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VOL. LXX, NO. 1

SUMMER 2005

Published for alumni, parents and friends of Albion College

Global reach An international lifestyle suits these Albion alumni just fine.

Transformations: May graduates look back on their Albion experience .......... 7

Unpacking: Science departments begin move into new quarters ..................... 12

‘Albion Fair’: Britons sing their way across England ................................... 23

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G. RACE PHOTO

D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

“Change and continuity” are visible on Albion’s campus, from venerated landmarks Vulgamore and Robinson Halls (top left) to the most recent additions, the Ferguson Building (bottom left) and Kresge Hall (top right, with new greenhouse under construction).

Change and continuity One of the most enjoyable aspects of my job as editor of Io Triumphe is the opportunity I have to visit with alumni when they come back to campus for reunions and other special occasions in the life of Albion College. Those who are returning after a long absence invariably comment on how much the campus itself has changed through the years—for the better. Even those who have graduated as recently as 10 years ago find much that’s new, notably the Kellogg Center and the Ferguson Student, Technology, and Administrative Services Building. Both have become new focal points for the Quadrangle and are among the busiest spots on campus throughout the day. And the changes continue with the science complex renovation and expansion now under way. Under this $41.6-million project, Palenske and Putnam Halls and Norris Center will be transformed with redesigned and vastly improved classrooms and laboratories. And our newest addition to campus, four-story Kresge Hall, will open to students and faculty this summer and will provide expanded laboratory space (along with sophisticated new instrumentation) to fully support the new directions science teaching and research are taking today. To better communicate with you about these and future developments on campus, we in Albion’s Communications Office are planning some important changes of our own in the format and appearance of Io Triumphe. This fall, we will introduce the “new” Io Triumphe in a full-color magazine format with improved and expanded content and a bright new look. While our readership remains high, based on what you have told us in recent surveys, we want to represent Albion College—its students, faculty, alumni, and D. TRUMPIE PHOTO programs—in the most informative and engaging ways possible. To do that, we must take Io Triumphe to a new level of sophistication and visual impact. Be assured that even with these changes the mission of Io Triumphe will remain centered on you, our alumni readers, and on maintaining that vital connection between you and your alma mater. As we plan for future editions, we welcome your input. Io Triumphe is your alumni magazine. Please tell us about Albion stories you’d like to read or topics you’d find interesting. Feel free to contact me with your comments or suggestions: Sarah Briggs, Editor Io Triumphe Albion College 611 E. Porter St. Albion, MI 49224 E-mail: sbriggs@albion.edu And keep sending us your news for class notes too! Information on job changes, honors, community involvement, marriages, births and deaths may be sent at any time to: classnotes@albion.edu or to the mailing address above. We’d love to hear from you.

—Sarah Briggs

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The view from Stockholm Jörgen, ’93, and Debby Porter Elovsson, ’95, reflect on what it means to be global citizens today. Debby Porter Elovsson: The expatriate life Since graduating from Albion, Debby Elovsson has pursued a career in marketing communications. She worked for the telecommunications giant, Ericsson, for four years, and recently has become a managing editor/consultant for CitatJournalist-gruppen, a communications firm serving many international clients. She currently oversees a team of seven writers providing news and information for a global corporate intranet news channel.

Language: The key to culture My Albion education gave me writing skills that helped me become a strong writer and editor today. It also helped me develop sophisticated analytical and research skills. This ability to size up my circumstances and adapt quickly has come in handy just about every time I’ve changed jobs or moved. I’ve always been fascinated by language, so studying French, German and Spanish at Albion came very naturally to me. Apart from giving me tools I needed to learn Swedish fast, these courses put in perspective language’s role in a culture, which is invaluable. Learn language and you have the key to culture.

Standing out and fitting in My experiences at Albion and since my graduation have helped me form more than one view of the world to guide me, and so I truly feel like a global citizen. Recently, I even became a Swedish citizen (dual citizenship), which seemed like an obvious step, since I have started to feel as much Swedish as I feel American. Still to a certain extent, I don’t fit in anywhere except the world in general. Some of my friends feel the same way. Over time, I fit in better and better in Sweden, but I fit in best in Stockholm, which is an international city that’s big but not too big. I believe this more now than ever since we left Stockholm a couple of years ago to live in a small town up north. It took less than a year to realize that I didn’t belong there. So we moved back to Stockholm and have a newfound love for this city of islands with the cleanest air of any city in the world. The many sidewalks and bikeways connecting all parts of the city mean we can also walk or ride our bikes almost everywhere.

On writing for a living My career as a writer and editor is a dream come true. The work is varied—coordinating article ideas, editing and writing articles, planning publication, and finding ways to improve newsflow. I work with a

great team of writers, so there’s a lot of creativity flowing even if the article ideas are not always that exciting. The fun part is trying to make an uninteresting article idea into something appealing and readable. The challenge with writing telecom-related articles for an international company’s intranet that reaches nearly 50,000 employees worldwide is to make the articles appealing while striving to write in an American English style that is easy to understand for people from extremely varied cultural backgrounds. Most employees are not native speakers of English, so our job is to make sure that what we write is not filled with jargon and clichés mostly familiar to a native speaker. Sometimes this goal makes writing something that is also creative, clever and interesting very difficult, especially when the subject matter may not always be the sexiest to begin with.

Adapting to a different corporate climate I find that the biggest differences between U.S. and Swedish firms in general can be summed up by the words consensus, fika and mandatory social benefits. The latter is a positive difference, including maternity and paternity leave: you have the legal right to fully paid full-time leave (sharing 18 months between both parents). The employer also must guarantee you a job, the same or similar to your current position, once you return from leave. Consensus is a major difference, and a frustrating one for me. This is the idea that everyone should have their say before a decision is made and that the decision is a group one, if a decision is made at all. One side effect of consensus and the Swedish concept of equality is that many people don’t work too hard, because it’s accepted that hard work does not necessarily equal higher pay or better benefits. Fika is a Swedish institution at the workplace. Swedish for coffee break, fika takes place twice a day, morning and afternoon, in many places. This involves socializing with colleagues, usually over coffee with some type of sweet pastry or sandwich, and it reflects the more relaxed work environment in Sweden.

In search of equal opportunity A similarity between U.S. and Swedish companies is a common commitment to equal opportunity for all, but this is even stronger here in Sweden in most respects—except when it comes to women climbing

the management ladder. Not long ago, a debate highlighted that there are more women in top management positions in the U.S. than in Sweden. The UN Development Programme’s Human Development Report 2004 showed that the number of female administrators and managers as a percentage of total population was 30.5 percent for Sweden compared to 45.9 percent in the U.S.

Finding the balance The balance between work and leisure among Swedes is very different from what you find in America. Working hard and burning the midnight oil will not get you promoted or earn you more money in Sweden, so work does not dominate life here as it often does in the States. But Swedes do enjoy learning new things, such as going to an art or language class outside of work. Some of the more popular leisure activities among Swedes are berry- or mushroom-picking and renovating their homes or summer cottages. Every time we go to a home store, it’s a nightmare trying to find parking.

Staying connected with home My recipe for living far away from family and friends is reliance on technology—a lot of e-mail and phone calls. Now that I have a digital camera, I just e-mail the latest photo. It’s easier for me than it is for my family. That said, however, my husband Jörgen is my closest family and my best friend. His family also treats me as one of their own. And I have made many great friends here in Stockholm.

Jörgen Elovsson: Navigating in a multicultural world A member of the Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Professional Management while a student at Albion, native Swede Jörgen Elovsson went on to earn an international master’s in business studies from the University of South Carolina in 1998. After working in financial management for Ericsson earlier in his career, he now runs his own management consulting firm in Stockholm.

“Made in Sweden” I finished high school in Sweden in June 1988, and decided to spend a year in the U.S. before my (mandatory) military service was to begin. As an above-average table tennis player in Sweden— the

SUMMER 2005

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PHOTO COURTESY OF D. ELOVSSON

The workplace and the place of work

Jörgen and Debby Porter Elovsson look forward to the arrival of their first child this summer. Sweden’s liberal maternity and paternity leave policies (including18 months of paid leave between both parents) is one of many benefits they appreciate in the Swedish workplace. world’s number 1 table tennis nation at the time—I was able to find and stay with a host family in Denver, thanks to publishing an advertisement in the American table tennis magazine with the headline “Made in Sweden.” I enjoyed being a big fish in the small ping pong community and traveled extensively throughout the continental U.S. during my first six months. Learning English starting at the age of nine proved to be an asset when I came to the U.S. Watching American movies, hardly ever dubbed on Swedish TV, also helped me pick up some colloquialisms and other native expressions. However, I learned British English in school and was not quite as prepared as I thought before my first arrival. I remember arriving at Kennedy Airport in New York City needing to use the restroom. Not familiar with the term “restroom” at the time, I made my way to that area of the airport anyway, concerned I would disturb the people who might be “resting” there. Much to my joyful relief, the “rest room” turned out to be the right place. You could say I still learned a lot by doing even though I may have had the initial communication skills in place.

To Germany via Albion While at Albion I participated in an off-campus program in Hamburg, Germany. It felt somewhat ironic that a Swede would go to America to improve his German language skills! Living in Germany in 1991 proved to be very exciting since we could observe firsthand the early stages of the reunification process. The discernable differences between western and eastern Germany were simply mind-boggling and made quite an impression on us. Our frequent student discussions at Albion on Old and New World differences paled in comparison.

Bridging the culture gap In my work, I have been able to combine my education in finance and my personal interest in information technology. These skills have provided me several opportunities to successfully implement complex systems within a finance context. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act [U.S. legislation passed in June 2002 to ensure corporate financial information is complete and correct] has kept me very busy during the past year. The act requires all companies listed on the New York stock exchanges to document and implement stringent internal control systems with even greater demands being placed on CEOs and finance directors. Having some understanding of the American corporate culture and the Swedish workplace, I have been able to bridge both the corporate and the cultural gap involved in implementing these changes. This type of work is very rewarding as it usually entails, in my opinion, the best of both corporate worlds: American decisiveness and drive coupled with Swedish concern for employees. Working at Ericsson put me in touch with people from many parts of the world and allowed me to travel to some 20 different countries. The cultural differences seemed very small and insignificant at first. However, as soon as discussions started on which activities to undertake and assigning responsibilities and deadlines, things changed dramatically. Perception of time and responsibility varies greatly from one country to the next, and, at the risk of cementing stereotypes, the pattern becomes more noticeable as you go south.

In terms of employee benefits, the most noticeable difference between working in Sweden—or most of Europe for that matter—compared to the U.S. is vacation time. By law everyone has five weeks of paid vacation in Sweden. If you opt out of overtime pay, you may get an extra week of vacation for a total of six weeks. Universal health care is provided at minimal cost to consumers. Income taxes, however, are considerably higher here. There are obviously pros and cons with either system. Not surprisingly, work has a different priority in the overall scheme of things. In the European workplace, your person is not necessarily defined by your business title or what you do. In my experience, titles are much more important in the States than in Europe. This is also reflected in everyday life where the family normally is prioritized over work.

Time out Last summer (July 2004), Debby and I decided to spend our vacation taking a road trip to Denmark and Germany. In addition to getting a chance to polish my rusty German, I was able to show Debby the city of Hamburg. Europe is our oyster, and although we may not travel as extensively as we could, just knowing the opportunity is there is great. During the summer of 2002 we drove to northern Norway and took the ferry boat to the island of Vaeroy (Værøy), one of the Norwegian Lofoten islands, where we hiked in the low mountains overlooking the body of water infamous for the maelstrom. Just crossing the border into Norway, which is only a 4-5 hour drive from Stockholm and has many similarities to Sweden, you still feel and see immediate differences evident in the architecture, language, food, roads and more. Norway also boasts the highest price levels in Scandinavia.

Words of advice If I were to offer any advice to American students preparing for careers in international business today, it would have to be: practice humility. When you finish school, you may think you have all the answers, with the degree and possibly attitude to back it up. Surely, it is important to believe in yourself and your skills, but you also need to recognize the experience of others and consider the ever-increasing complexity of the world we live in. Be humble. There is usually more than what meets the eye, and I have certainly had my fair share of humble pie since leaving Albion. A career in international business today inevitably involves traveling and interacting with people from other cultures and backgrounds. Although the international corporate language is English, I would strongly recommend learning a second, and possibly a third, language in order to better understand other cultures and nations. It is not necessary to speak another language perfectly, but making the effort will enable you to see things in a different light and appreciate that there are more ways than one of doing things.

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At home . . . abroad From his adopted home in Logroño, Spain, Tom Perry, ’69, has built worldwide business connections. By Sarah Briggs

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FOTO PAYA PHOTO

district, who themselves may not agree on the issues. “It’s very hard, in general, to get Spaniards to agree about anything,” Perry says with a smile. That’s when he steps in to help the wineries find common ground and identify strategies that are beneficial to the group as a whole. Americans learn from an early age to work together in groups, he says. “Spaniards are a lot more individualistic. To get them to work as a team . . . is sometimes more of a challenge than it would be in the United States. There’s just not this tradition of team-playing.” Being an American, and seen as an outsider who doesn’t have a vested interest in one group or viewpoint, also confers an advantage that a Spaniard wouldn’t have, he says. “The people I work with tend to be willing to listen to me because of my international experience.” Perry says that having a broad liberal arts education has also been an asset. “The good thing about Albion is that you have to take college-level courses in a lot of different subjects. I was particularly pleased with the way I was taught to write and speak effectively. That has certainly helped me in my career.” Not surprisingly, Tom and his wife, Marian, a native of Zaragoza, Spain, were determined from the beginning that their children, John and Martha, would be bilingual and would possess a decidedly global outlook on life. During the children’s preschool years, Tom typically spoke English at home, while Marian spoke Spanish to ensure that the children became proficient in both languages. That proficiency has proven advantageous, as John has since gone on to a career in international journalism in

basically sold everything I had— my ice skates, my oboe, my car— and bought a one-way ticket to Europe,” says Tom Perry,

recalling the leap of faith he made after finishing graduate school in the summer of 1971. Determined to pursue a career in international business, he never looked back. Today, Perry’s business travel regularly takes him from his home office in Logroño, Spain, across Europe and around the world, and, on any given day, you might find him conversing on the telephone not only in Spanish but in French, German or Swedish. After a short stint on the staff of the U.S. Cultural Center in Madrid following his arrival in Spain, Perry entered the wine-producing industry, and for the past 11 years has served as managing director of the Rioja Wine Exporters Association, which represents Spain’s best-known wine district. Some 500 wineries operate in the district, with about 100 of those exporting their distinctive red wines outside of Spain. Perry is the association’s chief spokesperson and advocate, working to gain increased recognition for Rioja wines among journalists and connoisseurs and to open up new markets throughout the world. While Europe accounts for most of their sales volume, Perry is also intent on expanding the reach of Rioja wines into the U.S. and elsewhere. When he started out in the wine business 30 years ago, he notes, very little Spanish wine was marketed outside of Europe, and competition came chiefly from French and Italian vintners. Today, the Spaniards are just as likely to compete with winemakers from South Africa, Chile, Australia and the U.S. “It’s a challenging job,” he notes. “No two days are ever the same. It’s really a lot of fun dealing with a wine district that is well known and seeing how your efforts are making the district more visible to the trade and to consumers.” Dealing with the regional, national and European Union lawmakers who develop legislation regulating the wine industry is one of the more demanding parts of his job. And Perry often must serve as mediator between the legislators and the wine producers within the

Madrid, and Martha frequently travels abroad for her job with the International Union of Health Promotion and Education in Paris. Tom, John and Martha have dual citizenship. Over the past 30 years, political tensions have In the past year, Tom Perry’s role as left their mark managing director of the Rioja Wine on Spain, and Exporters Association, representing on occasion Spain’s best-known wine district, has those tensions taken him throughout Europe as well have led to as to the U.S., Singapore and violent acts Australia. the Perrys have experienced firsthand. While Tom was working there in the 1970s, the U.S. Cultural Center was bombed by GRAPO, an anti-American extremist group. In 1997 Basque separatists firebombed the Perrys’ car as it sat parked on a street in San Sebastian, and in 2002 they bombed an apartment/ office building across the street from Tom’s office in Logroño. The 2004 train bombings by Islamic terrorists in Madrid left the Perrys shaken as well. “We’ve had to learn to deal with terrorism,” Tom admits. At the same time, he says, D. ACEVEDO PHOTO Spaniards believe the government security forces have effectively diminished the violence over the past year. The prevalent attitude, he says, is that “we have to get on with our lives.” From their home in Logroño, located near the southwestern Pyrenees, Tom and his family escape for weekends spent on the beach in San Sebastian or hiking in the mountains. “It’s a beautiful country,” Tom says of his adopted home. “I’ve lived there for 34 years and have no intentions of leaving.” The Rioja wine district in northern Spain now attracts some 626,000 visitors annually, more than twice the number who visited 20 years ago.

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SUMMER 2005

The view from Stockholm Jörgen, ’93, and Debby Porter Elovsson, ’95, reflect on what it means to be global citizens today. Debby Porter Elovsson: The expatriate life Since graduating from Albion, Debby Elovsson has pursued a career in marketing communications. She worked for the telecommunications giant, Ericsson, for four years, and recently has become a managing editor/consultant for CitatJournalist-gruppen, a communications firm serving many international clients. She currently oversees a team of seven writers providing news and information for a global corporate intranet news channel.

Language: The key to culture My Albion education gave me writing skills that helped me become a strong writer and editor today. It also helped me develop sophisticated analytical and research skills. This ability to size up my circumstances and adapt quickly has come in handy just about every time I’ve changed jobs or moved. I’ve always been fascinated by language, so studying French, German and Spanish at Albion came very naturally to me. Apart from giving me tools I needed to learn Swedish fast, these courses put in perspective language’s role in a culture, which is invaluable. Learn language and you have the key to culture.

Standing out and fitting in My experiences at Albion and since my graduation have helped me form more than one view of the world to guide me, and so I truly feel like a global citizen. Recently, I even became a Swedish citizen (dual citizenship), which seemed like an obvious step, since I have started to feel as much Swedish as I feel American. Still to a certain extent, I don’t fit in anywhere except the world in general. Some of my friends feel the same way. Over time, I fit in better and better in Sweden, but I fit in best in Stockholm, which is an international city that’s big but not too big. I believe this more now than ever since we left Stockholm a couple of years ago to live in a small town up north. It took less than a year to realize that I didn’t belong there. So we moved back to Stockholm and have a newfound love for this city of islands with the cleanest air of any city in the world. The many sidewalks and bikeways connecting all parts of the city mean we can also walk or ride our bikes almost everywhere.

On writing for a living My career as a writer and editor is a dream come true. The work is varied—coordinating article ideas, editing and writing articles, planning publication, and finding ways to improve newsflow. I work with a

great team of writers, so there’s a lot of creativity flowing even if the article ideas are not always that exciting. The fun part is trying to make an uninteresting article idea into something appealing and readable. The challenge with writing telecom-related articles for an international company’s intranet that reaches nearly 50,000 employees worldwide is to make the articles appealing while striving to write in an American English style that is easy to understand for people from extremely varied cultural backgrounds. Most employees are not native speakers of English, so our job is to make sure that what we write is not filled with jargon and clichés mostly familiar to a native speaker. Sometimes this goal makes writing something that is also creative, clever and interesting very difficult, especially when the subject matter may not always be the sexiest to begin with.

Adapting to a different corporate climate I find that the biggest differences between U.S. and Swedish firms in general can be summed up by the words consensus, fika and mandatory social benefits. The latter is a positive difference, including maternity and paternity leave: you have the legal right to fully paid full-time leave (sharing 18 months between both parents). The employer also must guarantee you a job, the same or similar to your current position, once you return from leave. Consensus is a major difference, and a frustrating one for me. This is the idea that everyone should have their say before a decision is made and that the decision is a group one, if a decision is made at all. One side effect of consensus and the Swedish concept of equality is that many people don’t work too hard, because it’s accepted that hard work does not necessarily equal higher pay or better benefits. Fika is a Swedish institution at the workplace. Swedish for coffee break, fika takes place twice a day, morning and afternoon, in many places. This involves socializing with colleagues, usually over coffee with some type of sweet pastry or sandwich, and it reflects the more relaxed work environment in Sweden.

In search of equal opportunity A similarity between U.S. and Swedish companies is a common commitment to equal opportunity for all, but this is even stronger here in Sweden in most respects—except when it comes to women climbing

the management ladder. Not long ago, a debate highlighted that there are more women in top management positions in the U.S. than in Sweden. The UN Development Programme’s Human Development Report 2004 showed that the number of female administrators and managers as a percentage of total population was 30.5 percent for Sweden compared to 45.9 percent in the U.S.

Finding the balance The balance between work and leisure among Swedes is very different from what you find in America. Working hard and burning the midnight oil will not get you promoted or earn you more money in Sweden, so work does not dominate life here as it often does in the States. But Swedes do enjoy learning new things, such as going to an art or language class outside of work. Some of the more popular leisure activities among Swedes are berry- or mushroom-picking and renovating their homes or summer cottages. Every time we go to a home store, it’s a nightmare trying to find parking.

Staying connected with home My recipe for living far away from family and friends is reliance on technology—a lot of e-mail and phone calls. Now that I have a digital camera, I just e-mail the latest photo. It’s easier for me than it is for my family. That said, however, my husband Jörgen is my closest family and my best friend. His family also treats me as one of their own. And I have made many great friends here in Stockholm.

Jörgen Elovsson: Navigating in a multicultural world A member of the Carl A. Gerstacker Institute for Professional Management while a student at Albion, native Swede Jörgen Elovsson went on to earn an international master’s in business studies from the University of South Carolina in 1998. After working in financial management for Ericsson earlier in his career, he now runs his own management consulting firm in Stockholm.

“Made in Sweden” I finished high school in Sweden in June 1988, and decided to spend a year in the U.S. before my (mandatory) military service was to begin. As an above-average table tennis player in Sweden— the

SUMMER 2005

I O

T R I U M P H E

5

PHOTO COURTESY OF D. ELOVSSON

The workplace and the place of work

Jörgen and Debby Porter Elovsson look forward to the arrival of their first child this summer. Sweden’s liberal maternity and paternity leave policies (including18 months of paid leave between both parents) is one of many benefits they appreciate in the Swedish workplace. world’s number 1 table tennis nation at the time—I was able to find and stay with a host family in Denver, thanks to publishing an advertisement in the American table tennis magazine with the headline “Made in Sweden.” I enjoyed being a big fish in the small ping pong community and traveled extensively throughout the continental U.S. during my first six months. Learning English starting at the age of nine proved to be an asset when I came to the U.S. Watching American movies, hardly ever dubbed on Swedish TV, also helped me pick up some colloquialisms and other native expressions. However, I learned British English in school and was not quite as prepared as I thought before my first arrival. I remember arriving at Kennedy Airport in New York City needing to use the restroom. Not familiar with the term “restroom” at the time, I made my way to that area of the airport anyway, concerned I would disturb the people who might be “resting” there. Much to my joyful relief, the “rest room” turned out to be the right place. You could say I still learned a lot by doing even though I may have had the initial communication skills in place.

To Germany via Albion While at Albion I participated in an off-campus program in Hamburg, Germany. It felt somewhat ironic that a Swede would go to America to improve his German language skills! Living in Germany in 1991 proved to be very exciting since we could observe firsthand the early stages of the reunification process. The discernable differences between western and eastern Germany were simply mind-boggling and made quite an impression on us. Our frequent student discussions at Albion on Old and New World differences paled in comparison.

Bridging the culture gap In my work, I have been able to combine my education in finance and my personal interest in information technology. These skills have provided me several opportunities to successfully implement complex systems within a finance context. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act [U.S. legislation passed in June 2002 to ensure corporate financial information is complete and correct] has kept me very busy during the past year. The act requires all companies listed on the New York stock exchanges to document and implement stringent internal control systems with even greater demands being placed on CEOs and finance directors. Having some understanding of the American corporate culture and the Swedish workplace, I have been able to bridge both the corporate and the cultural gap involved in implementing these changes. This type of work is very rewarding as it usually entails, in my opinion, the best of both corporate worlds: American decisiveness and drive coupled with Swedish concern for employees. Working at Ericsson put me in touch with people from many parts of the world and allowed me to travel to some 20 different countries. The cultural differences seemed very small and insignificant at first. However, as soon as discussions started on which activities to undertake and assigning responsibilities and deadlines, things changed dramatically. Perception of time and responsibility varies greatly from one country to the next, and, at the risk of cementing stereotypes, the pattern becomes more noticeable as you go south.

In terms of employee benefits, the most noticeable difference between working in Sweden—or most of Europe for that matter—compared to the U.S. is vacation time. By law everyone has five weeks of paid vacation in Sweden. If you opt out of overtime pay, you may get an extra week of vacation for a total of six weeks. Universal health care is provided at minimal cost to consumers. Income taxes, however, are considerably higher here. There are obviously pros and cons with either system. Not surprisingly, work has a different priority in the overall scheme of things. In the European workplace, your person is not necessarily defined by your business title or what you do. In my experience, titles are much more important in the States than in Europe. This is also reflected in everyday life where the family normally is prioritized over work.

Time out Last summer (July 2004), Debby and I decided to spend our vacation taking a road trip to Denmark and Germany. In addition to getting a chance to polish my rusty German, I was able to show Debby the city of Hamburg. Europe is our oyster, and although we may not travel as extensively as we could, just knowing the opportunity is there is great. During the summer of 2002 we drove to northern Norway and took the ferry boat to the island of Vaeroy (Værøy), one of the Norwegian Lofoten islands, where we hiked in the low mountains overlooking the body of water infamous for the maelstrom. Just crossing the border into Norway, which is only a 4-5 hour drive from Stockholm and has many similarities to Sweden, you still feel and see immediate differences evident in the architecture, language, food, roads and more. Norway also boasts the highest price levels in Scandinavia.

Words of advice If I were to offer any advice to American students preparing for careers in international business today, it would have to be: practice humility. When you finish school, you may think you have all the answers, with the degree and possibly attitude to back it up. Surely, it is important to believe in yourself and your skills, but you also need to recognize the experience of others and consider the ever-increasing complexity of the world we live in. Be humble. There is usually more than what meets the eye, and I have certainly had my fair share of humble pie since leaving Albion. A career in international business today inevitably involves traveling and interacting with people from other cultures and backgrounds. Although the international corporate language is English, I would strongly recommend learning a second, and possibly a third, language in order to better understand other cultures and nations. It is not necessary to speak another language perfectly, but making the effort will enable you to see things in a different light and appreciate that there are more ways than one of doing things.

6

I O

T R I U M P H E

SUMMER 2005

At home . . . abroad From his adopted home in Logroño, Spain, Tom Perry, ’69, has built worldwide business connections. By Sarah Briggs

I

FOTO PAYA PHOTO

district, who themselves may not agree on the issues. “It’s very hard, in general, to get Spaniards to agree about anything,” Perry says with a smile. That’s when he steps in to help the wineries find common ground and identify strategies that are beneficial to the group as a whole. Americans learn from an early age to work together in groups, he says. “Spaniards are a lot more individualistic. To get them to work as a team . . . is sometimes more of a challenge than it would be in the United States. There’s just not this tradition of team-playing.” Being an American, and seen as an outsider who doesn’t have a vested interest in one group or viewpoint, also confers an advantage that a Spaniard wouldn’t have, he says. “The people I work with tend to be willing to listen to me because of my international experience.” Perry says that having a broad liberal arts education has also been an asset. “The good thing about Albion is that you have to take college-level courses in a lot of different subjects. I was particularly pleased with the way I was taught to write and speak effectively. That has certainly helped me in my career.” Not surprisingly, Tom and his wife, Marian, a native of Zaragoza, Spain, were determined from the beginning that their children, John and Martha, would be bilingual and would possess a decidedly global outlook on life. During the children’s preschool years, Tom typically spoke English at home, while Marian spoke Spanish to ensure that the children became proficient in both languages. That proficiency has proven advantageous, as John has since gone on to a career in international journalism in

basically sold everything I had— my ice skates, my oboe, my car— and bought a one-way ticket to Europe,” says Tom Perry,

recalling the leap of faith he made after finishing graduate school in the summer of 1971. Determined to pursue a career in international business, he never looked back. Today, Perry’s business travel regularly takes him from his home office in Logroño, Spain, across Europe and around the world, and, on any given day, you might find him conversing on the telephone not only in Spanish but in French, German or Swedish. After a short stint on the staff of the U.S. Cultural Center in Madrid following his arrival in Spain, Perry entered the wine-producing industry, and for the past 11 years has served as managing director of the Rioja Wine Exporters Association, which represents Spain’s best-known wine district. Some 500 wineries operate in the district, with about 100 of those exporting their distinctive red wines outside of Spain. Perry is the association’s chief spokesperson and advocate, working to gain increased recognition for Rioja wines among journalists and connoisseurs and to open up new markets throughout the world. While Europe accounts for most of their sales volume, Perry is also intent on expanding the reach of Rioja wines into the U.S. and elsewhere. When he started out in the wine business 30 years ago, he notes, very little Spanish wine was marketed outside of Europe, and competition came chiefly from French and Italian vintners. Today, the Spaniards are just as likely to compete with winemakers from South Africa, Chile, Australia and the U.S. “It’s a challenging job,” he notes. “No two days are ever the same. It’s really a lot of fun dealing with a wine district that is well known and seeing how your efforts are making the district more visible to the trade and to consumers.” Dealing with the regional, national and European Union lawmakers who develop legislation regulating the wine industry is one of the more demanding parts of his job. And Perry often must serve as mediator between the legislators and the wine producers within the

Madrid, and Martha frequently travels abroad for her job with the International Union of Health Promotion and Education in Paris. Tom, John and Martha have dual citizenship. Over the past 30 years, political tensions have In the past year, Tom Perry’s role as left their mark managing director of the Rioja Wine on Spain, and Exporters Association, representing on occasion Spain’s best-known wine district, has those tensions taken him throughout Europe as well have led to as to the U.S., Singapore and violent acts Australia. the Perrys have experienced firsthand. While Tom was working there in the 1970s, the U.S. Cultural Center was bombed by GRAPO, an anti-American extremist group. In 1997 Basque separatists firebombed the Perrys’ car as it sat parked on a street in San Sebastian, and in 2002 they bombed an apartment/ office building across the street from Tom’s office in Logroño. The 2004 train bombings by Islamic terrorists in Madrid left the Perrys shaken as well. “We’ve had to learn to deal with terrorism,” Tom admits. At the same time, he says, D. ACEVEDO PHOTO Spaniards believe the government security forces have effectively diminished the violence over the past year. The prevalent attitude, he says, is that “we have to get on with our lives.” From their home in Logroño, located near the southwestern Pyrenees, Tom and his family escape for weekends spent on the beach in San Sebastian or hiking in the mountains. “It’s a beautiful country,” Tom says of his adopted home. “I’ve lived there for 34 years and have no intentions of leaving.” The Rioja wine district in northern Spain now attracts some 626,000 visitors annually, more than twice the number who visited 20 years ago.

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‘Becoming the person I wanted to be’ How their Albion experience has changed members of the Class of 2005 By Jake Weber Just before their graduation in May, Io Triumphe asked these seniors for their parting thoughts about their years at Albion and what lies ahead.

Mike Kopec Next move Mike Kopec has been awarded a full tuition scholarship at Wayne State University School of Medicine, and eventually hopes to practice family medicine or pediatrics. “I really like the idea of having sustained contact with patients,” says Kopec. “What interests me in medicine is the physicianpatient relationship.”

What he leaves at Albion Kopec was one of the Biology Department’s hardest-working students, J. JONES PHOTO both in and out of the classroom. He served as a tutor and teaching assistant, and spent two years assisting professor Dean McCurdy with his research on marine invertebrates. At the request of the department, Kopec met regularly with prospective students and parents, as well as College trustees, to talk about his research and extracurricular experiences. Kopec was also one of the coordinators of the Albion College Habitat for Humanity (ACHH) chapter for the past three years. “It was really fulfilling to me to see what we accomplished,” says Kopec of ACHH, which with his leadership, completed a home during 2004 and will complete homes in 2005 and 2006. “When I come back to Homecoming, I can always bring my family by and say, “Hey, I built that house.”

What he takes with him “I volunteered in high school a little bit, but at Albion I got involved in service organizations and that really got me going on the whole ‘service thing.’ My experience here really convinced me that I want to spend my life serving people. Albion has allowed me to become the person I wanted to become.”

Hometown Grand Blanc (Burton), Mich. Academic focus Major: Biology (departmental honors). Minor: History.

Albion highlights Activities: SOAR leader, resident assistant, Concert Choir, Union Board, Alpha Phi Omega, Student Volunteer Bureau. Community involvement: Greater Albion Habitat for

Humanity executive board, Albion College/Community Connection, Eucharist minister for Albion’s St. John Catholic Church, youth soccer coach, four-year nursing home volunteer. Honors: Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, five academic awards in biology, three Albion College leadership awards.

Kris Jelinek Next stop, Netherlands Kris Jelinek was chosen by Rotary International’s District 6290 as a M. GREEN PHOTO 2005 Rotary Ambassador, which will fund her master’s program in migration and ethnic studies at the International School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Amsterdam. Jelinek spent a semester in Mexico as part of an offcampus border studies program; her departmental honors thesis looked at educational issues for Mexican-American migrant children in Michigan. “I’m interested in doing more cross-cultural exploration,” says Jelinek of the Amsterdam program. “I’ve studied the U.S. border, and I’m interested in looking at parallels and differences with border issues in Europe.”

On service and leadership “Being involved in service is important to me for a number of reasons— giving back to the community, trying to be a positive contributor to society, attempting to build bridges,” Jelinek explains. “I see service as something very positive both for myself and for others. I have probably learned more from the people that I’ve worked with than I’ve actually ‘given.’” In recognition of her volunteer efforts, Michigan Campus Compact chose Jelinek this spring, from a pool of several hundred nominees across the state, to receive a Commitment to Service Award. “I was really honored because I think there are so many students who do important service work and make an impact on the campus and community,” explains Jelinek. “At the awards ceremony, it was inspirational to see all the work that people are doing, how important service is on campuses throughout the state.”

Hometown Suttons Bay, Mich. Academic focus Major: Anthropology/sociology (departmental honors). Minor: Spanish. Concentrations: Gerald R. Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service; human services.

Albion highlights Leadership positions: Alpha Xi Delta, Student Volunteer Bureau, Student Senate, Panhellenic Council, Wayfarer’s International Group for Service and Power (feminist organization). Albion-related travel: Philadelphia, Buffalo, N.Y.,

Washington, D.C., Memphis, Chicago, Costa Rica (twice), Bolivia, Mexico. Honors: two President Bernard T. Lomas Project 250 Awards (for contributions to campus life), Alpha Lambda Delta, Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, Lux Fiat Award.

Iain Charnley Serving the underserved Iain Charnley will enter Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in the fall, with the goal of returning to western Michigan to practice. Nonetheless, he also plans “to develop connections with international organizations to serve those in need of medical care, as well as be active in the community clinics around Chicago that are working to address the disparity in minority health.” Community impact Charnley was so active during his Albion College career that, as a junior, he J. JONES PHOTO received Michigan Campus Compact’s Outstanding Community Impact award, the organization’s highest, given to a handful of Michigan’s college students each year. Among many noteworthy activities, Charnley helped recruit and organize several hundred college students for Albion’s Victory Park Playground Build and Habitat for Humanity’s 2004 house, met weekly with elementary school students for tutoring and enrichment programs, and was an early leader in the Multi-Faith Council on campus. The Christian annex legacy Charnley spent much of his college career working with the administration to found the College’s first Christian annex for men, then building the house’s reputation as a fun place open to all students. One important lesson: “I realized that to make sure it had genuine support I had to change my personal goals in order to make things happen,” Charnley reflects. “There are times when, in order to see a project through, you need to make some compromises and also find good people to replace you. The house and guys within it have been essential to my spiritual growth, and it’s nice to think that will continue for others.” On balance “Whether through intramural soccer, the Concert Choir, Wednesday Night Chapel, or Habitat for Humanity, I’ve learned that fulfillment comes through achieving and maintaining balance,” says Charnley. “Albion also allowed me to remain

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close and connected to my family, and I credit their support for anything I’ve been able to accomplish here.”

Hometown Augusta, Mich. Academic focus Major: Biology. Minor: History. Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute.

Albion highlights Leadership positions: Alpha Phi Omega, Student Volunteer Bureau, Service Project Appalachia, Wesley Fellowship, Wednesday Night Chapel. Community involvement: nursing home volunteer, sixth-grade mentor, fifth-grade Project Alert, Albion Health and Wellness Team, Albion Interfaith Ministries board, United Way allocation panel, First United Methodist Church choir member, liturgist. Honors: Distinguished Albion Scholar, Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Lambda Delta, Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, Lux Fiat Award (contributions to campus life).

Laura Jordan Starting salary for her first job? Nothing. Laura Jordan has accepted a position with an indigALBIONIAN PHOTO enous-rights organization fighting for political and cultural autonomy in the Chiapas region of Mexico. “They don’t have money, but I’ll have a place to sleep, and food,” she smiles. With her Spanish and English skills, Jordan will help the group in communicating with the Mexican government, as well as share their issues with the wider world. Most of the people in this group don’t speak Spanish very well, Jordan says, noting that they generally use their indigenous tongues as their primary languages. “They just want the right to keep what they have,” she says. “The experiences this organization and these people offer—there’s so much I can learn from them . . . and I’m at the point in my life where I can afford to pursue this learning.”

Did Albion prepare her to do this job? Definitely, says Jordan, citing Peace Action, a group she helped found on campus in fall 2001. “It has played a role in my interest in social activism,” she explains. Jordan spent a summer in Mexico with former anthropology professor Liz Brumfiel, excavating a pre-Columbian community, and traveled to Honduras with the Organization for Latino/a Awareness.

Most unusual college experience While offcampus studying in India and Burma in the fall of 2003, Jordan took temporary ordination (a common practice among Burmese Buddhists) and spent three

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weeks as a Buddhist nun, following strictures to have a shaved head, wear robes, fast after noon and follow the code of discipline. “You don’t become ordained and suddenly become a different or more spiritual person,” says Jordan of the experience, “but there is something about the lifestyle that makes it easier to focus on spiritual issues.”

Thinking back over it all “Coming in to college, I never would have expected I would do so many neat things while I was here,” Jordan reflects. “Who guesses that they’re going to get to do those things? I feel really lucky that I’ve been at Albion.”

Hometown Flint, Mich. Academic focus Majors: Anthropology, Spanish. Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute.

Albion highlights Research: Student Research

Valuing others Groggel’s honors thesis was a qualitative report on Albion High School students and their vocational aspirations. Not only did he present his thesis results at two national conferences, he also spoke to the Albion Public Schools Board of Education and the Albion Youth Task Force, which used his findings in developing its 2005 Blueprint for Student Success. “I got to actually do something with my thesis, which was exciting,” says Groggel. “The whole experience got me thinking about doing research and becoming a professor—that’s a really theatrical job!” Hometown Grand Rapids, Mich. Academic focus Major: Psychology. Minor: Sociology. Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute. Offcampus study: National University College Cork (Ireland).

Partnership (philosophy). Activities: International Student Union; tutor/mentor, Washington Gardner Middle School. Honors: Distinguished Albion Scholar, Phi Beta Kappa, Jenkins Award (outstanding senior thesis), Notestein Award (outstanding scholarship in anthropology/sociology), Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, Lux Fiat Award (contributions to campus life).

Albion highlights Activities: Leadership roles, Albion College Players; WLBN-Radio; founding member, Collegiate Anti-Violence Educators. Community involvement: volunteer, Albion College’s Youth Initiative Program at Albion High School. Honors: four Theatre Department scholarships, Theta Alpha Phi (theatre honorary), Psi Chi (psychology honorary), Mortar Board.

Andrew Groggel

Ligia Paina

First job A veteran of eight Albion College theatre

D.C. or France? A native of Romania, Ligia

productions, including three lead roles, Andy Groggel is moving to San Jose, Calif., where he will work with a youth theatre program through City Year Corps, an affiliate of AmeriCorps.

Paina has been accepted to pursue an international D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

Why he loves theatre “Theatre teaches you a lot about [our] social life. Each character I play tells me something about a different type of person. . . . I think theatre’s fundamental to understanding other people.”

Valuing diversity As a resident assistant (RA), Groggel made sure diversity issues were discussed D. TRUMPIE PHOTO regularly on his hall. It wasn’t always easy; Groggel admits some of the students didn’t share his views. “Albion taught me the importance of diversity and having it be a part of your life,” says Groggel. “I hope that my work as an RA helped the people on my hall to learn that a little bit.”

health policy master’s degree at George Washington University, one of the few institutions in the U.S. to offer this program of study. It’s a prestigious placement, but, even so, she may defer for a year and teach English in France through a program organized by the French government. Says Paina, “It’s hard to decide, because both options will help me in my future plans.”

Romania to Albion and back: “I never thought of losing sight of Romania, and that had a lot to do with the support I got from Albion,” says Paina, who immigrated to Michigan at age 13. With a grant from Albion’s Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity, she carried out research on the status of Romania’s health care system since the institution of a democratic government there, and she eventually wrote her senior honors thesis on this topic. Paina notes that Albion College’s attorney, David Moore, ’68, and

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staff member Tom Hunsdorfer also assisted her in setting up a non-profit organization that has conducted two fund-raising events for a clinic in Detroit. She hopes this organization may eventually become an international player through collaborations with relief agencies in Romania and other developing countries. “It’s very important to me that I had the chance to start this project at Albion, and I hope to continue it in graduate school,” Paina says. “My professors and peers at Albion provided me with only support and encouragement, even for the most idealistic of my endeavors.”

Future plans Paina is looking forward to a career working with international organizations that provide health resources to developing countries. “One of the most memorable things I did at Albion was to go to Honduras with OLA [Organization of Latino/a Awareness],” Paina recalls. “I was inspired by the impact that our group had there in just a week. . . . I decided that I would like to pursue a career that will help me change the quality of life in developing nations.”

Hometown Dearborn Heights, Mich.

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Academic focus Major: International studies. Minor: Cell and molecular biology. Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute. Albion highlights Leadership positions: Resident assistant, International Student Union, Organization for Latino/a Awareness, Peace Action, Albionian. Honors: two President Bernard T. Lomas Project 250 Awards (for contributions to campus life), Alpha Lambda Delta, Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa.

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Commencement 2005 Commencement 2005 not only attracted a big crowd on the campus quadrangle, but drew listeners from as far away as India, Vietnam, Australia and Ecuador, and across the U.S., thanks to a live broadcast (video and audio) of the May 7 ceremony via the Internet. It was the first year Albion’s commencement has been broadcast online.

This year’s graduates head to jobs with such organizations as Comerica, Deloitte and Touche, Ernst & Young, Ford Motor Co., Office of Congressman Joe Schwarz, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Teach for America and the Peace Corps, and to graduate and professional schools including Brandeis University (social policy), College of William and Mary (psychology), University of Virginia (political science), Duke University (religious studies), University of Kentucky (biomedical science), Michigan State University (law), University of Illinois (mathematics) and University of Oregon (organic chemistry).

Matthew Walters (assisted by Beth Dodson and C.J. Fisher) had the honor of blowing the senior class horn, following a tradition reinstated by the Class of 2003.

Will Green (above right) represented the 364 members of the Class of 2005 as the senior speaker. Honored earlier this spring as a top senior by both the Mathematics and Physics Departments, Green also was the Briton swim team captain and 2005 league champion in the 200-yard freestyle.

Alexander Cutler, chief executive officer of Eaton Corp., gave the address and was also awarded an honorary doctorate from the College. He is married to new Albion trustee Sally Stark Cutler, ’75.

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staff member Tom Hunsdorfer also assisted her in setting up a non-profit organization that has conducted two fund-raising events for a clinic in Detroit. She hopes this organization may eventually become an international player through collaborations with relief agencies in Romania and other developing countries. “It’s very important to me that I had the chance to start this project at Albion, and I hope to continue it in graduate school,” Paina says. “My professors and peers at Albion provided me with only support and encouragement, even for the most idealistic of my endeavors.”

Future plans Paina is looking forward to a career working with international organizations that provide health resources to developing countries. “One of the most memorable things I did at Albion was to go to Honduras with OLA [Organization of Latino/a Awareness],” Paina recalls. “I was inspired by the impact that our group had there in just a week. . . . I decided that I would like to pursue a career that will help me change the quality of life in developing nations.”

Hometown Dearborn Heights, Mich.

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Academic focus Major: International studies. Minor: Cell and molecular biology. Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute. Albion highlights Leadership positions: Resident assistant, International Student Union, Organization for Latino/a Awareness, Peace Action, Albionian. Honors: two President Bernard T. Lomas Project 250 Awards (for contributions to campus life), Alpha Lambda Delta, Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa.

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Commencement 2005 Commencement 2005 not only attracted a big crowd on the campus quadrangle, but drew listeners from as far away as India, Vietnam, Australia and Ecuador, and across the U.S., thanks to a live broadcast (video and audio) of the May 7 ceremony via the Internet. It was the first year Albion’s commencement has been broadcast online.

This year’s graduates head to jobs with such organizations as Comerica, Deloitte and Touche, Ernst & Young, Ford Motor Co., Office of Congressman Joe Schwarz, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Teach for America and the Peace Corps, and to graduate and professional schools including Brandeis University (social policy), College of William and Mary (psychology), University of Virginia (political science), Duke University (religious studies), University of Kentucky (biomedical science), Michigan State University (law), University of Illinois (mathematics) and University of Oregon (organic chemistry).

Matthew Walters (assisted by Beth Dodson and C.J. Fisher) had the honor of blowing the senior class horn, following a tradition reinstated by the Class of 2003.

Will Green (above right) represented the 364 members of the Class of 2005 as the senior speaker. Honored earlier this spring as a top senior by both the Mathematics and Physics Departments, Green also was the Briton swim team captain and 2005 league champion in the 200-yard freestyle.

Alexander Cutler, chief executive officer of Eaton Corp., gave the address and was also awarded an honorary doctorate from the College. He is married to new Albion trustee Sally Stark Cutler, ’75.

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Campus says farewell to six The faculty members retiring from Albion this year have been known not only for their masterful teaching, but for their encouragement of student research and interdisciplinary study. The following profiles tell more about their professorial pursuits, as well as their future plans. All were honored with the designation professor emeritus at the College’s commencement in May.

Ralph Davis, philosophy Ralph Davis recently completed the eighth in a series of 10 paintings he’s calling “Worlds.” The canvasses, depicting spheres of the imagination suspended in the vastness of space, suggest not only this philosophy professor’s considerable talent as a painter, but the eclectic nature of his interests. Ever since he came to Albion as a National Endowment for the Humanities teaching fellow and joined the Basic Ideas program faculty, Davis has reached across diverse academic disciplines to find subject matter for his courses, as well as for his paintings. “I really liked the liberal arts model for education,” says Davis, citing one of the reasons his original two-year appointment on campus stretched to 38. He spent five years helping to develop the Basic Ideas program, which he eventually directed. The Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute, with its series of four interdisciplinary courses ranging across the arts and sciences, is an outgrowth of that program. Davis, a West Coast native who earned his Ph.D. at the University of Oregon, later directed the Honors Institute, and for the past year he served as the first Prentiss M. Brown Distinguished Honors Professor. Davis’s work as a professional artist also influenced how he taught his signature course on the philosophy of art. He says he designed the course with an “extremely practical” bent. “I wanted it to be valuable not only to art viewers, but also artists themselves.” This approach, he continues, “gives the students a great deal of insight into the process and standards that artists hold for themselves. I also have some insights into the commercial art world, and, no matter how idealistic you are, you can’t talk about modern art unless you talk about the commercial aspect, the role of galleries and critics and so on.” It’s a formula that attracted students from a broad range of majors over the years. “I always felt like he had more to say,” says art major Amy Weinmeister, ’05, explaining why she took four courses from Davis. Weinmeister noted that Davis’s perspectives as a scholar and an artist “gave me a holistic view of art and culture and history. I found his approach to be different than other ways I’d learned to view art. There are still things I think about from his classes.”

For his post-Albion career, Davis has already committed himself to teaching several more of the National Science Foundation’s Chautauqua short courses. However, most of his time will be devoted to his professional art career. “I don’t think you grow as an artist unless you produce a lot of [work], and you have deadlines, and get the kind of critical feedback that you don’t get on the amateur level,” explains Davis of his new career. He plans to market his paintings through galleries in New York and Chicago and on the West Coast, and this summer he returns to the Ann Arbor Art Fair, where he has exhibited for more than 25 years. —Jake Weber

Dennis Gaswick, chemistry Dennis Gaswick is probably best known on campus for his efforts to promote undergraduate research. But he also managed to land some impressive research opportunities for himself, including a year at Stanford with chemist Henry Taube, who would go on to win a Nobel Prize. Gaswick notes modestly that his research wasn’t part of the work that won Taube the Nobel, but he did publish his findings from that year in a nationally respected journal nonetheless. Over the course of his 36 years on Albion’s faculty, the inorganic chemist, whose primary interest was in metal complexes, also pursued his research at institutions ranging from Northwestern University to the Université de Neuchâtel in Switzerland. In 1988, Gaswick was one of the first Albion recipients of a Pew Science Grant, which allowed him to hire a student assistant for a summer research project on campus. That successful experience “really started our undergrad research here,” Gaswick reflects. On the basis of the progress made during that summer, he was able to obtain a Cottrell Science Grant from the Research Corporation that supported students for the next three summers. Gaswick has since mentored some 20 student researchers, most of whom have gone on to graduate degrees in chemistry. Funding for students in chemistry and the other science departments grew, and Gaswick became the coordinator for the summer undergraduate science research program that has evolved into the Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (FURSCA). Gaswick was the director of the first FURSCA summer program. “Dennis showed me the techniques and let me go to town,” says Heather Bullen, ’98, now a chemistry professor at Northern Kentucky University. “That summer research experience gave me confidence in myself as a chemist.” Bullen further remembers that Gaswick also taught her the value of not living in the lab. “We would work hard to set up experiments and then he would go play golf and tell me to go have fun,” she recalls. “Dennis taught me that to really enjoy what you do, you have to have balance. Following Dennis’ wisdom definitely helped me get through graduate school.”

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Gaswick, along with chemistry professors Jack Crump, Bob Dininny and Dan Steffenson, also ran an “experiment” on their students in the mid-1970s, in order to improve teaching and learning within the department. The then-popular pedagogical model for introductory chemistry emphasized a strict lesson timeline, “so students who did poorly during the first two weeks never had the chance to catch up,” Gaswick explains. The faculty team created a masterybased curriculum, for which they eventually wrote a textbook. The department continues to use this curriculum for firstyear students, and Gaswick credits it, in part, for the department’s enrollment growth. “You’ve got to get them hooked the first semester,” he says. “I’ve enjoyed the first-years, because they’re just getting started in the field. They’re interested . . . they work hard. And I have had good colleagues to take them through the next couple of years, until I could teach them as seniors again.” While he’ll miss teaching, Gaswick is looking forward to doing a few more lab experiments. But, he says, “Sunday afternoon, I’m just going to sit and watch golf and not grade notebooks.” —Jake Weber

Allen Horstman, history Legendary for his dry sense of humor Allen Horstman was serious when he reflected on what he will miss more than anything when he leaves Albion College: “The students, being in the classroom—no question.” But it was a circuitous route that brought this 28-year Albion veteran to the front of the classroom. The Indiana native received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Purdue in 1965. The unpleasant odors of the laboratories in which he worked prompted him to change course and earn a law degree from Harvard in 1968. Horstman returned to Indiana, where he soon grew tired of law and was dismayed by his discoveries regarding politicians. In a third career shift, he headed west to the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned his master’s and Ph.D. in history. He was hired by Albion upon graduating from Berkeley in 1977. “I have a paper I wrote my junior year of high school in English class,” Horstman recalled. “The assignment was, ‘If you could do anything in life, what would you do?’ My answer was ‘teach history.’ I’ve always wanted to do it—it just took me a while to get here.” Over the years Horstman has taught in the areas of British and early European history, in addition to constitutional law, Michigan history, ancient Greece, and the Honors seminar Great Issues in Social Science. He is also the author of a book, Victorian Divorce. While Horstman says serving as the College’s pre-law adviser for almost 20 years was also satisfying, he most treasures the classroom hours. “Whenever I close that classroom door and start teaching, I am having fun,” he says. “Those are my favorite times.”

Philosophy professor Ralph Davis, Horstman’s friend and longtime racquetball partner who also is retiring this year, praised Horstman’s encouragement of students to never stop learning. Davis also commented on his friend’s wry humor. “When we played racquetball he used to wear a t-shirt that said, ‘Sarcasm is just one of the many services I provide,’” Davis says. “I think that sums up his sense of humor pretty well. He is so dry it takes some students a long time to realize what’s happening.” Horstman will live full-time in Traverse City with his wife, Nancy Crocker Horstman, ’67, and devote more time to travel, golf, skiing, sailing and teaching continuing education courses in northern Michigan. “I just want to continue expanding my interests,” Horstman says of retirement. “So my life is going to be full.” —Morris Arvoy

Martin Ludington, ’64, physics Marty Ludington’s career spanned two watershed events in the history of Albion’s science program: the opening of the new science complex (Palenske and Putnam Halls and Norris Center) in 1969, the first year he began teaching, and the renovation and expansion of that complex as his final year on campus drew to a close. Over the intervening 36 years, his academic interests and passions both predicated and helped shape directions Albion would take in both teaching and undergraduate research. During Ludington’s first year on Albion’s faculty, he recalls, his department introduced Physics 102, Physics and Environmental Problems. “We started environmental studies long before there was such a thing as an environmental studies requirement,” says Ludington. His research in nuclear physics—he served for many years as an adjunct research scientist at the University of Michigan studying neutron activation analysis, production of anti-matter sources and high-accuracy calibration of gamma-ray detectors—was a significant influence on his interest in developing and teaching environmental courses. “Nuclear physics sort of leads you into environmental issues, because reactors are an environmental issue.” Stimulating students’ interest in science, regardless of their academic major, was always a priority with Ludington. And through his creatively designed first-year seminars, including one on the moral issues related to nuclear development called “A Tale of Two Cities: Chernobyl and Hiroshima,” he shared his curiosity about the “big questions” in science with his students. Ludington’s “quick wit and passion for physics ensured that there was never a dull moment in class,” recalls Josh Cassada, ’95. That’s not to say his classes were ever easy. “Marty challenged us in a way that made us achieve more than we thought we could,” says Zach Constan, ’95. “There are two ways you can go as a teacher: you can

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Hal Wyss, English

Ralph Davis

Dennis Gaswick

Allen Horstman

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Martin Ludington

Bruce Weaver spoon-feed students your material or really make them work for it. Marty definitely did the latter.” These qualities undoubtedly contributed to Ludington winning Teacher of the Year and Faculty Member of the Year honors during his Albion career. The opening in 2001 of Albion’s Dow Analytical Science Laboratory, with its array of sophisticated equipment including a gamma-ray spectrometer, helped Ludington advance his research agenda, and, just as importantly, involve his students in research projects that previously would have required trips to much larger research facilities off-campus. As an Albion graduate—and as the grandson, son, spouse, father, and, he hopes, future grandfather of Albion alumni—Ludington has more reasons than most to care about Albion’s future. The recent improvements in the science facilities have left him feeling optimistic. “The renovation and expansion of the science facilities at Albion represents a major investment in science teaching and research,” he says. “It will be a tremendous draw for future students and faculty.” Ludington will be able to keep tabs on the many changes happening on campus from his home in nearby Marshall, where he lives with his wife, Kathryn Fry Ludington, ’77. —Jake Weber

Bruce Weaver, speech communication Bruce Weaver launched his next career— as an environmental communication scholar—almost 20 years ago when he attended one of the country’s first conferences on this subject. On retiring from Albion after 24 years in the Speech Communication Department, he will now turn his occasional passion into a full-time pursuit. Weaver began his college teaching career as an expert in 18th-century British parliamentary rhetoric. However, the environmental movement that began in the 1960s—and the rhetoric of the ensuing environmental debates—caught his interest and eventually prompted a change in his research focus. He has also studied the communication related to the establishment of the national parks in the United States. Weaver credits Albion with giving him the opportunity to turn his fondness for nature into a full-fledged research area. “I was able to combine my love of the national parks, my love of hiking, my love of camping, and my love of rhetorical history all into one thing,” Weaver says. An Eagle Scout who as a youth spent nearly every summer weekend camping in his native Pennsylvania, Weaver says he is grateful for Albion faculty development grants that allowed him to do research at

Hal Wyss national parks across the country—leading to a rich research agenda. In the field of environmental communication, that research has paid off. “In the realm of rhetorical analysis of the environment, I’m one of the leaders in the country,” he says. Weaver currently serves on the editorial board of the Environmental Communication Yearbook and regularly presents his work at professional conferences. The environmental communication course he developed from his research has been a popular offering each spring for the past eight years. Early in his career, Weaver spent two years as a communication lecturer for the University of Maryland Overseas Division, teaching on U.S. military bases in Germany, Turkey and Belgium at the height of the Vietnam War. He earned his doctorate from the University of Michigan in 1974, and came to Albion in 1981 from the University of Wisconsin-Parkside. To Weaver’s friends, it’s clear that travel plays a huge role in his life. In retirement, he vows to add to the list of locales he has visited. In addition to the U.S. national parks, Weaver has trekked across the Peruvian Andes, journeyed on an African safari, toured Cuba’s aging streets, explored exotic landscapes of Cambodia, Vietnam, and Thailand, and traveled through most of Europe. Ironically, the one national park he has yet to visit is Michigan’s only one: Isle Royale National Park. It’s an omission he says he plans to remedy this summer. —Morris Arvoy

The longest-serving member of Albion’s English Department until his retirement this spring, Hal Wyss actually began his college teaching career at Ohio State University in the fall of 1962, shortly after he received his B.A. from Wesleyan University in Connecticut. Starting his master’s program in English at Ohio State, Wyss was a graduate assistant teaching English 101. In those days, Wyss recalls, grad assistants had full responsibilities over the courses they taught. “It wasn’t easy, coming right out of college and teaching undergrads at Ohio State,” he says. “There were some days when I wanted to sit down with the students.” Clearly, Wyss mastered his craft as a teacher, becoming a popular and much-loved professor at Albion. He was so appreciated by English majors and non-majors alike that he often saw the same students in different courses five or six times during their four years on campus. One student— Nick Kyriakopoulos, ’08—took three separate Wyss courses during the 2004-05 academic year. “Professor Wyss was full of great stories,” says Kyriakopoulos. “I always looked forward to attending his classes to hear one of his hilarious anecdotes. I never saw him walk into class without a smile on his face.” Wyss says he will greatly miss his classroom work and the daily contact with students. In addition to teaching courses on linguistics, Twain and Faulkner, stereotyping in American literature, and a First-Year Experience seminar on nature writing, Wyss also served for two decades on the College’s Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental Advisory Committee, the last three years as chair. During that time he read every single medical school application that students submitted to the committee, and as chair he edited and corrected nearly 100. His Hemingway and Fitzgerald course was among his most popular over the decades. “In some ways, it was my favorite,” he says. “It was the one that generated the most e-mails and cards from former students writing to tell me they were in Key West or Paris.” Also high on Wyss’s list of accomplishments during his Albion tenure were the two occasions he coordinated the College’s accreditation review process (1990 and 2000), including writing and editing the required documentation. It’s a job not suited to many, but Wyss says he enjoyed it and is very proud to have been involved. Wyss—whose wife, Missy, teaches dance at the College—is an avid naturalist and author of two coffee table books on eagles and hummingbirds. He says in retirement he will continue his nature writing, traveling and volunteering for nature groups. —Morris Arvoy

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Isaac Symposium speakers ponder ‘future of life’ D. TRUMPIE PHOTOS

By Jake Weber The “Future of Life” on the individual and global levels was a focus for the Isaac Lecture and the Isaac Symposium keynote address, both of which took place during Albion College’s 16th annual Elkin R. Isaac Student Research Symposium, held April 21. Symposium namesake Elkin R. “Ike” Isaac, ’48, offered the 2005 Isaac Lecture, discussing and demonstrating the role of exercise in combating the aging process. Isaac led several volunteers through a demonstration of “Ikesercise,” an exercise program he has developed specifically for people aged 65 and older. “The trauma of aging involves many factors, such as loss of strength, tone, range of motion, flexibility, balance, coordination, joint integrity, and the onset o f conditions like osteoporosis and arthritis,” noted Isaac. “My program will improve all of these factors for anyone who commits to it. Teddy Roosevelt said that the quality of life is a task worth pursuing, and that’s true for every age.” Pulitzer Prize-winning biologist Edward O. Wilson delivered the symposium keynote address, with the topic “The Future of Life.” He made a strong case for the need not only to preserve the environment and its related biodiversity, but also to study and more fully understand the still-enormous mysteries of life on this planet. Despite the fact that biologists have currently identified nearly two million different species of life on earth, many more are yet to be discovered. “We don’t know, even within the nearest order of magnitude, how many species are in the world,” said Wilson. “It’s an astonishing fact that we do not know the vast majority

of species on which our own lives depend.” Wilson explained that today’s biologists, using new technologies, are able to explore environments never before seen by man, such as the deep earth (single-cell organisms have been discovered living more than two miles below the earth’s surface), the oceans and forest canopies. In addition, explorers are finding vast new worlds literally at their fingertips, using DNA sampling to identify thousands of previously-unknown bacteria living in soil and even in human bodies. A more complete picture of the world’s biodiversity, Wilson argued, is far from simply a taxonomic exercise. “The benefits would be incalculable in terms of scientific knowledge, producing new products, finding out how the environment really works, saving species and managing the environment in ways that can be more sustainable,” he explained. He also noted that environmental protection should not be a humans-vs.wilderness argument. “Both the poor and biological diversity occur in developing countries,” Wilson explained. “The poor, especially the one billion people who are absolutely destitute, have very little chance to improve their lives in a devastated environment.” Coming to a full understanding of earth’s biodiversity, and using that knowledge to address environmental problems, “is a [challenge] that we have defined and it can be solved, and we know the cost,” Wilson concluded. “The resources to do it exist. . . . The technology exists, the costs are not high, and the longterm benefit is beyond calculation. A civilization able to envision God and embark on the colonization of space is surely going to find a way to save the integrity of this magnificent planet . . . because, quite simply, it’s the right thing to do, and it’s an ennobling task for our species.”

G. RACE PHOTO

Biologist E.O. Wilson met with students in the Honors Institute and other campus guests during his visit to Albion to deliver the Isaac Symposium keynote address. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author argued that stewardship of the earth’s biodiversity is essential for the future of the planet. Symposium namesake Elkin “Ike” Isaac, ’48, offered the 2005 Isaac Lecture on the role of exercise in combating the aging process. President Peter Mitchell, ’67, and Becky Mitchell were among those who participated in the “Ikesercise” demonstration.

G. RACE PHOTO

The move is on . . . Now that construction work has been completed on Kresge Hall, the newest addition to Albion’s science complex, and on Palenske Hall, installation of teaching and research equipment has begun. Renovations continue in Putnam Hall and Norris Center, and the new glass-walled atrium that will enclose the former courtyard in the complex is also taking shape. The $41.6-million science renovation and expansion project is slated for completion by summer 2006. (Clockwise from top left) New connectors (note glassed area, center of photo) between Kresge, Putnam and Palenske Halls link the science buildings on every floor, and provide attractive lounge and teaching spaces. M. ARVOY PHOTO G. RACE PHOTO

Fume hoods, like these in the organic chemistry lab in Kresge Hall, help ensure air-quality and safety standards. The new building contains labs for both the Biology and Chemistry Departments. Physics professor David Seely and junior Dan Coupland unpack electron beam tubes in one of the introductory physics labs in newly renovated Palenske Hall. The Geological Sciences and Mathematics/Computer Science Departments are also housed in Palenske. A new 2,600-square-foot greenhouse is going up alongside Kresge Hall. The greenhouse provides temperate, arid and tropical climate areas, and an inground planting space.

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Women’s tennis tops MIAA; men’s track competes at nationals By Bobby Lee Albion College is a member of the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA) and NCAA Division III. Find Briton sports on the Web at: www.albion.edu/sports/ . For sports publications, call 517/629-0434.

Women’s tennis: After losing the MIAA title by a single point in 2004, fourth-year head coach Scott Frew and his four returning singles players resolved to leave little doubt of their championship credentials this spring. The Britons started by mowing through the league schedule in the regular season, winning all seven matches. Albion won two contests by 9-0 scores and another by an 8-1 count. Winning championships in six out of nine flights—including singles wins from junior Betsy Netherton, sophomore Emily Stocker, and first-year A.ESH PHOTO

Men’s tennis: Fourth-year head coach Scott Frew had the perfect mix of athletes on the roster to make a leap in the MIAA standings. The Britons had experience in senior Jason Ryan and a trio of sophomores and youthful enthusiasm in the form of freshmen Alex Galvin, Jon VandenBerg, David Manger, Andrew Lulek and Brandon Still. Boosted by an outstanding second-place performance in the league’s two-day tournament, Albion tied Calvin and Hope for second place in the MIAA’s final standings. Kalamazoo continued its hold on the league title. Ryan posted a 5-1 singles record against MIAA opponents during the regular season and advanced to the championship final in the first singles and doubles brackets to gain All-MIAA first-team honors for the first time in his career. He earned additional recognition as the winner of the league’s Stowe Sportsmanship Award. Sophomores Neil Forster and Nate Marshall were tabbed for second-team recognition in the league. Both players finished third in their respective singles brackets in the MIAA Tournament, and Forster served as Ryan’s doubles partner. The Britons have high expectations for the future, as freshman Brandon Still was the runner-up in the sixth-singles flight in the MIAA Tournament and classmates Andrew Lulek and Jon VandenBerg placed third in their respective flights. Men’s track and field: Sopho-

Junior Betsy Netherton was an All-MIAA first-team selection and the MIAA Tournament champion at second singles and third doubles. With championships in six out of nine flights, Albion rolled to the MIAA Tournament title by a 20-point margin over second-place Hope. players Vicky Seiter and Emily Gundersen—Albion rolled to the MIAA Tournament title by a 20-point margin over second-place Hope. Junior Katie Tornga, the runner-up at No. 1 singles and champion with Stocker at No. 1 doubles, achieved All-MIAA firstteam honors for the third consecutive year. Netherton was promoted to the All-MIAA first team after achieving second-team status in each of her first two seasons. Stocker earned a spot on the second team. Prior to the MIAA Tournament, Albion placed fifth in the Intercollegiate Tennis Association’s (ITA) Central Regional event. A 5-4 win over 24th-ranked Carthage College of Kenosha, Wis., propelled the Britons to a berth in the NCAA Division III Championship Tournament for the third consecutive year. Albion completed a 16-6 campaign with a loss to Denison University of Granville, Ohio, in the opening round of the NCAA Tournament. Frew was honored as ITA Central Region Coach of the Year.

mores Jason Bowman and Jerry Krueger and freshman Michael Nyika gained individual titles and all-league status as Albion finished as a strong second-place team in the 140th Annual MIAA Field Day at Hope College May 5-6. The Britons, who also sprinted to victory in the 4x100-meter relay, racked up 191.5 points in the two-day meet. Calvin College posted 255 team points to win the league championship. Nyika and classmate Anthony Dunning

sprinted to a one-two finish in the 200 meters. Nyika’s winning time was 22.35 seconds, while Dunning was close behind at 22.62. Dunning solidified his at-large selection to the All-MIAA team when he joined Nyika, freshman Nick Kyriakopoulos and senior Ryan Williams to win the 4x100-meter relay in a time of 42.61 seconds. After winning the MIAA title in the 400, Krueger went on to lower the school record in the event to 47.99 seconds and earn a berth in the field at the NCAA Division III Championships. Bowman cleared the bar at 1.93 meters, or the equivalent of 6 feet, 4 inches, to win the high jump. He reached the NCAA Championship provisional qualifying standard when he posted a mark of 6 feet, 7 inches in a double dual meet against Hope and Olivet in early April. Senior Ivan Meiring, who achieved AllAmerica status the previous two years, was an at-large selection to the All-MIAA team after placing second in the shot put and third in the discus throw at the league meet. Meiring and junior Ross Plont, who threw the javelin more than 194 feet at a meet in May, were the Britons who joined Krueger at the NCAA Championships. Dave Egnatuk completed his 31st season as head coach.

Women’s track and field: At the MIAA Championships at Hope College May 5-6, sophomore Margot McGlothlin achieved All-MIAA status as she finished second in the 800 meters, and freshman Jenna Morse threw the discus 129 feet, 3 inches to place second. The Britons, who placed third overall, racked up 103 points in the two-day meet. Calvin College won the event with 327 points. McGlothlin completed the 800-meter race in a season-best time of 2:22.81. The 4x400 relay team turned in a second-place performance with a time of 4:11.80. McGlothlin ran the first leg, and then handed the race over to sophomore Amy Fry, senior Kaitlin Van Patten and sophomore Heather Johnston. Jacquelyn Williams enjoyed a good first year in the pole vault as she pushed the school record in the event to 10 feet, 2 B. LEE PHOTO inches. Prior to this season, a Briton woman had never cleared the bar above nine feet. Hayden Smith completed his fourth season as head coach. Softball:

Freshman Michael Nyika waits to receive the baton from senior Ryan Williams during the 4x100 relay run at Calvin College. The relay team won the league championship in that event at the MIAA Field Day. Nyika also took the league title in the 200 meters.

Albion enjoyed a successful spring break trip to Fort Myers, Fla., winning eight of 10 games, but the Britons could not keep that momentum going when they returned to the northern climate. Albion ended the season with an 18-18 overall record, 5-11 in the league.

Senior pitcher Michaela Adams completed her career as a four-time AllMIAA honoree when she gained a position on the second team. Adams ranked high in the MIAA this season in strikeouts, innings pitched and earned run average. She was first in the league with 64 1/3 innings pitched, third in strikeouts and ninth with a 2.61 earned run average. Adams also posted some impressive career numbers. She finished just shy of 400 strikeouts as she ended with 397 K’s in all games played. In MIAA play Adams closed out her career with 173 strikeouts, good enough for fourth place on the career strikeout list. She also finished tied for fifth place in most decisions as she compiled a 20-13 record in MIAA games. For her career Adams garnered a 1.81 ERA over 474 innings pitched. Seniors Katie Kelly and Jessica Possehn along with junior Jenelle Vlcek were other strong performers this season. Michelle Manning completed her first season as head coach.

Baseball: Albion believed it might be déjà vu all over again when it trailed MIAA-leading Adrian by one game in the league standings in mid-April. Instead of catching fire like they did en route to the MIAA title in 2004, the Britons struggled down the stretch and finished in a tie for fourth with a 10-11 league record. Adrian hung on to win the league championship. Albion placed three student-athletes on the All-MIAA squad, led by senior Dave Seales’ selection to the first team for the second consecutive year. Although listed as a pitcher, Seales was an offensive and defensive standout for the Britons. He posted a 3-3 record on the mound in MIAA contests. His 2.08 earned run average was the fifth lowest in the league. At the plate, Seales tied for third in the MIAA with six doubles, and his .507 slugging percentage was the seventhhighest figure in the league. For the season, Seales posted a 4-4 record on the mound with a 2.89 ERA in 62 1/3 innings of work. He was Albion’s second-leading hitter, posting a .360 batting average (50 hits in 139 at-bats) with 13 doubles, a triple, three homeruns and a team-high 23 runs batted in. Senior outfielder Chris Trott and firstyear pitcher John Fileccia received AllMIAA second-team recognition. Fileccia started the third game of every league series for the Britons in 2005. He was eighth in the league in ERA (3.19) and innings pitched (42 1/3). For the season, Fileccia notched a 5-4 record with a 3.88 ERA. In 62 2/3 innings of work, he allowed 37 runs on 74 hits and 19 walks with 41 strikeouts. Trott’s name appeared on the All-MIAA second team for the third consecutive year. He hit .333 (20 hits in 60 at-bats) in 18 league games with a double, a triple, two homeruns, 11 runs scored and eight RBI. Trott was Albion’s top hitter in 2005, posting a .363 average (45 hits in 124 atbats) with 10 doubles and 19 RBI. Scott Carden completed his second year as head coach of the baseball program.

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Class notes deadline The deadline for class notes appearing in this issue of Io Triumphe was April 30, 2005. Notes received after that date will appear in the next issue.

Class news 45-49 Audrey McPherson Murray, ’46, is very active in her church, serving on the Lay Committee. Audrey also was church council secretary for three years and chairs the Red Cross Blood Drive at the church. She was awarded a lifetime membership in the local Chamber of Commerce at the annual Chamber dinner in February. She and her husband, Don, will celebrate their 58th wedding anniversary in July. Their daughter,

Linda Murray Toberer, ’73, has a physical therapy practice in Oregon. The Murrays live in Howell. CORRECTION: The late Carlton Hornbrook, ’48, recently had a foundation set up in his name, the Carlton B. Hornbrook Athletic and Academic Foundation. The foundation allows for a male and female student from Sparta High School to be awarded a $500 scholarship each year. Carlton retired as principal of Sparta High School. He passed away in January 2003. Jenella Smith Emelianov, ’48, was featured in an article in the Port Huron Times Herald in February. She has been making sleeping bags for the homeless for the past two years. Most of her sleeping bags are given to Safe Horizons, which operates shelters for the homeless and for domestic abuse and sexual assault victims in Port Huron. They have also been distributed to Cass Community Center in Detroit. Jenella makes the sleeping bags mostly from donated materials. She is a retired adult education teacher. She and her husband, Mikhail, have two children and two grandchildren. They live in Port Huron.

A perfect fit

Donald Moore, ’48, recently had a scholarship endowed in his name at Coastal Carolina University by his son and daughter-in-law, Daniel and Toni Moore, of North Myrtle Beach, SC. A former teacher and school principal, he also pursued a career in real estate. Donald was a charter member of the North Myrtle Beach Rotary Club and served as president in 1975-76. He served on the City Council of Windy Hill Beach, and on the Horry County Higher Education Board from 1976 to 1991. Donald is married to Dagmar Wikander Moore, ’46, and they live in South Carolina.

Richard Dekoker, ’52, earned a B.S. degree from the University of Wisconsin. He also earned his J.D. from the University of Florida in 1973 and his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1998. He lives in Tampa, FL.

55-59 1955 Reunion Co-Chairs: James Garber jdgjim@comcast.net Beth Louise Capitanio Young blynorthville@aol.com

50-54 1950 Reunion Co-Chairs: William and Muriel Schlorff Newman w.a.newman@worldnet.att.net Warren Bayless, ’52, recently moved to Cathedral City, CA. The city is located in the Coachella Valley, partly on the Aqua Caliente Reservation.

Vivian Johnson Bull, ’56, was named 2004 Distinguished Alumna of the Year from Gogebic Community College. She is president of Linfield College in McMinnville, OR. Earlier in her career, Vivian taught at Drew University and served as co-founder and director of the Center for Public and Corporate Affairs. She graduated from the London School of Economics in 1957 and received her doctoral degree from New York University in 1974. Vivian was the

PHOTOS COURTESY OF A. NORTON

By Jim Whitehouse, ’69 “We were alike in size (which was handy for borrowing each other’s outfits), alike in interests and alike in temperament. We fit together from the start,” says Arlene Post Norton, ’33. She is speaking of her 74-year friendship with her Albion College roommate, Geraldine “Gerry” Pinch Knapp, ’33. We recently wrote the two women and asked them to tell us more about their long friendship. As they have always done, they first talked to each other. “Your letter created quite a stir with two or three phone calls and as many letters in response to it!” Arlene says. Arlene and Gerry were roommates for three years in the same first-floor room of Susanna Wesley Hall, and both still remember that it was the third room down on the righthand side. “It became just like home,” they say. Upon graduation, they remained friends, and communicated by letter in those pre-e-mail days. After working for a short time at the Horner Brothers Woolen Mill in Eaton Rapids, Gerry worked in Lansing for the State of Michigan Sales Tax Division. “I was trained as a teacher, but in 1933 there were no jobs. I learned shorthand and became a secretary,” says Gerry. Arlene was able to use her teaching certificate and taught in Grand Blanc. On April 11, 1935 Gerry Pinch married Gerald Knapp, who served as assistant to the vice president of Michigan State University. Arlene was her maid of honor. Two years later, Arlene Post married her college sweetheart, Chauncey Norton, ’34. Not surprisingly, Gerry was the matron of honor.

registrar and treasurer for the Joint Archaeological Expedition to Caesarea Maritima, Israel, for 16 years between 1972 and 1993. She has authored numerous publications dealing with international economics, history and politics. She and her husband, Robert, have two sons. Dave Sennema, ’56, recently sold his stock of more than 67,000 postcards to a dealer in Georgia. He had turned his hobby into a business of buying and selling antique postcards. Dave is now looking forward to tinkering with a collection of several hundred wooden boxes he has accumulated at flea markets and garage sales through the years. He and his wife, Marty, continue to sing in their church choir. He also sings lead in a male quartet called’“An Evening with the Pops.” They live in Columbia, SC. David Yonker, ’59, has retired as owner and CEO of Marchon, S.A. de C.V. The company and its Mexican associates provided intra-Mexican trucking services and service to the United States and Canada. He previously worked with Schneider National in Mexico, Sterling Drug and the Kimberly-Clark Corp. David was also a foreign service officer for five years. He is active with the Rotary Club and serves on the board of several organizations. He and his wife, Mary Jane, have been married for 42 years and have three children and four grandchildren. They live in Mexico City.

60-64 1960 Reunion Co-Chairs: John Lewis jlewismi@aol.com Michael Dant msdant@aol.com

Geraldine Pinch Knapp, ’33, and Arlene Post Norton, ’33, have been good friends since their days as roommates in Albion’s Susanna Wesley Hall. They stood up in each others’ weddings (pictured is Geraldine’s wedding to Gerald Knapp, April 11, 1935), vacationed together (note the bicycle-built-for-four excursion in Saugatuck shortly after Arlene’s marriage to Chauncey Norton, ’34), and have remained in close contact ever since. The two women stayed in touch through the years that followed, even though they lived apart, Gerry and Gerald in East Lansing, where she still resides, and Arlene and Chauncey in Detroit and later in Grosse Pointe, New York City, and Sun City, Ariz. Occasionally they were able to get together. “The Knapps were in Saugatuck on vacation in 1940 and invited us to come and spend a long weekend with them,” says Arlene. “One of the unforgettably fun experiences on that visit was a hilarious ride on a bicycle-built-for-four. None of us had ever seen anything like it before, but we grandly rode around town and the beach on it. We still refer to it as a ‘prime experience.’” In the 1970s, before Chauncey’s retirement from the accounting firm Deloitte and Touche, he was transferred for four years to New York City, and the Knapps visited the Nortons there. “We saw a lot, I remember, in the course of their visit,” says Arlene. The two women have not seen each other since that last visit, but still correspond regularly. “It has worked out well,” Gerry says of their friendship. “There were quite long periods between visits, but we always picked up where we left off.” The nicest part of this story is that it continues to repeat itself over and over as new generations of Albion roommates remain friends for life.

Robert Bartlett, ’60, recently had a novel published called The Salem Syndrome. Published by First Page Publications in Livonia, the book is available at amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com. Bob is professor of surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School. His academic focus is on critical care and life support systems. A graduate of the University of Michigan Medical School, he has a surgical practice in Ann Arbor. James Kingsley, ’63, has been elected chairman of the Judicial Tenure Commission. He serves as Calhoun County circuit judge. Jim was appointed to the bench in 1982 and served as the chief judge for the 37th Circuit for 10 years. He is a former president of the Michigan Judges Association and chair of the Judicial Conference of the State Bar of Michigan. Jim was appointed by the Michigan Supreme Court to serve as a member of the Representative Assembly of the State Bar of Michigan, and as a member of the Task Force on Gender Bias in the Courts. He earned his law degree from Northwestern University Law School. He and his wife, Judith Case Kingsley, ’63, live in Albion and have two children and three grandchildren. Robert Fischer, ’64, has recently retired in Fort Myers, FL. He ended his career in hospital management, serving most recently as the CEO of Mt. St. Johns Medical Center in Antigua and Barbuda, W.I. He can be reached via e-mail at: rfischer1399@yahoo.com.

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1965 Reunion Co-Chairs:

1970 Reunion Co-Chairs:

Thomas Padgett tpadgett@albion.edu

William Rafaill wsrafaill@rafaill.com

Carol Olsen Yeomans-Phalen Mcyeomans_phalen@hotmail.com

Rick Lange LangeHome@comcast.net

Peter Boyse, ’67, is retiring in July as the president of Delta College. He has served as president for 12 years, and previously served five years as executive vice president. Peter earned a master’s degree from the University of Michigan in 1969, and a master’s degree from Oregon State University in 1973. He earned his doctorate from Oregon State University in 1987. He and his wife, Barbra, have been married for 32 years and have two children and a grandson. They live in Bay City.

Rex Schlaybaugh Jr., ’71, was elected to serve on the board of the Metropolitan Affairs Coalition (MAC). MAC is a public/private partnership that brings together leaders to address public policy issues affecting the economic vitality and quality of life in southeastern Michigan. He is the chairman and chief executive officer of Dykema Gossett P.L.L.C. Rex is a past chairman and member of the Michigan Chamber of Commerce. He is also a past chairman and member of the Board of Trustees of Oakland University. Rex serves on the boards of John Hancock Life Insurance Co. USA and Bloomfield Hills Bancorp, Inc. He earned his law degree from the University of Detroit Law School. He lives in Birmingham.

Margaret “Peggy” Visconti Vesta, ’67, recently retired after 34 years in education. She taught elementary school for 24 years and spent 10 years as a guidance counselor. Peggy and her husband have a son and live in River Vale, NJ.

Jean Gebhardt Radin, ’74, completed her Ph.D. in educational leadership from Colorado State University. She will be teaching in the Education Department at Colorado State in the fall. She lives in Fort Collins, CO.

75-79 1975 Reunion Chair: Amy Beechler Wolbert awolbert@iserv.net Patricia Paulson Uhrmann, ’75, has moved with her husband, Fritz, to their vacation home in Big Bear Lake, CA. After 30 years in the food business, she started her own consulting firm and also

recruits for the food and pharmaceutical industries. Fritz has retired and spends his time assisting Pat in her new business and restoring antique vehicles. They accompanied their granddaughter to a hockey camp for Olympic hopefuls and traveled across Canada last spring. She can be reached via e-mail at: paturhmann1 @verizon.net. Jacqueline “Jackie” Went Wiggins, ’75, has worked in the cosmetic industry for more than 20 years. Currently, she teaches yoga and is a volunteer for women dealing with breast cancer. Jackie received an advanced merchandising degree from Toby Colburn (Manhattan). Her husband, Gene Wiggins, ’78, is currently the manager of major account business development for Gevity. He previously spent 12 years working for the San Jose Sharks and the San Francisco

Giants. Gene earned his M.B.A. from the University of San Francisco. They have traveled throughout the United States and recently spent 20 days exploring Africa, Germany and Spain. They have been married for 30 years and have a son. The Wiggins live in Alamo, CA. Steven Beauchamp, ’76, is the executive vice president for Cypress Creek Capital, a real estate investment firm that he formed with two other principals. Steven lives in Fort Lauderdale, FL. Cynthia Cartwright, ’78, a registered nurse and medical educator on staff at the Maine Medical Center in Portland, has served as a member of a team consulting on improvements in the education of family practice doctors in Vietnam. The project began in the mid-1990s and has now resulted in a new model for the delivery of primary care in that country, utilizing the newly trained physicians. The consultation team continues to work with Vietnamese medical educators on ways to modernize their programs. R. Stan Kryder, ’79, has joined Midtown Bank & Trust Co. in Atlanta, GA, as chief executive officer and a director of the company. He was previously employed by AmSouth Bancorporation. He also worked for First Union (now Wachovia) for more than 13 years. He began his career with The Citizens and Southern National Bank (now Bank of America) in Atlanta. He is involved in several community and civic organizations.

80-84 1980 Reunion Co-Chairs: Betsy Bacon Grodhaus Mgroudhau@columbus.rr.com Margaret Neely Nault margnault@comcast.net

Several Albion alumni met for a reunion Feb. 18 at the home of Larry, ’49, and Dinghy Spalding Sharp, ’50, in Green Valley, AZ. Attending the reunion were: (left to right) Bob Starnes, ’49, Marge Boothroyd Starnes, ’49, Larry Sharp, ’49, Dinghy Spalding Sharp, ’50, Lee Sawyer Gallentine, ’49, and Don Gallentine.

Louisa Hayward, ’76, on assignment with her employer, Exxon Mobil Corp., in London, hosted a gathering of her Albion classmates who were all celebrating their 50th birthdays. In attendance were: (left to right) Louisa Hayward, Debbie Davis Fisher, Leslie Kanberg and Marti Teeple Briney.

Carol Griffith, ’80, has been named the 2005 president-elect for the Livingston Association of Realtors. She is a licensed realtor with ERA Griffith in Brighton. She is also the president-elect for the Howell Rotary Club and chairwoman of the St. Joseph Mercy Hospital fall fundraising event. She lives in Brighton. Robert Johnston, ’81, is an attorney with Howard & Howard Attorneys, P.C.

When it comes to estate planning, many of the questions aren’t simple. Here’s one that is:

How can I make a planned gift to Albion College? Contact us, or have your attorney contact us, and we’ll make it easy, with suggestions on how to accomplish a gift and even sample wording. You can also visit our Planned Giving site on the Web at: www.albion.edu/alumni/giving.asp and click on “Planned Giving” When Kay Keller Robertson, ’56, marked her 70th birthday this spring, several of her Albion classmates joined the celebration at her home in Clarkston. Pictured are: (front row, left to right) Kay Keller Robertson, Connie Blessing Burt; (back row) Carolyn Gilbert Habel, Carole Sanford Stevens, Joanne Handy Ash and Sally Squire Campbell.

Office of Gift and Estate Planning • 611 E. Porter St. • Albion, MI 49224 517/629-0237 • advancement@albion.edu

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Stay in touch! Io Triumphe is providing the following information on retired faculty and spouses to permit alumni to renew contact with these former professors and friends. Dr. Robert Armstrong, 1318 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Kenneth Ballou, 803 S. Superior St., Suite 101, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Ingeborg Baumgartner, 411 Darrow St., Albion, MI 49224 Miss Betty Beese, 1121 Rivers Bend Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Albert Bolitho, 658 E. Minges Rd., Battle Creek, MI 49015 Mrs. Bruce Borthwick (Doris), 515 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Maurice Branch, 29300 Albion Rd., Albion, MI 49224 Mrs. John Cheek (Williemay), 1220 Jackson St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. James Cook, 703 Irwin Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Paul Cook, 118 Bushong Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Mr. E. Scott Cracraft, 499 N. Clark St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. John Crump, 14685 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Ralph Davis, 602 Kellogg, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 Dr. Dean Dillery, 1205 E. Broadwell, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Robert Dininny, 412 E. Erie St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Clara Dixon, Route FD1, Box 1296, Stonington, ME 04681 Dr. Thomas Doran, 4 Canterbury Lane, Albion, MI 49224 Miss Charlotte Duff, 1133 Rivers Bend Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Sol Elkin, 2104 Georgetown Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48105 Mrs. Wilbur Franklin (Mary Lou), 3905 Glenmere Dr., Youngstown, OH 44511 Mrs. H. Morley Fraser (Liz), 124-1/2 S. Clark St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Frank Frick, 116 Wilmen Rd., Quincy, MI 49082 Dr. Ronald Fryxell, 926 Maple St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Dennis Gaswick, 1015 Haven Lane, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. William Gillham, 289 Martin Rd., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. John Hart, 412 Fitch St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. William Hayes, 504 Linden St., Albion, MI 49224 Mrs. Nancy Held, 1155 Rivers Bend Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. David Hogberg, 15451 28 Mile Rd., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Allen Horstman, 1936 Outer Dr., Traverse City, MI 49684 Dr. John Hostetler, 312 Irwin Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Prof. Frank Joranko, 2215 Wellington, Lansing, MI 48910 Dr. David Kammer, 1500 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Mrs. Jean Keller (Betty), 803 S. Superior St., Suite 106, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Sheila Kragness, Box 276, Excelsior, MN 55331 Mr. Melvin Larimer, 139 West Silver Lake Rd. South, Traverse City, MI 49684 Mr. Paul Loukides, 103 Vicar Court, Charlottesville, VA 22901 Dr. Frances Lucas, 1020 S. Superior St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Martin Ludington, 314 W. Mansion, Marshall, MI 49068 Mr. Frank Machek, 9525 21 Mile Rd., Marshall, MI 49068 Dr. Philip Mason, 815 Hall St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Eugene Miller, 12900 Lake Ave., Apt. 809, Lakewood, OH 44107 Dr. Keith Moore, 1201 Jackson St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Richard Mortensen, 3366 N. Ludlow Rd., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Max Noordhoorn, 1801 Independence Blvd. #3, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 Dr. Martha O’Kennon, 312 Burr Oak St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. J. Thomas Oosting, 25 Grouse Lane, Brevard, NC 28712 Dr. Jack Padgett, 1206 Crescent Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. John Parker, 9611 Condit Rd., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Howard Pettersen, 413 Lombard St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. G. Robina Quale Leach, 611 E. Porter St., KC Box 4905, Albion, MI 49224 Mrs. Julian Rammelkamp (Mabel), 416 Linden Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. George Reed, 2608 Edgewater Court, Palmetto, FL 34221 Mrs. Henry Rottenbiller (Eva), 20776 29 1/2 Mile Road, Springport, MI 49284 Dr. Charles Schutz, P.O. Box 501, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Johan Stohl, 420 Allen Place, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Ewell Stowell, 1541 E. Michigan Ave., Albion, MI 49224 Mrs. Anthony Taffs (Jean), 908 Cram Lane, Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Lawrence Taylor, 1111 Rivers Bend Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Bruce Weaver, 915 S. Superior St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. John Wenzel, 840 Deer Park, St. Paul, MN 55116 Dr. John Williams, 411 N. Eaton St., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Timothy Williams, 904 Luther Dr., Albion, MI 49224 Dr. Hal Wyss, 909 Maple St., Albion, MI 49224

Robert specializes in the areas of qualified retirement plans, executive compensation and employee benefit plans. He is also an instructor for the Certified Employee Benefits Specialists Program, which is co-sponsored by the Wharton School of Business, the International Foundation of Employee Plans and Michigan State University. He earned his law degree from the University of Michigan Law School in 1984. Robert lives in Farmington Hills. Peter Dever, ’82, has been appointed to the newly created position of chief assistant Oakland County Friend of the Court, in charge of legal services. He most recently worked as deputy director for child support in San Jose, CA. He has also worked as a judge advocate for the U.S. Navy and as division director for the child support program in Denver, CO. He has launched many political initiative programs over the years, including the Driver’s License Buyback Program in California and Colorado. He earned his law degree from the Detroit College of Law (now affiliated with Michigan State University). He and his wife, Beth Ely Dever, ’83, have four children. They live in Clarkston. Maureen Donohue Krauss, ’84, was recently appointed deputy director of the Oakland County Department of Economic Development and Community Affairs. She has more than 20 years experience as an economic developer in Michigan and Arizona. Maureen spent the past six years as a senior business development representative with Oakland County’s Planning and Economic Development Services. In 1994, Maureen was named Economic Developer of the Year by the Arizona Association of Economic Development. She earned a master’s degree from the University of Michigan. She and her husband, Dean, have two children and live in Rochester Hills.

earned her master’s degree from Western Michigan University. She lives in Kalamazoo. Jeff Battershall, ’86, has been elected president of the board of Second Harvest Gleaners Food Bank of West Michigan, Inc. He is a partner with Warner Norcross & Judd LLP. Jeff specializes in corporate law, with an emphasis on mergers and acquisitions, and he chairs the firm’s business law group. He is a member of the American Bar Association, the State Bar of Michigan and the Grand Rapids Bar Association. Jeff received his law

degree from Harvard Law School. He lives in Ada. Craig Olson, ’86, has relocated to Portland, OR, from San Francisco, CA. He works for Design Within Reach as a regional business manager. Craig enjoys designing and building furniture, as well as surfing and skiing in the Pacific Northwest. He can be reached via e-mail at: craigolson@ spiritone.com. Robert McCarthy, ’87, is part of a group that has built Muskegon Commerce Bank

Summer/Fall Admissions Visit Programs The following Admissions Visit Day programs offer an excellent opportunity to introduce a promising high school student to Albion College. We also welcome individual campus visits at any time, and will design interviews and a campus tour based on the student’s interests. Just call 800/858-6770 or visit our Web site at www.albion.edu/admissions/campusvisit to make all arrangements. July 12 August 15 October 14 October 21 November 4 November 5 November 18 December 3

General Visit Program General Visit Program Ford Institute/Gerstacker Institute Science/Pre-Health Program General Visit Program Student Athlete Program Fine Arts/Humanities Program General Visit Program

Thomas Shimmel, ’84, has completed a number of adventures over the past 10 years with John Middlebrook, ’84, and Tom Gallant, ’84. They have reached the top of Pike’s Peak and Long’s Peak in Colorado. They have also twice climbed Mt. Whitney in California. Over the past two years, they have hiked in the Grand Canyon. This has included a hike down the South Kaibab trail and a return up the Bright Angel trail. Both Tom Shimmel and Tom Gallant live in Michigan, and John Middlebrook lives in North Carolina.

85-89 1985 Reunion Co-Chairs: James and Debra Frey Fadool dfadool@bio.fsu.edu Murray Borrello, ’85, was named cowinner of the Alma Order of the Tartan. He has taught geology and environmental science at Alma College since 1988. He has taught piano lessons and is an active member of St. John’s Episcopal Church. Murray is working toward his doctorate at Michigan State University. He earned his master’s degree from the University of Massachusetts. He lives in Alma. Debra Kollar, ’85, was named the 2004 Region B School Social Worker of the Year by the Michigan Association of School Social Workers. She has worked as a social worker at Bellevue Elementary School for the past 10 years. Debra

You can save on taxes while saving for your child’s education! Albion College is one of more than 200 participating institutions in the Independent 529 Plan, a prepaid college tuition plan tailored for private colleges. By contributing to an Independent 529 account you can set aside tomorrow’s tuition at less than today’s prices, and the account generates no federal income tax liability if used as intended. The prepaid tuition may be used at any of the participating colleges. To obtain more information on the Independent 529 Plan, administered by TIAA-CREF Trust Co., FSB, call 888/718-7878 or visit www.independent529plan.org.

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to assets of more than $100 million in the seven years the bank has been in existence. The bank will soon break ground on a new building. Robert previously worked for First Michigan Bank prior to its 1997 merger with Huntington Bank. He lives in Muskegon. Mike and Katie Giblin Olsson, both ’88, moved to Bloomington, IL, a year ago. Mike works for State Farm Insurance, and Katie is a stay-at-home mom. They have four children and can be reached via email at: mkolsson1@juno.com. Samuel Shaheen, ’88, has been appointed to the Citizens Bank-Saginaw Board of Directors. He is a surgeon with Midwestern Surgical Associates in Saginaw. Sam earned his medical degree from the University of Michigan School of Medicine. He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a member of the American Board of Surgery. Darrin York, ’89, was recently elected treasurer of Harrison Township, a suburb of Detroit. He is active in the Republican Party, sitting on the Macomb County Republican Executive Committee and the executive committee for District 10 for the state Republican Party. Darrin and his wife, Mary Jean, have been married for 10 years. They have twins that are five years old. They live in Harrison Township and can be reached via e-mail at: Darrinyork@hotmail.com.

90-94 1990 Reunion Co-Chairs: Nelson and Stephanie Hatton Cary ncary@columbus.rr.com Kristen Neller Verderame, ’90, has been appointed chief counsel for British Telecom (BT) Americas. She will be consolidating strategic and operational legal activities throughout the United States, Canada and South America. Kristen most recently was vice president of U.S. regulation and government relations for BT Americas. Prior to joining BT in 1998, she worked as an associate attorney in the international trade practice group for the Washington, D.C., office of Dewey Ballantine. Kristen earned her law degree from the University of Michigan Law School. She also completed post-JD work at the Georgetown University Law Center. She is the current board president of the British-American Business Association and also serves on the board of the European-American Business Council. Kristen and her husband, Mike, have two children and live in McLean, VA. Mark Sinila, ’92, is now with Michigan Agricultural Commodities as a commodities merchandiser. His wife, Christena, is a fourth-grade teacher with Okemos Public Schools. They have two children. The Sinilas live in Okemos and can be reached via e-mail at: mark@sinila.com. Julia Vossler Watters, ’94, has been promoted to the position of senior professional sales representative for Merck & Co. She and her husband, Kevin, live in Scottsdale, AZ, where he is employed by Mobile Productivity, Inc. as market area manager for the Southwestern United States.

95-99 1995 Reunion Co-Chairs: Michelle Lifford Khoury mlkhoury@hotmail.com Nicole Dupraw Carter ncarter@bellsouth.net Leigh Greden lgreden@yahoo.com

Amy Wasiak, ’00, went on a mission trip to Ecuador in April and May, where she provided general medical and surgical work as part of the Christian Medical and Dental Association (CMDA). She graduated from the Des Moines University (Iowa) College of Osteopathic Medicine in May. Amy was a volunteer for Special Olympics and Literacy Army. She also organized a Big Sister/Little Sister program for the Women’s Medical Association student chapter, pairing second-year students with incoming ones.

Todd Obren, ’01, has been promoted to assistant vice president for Niles Community Bank. He began with Chemical Bank Shoreline in 2001 as a commercial credit analyst. Todd is a volunteer for the United Way and the Edwardsburg Youth Soccer Association. He lives in Niles. Larry Lloyd, ’02, was promoted to sergeant on Jan. 1, 2005. He is currently serving with D Co. 1/187 Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, in Ft. Campbell, KY.

Jonathon Husby Jonathon.husby@teleatlas.com

Sarah Morin, ’02, was chosen as the AmeriCorps Volunteer for the West Central Groundwater Stewardship Program. The program covers Mason, Manistee, Oceana and part of Lake counties. She has started conducting groundwater flow model demonstrations for K-12 groups. Sarah earned her master’s degree from Western Michigan University. Megan Thayer, ’02, is the athletic director/administrative assistant at Sacred Heart Academy (middle school and high school) in Mt. Pleasant where she lives.

Jason Allgire, ’97, recently received his PADI OWD and advanced open water diver certifications in the Red Sea. He continues to live and teach in Egypt. He is preparing for a six-week visit to the United States from June through midJuly. Jason can be reached via e-mail at: jallgire@softhome.com. Sarah Coburn, ’97, is a claims analyst for Allied Insurance Brokers. She has lived in Atlanta, GA, for three years. She can be reached via e-mail at: sarah@coburnworks.com. Steven Willis, ’97, was recently promoted to internal audit services manager at JSJ Corp., a privately held mid-sized manufacturing company with several locations throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. JSJ Corp. is headquartered in Grand Haven. Steven and his wife, Shannon, have two children and live in Grand Haven. Lara Lenzotti Kapalla, ’98, has joined Miller Canfield as an associate practicing commercial litigation. She earned her law degree from Michigan State University College of Law. She is the author of an article that was printed in the 2004 Michigan State Law Review 207. Lara lives in Haslett. Jim Freer, ’99, was part of a group of Teleflex employees who were lucky enough to ring the bell opening the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on April 14. Jim and his colleagues got to spend time with the head of the NYSE and tour the exchange floor. They also got to witness some Teleflex stock being traded by their agents on the floor. Jim works in global strategic sourcing for Teleflex, Inc., and lives in Milford. Kim Buffington Otto, ’99, has been promoted to manager of the tax group of Wright Griffin Davis, the second largest business consulting and CPA firm in Washtenaw County. The firm has offices in Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti. She has been with the firm since 1999. Kim lives in Belleville.

00-04 2000 Reunion Co-Chair: Herb Lentz herblentz@yahoo.com Doug St. Martin, ’00, received his doctor of chiropractic degree in December 2004 from Life University. He is now practicing as an associate doctor in the highest volume practice in the state of Georgia. His wife, Jennifer Jodway St. Martin, ’99, started chiropractic school in April. The St. Martins have two children and live in Marietta, GA.

(Above left) B.J. Abbott Schweitzer, ’64, wearing her family’s heirloom gown at her Albion graduation, is flanked by her mother, Miriam Langley Abbott, ’35, and her grandmother, Cora Langley, the original owner of the gown. (Above right) The gown made its appearance once again at an Albion graduation when B.J.’s daughter, Heather, wore it at this year’s ceremony. They are pictured with B.J.’s parents, Miriam and Warren Abbott, both ’35.

Gown becomes family heirloom When Cora Langley graduated from Simmons College in the 1890s, little did she know that her academic gown would become an heirloom that would be passed down through three more generations. This May, Heather Schweitzer, ’05, became part of the fourth generation in her family to graduate wearing the same gown. Heather’s mother, B.J. Abbott Schweitzer, ’64, also wore the gown at her Albion graduation, as did Heather’s grandmother, Miriam Langley Abbott, ’35. Heather’s Albion roots also include her grandfather, G. Warren Abbott, ’35, and his mother, Jenny Congdon Abbott, Class of 1892, and, in all, some 23 of Heather’s relatives are Albion alumni.

All in the family Q.What family has had four generations attend Albion? A. Probably a few. Q.Okay, what family’s Albion experience covers 83 years from 1883 to 1966? A. That would be the Austin-Houghtaling-Newman family! Jenny Houghtaling, Class of 1888, from Oak Grove, Mich. enrolled as a freshman at Albion in the fall of 1884 and joined Delta Gamma. John Austin, Class of 1891, though the same age as Jennie, didn’t start Albion until the fall of 1887 and became a Delta Tau Delta. After she graduated from college, Jennie went into teaching and eventually became principal of Howell High School. John went west in 1891 to “read the law” with an attorney in Union, Ore. After an extended long-range courtship, Jennie and John married in 1895. They eventually returned to Michigan, settling in Highland Park, where John practiced law and served two terms as village president. Jennie passed away in 1933, John in 1946. Jennie and John’s daughter, Margaret Austin, ’18, was born in Oregon in 1896. She entered Albion in the fall of 1914. At registration, she met J. Richard Newman, ’16, a Sigma Nu who was there recruiting members for The Spooners, a boarding club located at 410 E. Porter St., of which he was the steward. Margaret followed her mother into Delta Gamma. After Dick graduated from law school, he and Margaret married in 1918. They settled in Detroit where Dick practiced law, first in partnership with his father-in-law, then on his own. Dick passed away in 1965, Margaret in 1976. Two of the Newmans’ three sons graduated from Albion: Kenneth, ’43, and William, ’50, both of whom joined Sigma Chi. Kenneth and Laura Jane Clement, ’43, a Delta Gamma, married in 1941. After graduation and army service, Kenneth became an executive at Michigan Bell Telephone Co. He was called to duty as a Naval officer during the Korean War. He passed away in 1998, followed by Jane in 2003. Kenneth and Jane’s son, K. Robert Newman, ’66, enrolled at Albion in the fall of 1962. Like his great-grandfather, he became a Delta Tau Delta. Following graduation, he obtained a master’s degree from the University of Michigan, became a CPA and a partner in a national accounting firm. He is now retired and living in Florida with his wife, Meredith Morden Newman.

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to assets of more than $100 million in the seven years the bank has been in existence. The bank will soon break ground on a new building. Robert previously worked for First Michigan Bank prior to its 1997 merger with Huntington Bank. He lives in Muskegon. Mike and Katie Giblin Olsson, both ’88, moved to Bloomington, IL, a year ago. Mike works for State Farm Insurance, and Katie is a stay-at-home mom. They have four children and can be reached via email at: mkolsson1@juno.com. Samuel Shaheen, ’88, has been appointed to the Citizens Bank-Saginaw Board of Directors. He is a surgeon with Midwestern Surgical Associates in Saginaw. Sam earned his medical degree from the University of Michigan School of Medicine. He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and a member of the American Board of Surgery. Darrin York, ’89, was recently elected treasurer of Harrison Township, a suburb of Detroit. He is active in the Republican Party, sitting on the Macomb County Republican Executive Committee and the executive committee for District 10 for the state Republican Party. Darrin and his wife, Mary Jean, have been married for 10 years. They have twins that are five years old. They live in Harrison Township and can be reached via e-mail at: Darrinyork@hotmail.com.

90-94 1990 Reunion Co-Chairs: Nelson and Stephanie Hatton Cary ncary@columbus.rr.com Kristen Neller Verderame, ’90, has been appointed chief counsel for British Telecom (BT) Americas. She will be consolidating strategic and operational legal activities throughout the United States, Canada and South America. Kristen most recently was vice president of U.S. regulation and government relations for BT Americas. Prior to joining BT in 1998, she worked as an associate attorney in the international trade practice group for the Washington, D.C., office of Dewey Ballantine. Kristen earned her law degree from the University of Michigan Law School. She also completed post-JD work at the Georgetown University Law Center. She is the current board president of the British-American Business Association and also serves on the board of the European-American Business Council. Kristen and her husband, Mike, have two children and live in McLean, VA. Mark Sinila, ’92, is now with Michigan Agricultural Commodities as a commodities merchandiser. His wife, Christena, is a fourth-grade teacher with Okemos Public Schools. They have two children. The Sinilas live in Okemos and can be reached via e-mail at: mark@sinila.com. Julia Vossler Watters, ’94, has been promoted to the position of senior professional sales representative for Merck & Co. She and her husband, Kevin, live in Scottsdale, AZ, where he is employed by Mobile Productivity, Inc. as market area manager for the Southwestern United States.

95-99 1995 Reunion Co-Chairs: Michelle Lifford Khoury mlkhoury@hotmail.com Nicole Dupraw Carter ncarter@bellsouth.net Leigh Greden lgreden@yahoo.com

Amy Wasiak, ’00, went on a mission trip to Ecuador in April and May, where she provided general medical and surgical work as part of the Christian Medical and Dental Association (CMDA). She graduated from the Des Moines University (Iowa) College of Osteopathic Medicine in May. Amy was a volunteer for Special Olympics and Literacy Army. She also organized a Big Sister/Little Sister program for the Women’s Medical Association student chapter, pairing second-year students with incoming ones.

Todd Obren, ’01, has been promoted to assistant vice president for Niles Community Bank. He began with Chemical Bank Shoreline in 2001 as a commercial credit analyst. Todd is a volunteer for the United Way and the Edwardsburg Youth Soccer Association. He lives in Niles. Larry Lloyd, ’02, was promoted to sergeant on Jan. 1, 2005. He is currently serving with D Co. 1/187 Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, in Ft. Campbell, KY.

Jonathon Husby Jonathon.husby@teleatlas.com

Sarah Morin, ’02, was chosen as the AmeriCorps Volunteer for the West Central Groundwater Stewardship Program. The program covers Mason, Manistee, Oceana and part of Lake counties. She has started conducting groundwater flow model demonstrations for K-12 groups. Sarah earned her master’s degree from Western Michigan University. Megan Thayer, ’02, is the athletic director/administrative assistant at Sacred Heart Academy (middle school and high school) in Mt. Pleasant where she lives.

Jason Allgire, ’97, recently received his PADI OWD and advanced open water diver certifications in the Red Sea. He continues to live and teach in Egypt. He is preparing for a six-week visit to the United States from June through midJuly. Jason can be reached via e-mail at: jallgire@softhome.com. Sarah Coburn, ’97, is a claims analyst for Allied Insurance Brokers. She has lived in Atlanta, GA, for three years. She can be reached via e-mail at: sarah@coburnworks.com. Steven Willis, ’97, was recently promoted to internal audit services manager at JSJ Corp., a privately held mid-sized manufacturing company with several locations throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. JSJ Corp. is headquartered in Grand Haven. Steven and his wife, Shannon, have two children and live in Grand Haven. Lara Lenzotti Kapalla, ’98, has joined Miller Canfield as an associate practicing commercial litigation. She earned her law degree from Michigan State University College of Law. She is the author of an article that was printed in the 2004 Michigan State Law Review 207. Lara lives in Haslett. Jim Freer, ’99, was part of a group of Teleflex employees who were lucky enough to ring the bell opening the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on April 14. Jim and his colleagues got to spend time with the head of the NYSE and tour the exchange floor. They also got to witness some Teleflex stock being traded by their agents on the floor. Jim works in global strategic sourcing for Teleflex, Inc., and lives in Milford. Kim Buffington Otto, ’99, has been promoted to manager of the tax group of Wright Griffin Davis, the second largest business consulting and CPA firm in Washtenaw County. The firm has offices in Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti. She has been with the firm since 1999. Kim lives in Belleville.

00-04 2000 Reunion Co-Chair: Herb Lentz herblentz@yahoo.com Doug St. Martin, ’00, received his doctor of chiropractic degree in December 2004 from Life University. He is now practicing as an associate doctor in the highest volume practice in the state of Georgia. His wife, Jennifer Jodway St. Martin, ’99, started chiropractic school in April. The St. Martins have two children and live in Marietta, GA.

(Above left) B.J. Abbott Schweitzer, ’64, wearing her family’s heirloom gown at her Albion graduation, is flanked by her mother, Miriam Langley Abbott, ’35, and her grandmother, Cora Langley, the original owner of the gown. (Above right) The gown made its appearance once again at an Albion graduation when B.J.’s daughter, Heather, wore it at this year’s ceremony. They are pictured with B.J.’s parents, Miriam and Warren Abbott, both ’35.

Gown becomes family heirloom When Cora Langley graduated from Simmons College in the 1890s, little did she know that her academic gown would become an heirloom that would be passed down through three more generations. This May, Heather Schweitzer, ’05, became part of the fourth generation in her family to graduate wearing the same gown. Heather’s mother, B.J. Abbott Schweitzer, ’64, also wore the gown at her Albion graduation, as did Heather’s grandmother, Miriam Langley Abbott, ’35. Heather’s Albion roots also include her grandfather, G. Warren Abbott, ’35, and his mother, Jenny Congdon Abbott, Class of 1892, and, in all, some 23 of Heather’s relatives are Albion alumni.

All in the family Q.What family has had four generations attend Albion? A. Probably a few. Q.Okay, what family’s Albion experience covers 83 years from 1883 to 1966? A. That would be the Austin-Houghtaling-Newman family! Jenny Houghtaling, Class of 1888, from Oak Grove, Mich. enrolled as a freshman at Albion in the fall of 1884 and joined Delta Gamma. John Austin, Class of 1891, though the same age as Jennie, didn’t start Albion until the fall of 1887 and became a Delta Tau Delta. After she graduated from college, Jennie went into teaching and eventually became principal of Howell High School. John went west in 1891 to “read the law” with an attorney in Union, Ore. After an extended long-range courtship, Jennie and John married in 1895. They eventually returned to Michigan, settling in Highland Park, where John practiced law and served two terms as village president. Jennie passed away in 1933, John in 1946. Jennie and John’s daughter, Margaret Austin, ’18, was born in Oregon in 1896. She entered Albion in the fall of 1914. At registration, she met J. Richard Newman, ’16, a Sigma Nu who was there recruiting members for The Spooners, a boarding club located at 410 E. Porter St., of which he was the steward. Margaret followed her mother into Delta Gamma. After Dick graduated from law school, he and Margaret married in 1918. They settled in Detroit where Dick practiced law, first in partnership with his father-in-law, then on his own. Dick passed away in 1965, Margaret in 1976. Two of the Newmans’ three sons graduated from Albion: Kenneth, ’43, and William, ’50, both of whom joined Sigma Chi. Kenneth and Laura Jane Clement, ’43, a Delta Gamma, married in 1941. After graduation and army service, Kenneth became an executive at Michigan Bell Telephone Co. He was called to duty as a Naval officer during the Korean War. He passed away in 1998, followed by Jane in 2003. Kenneth and Jane’s son, K. Robert Newman, ’66, enrolled at Albion in the fall of 1962. Like his great-grandfather, he became a Delta Tau Delta. Following graduation, he obtained a master’s degree from the University of Michigan, became a CPA and a partner in a national accounting firm. He is now retired and living in Florida with his wife, Meredith Morden Newman.

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Wedding Album See accompanying notes for details.

Robert Olson, ’90, to Jennifer Gordon on Oct. 23, 2004. (Front row) Eric DeWeerd, ’91. (Second row, left to right) Larry Jones, ’90, Rob Olson, ’90, Jennifer Gordon Olson, Bob Olson, ’57. (Back row) Chris Klinke, ’91, Trent Meyerhoefer, ’90, Grant Grinnell, ’57, Terry DeWeerd, Diane DeWeerd, Mary Sterling Eifert, ’90.

Christina Lombardo, ’99, to Bryan Johnson on Jan. 1, 2005. (Front row, left to right) Jennifer Kaiser-Blase, ’99, Christina Lombardo Johnson, ’99, Bryan Johnson, Paul Ogg, ’91. (Second row) Claire Walton-Swisher, ’99, Julie Darnton, ’99, Alana McClelland, ’97, Stephanie Beebe, ’98, Clark Dawood, ’98, Kristen Mitchell, ’98, Marcus LaPratt, ’98. (Back row) Sheila Abunassar Wilhelm, ’98, Nancy Noechel Rhatigan, ’97, Heidi Schwandt Depault, ’97, Thad Wilhelm, ’98, Herb Lentz, ’00, Michael Swisher, ’98, Ben Stephen, ’98, Emily Willis Stephen, ’98, Craig Olzak, ’00, Amanda Cowger, ’98, Amy Mayo-Moyle, ’97, Betsy Beauman, ’97.

Melissa Sharpe, ’00, to Troy Markel on May 29, 2004. (Left to right) Carrie Cangelosi, ’02, Tim Johnson, ’01, Erin Marasco-Johnson, ’01, Melissa Sharpe Markel, ’00, Troy Markel, Sarah Hartley, ’00, Amy Schreiber Czarnecki, ’99, and Tim Czarnecki, ’00.

Michael Swisher, ’98, to Claire Walton, ’99, on July 23, 2004. (Front row, left to right) Thad Wilhelm, ’98, Michael Swisher, ’98, Claire Walton-Swisher, ’99, Marcus LaPratt, ’98. (Second row) Jennifer Ludwig Martin, ’98, Sheila Abunassar Wilhelm, ’98, Emily Willis Stephen, ’98, Amanda Cowger, ’98, William Gallagher, ’99, Christina Lombardo Johnson, ’99, Craig Olzak, ’00. (Third row) Ben Stephen, ’98, Kristen Mitchell, ’98, Jennifer Kaiser-Blase, ’99, Amy Mayo-Moyle, ’97, Heidi Schwandt Depault, ’97, Rebecca Grady, ’99.

T.J. Whitehouse, ’99, to Annie Topie, ’01, on Sept. 4, 2004. (Front row, left to right) James Whitehouse, ’69, Jill Whitehouse, ’01, Keith Whitehouse, ’41, Lorene Rupp Whitehouse, ’41, T.J. Whitehouse, ’99, Annie Topie Whitehouse, ’01. (Second row) Scott Johnston, ’00, Dan Schleicher, ’98, Scott Schumacher, ’99, Ellie Whitlock Schumacher, ’99, Marsha Green Whitehouse, ’70, Matt Topie, ’99, Lesly Wilberding, ’01, Laurel Weinman, ’01, Ben Upward, ’00, Susie Stuewer, ’70, John Lessway, ’00, Andrea Carollo Lessway, ’01, Andy Lewis, ’01. (Third row) Charles Thomas, ’01, Elyse Minnick, ’01, Peter Butler, ’01, Chris Manuilow, ’01, Nicole Macy Hunter, ’01, Scott Stoy, ’97, Kelly Garbacz Stoy, ’00, Jaime Corte Christopher, ’98, Nick Christopher, ’98, Sabrina Corte Livermore, ’00, Jake Livermore, ’00, Ben Richardson, ’00, Renee Francois, ’03, Jason Thomas, ’00, Jim Miner, ’69, Joe Gardner, ’99. (Fourth row) Tara Simonds Conner, ’01, Caren Wood Easley, ’00, Jon Easley, ’00, Jay Witthuhn, ’97, Steve Appleton, ’98, Matt Corona, ’99, Colby Bodzick, ’97, Vinny Pothacamury, ’98, Alex Costas, ’01, Alicia Costas, ’03, Sean Connell, ’96, Jason Whalen, ’00, George Lennon, ’98, Jessica Savanna Lemmon, ’98, Kirk Rosin, ’98, Chris Friggens, ’98, Debra Haan Friggens, ’99.

Joseph Verbeke, ’01, to Emily Dobbins, ’03, on June 26, 2004. (Front row, left to right) Sara Mangus, ’01, Marie Slowey Stellingworth, ’45, Nancy Hagans Dobbins, ’56, Dick Dobbins, Emily Dobbins Verbeke, ’03, Joseph Verbeke, ’01, Jacquanette Moody, ’01, Melanie Heying, ’03, Sheila Santa, ’02. (Second row) Joshua James, ’01, Debbie Hancock, James Ball, Becky Mitchell, Alyson Dobbins, Lance Knudson, ’72, Sandi Ulrich Dobbins, ’71, Karen Knudson Dobbins, ’74, Karl Dickason, ’04, Melissa Beatty Lewis, ’01, Becky Wessling Baker, ’00. (Third row) Ben Hancock, David Habicht, ’80, Mary Kinney Habicht, ’77, Peter Mitchell, ’67, Tom Dobbins, ’79, Jim Dobbins, ’69, Bill Dobbins, ’74, David Fleming, ’03, Ryan Lewis, ’98, Jim Baker, ’00.

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Wedding Album See accompanying notes for details.

Robert Olson, ’90, to Jennifer Gordon on Oct. 23, 2004. (Front row) Eric DeWeerd, ’91. (Second row, left to right) Larry Jones, ’90, Rob Olson, ’90, Jennifer Gordon Olson, Bob Olson, ’57. (Back row) Chris Klinke, ’91, Trent Meyerhoefer, ’90, Grant Grinnell, ’57, Terry DeWeerd, Diane DeWeerd, Mary Sterling Eifert, ’90.

Christina Lombardo, ’99, to Bryan Johnson on Jan. 1, 2005. (Front row, left to right) Jennifer Kaiser-Blase, ’99, Christina Lombardo Johnson, ’99, Bryan Johnson, Paul Ogg, ’91. (Second row) Claire Walton-Swisher, ’99, Julie Darnton, ’99, Alana McClelland, ’97, Stephanie Beebe, ’98, Clark Dawood, ’98, Kristen Mitchell, ’98, Marcus LaPratt, ’98. (Back row) Sheila Abunassar Wilhelm, ’98, Nancy Noechel Rhatigan, ’97, Heidi Schwandt Depault, ’97, Thad Wilhelm, ’98, Herb Lentz, ’00, Michael Swisher, ’98, Ben Stephen, ’98, Emily Willis Stephen, ’98, Craig Olzak, ’00, Amanda Cowger, ’98, Amy Mayo-Moyle, ’97, Betsy Beauman, ’97.

Melissa Sharpe, ’00, to Troy Markel on May 29, 2004. (Left to right) Carrie Cangelosi, ’02, Tim Johnson, ’01, Erin Marasco-Johnson, ’01, Melissa Sharpe Markel, ’00, Troy Markel, Sarah Hartley, ’00, Amy Schreiber Czarnecki, ’99, and Tim Czarnecki, ’00.

Michael Swisher, ’98, to Claire Walton, ’99, on July 23, 2004. (Front row, left to right) Thad Wilhelm, ’98, Michael Swisher, ’98, Claire Walton-Swisher, ’99, Marcus LaPratt, ’98. (Second row) Jennifer Ludwig Martin, ’98, Sheila Abunassar Wilhelm, ’98, Emily Willis Stephen, ’98, Amanda Cowger, ’98, William Gallagher, ’99, Christina Lombardo Johnson, ’99, Craig Olzak, ’00. (Third row) Ben Stephen, ’98, Kristen Mitchell, ’98, Jennifer Kaiser-Blase, ’99, Amy Mayo-Moyle, ’97, Heidi Schwandt Depault, ’97, Rebecca Grady, ’99.

T.J. Whitehouse, ’99, to Annie Topie, ’01, on Sept. 4, 2004. (Front row, left to right) James Whitehouse, ’69, Jill Whitehouse, ’01, Keith Whitehouse, ’41, Lorene Rupp Whitehouse, ’41, T.J. Whitehouse, ’99, Annie Topie Whitehouse, ’01. (Second row) Scott Johnston, ’00, Dan Schleicher, ’98, Scott Schumacher, ’99, Ellie Whitlock Schumacher, ’99, Marsha Green Whitehouse, ’70, Matt Topie, ’99, Lesly Wilberding, ’01, Laurel Weinman, ’01, Ben Upward, ’00, Susie Stuewer, ’70, John Lessway, ’00, Andrea Carollo Lessway, ’01, Andy Lewis, ’01. (Third row) Charles Thomas, ’01, Elyse Minnick, ’01, Peter Butler, ’01, Chris Manuilow, ’01, Nicole Macy Hunter, ’01, Scott Stoy, ’97, Kelly Garbacz Stoy, ’00, Jaime Corte Christopher, ’98, Nick Christopher, ’98, Sabrina Corte Livermore, ’00, Jake Livermore, ’00, Ben Richardson, ’00, Renee Francois, ’03, Jason Thomas, ’00, Jim Miner, ’69, Joe Gardner, ’99. (Fourth row) Tara Simonds Conner, ’01, Caren Wood Easley, ’00, Jon Easley, ’00, Jay Witthuhn, ’97, Steve Appleton, ’98, Matt Corona, ’99, Colby Bodzick, ’97, Vinny Pothacamury, ’98, Alex Costas, ’01, Alicia Costas, ’03, Sean Connell, ’96, Jason Whalen, ’00, George Lennon, ’98, Jessica Savanna Lemmon, ’98, Kirk Rosin, ’98, Chris Friggens, ’98, Debra Haan Friggens, ’99.

Joseph Verbeke, ’01, to Emily Dobbins, ’03, on June 26, 2004. (Front row, left to right) Sara Mangus, ’01, Marie Slowey Stellingworth, ’45, Nancy Hagans Dobbins, ’56, Dick Dobbins, Emily Dobbins Verbeke, ’03, Joseph Verbeke, ’01, Jacquanette Moody, ’01, Melanie Heying, ’03, Sheila Santa, ’02. (Second row) Joshua James, ’01, Debbie Hancock, James Ball, Becky Mitchell, Alyson Dobbins, Lance Knudson, ’72, Sandi Ulrich Dobbins, ’71, Karen Knudson Dobbins, ’74, Karl Dickason, ’04, Melissa Beatty Lewis, ’01, Becky Wessling Baker, ’00. (Third row) Ben Hancock, David Habicht, ’80, Mary Kinney Habicht, ’77, Peter Mitchell, ’67, Tom Dobbins, ’79, Jim Dobbins, ’69, Bill Dobbins, ’74, David Fleming, ’03, Ryan Lewis, ’98, Jim Baker, ’00.

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Alex Carroll, ’03, had a major role in The Work and the Glory, a film based on the best-selling series of books about the founding of the Mormon religion. The film had its Michigan premiere at a theater in Carroll’s hometown of Roscommon in February and opened nationally in March.

Kelly Harrold, ’02, to Christopher Rogers on April 9, 2005. (Left to right) Susan Laing, ’02, Amanda Goff, ’02, Emily McCarthy, ’02, Chris Rogers, Kelly Harrold Rogers, ’02, Josh James, ’01, Kat Bruner, ’02, and Vicki Kuo, ’02.

Jennifer Willard, ’01, to David Furchak on Jan. 15, 2005. (Front row, left to right) Hilary Hansen, ’01, Jennifer Willard Furchak, ’01, Angela Pierce, ’01, Juli Delucia, ’01. (Second row) Andrea Leonardis, ’01, Andrew Frick, ’01, Rick Strong, ’01, Amanda Etherton, ’01, Heather Mustonen, ’01. 40 39

43 44

42

46 47

41 27

48

45 30 31

49 50 51

52

54 53

55 56

59

57 58

33 37 36 24 Sarah Hepinstall, ’02, to Travis Rundle, 26 29 28 32 38 35 25 34 22 21 ’02, on June 5, 2004. (1) Mike Sequite, ’75. 16 15 23 17 14 19 13 20 7 (2) Sharon Sequite. (3) Mandy Konkle. 10 18 5 4 (4) Troy Rundle, ’05. (5) Lance Coleman, 6 12 2 1 9 ’91. (6) John Bennink, ’02. (7) Travis 8 11 3 Rundle, ’02. (8) Sarah Hepinstall Rundle, ’02. (9) Ann Rundle. (10) Craig Rundle, ’74. (11) Tara Kneeshaw, ’01. (12) Joyce Weiss Joranko, ’55. (13) Mark Garrison, ’71. (14) Thom Wilch. (15) Kristy Brierly. (16) John Stadelman, ’99. (17) Bill Poirier, ’02. (18) Alicia Costas, ’03. (19) Isa Salvador, ’02. (20) Marissa Nieman, ’01. (21) Melissa Church, ’02. (22) Mary Ann Stokes Egnatuk, ’76. (23) Frank Joranko, ’52. (24) Kerry Wright II, ’02. (25) Todd Ritter, ’02. (26) Jared Owens, ’02. (27) Laurel Weinman, ’01. (28) Brian Beeker, ’02. (29) Erik Vernon, ’02. (30) Dan Dreyer, ’02. (31) Nancy Polnasek. (32) Jeff Long, ’02. (33) Lindsay Humenny, ’05. (34) Chris Stefanes, ’03. (35) Carol Moss. (36) Bob Moss. (37) Michelle Summers, ’02. (38) Dave Egnatuk, ’71. (39) Jared Merchant, ’02. (40) Chris Rundle, ’72. (41) Nic Loafman, ’01. (42) Tyler Alpers, ’03. (43) Jason Whalen, ’00. (44) Leon McDonald III, ’03. (45) Chris Huff, ’02. (46) Shannon Spykerman Huff, ’02. (47) Greg Polnasek. (48) Bryan Heckman, ’02. (49) Lori Leszczynski, ’01. (50) Brooke Kilby, ’01. (51) Carmen Cotto, ’99. (52) Kees Hiatt, ’01. (53) Chris Brower, ’02. (54) Kristy Sholes, ’02. (55) Tom Johnson. (56) Mike Turner, ’69. (57) Peg Mitchell Turner, ’69. (58) Paul Anderson. (59) D.J. Rehberg, ’97. Not pictured: Jim Conway, ’87.

Alex Case, ’03, is a second-year law student at the University of Richmond School of Law. He was recently named the Allen Chair Editor for the University of Richmond Law Review. He lives in Richmond, VA. Mackenzie Bickel, ’04, is a licensed inhouse claims adjuster for Hagerty Insurance Agency, based in Traverse City. She handles the East Coast of the United States. Mackenzie lives in Traverse City. Jamie Druse, ’04, has been hired as a law clerk for George Patrick and Associates of Crown Point, IN. She will continue to work part-time during the school year and full-time in the summer and during holidays. She is a student at Valparaiso University School of Law (VUSL).

Faculty and friends Two Albion residents with close ties to Albion College received Battle Creek Enquirer George Awards this spring. Sharon Hostetler, a retired Albion College staff member, was honored for her work in developing Kids Cardiac Life Support, a program that teaches young children how to deal with emergency situations. The program, run entirely with volunteers, shows children how to dial 911 and how to do rescue breathing, and it also covers healthy lifestyles. Hostetler, who is married to Phil Hostetler, professor emeritus of psychology, has operated her program in the Albion Public Schools for many years, and also took it to South Africa. Robina Quale-Leach, professor emerita of history, was recognized for her tireless community activism. The Albion Community Initiative, a grassroots campaign she helped organize several years ago, assists unemployed industrial workers in finding health care and new jobs. More recently, she began an effort, in partnership with the Albion Community Foundation, to raise funds to help area residents in meeting housing code requirements. She is also active in the local NAACP and St. James Episcopal Church.

Weddings

Rachel Todd, ’04, to David Hansen, ’03, on June 12, 2004. (Left to right) Angie Spain, ’04, Karen Dumas, ’04, Martin Ludington, ’64, Jennifer Timpner, ’04, Daniel Knapp, ’04, Rachel Todd Hansen, ’04, Ron Leyder, ’05, David Hansen, ’03, Denny VanCleve, ’02, Courtney Mangus, ’06, Rebecca Reichle VanCleve, ’03, Lynn Skipper, ’06, Alisha Cusack, ’05, Nikell McCarthy, ’03, Stephen Fritz, ’05, Lynn Kulpa, ’06, Marci Nelson, ’04, David Schrock, ’02, Lindsay Drewes, ’05, Jon Leazenby, ’05, Eric Tosh, ’03.

Natalie Papcun, ’02, to Kyle Gasiorowski on Jan. 17, 2004. (Front row, left to right) Kyle Gasiorowski, Natalie Papcun Gasiorowski, ’02, Kristin Degel, ’02. (Second row) Jennifer Barrett, ’04, Melissa Gerst, ’04, Emily Deveau, ’04, Karen Reed, ’02, Jessica Hauser, ’04, Melissa Mears Harns, ’02, Caitlin Fitzgerald, ’04, Heidi Schurman, ’02. (Third row) Matthew Benson, ’05, Emily Arend, ’02, Lisa Whiteley, ’02, Jim Robbins, ’03, Mike Compton, ’04, Tony Hillman, ’01.

David Badour, ’90, to Melissa Ciccarelli on Jan. 22, 2005 in Ocho Rios, Jamaica. Wedding guests included best man Dominic Livedoti, ’90. David works as the vice president of business development for Emergency Physicians Medical Group, PC, in Ann Arbor. Melissa works as a fitness specialist at the Fairlane Club in Dearborn. The couple lives in Farmington Hills. Robert Olson, ’90, to Jennifer Gordon on Oct. 23, 2004 on the grounds of the Chautauqua Institution on Chautauqua Lake in western New York. The couple

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lives in Shaker Heights, OH. (See accompanying photo.) Ann Walsh, ’94, to Scott Norton on July 17, 2004 in Winnetka, IL. Ann is a reading specialist for New Trier School System. Scott is employed by Accenture. They live in Chicago, IL. Amy Peters, ’95, to William Recor on Feb. 19, 2005 in Puerto Adventuras, Mexico. Amy is employed by Mona Shores Public Schools. William is employed by the City of Grand Rapids. The couple lives in Spring Lake. Andrew Galloway, ’96, to Nicole Eyre on Aug. 28, 2004. Andrew is a loan officer for Fidelity Mortgage Co., Bay City. Nicole is office manager for Hantz Financial Services. The Galloways live in Bay City. Robert Britt, ’98, to Abigail Gaetzi on Nov. 6, 2004. Robert is employed by Cintas Corp. in Grand Rapids. Abigail is employed by Generation Care Physical Therapy in Muskegon. The couple lives in Fruitport. Christopher Friggens, ’98, to Debra Haan, ’99, on July 31, 2004 in Spring Lake. Albion alums in the wedding included father of the bride, David Haan, ’58, , father of the groom, Thomas Friggens, ’71, and Michael Friggens, ’02, best man and brother of the groom. Christopher is employed by Inforte Corp., Chicago, IL, as a senior consultant. Debra is employed with Manning Selvage & Lee, Chicago, as a public relations account executive. The couple lives in Chicago.

Colleen Grifka, ’98, to Brian Buda on May 29, 2004 in Troy. Colleen earned a master’s degree from Grand Valley State University. She is employed as a physician assistant in surgical oncology at the University of Michigan Health Systems in Ann Arbor. Brian is employed as senior program manager of international business at Meridian Automotive Systems in Dearborn. The couple lives in Ypsilanti. Michael Swisher, ’98, to Claire Walton, ’99, on July 23, 2004 in Plymouth. Michael is teaching general music for Walled Lake Schools. Claire is teaching language arts at Pioneer Middle School in Plymouth-Canton. The couple lives in Royal Oak and can be reached via e-mail at: mpswisher@hotmail.com. (See accompanying photo.) Christina Lombardo, ’99, to Bryan Johnson on Jan. 1, 2005 in Northville. (See accompanying photo.) T.J. Whitehouse, ’99, to Annie Topie, ’01 on Sept. 4, 2004. (See accompanying photo.) Melissa Sharpe, ’00, to Troy Markel on May 29, 2004 in East Lansing. Melissa and Troy completed medical school at Penn State College of Medicine in May 2004. They are now completing their respective residency programs in pediatrics and surgery at Indiana University. They live in Indianapolis, IN. (See accompanying photo.) Crystal Shaw, ’01, to Jeff Brick on April 2, 2004 on the beach in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Crystal is a geologist for

Tecumseh Professional Associates, Inc., an environmental consulting firm. Jeff is a health and safety manager for Hall Environmental Analysis Laboratory, Inc. The couple lives in Albuquerque, NM. Joseph Verbeke, ’01, to Emily Dobbins, ’03, on June 26, 2004 in Jackson. The couple lives in Denver, CO. (See accompanying photo.) Jennifer Willard, ’01, to David Furchak on Jan. 15, 2005. (See accompanying photo.) Kelly Harrold, ’02, to Christopher Rogers on April 9, 2005. Kelly is an associate attorney with the litigation firm of Janik & Dorman LLP in Cleveland, OH. Her focus is on insurance and corporate defense. Christopher is currently working at Home Depot. He recently finished a four-year stint with the U.S. Navy and will attend college in the fall. The couple lives in Copley, OH. (See accompanying photo.) Sarah Hepinstall, ’02, to Travis Rundle, ’02, on June 5, 2004. Sarah is a senior research technician at Penn State University in the Nutrition Department, and Travis is a graduate assistant for the Penn State football team and coaches the defensive ends. The couple resides in State College, PA. (See accompanying photo.) Natalie Papcun, ’02, to Kyle Gasiorowski on Jan. 17, 2004. (See accompanying photo.) Rachel Todd, ’04, to David Hansen, ’03, on June 12, 2004. (See accompanying photo.)

News for Albionotes Please use the space below to send your news about promotions, honors, appointments, marriages, births/ adoptions, travels and hobbies. When reporting information on a recent marriage, please provide date, location, and Albion-connected guests and their class years; also indicate any changes in legal name for you and your spouse. When reporting information on a death, please provide date, location, and Albion-connected survivors and their class years. Use of this form will help guarantee inclusion of your news in an upcoming issue of Io Triumphe. We try to process all class note information promptly, but please note that the Albionotes deadline falls several weeks prior to publication. If your information arrives after the deadline for a given issue, it will be held and included in the succeeding issue. Name ______________________________________________________ Class year ____________________ (Please print name)

Preferred title ■ Mr.

■ Dr.

■ Mrs.

■ Ms.

■ Miss

Please join the Class of 2005 and give back to your Alma Mater

■ No title

Home address _____________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State ___________ ZIP ______________ Home telephone ____________________________ Home e-mail address _____________________________ Business address ___________________________________________________________________________ City ____________________________________________________ State ___________ ZIP _____________ Business telephone __________________________ Business e-mail address ___________________________ (Or simply attach a copy of your business card.) Check here if this is a new address. Also, if you have a winter address that is different from your permanent address, indicate it in the space below along with the months when you reside at that address.

News notes (Attach additional sheet, if necessary.)

Send to: Editor, Io Triumphe, Office of Communications, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224; or send via e-mail to: classnotes@albion.edu. Be sure to include your full name, class year, address (geographic and e-mail) and telephone number in your e-mail message.

Congratulations to this year’s graduates! 87%

$19,369

of the class made their first gift to Albion.

was given back to the College!

This is the highest participation rate in the history of the Senior Class Gift Program.

A new fiscal year has just begun for the Albion Annual Fund. Help us start it out right and become one of the first to give. Office of Annual Giving • 611 E. Porter St. • Albion, MI 49224 517/629-0448 • Web: www.albion.edu/alumni/giving.asp

Baby Britons Cera Marissa on Jan. 11, 2004 in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala and adopted by Paul Mlotkowski and Susan Huepenbecker, ’86, on June 14, 2004. Susan is the director of print production for BBDO Detroit. The family lives in Royal Oak. Matthew Schuyler on Jan. 15, 2005 to Russell and Elizabeth VerPlank Kerl, ’87. Proud grandparents are Joel and Susan Yates VerPlank, both ’59. The family lives in Killen, AL. Cassidy Dru on Feb. 19, 2005 to Jeff and Cathi Zimmer Myer, ’88. She joins big brother Duncan, 2. They live in Burlington, MA, and can be reached via e-mail at: cmyer@rcn.com. Max Damian on Aug. 27, 2004 to Damian, ’89, and Rebecca KalbHayden, ’90. He joins big brothers Connor, 10, Quinn, 9, and Cole, 4. The family lives in Royal Oak. Domenic Lawrence on March 17, 2005 to Kate and Richard Bruno, ’91. He joins big sister Grace Margaret, 20 months. The Brunos live in Rochester. Madeleine Grace on Nov. 11, 2004 to Suzanne and Matt Croissant, ’91. Suzanne is an attorney with Dickinson Wright. Matt is a financial advisor with Wachovia Securities. The family lives in Clarkston and can be reached via e-mail at: croissant@sbcglobal.net. Abraham Jeremiah on Sept. 17, 2004 to Mark and Rebecca Russell Thompson, both ’91. He joins big brothers Noah James, 7, and Jonah Michael, 5. Mark is the program director for the University of Wisconsin Fox Valley Family Practice Residency Program. Rebecca works as the executive director of the Fox Cities Community Health Center. They live in Appleton, WI.

Thomas Martin on Feb. 9, 2005 to Stephan and Elisa Jensen Wuench, ’91. He joins big sister Olivia, 2. The family lives in Brighton. Avelina in September 2004 to Vince and Amy Goodwin Parlove, ’92. She joins siblings Gianna, 5, and Rocco, 3. The Parloves live in Brighton. Gavin Conner on April 4, 2005 to Laura and Christopher Sale, ’92. He joins big brother Matthew. The family lives in Columbus, OH. Lauren Elizabeth on Feb. 20, 2005 to Christena and Mark Sinila, ’92. She joins big brother Benjamin Andrew, 3. They live in Okemos. Andrew Jack on Nov. 10, 2004 to Cory and Dana Teague Bultman, ’93. He joins big brother Lance. The family lives in Rockford. Caroline Audrey on April 11, 2005 to Rob and Lisa Bremer Henry, both ’93. Rob is a high school social studies and English teacher. Lisa is a high school French teacher. The Henrys live in Spring Lake. Owen Daniel on March 3, 2005 to Sheri and Dan Ackerman, ’94. They live in Dexter. William Lawrence on March 1, 2005 to Michelle and Keith Clark, ’94. He joins big sister Grace. The Clarks live in Royal Oak. Evan Daniel on March 28, 2005 to Dan and Julie Hamrick-Cosgrove, ’95. He joins big sister Cara Grace. The family lives in Canton. Tate Lawrence on Dec. 8, 2004 to Tom and Sheryl Fischer Jacobs, both ’95. He joins big brothers Fischer, 3, and Colton, 2. The family lives in Horton and can be reached via e-mail at: tomjacobsfamily@netscape.com.

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lives in Shaker Heights, OH. (See accompanying photo.) Ann Walsh, ’94, to Scott Norton on July 17, 2004 in Winnetka, IL. Ann is a reading specialist for New Trier School System. Scott is employed by Accenture. They live in Chicago, IL. Amy Peters, ’95, to William Recor on Feb. 19, 2005 in Puerto Adventuras, Mexico. Amy is employed by Mona Shores Public Schools. William is employed by the City of Grand Rapids. The couple lives in Spring Lake. Andrew Galloway, ’96, to Nicole Eyre on Aug. 28, 2004. Andrew is a loan officer for Fidelity Mortgage Co., Bay City. Nicole is office manager for Hantz Financial Services. The Galloways live in Bay City. Robert Britt, ’98, to Abigail Gaetzi on Nov. 6, 2004. Robert is employed by Cintas Corp. in Grand Rapids. Abigail is employed by Generation Care Physical Therapy in Muskegon. The couple lives in Fruitport. Christopher Friggens, ’98, to Debra Haan, ’99, on July 31, 2004 in Spring Lake. Albion alums in the wedding included father of the bride, David Haan, ’58, , father of the groom, Thomas Friggens, ’71, and Michael Friggens, ’02, best man and brother of the groom. Christopher is employed by Inforte Corp., Chicago, IL, as a senior consultant. Debra is employed with Manning Selvage & Lee, Chicago, as a public relations account executive. The couple lives in Chicago.

Colleen Grifka, ’98, to Brian Buda on May 29, 2004 in Troy. Colleen earned a master’s degree from Grand Valley State University. She is employed as a physician assistant in surgical oncology at the University of Michigan Health Systems in Ann Arbor. Brian is employed as senior program manager of international business at Meridian Automotive Systems in Dearborn. The couple lives in Ypsilanti. Michael Swisher, ’98, to Claire Walton, ’99, on July 23, 2004 in Plymouth. Michael is teaching general music for Walled Lake Schools. Claire is teaching language arts at Pioneer Middle School in Plymouth-Canton. The couple lives in Royal Oak and can be reached via e-mail at: mpswisher@hotmail.com. (See accompanying photo.) Christina Lombardo, ’99, to Bryan Johnson on Jan. 1, 2005 in Northville. (See accompanying photo.) T.J. Whitehouse, ’99, to Annie Topie, ’01 on Sept. 4, 2004. (See accompanying photo.) Melissa Sharpe, ’00, to Troy Markel on May 29, 2004 in East Lansing. Melissa and Troy completed medical school at Penn State College of Medicine in May 2004. They are now completing their respective residency programs in pediatrics and surgery at Indiana University. They live in Indianapolis, IN. (See accompanying photo.) Crystal Shaw, ’01, to Jeff Brick on April 2, 2004 on the beach in St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Crystal is a geologist for

Tecumseh Professional Associates, Inc., an environmental consulting firm. Jeff is a health and safety manager for Hall Environmental Analysis Laboratory, Inc. The couple lives in Albuquerque, NM. Joseph Verbeke, ’01, to Emily Dobbins, ’03, on June 26, 2004 in Jackson. The couple lives in Denver, CO. (See accompanying photo.) Jennifer Willard, ’01, to David Furchak on Jan. 15, 2005. (See accompanying photo.) Kelly Harrold, ’02, to Christopher Rogers on April 9, 2005. Kelly is an associate attorney with the litigation firm of Janik & Dorman LLP in Cleveland, OH. Her focus is on insurance and corporate defense. Christopher is currently working at Home Depot. He recently finished a four-year stint with the U.S. Navy and will attend college in the fall. The couple lives in Copley, OH. (See accompanying photo.) Sarah Hepinstall, ’02, to Travis Rundle, ’02, on June 5, 2004. Sarah is a senior research technician at Penn State University in the Nutrition Department, and Travis is a graduate assistant for the Penn State football team and coaches the defensive ends. The couple resides in State College, PA. (See accompanying photo.) Natalie Papcun, ’02, to Kyle Gasiorowski on Jan. 17, 2004. (See accompanying photo.) Rachel Todd, ’04, to David Hansen, ’03, on June 12, 2004. (See accompanying photo.)

News for Albionotes Please use the space below to send your news about promotions, honors, appointments, marriages, births/ adoptions, travels and hobbies. When reporting information on a recent marriage, please provide date, location, and Albion-connected guests and their class years; also indicate any changes in legal name for you and your spouse. When reporting information on a death, please provide date, location, and Albion-connected survivors and their class years. Use of this form will help guarantee inclusion of your news in an upcoming issue of Io Triumphe. We try to process all class note information promptly, but please note that the Albionotes deadline falls several weeks prior to publication. If your information arrives after the deadline for a given issue, it will be held and included in the succeeding issue. Name ______________________________________________________ Class year ____________________ (Please print name)

Preferred title ■ Mr.

■ Dr.

■ Mrs.

■ Ms.

■ Miss

Please join the Class of 2005 and give back to your Alma Mater

■ No title

Home address _____________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State ___________ ZIP ______________ Home telephone ____________________________ Home e-mail address _____________________________ Business address ___________________________________________________________________________ City ____________________________________________________ State ___________ ZIP _____________ Business telephone __________________________ Business e-mail address ___________________________ (Or simply attach a copy of your business card.) Check here if this is a new address. Also, if you have a winter address that is different from your permanent address, indicate it in the space below along with the months when you reside at that address.

News notes (Attach additional sheet, if necessary.)

Send to: Editor, Io Triumphe, Office of Communications, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224; or send via e-mail to: classnotes@albion.edu. Be sure to include your full name, class year, address (geographic and e-mail) and telephone number in your e-mail message.

Congratulations to this year’s graduates! 87%

$19,369

of the class made their first gift to Albion.

was given back to the College!

This is the highest participation rate in the history of the Senior Class Gift Program.

A new fiscal year has just begun for the Albion Annual Fund. Help us start it out right and become one of the first to give. Office of Annual Giving • 611 E. Porter St. • Albion, MI 49224 517/629-0448 • Web: www.albion.edu/alumni/giving.asp

Baby Britons Cera Marissa on Jan. 11, 2004 in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala and adopted by Paul Mlotkowski and Susan Huepenbecker, ’86, on June 14, 2004. Susan is the director of print production for BBDO Detroit. The family lives in Royal Oak. Matthew Schuyler on Jan. 15, 2005 to Russell and Elizabeth VerPlank Kerl, ’87. Proud grandparents are Joel and Susan Yates VerPlank, both ’59. The family lives in Killen, AL. Cassidy Dru on Feb. 19, 2005 to Jeff and Cathi Zimmer Myer, ’88. She joins big brother Duncan, 2. They live in Burlington, MA, and can be reached via e-mail at: cmyer@rcn.com. Max Damian on Aug. 27, 2004 to Damian, ’89, and Rebecca KalbHayden, ’90. He joins big brothers Connor, 10, Quinn, 9, and Cole, 4. The family lives in Royal Oak. Domenic Lawrence on March 17, 2005 to Kate and Richard Bruno, ’91. He joins big sister Grace Margaret, 20 months. The Brunos live in Rochester. Madeleine Grace on Nov. 11, 2004 to Suzanne and Matt Croissant, ’91. Suzanne is an attorney with Dickinson Wright. Matt is a financial advisor with Wachovia Securities. The family lives in Clarkston and can be reached via e-mail at: croissant@sbcglobal.net. Abraham Jeremiah on Sept. 17, 2004 to Mark and Rebecca Russell Thompson, both ’91. He joins big brothers Noah James, 7, and Jonah Michael, 5. Mark is the program director for the University of Wisconsin Fox Valley Family Practice Residency Program. Rebecca works as the executive director of the Fox Cities Community Health Center. They live in Appleton, WI.

Thomas Martin on Feb. 9, 2005 to Stephan and Elisa Jensen Wuench, ’91. He joins big sister Olivia, 2. The family lives in Brighton. Avelina in September 2004 to Vince and Amy Goodwin Parlove, ’92. She joins siblings Gianna, 5, and Rocco, 3. The Parloves live in Brighton. Gavin Conner on April 4, 2005 to Laura and Christopher Sale, ’92. He joins big brother Matthew. The family lives in Columbus, OH. Lauren Elizabeth on Feb. 20, 2005 to Christena and Mark Sinila, ’92. She joins big brother Benjamin Andrew, 3. They live in Okemos. Andrew Jack on Nov. 10, 2004 to Cory and Dana Teague Bultman, ’93. He joins big brother Lance. The family lives in Rockford. Caroline Audrey on April 11, 2005 to Rob and Lisa Bremer Henry, both ’93. Rob is a high school social studies and English teacher. Lisa is a high school French teacher. The Henrys live in Spring Lake. Owen Daniel on March 3, 2005 to Sheri and Dan Ackerman, ’94. They live in Dexter. William Lawrence on March 1, 2005 to Michelle and Keith Clark, ’94. He joins big sister Grace. The Clarks live in Royal Oak. Evan Daniel on March 28, 2005 to Dan and Julie Hamrick-Cosgrove, ’95. He joins big sister Cara Grace. The family lives in Canton. Tate Lawrence on Dec. 8, 2004 to Tom and Sheryl Fischer Jacobs, both ’95. He joins big brothers Fischer, 3, and Colton, 2. The family lives in Horton and can be reached via e-mail at: tomjacobsfamily@netscape.com.

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Frances “Frannie” Kathryn on Jan. 13, 2005 to Dominic and Helen Quenneville Kiomento, both ’95. She joins big brother James, 1. Dominic and Helen both work for the same small hospital outside Cincinnati, OH. They live in Sardinia, OH, and can be reached via e-mail at: dkiomento@hotmail.com. Mallory Catherine on Jan. 25, 2005 to Tony and Christine Kaufmann Schoendorff, ’95. The family lives in Swartz Creek. Emma Ryan on Oct. 26, 2004 to Jason and Mary Ann Greening White, both ’95. She joins big sister Abigail Grace, 3. The family lives in Troy and can be reached via e-mail at: white_shoes_white @yahoo.com. Cole Thomas on Dec. 19, 2004 to Mike, ’97, and Holly Hay Cabana, ’96. He joins big sister Kylie, 2. The Cabanas live in Dexter and can be reached via e-mail at: hcabana@comcast.net. Cooper Allen on Dec. 8, 2004 to Todd and Michelle Murawski Ciavola, ’96. He joins big sister Katie, 2. The family lives in Greensboro, GA. Charlotte Marie on March 22, 2005 to Scott, ’97, and Kelly Garbacz Stoy, ’00. The family lives in Plymouth and can be reached via e-mail at: kelly_stoy@ yahoo.com. Luke Charles on Feb. 24, 2005 to Shannon and Steven Willis, ’97. This is their second child. The family lives in Grand Haven. Logan Christopher on Feb. 10, 2005 to Christopher and Mary Garner Durant, ’98. He joins big sister Hannah, 3. They live in Hilliard, OH, and can be reached via e-mail at: cmdurant@sbcglobal.net. Joshua James on Feb. 25, 2005 to Dan and Jaime Hatherly Loch, ’98. Proud aunts and uncles include Beth Hatherly, ’98, Rob Hatherly, ’02, and Dan McCarty, ’99. The family lives in Rochester and can be reached via e-mail at: j_loch2328@hotmail.com. Bryce Alexander on Feb. 4, 2005 to Jeff and Erica Peterson Garbacz, both ’99. The family lives in Royal Oak and can be reached via e-mail at: erica_garbacz @yahoo.com. Derek John on March 23, 2005 to John and Beth Grewe Orr, ’99. He joins big sister Cassidy Jayne. The family lives in West Branch. Brendan Mason on March 21, 2005 to Cynthia and Zachary Posner, ’99. Zach is an attorney with Posner, Posner & Posner, located in downtown Detroit. The Posners live in West Bloomfield and can be reached via e-mail at: poz235@yahoo.com. Grace Sana on Aug. 27, 2004 to Nick and Melissa Jellen Angert, ’00. She joins big sister Elizabeth, 2. Melissa is a former teacher who is now a stay-at-home mom. The family lives in Philadelphia, PA, and can be reached via e-mail at: angerts00@yahoo.com. Hannah Effie on March 14, 2005 to Ryan and Sara Shunk Maurer, both ’00. They live in Farmington Hills. Rogan Alexander on Jan. 11, 2005 to Doug and Jennifer Jodway St. Martin, both ’00. He joins big sister Laila Paige. The family lives in Marietta, GA.

Obituaries Robert Gaskell, ’33, on March 5, 2005. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1940. He taught at the University of Alabama, Brown University and Iowa State University, before becoming the head of the Mathematics Research Laboratory at Boeing Aircraft in Seattle, WA. He returned to academia in 1959 at Oregon State University. He later served as chairman of the Mathematics Department at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA. Robert was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He lived in Pasadena, CA. He is survived by two children, including Robert Gaskell, ’68, five grandchildren, a great-granddaughter and a dear friend. George Gaunt, ’33, on Feb. 24, 2005. He was a member of First United Methodist Church of Birmingham, AL, and was also a member of the McDorman Sunday School. George was a partner in the Mims and Gaunt architectural firm. He was a graduate of the University of Michigan and served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy. He is survived by a daughter and three grandchildren. Jack Dart, ’34, on Feb. 23, 2005. He was a self-employed chemical engineer and a longtime resident of Potomac, MD. He graduated from the University of Michigan in 1937 and then worked for American Oil Co., Magnolia Petroleum Co., and Esso Research and Engineering Co. He also worked for Houdry Process Corp. from 1947 to 1962. In 1962, he became a partner in the chemical engineering consulting firm of Weinrich and Dart. Jack established his own consulting firm, J.C. Dart and Associates, in 1963. He also served as an adjunct professor of chemical engineering at Catholic University. He received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from Albion College in 1992. Jack is survived by four children, six grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and a cousin, Ann Reed Simpson, ’51. Fred Dimock, ’35, on Feb. 28, 2005. He earned degrees from the University of Michigan in 1937 and 1940. He served in the U.S. Army from 1942 to 1945. From 1946 to 1970, he was on the administrative staff of the University of Michigan Library. Fred retired to Florida in 1970, living in Pompano Beach, Marco Island and Naples. He is survived by a niece. Howard Miller, ’37, on Jan. 28, 2005. He and his wife operated an 80-acre farm in Portage. They traveled extensively, visiting every state in the United States and nearly every Canadian province. They also owned a home in Nobleton, FL, where they spent their winters for 31 years. Howard was a charter member of Knights of Pythias. He was a member of the Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife of nearly 70 years, Olive, two daughters, six grandchildren and 12 greatgrandchildren. Robert Tuttle, ’38, on Feb. 8, 2005. He was a founding partner of Swenk-Tuttle Press in Adrian, where he worked for more than 25 years. He was managing editor of Lakeland Boating magazine for over three years. In 1980, he and his wife, Marion, moved to Brandon, FL, and spent their summers on Derby Lake near Staunton. They moved to Ft. Myers, FL, in 1990. Robert was a lifelong member of

the United Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife, Marion Eastman Tuttle, ’38, three children, 10 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. William Henning, ’40, on Dec. 20, 2004 in Springfield, OH. He served as secretary, treasurer and general manager of Rose Hill Burial Park from 1956 to 1976. He was president of The American Cemetery Consultants Inc. from 1960 to 1989. Before that William was executive secretary of The Allegheny Co. Funeral Directors’ Association in Pittsburgh, PA, and executive secretary of The American Cemetery Association. He was president of The Ohio Association of Cemetery Superintendents and Officials in 1960-61. William was a member of Kiwanis and the United Methodist Church. He served in the U.S. Air Force during World War II. He attended the Northwestern University Law School and the University of Michigan. William is survived by his wife, Charlotte, two daughters, and four grandchildren. Marie Kuhn Homchis, ’40, on March 16, 2005. She lived in Northfield, OH. Marie is survived by a daughter, Judy Homchis Shoskey, ’64, a son-in-law, William Shoskey, ’63, and two granddaughters, Amy Shoskey, ’88, and Katie Shoskey Simon, ’90. Norman Sleight, ’40, on May 16, 2005 in Newark, OH. After pursuing graduate studies in nuclear chemistry, Norman worked as a research chemist for the U.S. government’s Manhattan Project during World War II. He then became an agent for State Farm Insurance in St. John’s, MI and earned his chartered life underwriter designation in 1951. Two years later, he was selected to start State Farm’s operation in Ohio. In 1961, he was named regional vice president (Ohio) and worked in that capacity until his retirement in 1985. Very involved in his community, Norman was a former president of the Newark Rotary Club and served as board president for Licking Memorial Hospital and as a trustee of the Mid-Ohio Health Planning Federation. He also headed the local United Way board and was an elder for the Second Presbyterian Church. Among his many honors, he received the Silver Beaver Award and the God and Service Award from the Boy Scouts of America and the Distinguished Alumni Award from Albion College. He is survived by a son, Douglas Sleight, ’65, a daughter, Susanne Fuller, three grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, brothers Stuart and Justin Sleight, ’43, and sister-in-law, Marjorie Wardell Sleight, ’44. Together with his late wife, Alethea, and with Justin and Marjorie Sleight, Norman established the Sleight Professorship in Leadership Studies and the Sleight Leadership Program at Albion College. Richard O’Donald, ’44, on Jan. 24, 2005. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He worked as an engineer at Rapistan in Grand Rapids. Richard is survived by his daughter, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Helen Hanchett Stone, ’45, on Dec. 1, 2004 in Sarasota, FL. She was a member of Delta Gamma sorority. Helen was a member of the Church of the Palms in Sarasota, as well as a social member of The Oaks Club and TPC Prestancia. She is survived by two sons and three grandchildren.

Raymond Safronoff, ’49, on Feb. 27, 2005 in Royal Oak. He was a summertime resident of Benzie County for the past 50 years. Raymond is survived by his wife, Virginia, four sons and five grandchildren. Bill Latham, ’51, on Sept. 28, 2004. He taught English, German and Latin for one year in Bessemer and two years at Jackson High School. He served in World War II. Bill built and owned Bill and Cliff’s Party Store along with his brother, Clifford. They sold the store after 12 years, and he built and owned Latham’s Plumbing and Electrical in Jackson for 21 years, retiring in 1989. Bill served on the Blackman Township board (Jackson County) as a trustee for 35 years. He was a lifetime member of the VFW and the Masons. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Betty, and two sons. Jack Newell, ’51, on June 7, 2004 in Bloomfield Hills. He was a graduate of the University of Michigan Business School. He was a group pension actuary and vice president of Maccabees Mutual Life Insurance Co, in Southfield, where he retired in 1988. Jack is survived by his wife, Marjorie Harger Newell, ’52, four children and six grandchildren. James Brayman, ’50, on April 1, 2005. He lived in Arvada, CO. He is survived by his wife, Susan. Robert Kouts, ’55, on April 11, 2005 in Traverse City. He was a member of the 1952 Albion College football team, which was inducted into the Albion College Athletic Hall of Fame. Robert served in the U.S. Navy as a teletype operator. He began a career with State Farm Insurance in 1958. Robert retired in 1993 as manager of Fire Company Commercial Lines. He is survived by his wife, Lynn Shirley Kouts, ’57, two children and four grandchildren. Alden “Monte” Burns, ’56, on Jan. 22, 2005 in Grand Rapids. He graduated from Garrett-Evangelical Seminary in Evanston, IL. He later served on its Board of Trustees, as well as being a trustee at Adrian College. Monte served eight church appointments in the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church over 43 years as a pastor. He retired in 1982, but continued to work part-time until 1996 at the Northwest United Methodist Church near Kalamazoo. On two occasions his clergy colleagues elected him to serve at the UMC General Conference, the legislative assembly for the conference. He also received an honorary doctorate from Albion College. Monte is survived by two sons, a daughter, six grandchildren, including William Alden Burns, ’84, four great-grandchildren and two stepgreat-grandchildren. Terry Banta, ’61, on April 4, 2005 in Norton Shores. He was an active member and missionary for Alcoholics Anonymous. He was employed at Multi State Insurance Center in Spring Lake as an independent insurance agent. Terry is survived by his wife, Barbara, three children, two step-children and eight grandchildren. Carol Turner-Elliott, ’61, on March 14, 2005 in àTerling Heights. She graduated from St. Clair Community College with a medical secretary degree. She lived in Sarasota, FL, from 1989 to 2000, but moved back to Michigan to be closer to her children and grandchildren. Carol is survived by three children, four grandchildren and a great-grandchild.

Patricia Pursell Mosley, ’62, on Dec. 7, 2004. She received her master’s degree from Western Michigan University. She taught in th3†Three Rivers Community School District at Park Community/ Howardsville two-room school, where she met her husband of 19 years. She was an active member of First Baptist Church in Portage. Nancy Alexander Van Gundy, ’71, on March 22, 2005 in Columbus, OH. She was employed at Abbott-Sysco for 21 years as a district sales manager and marketing associate. She was a past member of the Board of Trustees for the Central Ohio Restaurant Association. Nancy is survived by a son. Doan Hansen, ’75, on March 12, 2005. He lived in Miller Place, NY. After earning a master’s degree in 1981 and a Ph.D. in 1986, both from the University of Michigan, Doan joined the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Long Island, NY. In December 2000, he received the EPA’s Outstanding Contributions Award, as well as Vice President Al Gore’s Hammer Award. In 1997, Doan received the U.S. Department of Energy’s annual “Excellence in Emergency Management” award. He was the author of Work Environment: Vol. 1, 2 and 3, and had recently completed another book, as yet to be published, titled Planning. He was a certified industrial hygienist whose recent work was primarily aimed at preparedness for and prevention of terrorist acts. Doan founded his own consulting/ advisory company, Urban Health Inc., in mid-2003, while continuing his connection with the Department of Energy. He is survived by his mother and step-father, a sister and brother-in-law. Megan Snyder Theodore, ’75, on Oct. 20, 2004 in Akron, OH. She was a Montessori teacher who taught in San Francisco, CA, and Dayton, OH. Her last assignment was as elementary directress for the students at Hudson Montessori School in Hudson, OH. Megan was an avid reader and supporter of arts programs. She also promoted environmental awareness. She is survived by her husband, Michael. Susan Emmons Nolan, ’89, on March 28, 2005. She was a third grade teacher at Wealthy Elementary School in East Grand Rapids for 10 years. She is survived by her husband, Patrick, two children and three step-children. Jessica Longhurst, ’06, on April 10, 2005 in northern Australia. An Albion College junior, she was studying in Australia. Jessie was the co-valedictorian at Albion High School, where she graduated in 2002. A psychology major and member of the Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute, she was a Distinguished Albion Scholar and served as a LancyNCUR-FURSCA research scholar. Jessie was a member of Alpha Phi Omega and founder of the Gun Violence Prevention Program. She participated in swimming, track and cross country. She is survived by her parents, three sisters and grandparents. In memory of Jessie Longhurst, the Jessie’s Gift Mentoring Program has been established at Albion College by family and friends. It will encourage Albion students to volunteer as mentors with youths in the local community. Gifts may be sent to: Development Office, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224.

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Frances “Frannie” Kathryn on Jan. 13, 2005 to Dominic and Helen Quenneville Kiomento, both ’95. She joins big brother James, 1. Dominic and Helen both work for the same small hospital outside Cincinnati, OH. They live in Sardinia, OH, and can be reached via e-mail at: dkiomento@hotmail.com. Mallory Catherine on Jan. 25, 2005 to Tony and Christine Kaufmann Schoendorff, ’95. The family lives in Swartz Creek. Emma Ryan on Oct. 26, 2004 to Jason and Mary Ann Greening White, both ’95. She joins big sister Abigail Grace, 3. The family lives in Troy and can be reached via e-mail at: white_shoes_white @yahoo.com. Cole Thomas on Dec. 19, 2004 to Mike, ’97, and Holly Hay Cabana, ’96. He joins big sister Kylie, 2. The Cabanas live in Dexter and can be reached via e-mail at: hcabana@comcast.net. Cooper Allen on Dec. 8, 2004 to Todd and Michelle Murawski Ciavola, ’96. He joins big sister Katie, 2. The family lives in Greensboro, GA. Charlotte Marie on March 22, 2005 to Scott, ’97, and Kelly Garbacz Stoy, ’00. The family lives in Plymouth and can be reached via e-mail at: kelly_stoy@ yahoo.com. Luke Charles on Feb. 24, 2005 to Shannon and Steven Willis, ’97. This is their second child. The family lives in Grand Haven. Logan Christopher on Feb. 10, 2005 to Christopher and Mary Garner Durant, ’98. He joins big sister Hannah, 3. They live in Hilliard, OH, and can be reached via e-mail at: cmdurant@sbcglobal.net. Joshua James on Feb. 25, 2005 to Dan and Jaime Hatherly Loch, ’98. Proud aunts and uncles include Beth Hatherly, ’98, Rob Hatherly, ’02, and Dan McCarty, ’99. The family lives in Rochester and can be reached via e-mail at: j_loch2328@hotmail.com. Bryce Alexander on Feb. 4, 2005 to Jeff and Erica Peterson Garbacz, both ’99. The family lives in Royal Oak and can be reached via e-mail at: erica_garbacz @yahoo.com. Derek John on March 23, 2005 to John and Beth Grewe Orr, ’99. He joins big sister Cassidy Jayne. The family lives in West Branch. Brendan Mason on March 21, 2005 to Cynthia and Zachary Posner, ’99. Zach is an attorney with Posner, Posner & Posner, located in downtown Detroit. The Posners live in West Bloomfield and can be reached via e-mail at: poz235@yahoo.com. Grace Sana on Aug. 27, 2004 to Nick and Melissa Jellen Angert, ’00. She joins big sister Elizabeth, 2. Melissa is a former teacher who is now a stay-at-home mom. The family lives in Philadelphia, PA, and can be reached via e-mail at: angerts00@yahoo.com. Hannah Effie on March 14, 2005 to Ryan and Sara Shunk Maurer, both ’00. They live in Farmington Hills. Rogan Alexander on Jan. 11, 2005 to Doug and Jennifer Jodway St. Martin, both ’00. He joins big sister Laila Paige. The family lives in Marietta, GA.

Obituaries Robert Gaskell, ’33, on March 5, 2005. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1940. He taught at the University of Alabama, Brown University and Iowa State University, before becoming the head of the Mathematics Research Laboratory at Boeing Aircraft in Seattle, WA. He returned to academia in 1959 at Oregon State University. He later served as chairman of the Mathematics Department at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA. Robert was a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He lived in Pasadena, CA. He is survived by two children, including Robert Gaskell, ’68, five grandchildren, a great-granddaughter and a dear friend. George Gaunt, ’33, on Feb. 24, 2005. He was a member of First United Methodist Church of Birmingham, AL, and was also a member of the McDorman Sunday School. George was a partner in the Mims and Gaunt architectural firm. He was a graduate of the University of Michigan and served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy. He is survived by a daughter and three grandchildren. Jack Dart, ’34, on Feb. 23, 2005. He was a self-employed chemical engineer and a longtime resident of Potomac, MD. He graduated from the University of Michigan in 1937 and then worked for American Oil Co., Magnolia Petroleum Co., and Esso Research and Engineering Co. He also worked for Houdry Process Corp. from 1947 to 1962. In 1962, he became a partner in the chemical engineering consulting firm of Weinrich and Dart. Jack established his own consulting firm, J.C. Dart and Associates, in 1963. He also served as an adjunct professor of chemical engineering at Catholic University. He received the Distinguished Alumnus Award from Albion College in 1992. Jack is survived by four children, six grandchildren, four great-grandchildren and a cousin, Ann Reed Simpson, ’51. Fred Dimock, ’35, on Feb. 28, 2005. He earned degrees from the University of Michigan in 1937 and 1940. He served in the U.S. Army from 1942 to 1945. From 1946 to 1970, he was on the administrative staff of the University of Michigan Library. Fred retired to Florida in 1970, living in Pompano Beach, Marco Island and Naples. He is survived by a niece. Howard Miller, ’37, on Jan. 28, 2005. He and his wife operated an 80-acre farm in Portage. They traveled extensively, visiting every state in the United States and nearly every Canadian province. They also owned a home in Nobleton, FL, where they spent their winters for 31 years. Howard was a charter member of Knights of Pythias. He was a member of the Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife of nearly 70 years, Olive, two daughters, six grandchildren and 12 greatgrandchildren. Robert Tuttle, ’38, on Feb. 8, 2005. He was a founding partner of Swenk-Tuttle Press in Adrian, where he worked for more than 25 years. He was managing editor of Lakeland Boating magazine for over three years. In 1980, he and his wife, Marion, moved to Brandon, FL, and spent their summers on Derby Lake near Staunton. They moved to Ft. Myers, FL, in 1990. Robert was a lifelong member of

the United Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife, Marion Eastman Tuttle, ’38, three children, 10 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. William Henning, ’40, on Dec. 20, 2004 in Springfield, OH. He served as secretary, treasurer and general manager of Rose Hill Burial Park from 1956 to 1976. He was president of The American Cemetery Consultants Inc. from 1960 to 1989. Before that William was executive secretary of The Allegheny Co. Funeral Directors’ Association in Pittsburgh, PA, and executive secretary of The American Cemetery Association. He was president of The Ohio Association of Cemetery Superintendents and Officials in 1960-61. William was a member of Kiwanis and the United Methodist Church. He served in the U.S. Air Force during World War II. He attended the Northwestern University Law School and the University of Michigan. William is survived by his wife, Charlotte, two daughters, and four grandchildren. Marie Kuhn Homchis, ’40, on March 16, 2005. She lived in Northfield, OH. Marie is survived by a daughter, Judy Homchis Shoskey, ’64, a son-in-law, William Shoskey, ’63, and two granddaughters, Amy Shoskey, ’88, and Katie Shoskey Simon, ’90. Norman Sleight, ’40, on May 16, 2005 in Newark, OH. After pursuing graduate studies in nuclear chemistry, Norman worked as a research chemist for the U.S. government’s Manhattan Project during World War II. He then became an agent for State Farm Insurance in St. John’s, MI and earned his chartered life underwriter designation in 1951. Two years later, he was selected to start State Farm’s operation in Ohio. In 1961, he was named regional vice president (Ohio) and worked in that capacity until his retirement in 1985. Very involved in his community, Norman was a former president of the Newark Rotary Club and served as board president for Licking Memorial Hospital and as a trustee of the Mid-Ohio Health Planning Federation. He also headed the local United Way board and was an elder for the Second Presbyterian Church. Among his many honors, he received the Silver Beaver Award and the God and Service Award from the Boy Scouts of America and the Distinguished Alumni Award from Albion College. He is survived by a son, Douglas Sleight, ’65, a daughter, Susanne Fuller, three grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, brothers Stuart and Justin Sleight, ’43, and sister-in-law, Marjorie Wardell Sleight, ’44. Together with his late wife, Alethea, and with Justin and Marjorie Sleight, Norman established the Sleight Professorship in Leadership Studies and the Sleight Leadership Program at Albion College. Richard O’Donald, ’44, on Jan. 24, 2005. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He worked as an engineer at Rapistan in Grand Rapids. Richard is survived by his daughter, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Helen Hanchett Stone, ’45, on Dec. 1, 2004 in Sarasota, FL. She was a member of Delta Gamma sorority. Helen was a member of the Church of the Palms in Sarasota, as well as a social member of The Oaks Club and TPC Prestancia. She is survived by two sons and three grandchildren.

Raymond Safronoff, ’49, on Feb. 27, 2005 in Royal Oak. He was a summertime resident of Benzie County for the past 50 years. Raymond is survived by his wife, Virginia, four sons and five grandchildren. Bill Latham, ’51, on Sept. 28, 2004. He taught English, German and Latin for one year in Bessemer and two years at Jackson High School. He served in World War II. Bill built and owned Bill and Cliff’s Party Store along with his brother, Clifford. They sold the store after 12 years, and he built and owned Latham’s Plumbing and Electrical in Jackson for 21 years, retiring in 1989. Bill served on the Blackman Township board (Jackson County) as a trustee for 35 years. He was a lifetime member of the VFW and the Masons. He is survived by his wife of 49 years, Betty, and two sons. Jack Newell, ’51, on June 7, 2004 in Bloomfield Hills. He was a graduate of the University of Michigan Business School. He was a group pension actuary and vice president of Maccabees Mutual Life Insurance Co, in Southfield, where he retired in 1988. Jack is survived by his wife, Marjorie Harger Newell, ’52, four children and six grandchildren. James Brayman, ’50, on April 1, 2005. He lived in Arvada, CO. He is survived by his wife, Susan. Robert Kouts, ’55, on April 11, 2005 in Traverse City. He was a member of the 1952 Albion College football team, which was inducted into the Albion College Athletic Hall of Fame. Robert served in the U.S. Navy as a teletype operator. He began a career with State Farm Insurance in 1958. Robert retired in 1993 as manager of Fire Company Commercial Lines. He is survived by his wife, Lynn Shirley Kouts, ’57, two children and four grandchildren. Alden “Monte” Burns, ’56, on Jan. 22, 2005 in Grand Rapids. He graduated from Garrett-Evangelical Seminary in Evanston, IL. He later served on its Board of Trustees, as well as being a trustee at Adrian College. Monte served eight church appointments in the West Michigan Conference of the United Methodist Church over 43 years as a pastor. He retired in 1982, but continued to work part-time until 1996 at the Northwest United Methodist Church near Kalamazoo. On two occasions his clergy colleagues elected him to serve at the UMC General Conference, the legislative assembly for the conference. He also received an honorary doctorate from Albion College. Monte is survived by two sons, a daughter, six grandchildren, including William Alden Burns, ’84, four great-grandchildren and two stepgreat-grandchildren. Terry Banta, ’61, on April 4, 2005 in Norton Shores. He was an active member and missionary for Alcoholics Anonymous. He was employed at Multi State Insurance Center in Spring Lake as an independent insurance agent. Terry is survived by his wife, Barbara, three children, two step-children and eight grandchildren. Carol Turner-Elliott, ’61, on March 14, 2005 in àTerling Heights. She graduated from St. Clair Community College with a medical secretary degree. She lived in Sarasota, FL, from 1989 to 2000, but moved back to Michigan to be closer to her children and grandchildren. Carol is survived by three children, four grandchildren and a great-grandchild.

Patricia Pursell Mosley, ’62, on Dec. 7, 2004. She received her master’s degree from Western Michigan University. She taught in th3†Three Rivers Community School District at Park Community/ Howardsville two-room school, where she met her husband of 19 years. She was an active member of First Baptist Church in Portage. Nancy Alexander Van Gundy, ’71, on March 22, 2005 in Columbus, OH. She was employed at Abbott-Sysco for 21 years as a district sales manager and marketing associate. She was a past member of the Board of Trustees for the Central Ohio Restaurant Association. Nancy is survived by a son. Doan Hansen, ’75, on March 12, 2005. He lived in Miller Place, NY. After earning a master’s degree in 1981 and a Ph.D. in 1986, both from the University of Michigan, Doan joined the Brookhaven National Laboratory in Long Island, NY. In December 2000, he received the EPA’s Outstanding Contributions Award, as well as Vice President Al Gore’s Hammer Award. In 1997, Doan received the U.S. Department of Energy’s annual “Excellence in Emergency Management” award. He was the author of Work Environment: Vol. 1, 2 and 3, and had recently completed another book, as yet to be published, titled Planning. He was a certified industrial hygienist whose recent work was primarily aimed at preparedness for and prevention of terrorist acts. Doan founded his own consulting/ advisory company, Urban Health Inc., in mid-2003, while continuing his connection with the Department of Energy. He is survived by his mother and step-father, a sister and brother-in-law. Megan Snyder Theodore, ’75, on Oct. 20, 2004 in Akron, OH. She was a Montessori teacher who taught in San Francisco, CA, and Dayton, OH. Her last assignment was as elementary directress for the students at Hudson Montessori School in Hudson, OH. Megan was an avid reader and supporter of arts programs. She also promoted environmental awareness. She is survived by her husband, Michael. Susan Emmons Nolan, ’89, on March 28, 2005. She was a third grade teacher at Wealthy Elementary School in East Grand Rapids for 10 years. She is survived by her husband, Patrick, two children and three step-children. Jessica Longhurst, ’06, on April 10, 2005 in northern Australia. An Albion College junior, she was studying in Australia. Jessie was the co-valedictorian at Albion High School, where she graduated in 2002. A psychology major and member of the Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute, she was a Distinguished Albion Scholar and served as a LancyNCUR-FURSCA research scholar. Jessie was a member of Alpha Phi Omega and founder of the Gun Violence Prevention Program. She participated in swimming, track and cross country. She is survived by her parents, three sisters and grandparents. In memory of Jessie Longhurst, the Jessie’s Gift Mentoring Program has been established at Albion College by family and friends. It will encourage Albion students to volunteer as mentors with youths in the local community. Gifts may be sent to: Development Office, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224.

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Four new members join board The Alumni Association Board of Directors has appointed four new members and reappointed two incumbents to fill terms beginning July 1, 2005. Named to a second term were: Brian Fox, ’73, and Robin Gearhart, ’96. The following are new to the board: ■ Sarah Cooper, ’03. While on campus, Sarah Cooper was involved in a variety of activities. As a member of Alpha Xi Delta sorority, she served as house activities chairperson and historian. She was one of the founding members of the EduAction Club and later became coordinator. As a student, Cooper worked in the Office of Institutional Advancement as a phonathon manager, sat on the LIBERAL ARTS AT WORK Campaign Leadership Committee, and was a member of the Senior Class Gift Committee. She also shared her expertise as a writer for the Albionian. Cooper has completed her second year as a kindergarten and first-grade team teacher in the Grand Rapids Child Discovery Center, and she is working toward her early childhood education endorsement and master of arts in teaching degree. ■ Margaret Neely Nault, ’80. Margaret Nault has devoted much of her time since graduation to her community and her children. She is currently a sustaining member of the Junior League of Grand Cooper Rapids, past chair of Very Special Arts of West Michigan and past chair of the Cultural Arts Committee of the elementary and middle school in the Forest Hills Central school district. She is also a board member of HHS Health Options, treasurer of the Academic Nault

Boosters Club and manager of the middle school lacrosse team. Nault is a member of Forest Hills Presbyterian Church where she serves as clerk of the session and as a Sunday school teacher for middle school children. Currently she is co-chair of her 25th Albion College reunion. She and her husband, Bob, live in Ada with their two children, Allison and Ryan. ■ Frederick O. Neumann, ’67. Rick Neumann has been involved in his community in numerous ways. He has served for 20 years as a board member of the Rivertown Business Association/ Downtown Detroit, Inc., including five years as board president. He has also served on the advisory board of the Greening of Detroit and has chaired the City of Grosse Pointe Beautification Commission. Since graduation, Neumann has continued his enthusiasm for Albion College by helping with various fundraising campaigns and as a board member of the Sigma Chi House Corporation, serving eight years as board president. Currently, he is president of Walter

Machine & Screw Co. in Detroit. He and his wife have two daughters, Jennifer and Katy, ’96. ■ Glenna VanderMeer Paukstis, ’59. After earning a master’s degree in special education from the University of Michigan, Glenna Paukstis spent 10 years as a teacher and administrator for special education programs in the Kent Intermediate School District in Grand Rapids. She has been a leader and board member of many organizations, including: the American Association of University Women, The Epilepsy Center of Michigan and the United Way. Paukstis has volunteered with the Oakland County Health Department otology clinic, Hospital Guild, Church

Fox

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Neumann

Paukstis

By Mike Zamiara, ’87 Member, Alumni Association Board of Directors Moran, I spent almost five years at the only company in the world that has a licensed anthrax vaccine (BioPort Corp.) and learned more about microbiology and the immune system than I knew about debits and credits. Just recently I left BioPort and joined Stealth Medical Technologies, a company that makes knee and hip implants out of exotic metals. Again I am starting up the learning curve to better understand the science behind knee and hip replacements. The one great part about both of these jobs is that they are in Michigan. Because Michigan has been stereotyped as the automotive state for so long, it is good to see some opportunities in the life sciences industry. You are probably asking, “Why in the world is Zamiara sharing his life story with me?” Well, during my final meeting as an Alumni Association board member, I got the opportunity to tour the newly renovated science complex (although construction was still under way). What I saw was

Library Committee and at the local historical society. Since graduation, she and her husband, Chuck Paukstis, ’57, have attended alumni events on campus and in the Detroit area, numerous Homecomings/ class reunions and receptions for prospective students. She has also been active in Delta Zeta alumnae activities since graduation from Albion. Paukstis and her husband have one daughter, Sarah, ’92. Retiring from the board as of June 30, 2005 were: Katherine Jewell Dempster, ’57, Kirk Heinze, ’70, Louise Kirk, ’90, and Michael Zamiara, ’87. The complete board roster is shown in the accompanying box.

Alumni Association Board of Directors Your Alumni Association Board of Directors welcomes your comments. Feel free to discuss your concerns with them at board meetings or at any other alumni gatherings.

Terms expiring in 2006

Terms expiring in 2008

James H. Cox, ’87; Mansfield, Ohio Lyn Ward Healy, ’72; Nashua, N.H. Kenneth B. Hollidge, Jr., ’67; Grand Haven Joshua D. Merchant, ’96; Ithaca Timothy R. Newsted, ’78; Hastings H. Douglas Shepherd, ’98; Traverse City

Sarah E. Cooper, ’03; Grand Rapids Brian W. Fox, ’73; Lamoille, Nev. Robin L. Gearhart, ’96; Tinley Park, Ill. Margaret Neely Nault, ’80; Ada Frederick O. Neumann, ’67; Grosse Pointe Farms Glenna VanderMeer Paukstis, ’59; Ludington

Terms expiring in 2007

Albion is on the move! Even though I earned a degree from Albion in economics and management and accepted a position with Plante & Moran as a staff accountant, I still wasn’t sure where my career was going to take me after graduation. One thing I was quite certain about was that I wouldn’t end up doing anything in science. My father was a pharmacist, and I had the opportunity to join that profession and take over the family business, but I had no desire to do anything that required classes in chemistry and biology. So where did this economics degree take me? Sure enough, it took me into the science field. After working at Plante &

N E W S

Keith James, ’86; Farmington Hills Kenneth A. George, ’90; Grand Rapids William S. Rafaill, ’70; Albion Pamela Gee Royle, ’60; Chesterfield, Mo. Susan J. Sadler, ’77; Bloomfield Hills Carl D. Samberg, ’89; St. Paul, Minn.

fantastic. The College has taken a giant leap forward to better prepare Albion students for careers in science. When I took some of our scientists at BioPort to the Albion Web site to show them what the facility would offer, they were very impressed. Right now, they do most of their hiring from major universities, but they were open to consider Albion graduates in the future. And given my own experience, I now understand why these facilities are just as important for students majoring in fields other than science. We all need to be better informed about scientific issues today. In addition to the College’s focus on the sciences, I would also like to share the experience that I have had getting to know some of the students at Albion over the past three years. I am proud to say that there is a good chance that I would not get into Albion if I were a high school student today (some of you who know me are probably thinking that this is not saying much for the College, but, believe me, the caliber of students has significantly improved). At each of our board meetings, students from various campus organizations have shared their views of campus life at Albion, and, every time, I have

Ex-officio members Peter T. Mitchell, ’67, president, Albion College William K. Stoffer, ’74, alumni trustee Ben E. Hancock, Jr., vice president for institutional advancement Marcia Hepler Starkey, ’74, associate vice president for alumni/parent relations and annual giving Stefanie Bertee, ’07, president, Student Association for Alumni

walked away amazed at the intelligence, poise and independent thinking that they demonstrate. When you combine the improvement in the learning facilities with the liberal arts curriculum and add in the high caliber of the students that we are attracting to Albion, it makes for a very dynamic educational environment. Economists are predicting that there will be tremendous growth in research and development in the life science fields in the coming years. My firsthand experience would certainly support that view. I am excited to see that Albion is taking the necessary steps to better prepare our students to work in this industry. All the more reason for us to assist our alma mater by recommending Albion to prospective students and giving the College our financial support. If you get the chance, go to the Web site (www.albion.edu/alumni/campaign/ science/) and click on the Web cam to take a look at the new science complex or better yet come back to Albion for the College’s Alumni Science Symposium and Homecoming 2005 (Sept. 29-Oct. 2) to experience it all in person.

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Hitting the high notes: ‘Britons in Britain’ tour scores with singers . . . and audiences By Stacey Anderson Markin, ’99 The Albion College Concert Choir has recently returned from the “Britons in Britain” tour, a 10-day tour of England (May 12-21) in which choir students and choir alumni, under the direction of music professor Douglas Rose, sang in some of the most beautiful churches and cathedrals in the country. Among the alumni on the tour, the class years ranged from 1963 to 2005. Performances were held in John Wesley’s Chapel, Shrewsbury Abbey, Bath Abbey, Salisbury Cathedral and Chichester Cathedral. Some key pieces in the tour repertoire had connections to the locations that the choir visited. In a joint concert with the Portsmouth University Choir at the Chichester Cathedral, the choir performed Bernstein’s “Chichester Psalms,” written for a summer festival in Chichester 40 years ago, and Haydn’s “Missa in Angustiis” or the “Nelson Mass,” commemorating the bicentennial of the Battle of Trafalgar. Students and alumni were overwhelmed with the music and camaraderie they experienced on this tour. The quotes below capture an unforgettable journey. Katie Brewer, ’05: To be able to go to England as my last Albion collegiate experience has been a blessing. Not only have I had the chance to see sights of such importance to our own and world history, but I have had time with my closest friends at Albion. We will always have this experience together, and it will serve as a common thread at all our future gatherings. It has been a great trip to end a great life at Albion. I can only hope that the next years are just as fulfilling. David Fleming, ’03: I have never in recollection seen a place that so passionately works to protect its heritage while fully accepting the challenges and possibilities of modernity. That an industrialized nation, with so limited a land area, has managed to leave unspoiled so

much of its countryside astounds me. The beauty of the land and the beauty of the buildings and towns compete for my attention. England has been an amazing place to see, learn about, and in which to perform. That these places no longer exist for me only in books is a great gift. Abby Gilbert, ’03: What a great experience to come to England and to make beautiful music with talented musicians! My favorite day of the tour was Bath. It was interesting to wander around the ruins and realize that the Romans and the English had been using Bath for so long. Singing inside Bath Abbey was an amazing experience. In addition to the beautiful sounds, the architecture, stained glass and other adornments are beautiful. Jim Royle, ’63: The music simply resonates as the “Britons in Britain,” Albion College’s ambassadors of musical goodwill, sing their way across England in these wondrous old cathedrals. Those who hear the concerts ask where this “musical school” must be, and, of course, we “bask in the reflected glory” as we remember our own tours of the early 1960s, which took us to such faraway places as Detroit, Chicago and even New York City! Tamara Transue Royle, ’63, a.k.a. the “Royle Queen Mum”: As freshmen in 1960, Jim and I began our first choir tour traveling coast-to-coast (Lake Michigan to Lake Huron). Now, 45 years later, we are on the English coast at Portsmouth with the

ALUMNI SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM

(Clockwise from top left) Albion College Choir members at Salisbury Cathedral; having fun with a Buckingham Palace guard in London; singing Bernstein’s “Chichester Psalms” in Chichester; and performing in Bath Abbey .

choir having sung in many famous cathedrals across this British isle. “Mr. Dave” [Strickler] would be very proud of this current Albion Choir and of the fine traditions they are upholding as musical ambassadors, representing Albion College’s “fondest memories,” indeed! The Rector of the Bath Abbey: We have a lot of choirs in this space, and this may be the best that it has sounded in centuries.

Finale The resonance of the English churches and cathedrals continually impressed our choir members. I have a feeling that this trip will resonate, much as their songs did, in our memories. And we hope that our brief stay in England will resonate with the people we met in the U.K. as well. How did the “Britons in Britain” choir tour end? Riding back on the bus from

Sept. 29-30, 2005

As you make plans to join us in celebrating Albion College’s 170th year during Homecoming Weekend this fall, you have the added opportunity to participate in an Alumni Science Symposium, with a keynote address by Harvey Lodish, professor of biology and bioengineering at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. • Enjoy presentations by distinguished Albion alumni and faculty. • Reunite with former professors and interact with current students in science and mathematics. • Tour the newest addition to Albion’s science complex, Kresge Hall, and renovated Palenske Hall.

For complete schedule information, go to: www.albion.edu/ sciencesymposium Please save the date and make it a priority to “come home” to Albion this fall!

Chichester, we decided to sing the Alma Mater. We all joined hands (a choir tradition) to sing “Albion, Dear Albion.” As we began singing, our driver, Jeff, turned off all the lights in the coach. The melody floated through the darkened space as Doug Rose and the students, alumni and staff sang . . . hand-in-hand. When we finished, Jeff came on the coach microphone and said, “I’m not ashamed to admit, it brings a tear to me eye.” President Mitchell always says that “Albion, Dear Albion” is the most beautiful Alma Mater in the land. I think that we have all seen that it may be the most beautiful song in any land when it is sung with the emotion of shared friendship. For more photos and a narrative of the “Britons in Britain” choir tour, visit: www.albion.edu/blogs/2005_gallery _england.asp

Join us ‘up North’! All Albion alumni and friends are welcome at the following events. Frankfort 6 p.m.

Monday, July 18 Albion Barbecue Picnic Home of Don and Judy Dow Rumelhart

Bay View 6 p.m. 8 p.m.

Saturday, July 30 Potluck Supper Theatre Production: “The Secret Garden” (Reserved tickets: $20 per person) Events will take place on the Bay View campus.

Invitations will be mailed shortly. If you will be traveling in northern Michigan and would like to attend either of these events, please call the Office of Alumni and Parent Relations, 517/629-0448, to make a reservation.

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Sept. 29-Oct. 2 Thursday, Sept. 29

Saturday, Oct. 1

5:30 p.m. Alumni Science Symposium, Baldwin Hall The Science Symposium will open with a reception and dinner followed by keynote speaker Harvey F. Lodish, Ph.D., professor of biology and bioengineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For more information, see p. 23. (Advance reservations are necessary.)

8 a.m. Homecoming Fun Run, Dow Recreation and Wellness Center All alumni, faculty, staff, students and area residents are invited to a morning fun run. (Light refreshments provided.)

A rock ’n’ roll Saturday night! Motown legend

Friday, Sept. 30 7:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Alumni Science Symposium, Baldwin Hall Open to all alumni interested in learning more about future directions in scientific and medical research and in science education, the symposium will highlight alumni, faculty and student research. Roundtables, panel discussions and poster sessions on a variety of topics will be featured throughout the day. For more information, see p. 23. (Advance reservations are necessary.) 9 a.m. Ninth Annual Briton Classic Golf Tournament, The Medalist Golf Club, Marshall Shot gun start at 10 a.m., following registration at 9 a.m. Go to www.albion.edu/sports/britonclassic/ for more details. 9:30 a.m. Briton Homecoming Bicycle Ride, Sprankle-Sprandel Stadium/“A” Field Biking enthusiasts are invited to participate in a bicycle ride through the countryside of Calhoun and Jackson counties. In honor of the 170th anniversary, the route will pass by several historical points of interest in and around town. The design of the bike trails will allow riders to do as little or as much riding as they desire. (SAG and light refreshments provided.) 4:30 p.m. All-Class Reception, Kellogg Center Please join fellow alumni and President Peter T. Mitchell, ’67, for an all-class reception celebrating Albion’s 170th Anniversary. 6:15 p.m. Athletic Hall of Fame Dinner and Induction Ceremony, Baldwin Hall Help us honor this year’s Athletic Hall of Fame inductees for their contributions to athletics as students or alumni. (Advance reservations are necessary.) 8:30 p.m. Prentiss M. Brown Honors Institute Reunion, Kellogg Center, Langbo Living Room All Honors Institute alumni are invited to a reunion reception that is patterned after the Midnight Desserts/ Midnight Breakfasts that have been a tradition in the honors program. We will also recognize the Class of 1980, the first class to have entered the program as freshmen, celebrating their 25th reunion this year. 9:30 p.m. Alumni and Student Bonfire and Pep Rally, Canoe Livery

Dennis Edwards

9:15 a.m. Distinguished Alumni Awards Ceremony, Kellogg Center The reception begins at 9:15 a.m. in the Alumni Conference Room, and the ceremony follows at 10 a.m. in Gerstacker Commons. Noon All-Class Picnic Luncheon for Alumni, Faculty and Students, Lomas Fieldhouse, Dow Recreation and Wellness Center 1 p.m. Football vs. Adrian, Sprankle-Sprandel Stadium Pre-game festivities include presentation of the Hall of Fame inductees. A special halftime program commemorating the College’s 170th year will feature the Homecoming Court, the British Eighth and the Alumni Band. Rick Blatti, former director of bands at Albion, will return to conduct the Alumni Band in celebration of the College’s 170th year. Building Tours: Kresge Hall, Palenske Hall, Held Equestrian Center All alumni, parents and friends of the College are invited to tour Albion’s newest additions to campus. Times will be posted during the weekend.

will lead the Temptations Review in concert, Saturday, Oct. 1, 8:30 p.m.

Sunday, Oct. 2 8 a.m. Prayer Gathering, Tennant Hall, Fellowship Lounge Alumni from all Christian traditions are invited to join current students in prayer. Come and share your joys and concerns and bless your Albion College community (past and present). Those who cannot attend are welcome to forward prayer requests beforehand to the Office of the Chaplain, 517/629-0492. Worship Services will be held at the First United Methodist Church, 9 a.m. and 11 a.m., Wesley Chapel. 4 p.m. Homecoming Choir and Orchestra Concert, Goodrich Chapel The Albion College Choir, Alumni Choir and Albion College Symphony Orchestra will present their traditional Homecoming Concert.

8:30 p.m. The Temptations Review featuring Dennis Edwards, Goodrich Chapel Get ready to rock the night away with this live performance by Dennis Edwards and his ensemble, which includes trombonist Nick For more details and regular updates, go to: Cucinella, ’01. A five-time Grammy Award winner, Edwards has 14 Gold Albums to his www.albion.edu/alumni/homecoming_2005.asp credit and is a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee. (Advance tickets are necessary. Limited availability.) Saturday Class Reunions For classes ending in “0” or “5,” 1950-2000. Reunion information and locations will be posted on the Web as details become available: www.albion.edu/alumni/ homecoming2005.asp

2005 Homecoming award recipients Albion College will honor the following individuals during Homecoming Weekend for their contributions to and passion for Albion College, their communities and their professions.

In honor of the College’s 170th anniversary, the Alumni Band and the Alumni Choir are seeking an even greater number of musicians. Please contact the Music Department at 517/629-0481 for more information. The Music Department hopes to represent as many decades as possible of Albion’s rich musical tradition over Homecoming Weekend.

Individuals

Duncan M. Beagle, ’70 Faith E. Fowler, ’81 George K. Heartwell, ’71 Margaret Mitchell Turner, ’69

Gary E. Allore, ’85 Robert L. Basselman, ’75 John W. Dunlop, ’89 Debra Frey Fadool, ’85 Daniel M. Korson, ’85 Catherine Marcos-Millet, ’89 Brian G. McPheely, ’78 H. Rick Otis, ’77 Timothy H. Williams

Meritorious Service Award

Special Recognition

William C. Ferguson, ’52 Bernard T. Lomas, ’46

Daniel Boggan, ’67

Distinguished Alumni Award

Calling alumni musicians!

Athletic Hall of Fame Inductees

Teams

1970 Golf 1977 Football


Io Triumphe! A magazine for alumni and friends of Albion College