91. He joins big brothers Louie and Ryan. Reed is currently working in sales at NSI Software in Indianapolis, IN. They live in Noblesville, IN. Benjamin Crane on Jan. 9, 2004 to Pete and Ellen Crane Freigang, ’92. He joins siblings Andrew, 5, and Kara, 2. Proud grandparents include William Crane, ’62. Ellen and her family live in Saginaw. Helen Rose on Jan. 12, 2004 to Robert and Jill Martindale Barr, both ’93. Proud aunts include Katie Martindale, ’91, Amy Martindale, ’96, and Jennifer Barr, ’00. The family lives in University Heights, OH. Noah Jay on Dec. 29, 2003 to Brent and Adrienne Auker Keller, both ’93. Proud grandparents are Ron, ’58, and Patricia Reppert Keller, ’61. The Kellers live in Grand Blanc, and can be reached by e-mail at: kellerab@aol.com. Henry Daniel on March 30, 2004 to R. Daniel and Kelley Turnock McLean, both ’93. Daniel is an attorney with Macomb County Friend of the Court. Kelley is an assistant attorney general for the State of Michigan. The family lives in Harper Woods. Emma Grace on Jan. 23, 2004 to Scott and Amy Valovich Merchant, both ’93. They live in Bloomfield Hills. Rachel Kay on Feb. 23, 2004 to David and Linda Lucas Newman, ’93. They live in Glen Ellyn, IL. Gillian Frances on Feb. 20, 2004 to Kirk and Connie Krayer Ciak, ’94. She joins big brother Paul, 2. The family lives in Troy. Orion Michael on Feb. 26, 2004 to Orie Kristel and Lisa Evans, ’94. Lisa is selfemployed as a life coach. They live in Columbus, OH. Ingrid Klara on Nov. 4, 2003 to Tom and Jennifer Maxam Grossman, ’94. She joins big sister Gretel, 2. The Grossmans live in Bay City. Jack Thomas on Dec. 28, 2003 to Matt, ’94, and Michelle Miedema Molitor, ’96. The family lives in Ann Arbor.

Emma Rose on Nov. 5, 2003 to Dave and Sandy Schaffner Ditman, ’95. The family lives in Chesapeake, VA, and can be reached by e-mail at: angel1234@cox.net. Elise Ana on March 27, 2004 to Timothy and Courtney Roeck Essenmacher, ’95. Courtney works for Aether Consulting, Inc. They live in Lathrup Village. Allison Marie on March 1, 2004 to Kyle, ’97, and Sarah VandenBout Klein, ’95. She joins big brother Alex. Kyle is director of sales at Intermet, Inc., a Troybased automotive supplier. Sarah works part-time as a human resources generalist at Valassis, a Livonia marketing company. The Kleins live in Commerce Township. Wyatt Mitchell on Aug. 3, 2003 to Scott, ’95, and Shannon Hall Tithof, ’97. The family lives in San Anselmo, CA, and can be reached by e-mail at: setithof@aol.com. James John on Jan. 18, 2004 to Kevin and Amy Niesen Gentner, ’96. Proud relatives include aunts Jenny Simmons Niesen, ’99, and Katy Niesen, ’05. The Gentners live in Lapeer. Thomas Jack on Oct. 1, 2003 to Tomas De La Fuente and Jacie Hunnicutt, ’96. They live in Lansing. Andrew Kirk on March 16, 2004 to Mark and Kristin Misner Meier, ’96. Proud grandparents include Jim, ’66, and Marilyn Spitler Misner, ’68. Kristin is a physical therapist for the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. The family lives in Ann Arbor and can be reached by e-mail at: krismis@umich.edu. Garrett Lee on March 27, 2004 to Derek and Tami McCumons Moe, ’96. The family lives in Wilton, CT. Elena Ruth on Jan. 5, 2004 to Adam, ’97, and Jessica Beyer Wood, ’96. She joins her big brother Matt. They live in South Lyon. Avery Rose on Jan. 19, 2004 to Andy and Amy Peabody Kamai, ’97. She joins big sister Abby, 3. The family lives in Grayslake, IL, and can be reached by e-mail at: aakamai@comcast.net.

Obituaries William McKale, ’32, on March 21, 2004. He was a retired postmaster and supervisor in Tucson, AZ. Emmajane Miller Fitch, ’33, on April 16, 2004 in Royal Oak. She was active in the community as president of several grade school PTAs, as a Cub Scout leader, and as a permanent substitute teacher for many years. She was a member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority. She is survived by four sons, Bruce, ’61, Gerald, ’65, David, ’69, and Mark, ’83, four grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Angelina Magnotta O’Neill, ’34, on Jan. 27, 2004 in Brackenville, DE. She worked as a chemist and teacher before becoming a full-time wife and mother. With her husband, Angelina worked for the Michigan Institute of Laundry and Dry Cleaning for 35 years. She was a charter member of St. Therese of Lisieux Parish in Lansing. Angelina is survived by three children, eight grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. She had three sisters who were Albion graduates and preceded her in death. Frederick Krueger, ’40, on Jan. 23, 2004. He worked for Texaco Inc. for 36 years. Frederick served in World War II, receiving the Presidential Unit Citation award for combat duty while serving on aircraft carriers in the Pacific. A resident of Grand Rapids, he was a member of Our Savior Lutheran Church and past president of West Michigan Oil Men’s Club. He is survived by his wife, Mary Jane, four sons, and five grandchildren. Helen Williams Moore, ’41, on Nov. 6, 2003 in Northville. Helen and her husband traveled the world in connection with his engineering career, living in Canada, Mexico, Brazil and the Philippines. They often traveled between Canada and the United States in their own aircraft, which they both piloted. Helen was a member of Kappa Delta sorority. She is survived by three children, six grandchildren and two sisters, including Clara Williams Debar, ’43.

Samuel Evan on Dec. 18, 2002 to Michelle and Matthew Belcher, ’95. Matthew is a tax attorney for Deloitte & Touche in Washington, DC. The family lives in Vienna, VA.

David Charles on Sept. 2, 2004 to Dave and Carrie Schreur Mehney, ’98. He joins big sister Caroline, 2. Proud relatives include grandparents Jeff, ’69, and Susie Schreur, ’71, aunts Amy Schreur Wiener, ’91, and Susan Emmons Nolan, ’89, and uncles Peter Vasiu, ’91, and Dan Mehney, ’93. The family lives in Grand Rapids.

Jackson DuPraw on Dec. 29, 2003 to Matthew and Nicole DuPraw Carter, ’95. Nicole and Matt are both practicing pediatricians. The family lives in Silver Spring, MD.

Alexandria Marie on Feb. 21, 2004 to Jared and Shawn LaCasse Mehrens, ’98. They live in Howell and can be reached by e-mail at: deucemehrens@comcast.net.

Tyndale Rutledge, ’41, on Dec. 18, 2002. He was a navigator in the Navy during the World War II Normandy invasion. After military service, Tyndale joined the insurance business. He was active with Alpha Tau Omega, initiating a scholarship program in St. Louis, MO for deserving high school students. Tyndale was active in the St. Louis Kiwanis Club, the Kirkwood Area Chamber of Commerce and the Kirkwood Rotary Club. He was a longtime member and past president of the Greenbrier Hills Country Club. He is survived by his wife, Gloria Gloor Rutledge, ’41, a daughter and son-inlaw, Shelley Rutledge Brown, ’71, and David Brown, ’70, and two grandchildren.

Grace Ann on Jan. 22, 2004 to Jennifer and Gregg Colburn, ’95. Gregg works for Citadel Investments Group, L.L.C., in Chicago, IL. They live in Chicago.

Kristin Michelle on May 11, 2003 to Amy and Eric Maust, ’99. Eric is a personal training manager at Lifetime Fitness in Rochester Hills. The family lives in Rochester Hills and can be reached by e-mail at: ericandamymaust@comcast.net.

Charles Cochran, Sr., ’42, on April 28, 2004 in Fort Myers, FL. Upon graduation, he joined the U.S. Army. Charles was dean of men and later business manager at Franklin College until 1957, when he left to become vice president of business affairs at Cornell

James Liam on Dec. 10, 2003 to Kevin FitzPatrick and Jennifer Troyer, ’94. They live in Canton.

College in Iowa, where he remained for 29 years until retiring. Charles was a member of the Mt. Vernon (IA) Rotary Club for 20 years and was first chairman of the zoning commission in Mt. Vernon. He was a member of the Chamber of Commerce and on the board at Rust College in Mississippi. He is survived by his wife, Marjorie, two sons, including Charles Jr., ’68, two daughters, five grandchildren, and a sister, Barbara Cochran Whitney, ’47. Bette Bearss Ettig, ’44, on Jan. 16, 2004 in Ellenton, FL. She was a teacher at Quincy, Napoleon and Vandercook Lake, retiring from the East Jackson school district after 32 years of teaching. Bette was a member of the Sigma Alpha Iota music sorority and the Tuesday Musicale of Jackson. She also attended the Nazarene Church in Bradenton, FL, and the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Jackson. She is survived by her husband, Robert, three children, eight grandchildren and a great-grandchild. Kenneth Ferguson, ’44, on Aug. 3, 2002 in Idaho Falls, ID. He went to work in Oak Ridge, TN, and enlisted in the Army during World War II. After basic training, Kenneth was sent back to Oak Ridge and assigned to the Special Engineering Detachment (SED) Unit. He earned his master’s degree from the University of Illinois and later worked for 18 years at Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago, IL. Kenneth was then transferred to a federal laboratory in Idaho Falls, where he worked for 20 years. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy Dinger Ferguson, ’46, a son, a daughter, four grandchildren, three stepgrandchildren and a nephew, Daniel Dinger, ’87. William Voglesong, ’44, on April 21, 1999 in Rochester, NY. He served as a physicist with Eastman Kodak Co. and as an instructor at the Rochester Institute of Technology. William was considered an expert in the field of color photography. He is survived by his wife, Marion Bunte Voglesong, ’46, four children, including Bruce Voglesong, ’73, and six grandchildren. Betty Maronick Hammond, ’45, on Sept. 7, 2003 in Bay View. She and her husband had spent their summers in Bay View for more than 50 years. Their winter home was in Naples, FL, and they were formerly long-time residents of Dearborn. Betty was a member of Kappa Delta sorority. She is survived by her husband, Bill Hammond, ’46, four children, 10 grandchildren, two sisters, including Dolores Maronick Dougherty, ’51, and a brother. Jean Moffett Cummings, ’46, on Feb. 24, 2004 in Harbor Springs. She was an active member of Harbor Springs United Methodist Church for 54 years. Jean was a Girl Scout leader and a member of the P.T.A. and Delta Gamma sorority. She is survived by her husband, Truman Cummings Jr., ’43, six children, including Christina Cummings Lemon, ’79, and Truman Cummings, ’83, a sister and brother-in-law, Cherry Moffett Watson and Edward Watson, Jr., both ’43, eight granddaughters, one great-granddaughter, and 10 nieces and

nephews, including Roger Chope, ’68, Wendy Watson Fershee, ’69, Douglass Smith, ’75, Sarah Smith Lubarsky, ’78, and Carl Smith, ’82. Phillip Friedrick, ’49, on March 4, 2004 in Albion. He graduated from Eastern Michigan University and worked for Union Steel, Wyandotte Chemical and Hayes Albion. In 1968, Phillip and his wife bought and operated the Friedrick Variety and Department Store in Concord. He was active with the Boy Scouts and served as a volunteer grandparent. He taught for Jackson Community College, as well as Spring Arbor University, where he supervised the college program in the Michigan prison system. He is survived by his wife, Norma, three children, including Lynn Friedrick Fick, ’78, and Phillip Friedrick, ’79, daughter-in-law, Gail Barclay Friedrick, ’78, five grandchildren and a sister, Lillian Friedrick Sweezey, ’50. Earl Williamson, ’49, on Oct. 17, 2003. He served in the Navy during World War II. Earl retired in 1988 from Manistique Area Schools, where he had taught and coached for 30 years. He was also employed by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources as a park ranger at Indian Lake State Park and also at Big Springs from 1960 to 1996. He was a member of the Church of the Redeemer-Presbyterian of Manistique, having served as a church trustee and elder. Earl is survived by his wife, Helen Dickison Williamson, ’48, two children, a granddaughter and a brother-in-law, George Dickison, ’43. Mark Bascom, ’50, on March 5, 2004 in Largo, FL. His career spanned 34 years in the Bay City school system, as a teacher, principal and assistant superintendent. He is survived by his wife, Violet Bascom. Virginia Allen, ’54, on Jan. 22, 2004 in Maple Rapids. A graduate of Bronson Methodist School of Nursing and Central Michigan University, Virginia was an R.N., and served as school nurse for Kalamazoo Schools for 38 years. She was a member of the Maple Rapids United Methodist Church and the D.A.R. Virginia was a lifetime member of the O.E.S. Chapter #69 of Elsie, and served as past president of the Huntley National Association and the Michigan Nursing Association. She also traveled to China and Australia under an ambassadorship program sponsored by the Kalamazoo school system. She is survived by a brother, a brother-in-law, several nieces and nephews and several great-nieces and nephews. Lawrence Smith, ’57, on Sept. 20, 2003 in Centennial, CO. He is survived by his wife, Barbara McIntosh Smith, ’57, four children and five grandchildren. Mildred Lyons Riedell-Guimond, ’59, on April 15, 2004 in Portage. She taught for more than 30 years, in Albion public schools and several rural school systems, retiring from the Kalamazoo public schools. Mildred was a member of the Audubon Society. She is survived by her husband, William, two daughters, a grandson and three great-grandchildren.


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Beau David on Feb. 17, 2004 to Raubyn and Reed Barich, ’91. He joins big brothers Louie and Ryan. Reed is currently working in sales at NSI Software in Indianapolis, IN. They live in Noblesville, IN. Benjamin Crane on Jan. 9, 2004 to Pete and Ellen Crane Freigang, ’92. He joins siblings Andrew, 5, and Kara, 2. Proud grandparents include William Crane, ’62. Ellen and her family live in Saginaw. Helen Rose on Jan. 12, 2004 to Robert and Jill Martindale Barr, both ’93. Proud aunts include Katie Martindale, ’91, Amy Martindale, ’96, and Jennifer Barr, ’00. The family lives in University Heights, OH. Noah Jay on Dec. 29, 2003 to Brent and Adrienne Auker Keller, both ’93. Proud grandparents are Ron, ’58, and Patricia Reppert Keller, ’61. The Kellers live in Grand Blanc, and can be reached by e-mail at: kellerab@aol.com. Henry Daniel on March 30, 2004 to R. Daniel and Kelley Turnock McLean, both ’93. Daniel is an attorney with Macomb County Friend of the Court. Kelley is an assistant attorney general for the State of Michigan. The family lives in Harper Woods. Emma Grace on Jan. 23, 2004 to Scott and Amy Valovich Merchant, both ’93. They live in Bloomfield Hills. Rachel Kay on Feb. 23, 2004 to David and Linda Lucas Newman, ’93. They live in Glen Ellyn, IL. Gillian Frances on Feb. 20, 2004 to Kirk and Connie Krayer Ciak, ’94. She joins big brother Paul, 2. The family lives in Troy. Orion Michael on Feb. 26, 2004 to Orie Kristel and Lisa Evans, ’94. Lisa is selfemployed as a life coach. They live in Columbus, OH. Ingrid Klara on Nov. 4, 2003 to Tom and Jennifer Maxam Grossman, ’94. She joins big sister Gretel, 2. The Grossmans live in Bay City. Jack Thomas on Dec. 28, 2003 to Matt, ’94, and Michelle Miedema Molitor, ’96. The family lives in Ann Arbor.

Emma Rose on Nov. 5, 2003 to Dave and Sandy Schaffner Ditman, ’95. The family lives in Chesapeake, VA, and can be reached by e-mail at: angel1234@cox.net. Elise Ana on March 27, 2004 to Timothy and Courtney Roeck Essenmacher, ’95. Courtney works for Aether Consulting, Inc. They live in Lathrup Village. Allison Marie on March 1, 2004 to Kyle, ’97, and Sarah VandenBout Klein, ’95. She joins big brother Alex. Kyle is director of sales at Intermet, Inc., a Troybased automotive supplier. Sarah works part-time as a human resources generalist at Valassis, a Livonia marketing company. The Kleins live in Commerce Township. Wyatt Mitchell on Aug. 3, 2003 to Scott, ’95, and Shannon Hall Tithof, ’97. The family lives in San Anselmo, CA, and can be reached by e-mail at: setithof@aol.com. James John on Jan. 18, 2004 to Kevin and Amy Niesen Gentner, ’96. Proud relatives include aunts Jenny Simmons Niesen, ’99, and Katy Niesen, ’05. The Gentners live in Lapeer. Thomas Jack on Oct. 1, 2003 to Tomas De La Fuente and Jacie Hunnicutt, ’96. They live in Lansing. Andrew Kirk on March 16, 2004 to Mark and Kristin Misner Meier, ’96. Proud grandparents include Jim, ’66, and Marilyn Spitler Misner, ’68. Kristin is a physical therapist for the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. The family lives in Ann Arbor and can be reached by e-mail at: krismis@umich.edu. Garrett Lee on March 27, 2004 to Derek and Tami McCumons Moe, ’96. The family lives in Wilton, CT. Elena Ruth on Jan. 5, 2004 to Adam, ’97, and Jessica Beyer Wood, ’96. She joins her big brother Matt. They live in South Lyon. Avery Rose on Jan. 19, 2004 to Andy and Amy Peabody Kamai, ’97. She joins big sister Abby, 3. The family lives in Grayslake, IL, and can be reached by e-mail at: aakamai@comcast.net.

Obituaries William McKale, ’32, on March 21, 2004. He was a retired postmaster and supervisor in Tucson, AZ. Emmajane Miller Fitch, ’33, on April 16, 2004 in Royal Oak. She was active in the community as president of several grade school PTAs, as a Cub Scout leader, and as a permanent substitute teacher for many years. She was a member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority. She is survived by four sons, Bruce, ’61, Gerald, ’65, David, ’69, and Mark, ’83, four grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Angelina Magnotta O’Neill, ’34, on Jan. 27, 2004 in Brackenville, DE. She worked as a chemist and teacher before becoming a full-time wife and mother. With her husband, Angelina worked for the Michigan Institute of Laundry and Dry Cleaning for 35 years. She was a charter member of St. Therese of Lisieux Parish in Lansing. Angelina is survived by three children, eight grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. She had three sisters who were Albion graduates and preceded her in death. Frederick Krueger, ’40, on Jan. 23, 2004. He worked for Texaco Inc. for 36 years. Frederick served in World War II, receiving the Presidential Unit Citation award for combat duty while serving on aircraft carriers in the Pacific. A resident of Grand Rapids, he was a member of Our Savior Lutheran Church and past president of West Michigan Oil Men’s Club. He is survived by his wife, Mary Jane, four sons, and five grandchildren. Helen Williams Moore, ’41, on Nov. 6, 2003 in Northville. Helen and her husband traveled the world in connection with his engineering career, living in Canada, Mexico, Brazil and the Philippines. They often traveled between Canada and the United States in their own aircraft, which they both piloted. Helen was a member of Kappa Delta sorority. She is survived by three children, six grandchildren and two sisters, including Clara Williams Debar, ’43.

Samuel Evan on Dec. 18, 2002 to Michelle and Matthew Belcher, ’95. Matthew is a tax attorney for Deloitte & Touche in Washington, DC. The family lives in Vienna, VA.

David Charles on Sept. 2, 2004 to Dave and Carrie Schreur Mehney, ’98. He joins big sister Caroline, 2. Proud relatives include grandparents Jeff, ’69, and Susie Schreur, ’71, aunts Amy Schreur Wiener, ’91, and Susan Emmons Nolan, ’89, and uncles Peter Vasiu, ’91, and Dan Mehney, ’93. The family lives in Grand Rapids.

Jackson DuPraw on Dec. 29, 2003 to Matthew and Nicole DuPraw Carter, ’95. Nicole and Matt are both practicing pediatricians. The family lives in Silver Spring, MD.

Alexandria Marie on Feb. 21, 2004 to Jared and Shawn LaCasse Mehrens, ’98. They live in Howell and can be reached by e-mail at: deucemehrens@comcast.net.

Tyndale Rutledge, ’41, on Dec. 18, 2002. He was a navigator in the Navy during the World War II Normandy invasion. After military service, Tyndale joined the insurance business. He was active with Alpha Tau Omega, initiating a scholarship program in St. Louis, MO for deserving high school students. Tyndale was active in the St. Louis Kiwanis Club, the Kirkwood Area Chamber of Commerce and the Kirkwood Rotary Club. He was a longtime member and past president of the Greenbrier Hills Country Club. He is survived by his wife, Gloria Gloor Rutledge, ’41, a daughter and son-inlaw, Shelley Rutledge Brown, ’71, and David Brown, ’70, and two grandchildren.

Grace Ann on Jan. 22, 2004 to Jennifer and Gregg Colburn, ’95. Gregg works for Citadel Investments Group, L.L.C., in Chicago, IL. They live in Chicago.

Kristin Michelle on May 11, 2003 to Amy and Eric Maust, ’99. Eric is a personal training manager at Lifetime Fitness in Rochester Hills. The family lives in Rochester Hills and can be reached by e-mail at: ericandamymaust@comcast.net.

Charles Cochran, Sr., ’42, on April 28, 2004 in Fort Myers, FL. Upon graduation, he joined the U.S. Army. Charles was dean of men and later business manager at Franklin College until 1957, when he left to become vice president of business affairs at Cornell

James Liam on Dec. 10, 2003 to Kevin FitzPatrick and Jennifer Troyer, ’94. They live in Canton.

College in Iowa, where he remained for 29 years until retiring. Charles was a member of the Mt. Vernon (IA) Rotary Club for 20 years and was first chairman of the zoning commission in Mt. Vernon. He was a member of the Chamber of Commerce and on the board at Rust College in Mississippi. He is survived by his wife, Marjorie, two sons, including Charles Jr., ’68, two daughters, five grandchildren, and a sister, Barbara Cochran Whitney, ’47. Bette Bearss Ettig, ’44, on Jan. 16, 2004 in Ellenton, FL. She was a teacher at Quincy, Napoleon and Vandercook Lake, retiring from the East Jackson school district after 32 years of teaching. Bette was a member of the Sigma Alpha Iota music sorority and the Tuesday Musicale of Jackson. She also attended the Nazarene Church in Bradenton, FL, and the Seventh Day Adventist Church in Jackson. She is survived by her husband, Robert, three children, eight grandchildren and a great-grandchild. Kenneth Ferguson, ’44, on Aug. 3, 2002 in Idaho Falls, ID. He went to work in Oak Ridge, TN, and enlisted in the Army during World War II. After basic training, Kenneth was sent back to Oak Ridge and assigned to the Special Engineering Detachment (SED) Unit. He earned his master’s degree from the University of Illinois and later worked for 18 years at Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago, IL. Kenneth was then transferred to a federal laboratory in Idaho Falls, where he worked for 20 years. He is survived by his wife, Dorothy Dinger Ferguson, ’46, a son, a daughter, four grandchildren, three stepgrandchildren and a nephew, Daniel Dinger, ’87. William Voglesong, ’44, on April 21, 1999 in Rochester, NY. He served as a physicist with Eastman Kodak Co. and as an instructor at the Rochester Institute of Technology. William was considered an expert in the field of color photography. He is survived by his wife, Marion Bunte Voglesong, ’46, four children, including Bruce Voglesong, ’73, and six grandchildren. Betty Maronick Hammond, ’45, on Sept. 7, 2003 in Bay View. She and her husband had spent their summers in Bay View for more than 50 years. Their winter home was in Naples, FL, and they were formerly long-time residents of Dearborn. Betty was a member of Kappa Delta sorority. She is survived by her husband, Bill Hammond, ’46, four children, 10 grandchildren, two sisters, including Dolores Maronick Dougherty, ’51, and a brother. Jean Moffett Cummings, ’46, on Feb. 24, 2004 in Harbor Springs. She was an active member of Harbor Springs United Methodist Church for 54 years. Jean was a Girl Scout leader and a member of the P.T.A. and Delta Gamma sorority. She is survived by her husband, Truman Cummings Jr., ’43, six children, including Christina Cummings Lemon, ’79, and Truman Cummings, ’83, a sister and brother-in-law, Cherry Moffett Watson and Edward Watson, Jr., both ’43, eight granddaughters, one great-granddaughter, and 10 nieces and

nephews, including Roger Chope, ’68, Wendy Watson Fershee, ’69, Douglass Smith, ’75, Sarah Smith Lubarsky, ’78, and Carl Smith, ’82. Phillip Friedrick, ’49, on March 4, 2004 in Albion. He graduated from Eastern Michigan University and worked for Union Steel, Wyandotte Chemical and Hayes Albion. In 1968, Phillip and his wife bought and operated the Friedrick Variety and Department Store in Concord. He was active with the Boy Scouts and served as a volunteer grandparent. He taught for Jackson Community College, as well as Spring Arbor University, where he supervised the college program in the Michigan prison system. He is survived by his wife, Norma, three children, including Lynn Friedrick Fick, ’78, and Phillip Friedrick, ’79, daughter-in-law, Gail Barclay Friedrick, ’78, five grandchildren and a sister, Lillian Friedrick Sweezey, ’50. Earl Williamson, ’49, on Oct. 17, 2003. He served in the Navy during World War II. Earl retired in 1988 from Manistique Area Schools, where he had taught and coached for 30 years. He was also employed by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources as a park ranger at Indian Lake State Park and also at Big Springs from 1960 to 1996. He was a member of the Church of the Redeemer-Presbyterian of Manistique, having served as a church trustee and elder. Earl is survived by his wife, Helen Dickison Williamson, ’48, two children, a granddaughter and a brother-in-law, George Dickison, ’43. Mark Bascom, ’50, on March 5, 2004 in Largo, FL. His career spanned 34 years in the Bay City school system, as a teacher, principal and assistant superintendent. He is survived by his wife, Violet Bascom. Virginia Allen, ’54, on Jan. 22, 2004 in Maple Rapids. A graduate of Bronson Methodist School of Nursing and Central Michigan University, Virginia was an R.N., and served as school nurse for Kalamazoo Schools for 38 years. She was a member of the Maple Rapids United Methodist Church and the D.A.R. Virginia was a lifetime member of the O.E.S. Chapter #69 of Elsie, and served as past president of the Huntley National Association and the Michigan Nursing Association. She also traveled to China and Australia under an ambassadorship program sponsored by the Kalamazoo school system. She is survived by a brother, a brother-in-law, several nieces and nephews and several great-nieces and nephews. Lawrence Smith, ’57, on Sept. 20, 2003 in Centennial, CO. He is survived by his wife, Barbara McIntosh Smith, ’57, four children and five grandchildren. Mildred Lyons Riedell-Guimond, ’59, on April 15, 2004 in Portage. She taught for more than 30 years, in Albion public schools and several rural school systems, retiring from the Kalamazoo public schools. Mildred was a member of the Audubon Society. She is survived by her husband, William, two daughters, a grandson and three great-grandchildren.


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Republican strategist Robert Teeter dies Robert Teeter, ’61, died of cancer on June 13, 2004, at his home in Ann Arbor. President of the Ann Arborbased Coldwater Corp. at the time of his death, Teeter was a pioneer in the development and practice of modern public opinion research. Shortly after graduating from Albion, Teeter joined George Romney’s Michigan gubernatorial campaign. This experience led him in 1967 to a position at Market Opinion Research (MOR), where he first was director of the political research division and then president. In 1989, Teeter founded Coldwater Corp., a business consulting and research firm that conducts the NBC News/Wall Street Journal national polling program, in addition to providing strategic planning consultation to senior executives. Teeter served in a senior position in the presidential campaigns of Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan, and as the national campaign chairman for President George H.W. Bush in 1992. Nearly half of the nation’s incumbent Republican governors and U.S. senators were also among his clients. He was a member of the Board of Directors of UPS, Visteon Corp., Kaydon Corp. and the Bank of Ann Arbor, and of the

executive committee of the Albion College Board of Trustees. Teeter received an honorary doctor of humane letters degree at Albion’s commencement this past May. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth Carter Teeter, ’63, a son, John, a daughter, Katherine, and two brothers, Philip Teeter and John Teeter, ’67.

Machek

department. He has clearly been a mentor to us all. We look to him to help us find middle ground, and he always has a solution for us when we need one. We all respect him as an artist, but also as a teacher.” As a young faculty member learning the ropes when Machek was department chair, Chytilo noted that Machek was the “perfect mentor.” “He was always available to talk yet he never imposed anything on you,” she says. “He let me make my own mistakes, and I was able to learn from them.” Machek will not be at a loss for things to do in retirement. He will pursue his art, as well other interests including carpentry, woodworking and photography. Machek has restored two historic homes in Marshall, and might be persuaded to do more. His travel plans include trips to Prague and southern France. For the past 20 years, he has served as the zoning administrator and a planning commissioner for Eckford Township, where he lives with his wife, Ann. Machek says his art will continue to grow. He has always been interested in textures in art, and in the last few years he has become more involved in creating abstract art by importing base images to his computer, manipulating them in Photoshop, and then working them over in color pencil, graphite and ink. Machek, who has completed more than 50 portrait commissions and countless other drawings and paintings over the years, says, “I’m never bored. . . . I’ve always done work, and I always will.”

(continued from p. 12) probably never would have done that. I think that’s helped me, as well as offered something to the students.” Pinpointing students as the greatest dynamic in his decades at Albion, Machek says that in the 1970s students entered college knowing they wanted to major in art, and art classes were in great demand across campus—so much so that the Art Department held its own pre-registration. Then, he says, art became less popular as a major, and students became majors only after they had taken the classes and enjoyed the experience. Thanks in part to strong recruiting efforts in the past few years, students now are entering with more commitment to art—submitting portfolios and applying for art scholarships. “I think they are more practical and careeroriented now than students were in the late 1960s and ’70s,” he says. “They want to see what the specific reward is going to be for an endeavor. . . . But our students are still hardworking.” Mentoring generations of artists and art majors has long been a hallmark for Machek. Less visible is the mentoring he has done for his department colleagues. As an accomplished portraitist and the one constant at Bobbitt almost since the building opened its doors, the dean of Albion art professors has earned the strong admiration of his colleagues. “Frank has great guidance and wisdom, and we all benefit from that,” says Lynne Chytilo, professor and chair of art and art history. “Frank is the driving force of the

To honor Bob Teeter’s long service as a trustee and Visiting Committee member for the Gerald R. Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service, the Visiting Committee has established the Robert M. Teeter Student Research Fellowship Endowment in the Ford Institute. For more information, contact: Ben Hancock, vice president for institutional advancement, 517/629-0242, or e-mail bhancock@albion.edu.

The Teeter legacy Some of Robert Teeter’s colleagues and friends offer their remembrances below. Bob Teeter embodied the commitment to civic engagement that is at the core of the liberal arts tradition. He used the critical thinking and problem-solving skills he learned as an undergraduate both to forge a life of meaning and purpose and to improve the quality of life for others. There’s no question that his pioneering work in public opinion research set the standard in his field. His contributions as a

wise counselor to our nation’s top leaders, including four U.S. presidents, are welldocumented. Less well known, but equally valued within our campus community, was his sage advice as a member of our Board of Trustees. Bob Teeter was a role model for me and all Albion alumni, a true citizen of the world. Peter Mitchell, ’67 President, Albion College I had the good fortune of knowing Bob Teeter as a fellow trustee of Albion College and as a consultant to me and the External Affairs leadership team at NYNEX (now Verizon), and, I’m proud to say, we became very good friends. His commitment to excellence was evident in all of his relationships. You could count on Bob’s loyalty and on counsel that was always measured, direct, based on fact and logic, and ethically sound. Bob helped shape so many strategies and policies in politics, business and at Albion, yet he seldom stood in the limelight. His ego didn’t demand personal attention. He was a team player dedicated to the mission. Since Bob’s passing, people have commented on how down-to-earth he was even though he worked with some of the most important people in the world. They credit the Midwestern values that he never lost. I believe that Bob’s Albion education helped those values mature and become the solid foundation for a life we now praise and honor.

One of democracy’s great American practitioners was lost last week with the death at age 65 of Bob Teeter. . . . A product of a classic Midwest small town, Coldwater, Mich., equipped with a first-class liberal arts education from Albion College, he was as brimming with idealism as many political operatives are drenched in cynicism. He also had a sunny disposition and a sense of humor that savored the rich, feisty characters in politics more than the grim strivers. . . . Over the years we probably shared as many dinners and conversations about politics as I enjoyed with any operative in either party. Every time, my perspective was changed—and improved—by something he said. . . . For him, what counted was good government—and the integrity of the candidates he helped. . . . He searched for and found people who cared about public service and not just about enhancing a career. David Broder Syndicated Columnist, Washington, D.C. (From the Washington Post) Bob Teeter was one of my closest friends. We have known each other and worked together for more than 30 years, and he will be sorely missed. Bob Teeter has been the single most important Republican strategist for many of us who have spent a career in public life. He was a wise and thoroughly decent man; our political system works better today because Bob was part of it.

William Ferguson, ’52 Trustee, Armonk, N.Y.

Richard Cheney Vice President of the United States Washington, D.C. (From the Detroit News)

O’Kennon

President’s Advisory Council on Intercultural Affairs Award for her contributions to promoting diversity on campus. “What made Dr. O’Kennon an exceptional professor for me was her excitement not only about mathematics but about life,” says Michelle Hribar, ’91, a professor of computer science at Pacific University. “She always had some new topic she was eagerly investigating. . . . I think she encouraged that in all of her students.” “I had no intention of majoring in mathematics,” continues Hribar, who recalls that many of her classmates decided to become math majors after studying calculus with O’Kennon. “I think all of us remember that 8 a.m. class very fondly and owe Dr. O’Kennon much gratitude for her excellent teaching!” In retirement, O’Kennon looks forward to continuing her translation program development—and will keep up with a new hobby that has gained significant local interest. Reviving a childhood passion for paper and scissors, O’Kennon has spent the past two years creating “pop-ups” –elaborate 3-D paper still lifes, landscapes, and Escher-like worlds that leap out of a flat card. Although she intended the pop-ups solely as something to do in the evenings, O’Kennon now offers them for sale in downtown Albion. “It wasn’t just a matter of style which made Martha such a wonderful educator for me. It was also her interests in so many fields,” says statistician David Barber, ’97, who worked with O’Kennon to move her translation programs to a Web-based language. “Without a doubt she has been one of the most memorable professors Albion College has had.”

(continued from p.12) college-bound African students. She decided to teach herself Xhosa in order to better do her job and learn more about the culture. “I started putting little sentences in the computer,” O’Kennon says. “Every time I’d learn a sentence pattern I’d put that in the computer, too.” By the time she got to South Africa her “little sentences” became the basis of research into computerized language translation that has occupied her time for the last 12 years. Along with the Xhosa translator, which O’Kennon continues to improve, she has established a computer translator for the Native American languages Ojibwe/Odawa, and is starting a project to work on the African languages Pulaar/Fulfulde. While no computer translator is perfect, she says, “you can write a pretty good one, one that’s useful.” Some of the languages O’Kennon works with are “endangered,” and that motivates her as well. “I like the idea of helping to preserve communication,” she says. “These languages are all so different, and if we lose these unique ways that people have learned to communicate, we’re losing a lot.” Closer to home, O’Kennon’s tenure at Albion has been marked by a similar excitement about the diversity of the campus community. She served as the first adviser to the College’s Asian Awareness Group, and has advised the Jewish Student Union (now Hillel) and the Star Trek Club. An enthusiastic supporter of the Gerstacker International House and international students for many years, O’Kennon received this year’s


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Let the work begin D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

Marking the official start of the science complex renovation and expansion project April 16 were: President Peter Mitchell, ’67; Lisa Lewis, associate professor of chemistry; Thomas Wilch, associate professor of geological sciences; student Lindsay Drewes, ’05; student Anjali Arora, ’04; Richard Baird, ’78, chairman of the Board of Trustees; and John Vournakis, ’61, trustee and co-chair of the science facility fund-raising drive. Drewes is the granddaughter of trustee Bruce Kresge, ’53, for whom the new laboratory building in the complex is named.

The $41.6-million science complex renovation and expansion project began this spring with construction of Kresge Hall, a new 42,000-square-foot laboratory building, and adjacent greenhouse. (The Campus Safety building appears at upper left and Norris Center at far right.) The renovation of Norris Center, Palenske Hall and Putnam Hall has also begun. A glassed-in atrium will enclose the current courtyard in the facility. Fund-raising for the project continues, with $23-million in gifts and pledges in hand as of mid-June. The College must raise a total of $23.3-million in current gifts by June 2005 to meet the terms of a $1.5-million challenge grant from the Kresge Foundation.

M. ARVOY PHOTOS

Martin Ludington, ’64, chair and professor of physics, and David Green, ’64, visiting professor of chemistry, unearthed this artifact during the move of the science departments from Palenske Hall into temporary quarters in Epworth Hall. Ludington and Green are pointing to themselves as physics honors society members during their student days at Albion.

You can be a sidew superintende alk nt!

No matter whe re you live, yo u can watch the daily prog ress of the sc ience compl renovation an ex d expansion project via ou r new Web cam . Just go to: www.albion. edu/scienced rive/webcam /

Albion’s Physics Department is “returning to its roots” for the coming academic year, as a result of the temporary move into Epworth Hall during the science complex renovation. The department was housed in Epworth for five decades before moving into its current home in Palenske Hall in 1969.

Enjoy a musical celebration in Bay View All Albion alumni and friends are welcome at the following events, to be held on the Bay View campus. Saturday, July 31 3:30 p.m. Mini-Class: “Hymns of the Victorian Age” Douglas Rose, Chair and Associate Professor of Music, Albion College 4:45 p.m. Mini-Class: “American Musical Theatre—Fiddler on the Roof” Royal Ward, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Professor of Theatre, Albion College 6 p.m. Potluck 8 p.m. Theatre Production: Fiddler on the Roof (Reserved tickets: $20 per person) Sunday, August 1 10:45 a.m. Special Music at Bay View Worship Service: Pro Choral John Hall Auditorium Pro Choral is a select, 20-voice ensemble composed of Albion College alumni and directed by Dr. Rose. Invitations will be mailed shortly. If you will be traveling in northern Michigan and would like to attend these events, please call the Office of Alumni and Parent Relations, 517/629-0448.

Enjoy a weekend in Bay View

Family Weekend, November 13-14 Plan to join our Albion family by bringing yours to campus. Come and meet other Albion College parents and families while attending the Albion vs. Olivet football game and a gala dinner with your student. Enjoy an entertaining show by Craig Karges, whose performance is an extraordinary blend of mystery, humor, psychology and intuition. Lots to do and fun for the whole family! A complete schedule of events will be mailed to you this fall. For updates in the meantime, visit our Web site: www.albion.edu/alumni/ familyweekend.asp. Questions? Contact the Office of Alumni and Parent Relations, 517/629-0435, or e-mail: pschuler@albion.edu.

Io Triumphe! A magazine for alumni and friends of Albion College  

Summer 2004 edition

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