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“If you want to make a difference in the lives of

hear from some of these remarkable individuals in

Haitians, get involved with the children,” says Bill

this issue as well. What’s most extraordinary

Gray, D.O., ’74, whose work as a medical mission-

about their stories, however, is not the depth of

ary in Haiti is chronicled in our cover story. His

their commitment to their causes—or the good

thoughts could be echoed by other Albion alumni

they personally have accomplished—but the way

who have changed children’s lives (and the lives of

they have inspired others to join them. They are

their families) for the better in many other parts

proof that one individual can indeed bring about

of the world, including Africa, Latin America and

profound change, and that, once started, the

Asia, and right here in the United States. You will

ripples will continue to spread.

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Going on faith W. NEALEY PHOTOS

Bill Gray, D.O., ’74 By Sarah Briggs “‘Waiting to see a doctor’ has an entirely different meaning in Haiti,” says Bill Gray, D.O., ’74, who this past January completed his eighth medical mission trip to that troubled Caribbean nation. Gray notes that some of his Haitian patients— particularly the children—have never seen a doctor before. And health care for most adults is sporadic, at best. Frequently, they must go months or even years before they can be treated by a local health care worker—and that’s if they can afford payment. Haiti has no national health care system and no provision for those who cannot pay for services. Often, the only medical advice rural patients receive comes from the local witch doctor. To help fill this gap, Mission to Haiti, the organization with which Gray is affiliated, sends volunteers from all over North America to address the health care needs of the country’s poorest citizens. The group also helps with construction projects, offers Christian education and sets up sponsorships for Haitian children. With a volunteer medical team consisting of physicians, dentists, nurses, pharmacists and support personnel, Gray typically will spend 10 days serving in temporary clinics set up in churches within a threehour drive of Port-au-Prince. “As the team’s medical director,” Gray explains, “I am directly involved with patient care and oversee the care that is given by other health care providers.” The medical team sees approximately 1,500 patients and treats medical issues ranging from various types of cancer, AIDS and tuberculosis, to more routine ailments such as hypertension, diabetes, colds, sexually transmitted diseases, arthritis and skin problems. A typical day for the volunteers begins at 6 a.m. and stretches well into the evening. They persist despite temperatures that can top 90 degrees, limited sanitary facilities, and risks of water-borne and insect-borne illnesses, including malaria. “When we work as a team, you don’t hear any complaining . . . none,” he continues. “It’s such a wonderful experience to work with other Christians— we are singular in purpose. Everyone works hard. When we’re done, we’re exhausted, but it’s a good kind of exhaustion.” What’s most difficult for the volunteers, Gray says, is knowing that, in spite of the large numbers of patients they treat, many more are left unserved. At the end of each day, people still stand in line outside the clinic Mission to Haiti provides health care for thousands of patients at clinics like this one in the rural countryside. Treatment is given for medical issues ranging from various types of cancer, AIDS and tuberculosis, to more routine ailments such as hypertension, diabetes, colds, sexually transmitted diseases, arthritis and skin problems.

doors or even come to the volunteers’ compound, hoping somehow to get help for themselves or a family member. And it’s usually impossible to do any immediate follow-up care, though Gray says that during a return trip he can sometimes check on the progress of patients seen previously. It’s especially gratifying to see the children improve, he notes. In some cases, children who Bill Gray, D.O., ’74, in Haiti with his sponsored child, Junior Dorilus, the boy’s mother were near death and an interpreter. Gray has participated in medical mission trips to Haiti for the past five when Gray first years, and also promotes sponsorships for the children there. “If you want to make a saw them have difference in the lives of Haitians, get involved with the children,” he says. become healthy and energetic on his next visit. Tempering these stories of hope, however, visits with them in person when he is in Haiti. When are Gray’s memories of patients with potentially fatal the child’s father died and the family’s house was conditions who could have been helped by modern destroyed, all in the course of a few months, Mission treatments available in the U.S. but who faced almost to Haiti volunteers then raised the funds and provided certain death in Haiti. the labor to rebuild the home. “For you and me having Gray, who maintains a private dermatology practice a new house is a big deal,” Gray says, “but imagine in Cheboygan, first became involved in mission what this means to a Haitian!” work in Haiti five years ago at the urging of Barry Gray’s experience has since prompted several of his Doublestein, ’76. As president of Osteopathic Institute Michigan patients to sponsor Haitian children. He is of the South in Atlanta, Doublestein was looking for also involved in bringing other medical volunteers into ways to involve American physicians and medical the program, serving on Mission to Haiti’s medical students in meeting Haiti’s health care needs. Gray committee and representing the organization at the says he was at first reluctant to go. Global Missions Health Conference, the world’s “I had to face my own fears and insecurities about largest medical missionary conference. taking my faith and talents and putting them into action “The work that Bill Gray and his volunteers have in a third-world country,” he says. done and continue to do seems insignificant if you look Since then, at the whole of Haiti’s problems,” says Barry Gray has also Doublestein. “However, if you looked, as I did, into become a the grateful eyes of the father who would have lost his sponsor for a 13infant son in hours if it had not been for Bill’s care year-old Haitian then you know that you have made a difference in at child, Junior least one person’s life. You are there to make an Dorilus, providimpact one person at a time. That’s what it’s all ing financial about.” support for his Gray says he is drawn back to Haiti because he sees schooling, food “such huge needs,” medically, emotionally and and clothing. spiritually in the population there. “It’s great to be an Gray exchanges encouragement to our patients.” In spite of Haiti’s letters with the political problems, he says he definitely plans to go family throughback many more times, and already has signed up for out the year and another mission trip in July. “The appreciation for what you do—you can’t measure it in words.” If you would like to learn more about Mission to Haiti and its programs, go to www.missiontohaiti.org/ or contact Bill Gray directly at nmderm@freeway.net .


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PHOTOS COURTESY OF A. TABER

(Left) Ann Gehman Taber, ’53, reads to schoolchildren in Mutare, Zimbabwe. Her involvement there has since expanded beyond the school, and she recently gathered supplies for two mission hospitals and for a missionary who works with street kids. Those and the other items she and fellow volunteers collected filled a commercial shipping container. (Below) Ann (far right) and her husband, Morris Taber, ’55, have worked with dozens of volunteers to collect books for a school library in Mutare. Thanks in large part to their efforts, the library now has more than 9,000 holdings.

Morris, ’55, and Ann Gehman Taber, ’53 By Peri Stone-Palmquist This article originally appeared Aug. 18, 2003 in The Ann Arbor News. All rights reserved. Reprinted with permission. The school fees were too hefty— so they found the money. Food was too scarce— so they found the resources for a meal a day. A dream for a library was floundering— so they found the books. Morris and Ann Taber make things happen. They empower others to make things happen. And they just so happen to focus their energies and commitment on the children of Mutare, Zimbabwe. The way they describe it, things have just happened—opportunities have just dropped in their laps. “We haven’t been proactive,” Morris insists. “We fill in their needs.” Indeed, their ministry—which now involves many eager volunteers in the U.S.—has its seeds in a tourist trip in 1997. “Animals and Africa had always been on our list,” Morris said. “We said, ‘The price is right . . . let’s go.” Their youngest son, Steve, said he remembered thinking at the time it seemed an unusual choice for a vacation destination. But it did make sense. His parents were avid travelers, even taking their grade-school age sons on an 11-week tour of Europe in a recreational vehicle in 1969. And they often visit unusual places, such as Mongolia and Siberia. Yet, he said they’re also frugal people, the kind who don’t indulge in impulse buys and have saved diligently for the opportunity to travel. “They weren’t going to settle for a fancy safari in Kenya,” he said. Their subsequent service in Zimbabwe also makes sense to Steve, who remembers his parents talking about wanting to do such work when they retired. “I knew they wouldn’t be the kind to retire to Florida and play golf.” They feel it’s their duty to give back, he said. “It fits in with their religious convictions. This is what God wants us to do—that’s the driving force.” The Tabers’ first trip back to Mutare—after the tour trip there—was in 1999 and lasted five months. Morris, a retired history professor, secured a volunteer

teaching position at Africa University. When Morris noticed his students couldn’t afford books, he raised $29 for each American history textbook he was using. Ann, a retired school librarian, offered her help to nearby Hartzell Primary School for ages 5-12. The school didn’t have a library, but Ann figured she could collect books to put in the classrooms. Under the vision of a headmaster intent on a library for his students, however, Ann became involved in something much larger. Their “modest appeals” for reading material snowballed into an outpouring of support. Churches and community donations brought 1,200 books to the school. Hartland Consolidated Schools donated 4,000. Greenhills School collected nearly 30 bags of books. When the Tabers first arrived in Mutare in 1997, the would-be library was a small room with a hole in the ceiling. Today, the library has its own building with more than 9,000 holdings—a testament to the community’s own initiative and Ann’s work. The Tabers have left their mark in other ways as well. In 1999, Ann said she noticed about 20 students sitting under a tree and wondered why they weren’t in school. The headmaster told her they couldn’t afford the fee—about $5 in U.S. currency at the time. “I was surprised they’d be sending these kids home,” Ann said. The headmaster told them about 125 children couldn’t pay—and the Tabers quickly found the money from a U.S. friend to meet the need. Now, more than 400 elementary students are sponsored. They’ve also helped find funding for school uniforms, computers, supplies and the $200 fee for 20 high school students. Quickly attached to the beauty of the country and its people, the Tabers returned in 2000, 2001 and 2002— on their own nickel. During [their] most recent trip, the headmaster reported that 800 of 950 students came to school with some degree of hunger. “So I asked how much would it cost to feed the entire school?” Morris said. A check to cover the approximately $25-a-day cost for an enriched liquid meal launched the lunch program—one the Tabers hope to continue as long as there is need and funding. Once the program started, school officials said attendance spiked. “It’s very satisfying to know you’re helping that many people,” Ann said.

Part of what makes that possible is yet another offshoot ministry. The Tabers buy arts and crafts from artisans while in Zimbabwe and then sell them back in the U.S. They use the money to cover the items’ cost and shipping and then donate the rest back to their many programs. And now, as they hatch plans to support a Mutare orphanage and send more books and supplies, they’re in the process of establishing an official nonprofit organization, tentatively called The Zimbabwe Children’s Fund. “They’re amazing,” said Melanie Lee Carey, pastor at their church, First United Methodist of Ypsilanti. “I can’t keep up with them—they do so many things.” Carey said the Tabers have really connected their vision to how the church can make a difference. “They’ve been able to get lots of people involved.” Terry Joiner, a church member and pediatrician in Ypsilanti, said he’s hoping to travel with the Tabers on their next trip to satisfy a curiosity the couple has instilled about Mutare and see what he can do in terms of health needs. “They make it easy to reach out,” he said. Bill Secrest, a colleague who has known Morris for 20 years, said the couple serves as a conduit for the wealth in America. Secrest has supported the Tabers’ work from the beginning—writing a check on the spot when told about the school fees. “I don’t know too many people,” he said, “who are willing to risk everything to help other people.” Just prior to publication of this edition of Io Triumphe, the Tabers and other volunteers filled a 2,300-cubicfoot shipping container with items that are now bound for Mutare, Zimbabwe. Ann writes that the container was packed with books for the Primary School Library; medical supplies for two mission hospitals; supplies for an orphanage; toys; videos; a Rototiller; and supplies, including clothing, school supplies, blankets and books, for a missionary who runs a program for street kids. To learn more about the Tabers’ work in Zimbabwe, write: AnnT63@aol.com.

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Helping our fellow travelers Editor’s note: These first-person accounts continue our cover story on alumni who are reaching out to those in need, both locally and globally.

Harry ’’Skip’’ Wells, ’63, and Joan Hotchkiss Wells, ’63 Skip is a retired portfolio manager, and Joan is a former teacher. They live in Westwood, Mass. Two questions that sound very similar but that produce entirely different answers are: What would you like to do today? And, what would you like to say that you have done at the end of the day? With some of our time, most of us would like to say that we have helped some of our less fortunate fellow travelers. Hopefully, our output has aided and abetted those we are trying to assist, but there is no question that the input of psychic income helps us feel better and walk with a greater sense of confidence. Many times Christianity seems like a bitter pill to swallow: Giving when we would rather be consuming. But the reward for giving is a fuller, richer life. • • • • • Joan: Ever since I can remember, I have loved reading! Illiteracy would be a terrible burden, I have always thought. Perhaps this was why I chose teaching as my profession. First and second grades were my grades of choice, and it was because of reading: watching these children open up to the possibilities, seeing that magic moment when everything clicks and hearing them say proudly, “I can read!” Unfortunately, it was also the time when I saw what a struggle it was for a few. These students were not “dumb” or disabled in any way I could uncover, and yet there they were, struggling, not able to put it all together. In those years (1963-1968) basic phonics was encouraged, and I taught it, but at least in my realm, little was known about learning disabilities. When I think back, I wonder how many children were lost because we as teachers didn’t know how to help them or even talk to them about what they were experiencing.

So when I heard about a course in OrtonGillingham (the father of all learning disabilities programs) being offered locally, I decided to dust off my teaching skills and find out what it was all about. Forty-five class hours and an internship of 100 supervised teaching hours later, I passed my “final exam” paper and became a certified Orton-Gillingham teacher. I now tutor four afternoons a week at a local center and once again feel young-at-heart when I hear those words, “I can read!” Skip: I believe that every kid should get his or her fair shot at the starting line in life. That’s one of the reasons why I have spent the last 34 years at The Home for Little Wanderers as a big brother, fund raiser, strategist and/or chairman. In any given year, The Home counsels and helps over 7,000 troubled kids and their families in the greater Boston area. Their ages range from birth to 18, and the severity of their emotional problems is mild to acute. At any one time, we are treating over 400 severely troubled kids. Of these 400, 90 percent are abused, and most of that 90 percent are sexually abused. Unfortunately, most of this abuse is passed down from generation to generation. If we can break this cycle of abuse, we will help not only these children but their children and their children’s children. Outcome measurement is a subject we deal with every day, but we have enough anecdotal evidence to know we are making a difference. • • • • • For the last several years, we have participated in a prison ministry through our church. Once a year we visit a prison for a three-day weekend, though not overnight. We teach a Quaker course on alternatives to violence. And, make no mistake, there is plenty of violence to diffuse as most of those we work with are rapists and murderers who typically are doing life sentences without any chance of parole. In addition to the questions on violence, there are always two other questions that arise: Where do I go for forgiveness? Where do I go for hope? We suspect we all wrestle with these two questions. After 40 years of marriage, Joan and I sometimes find the dinner table conversation can be a little slack. However, we are never at a loss for conversation after one of these prison weekends. What would you like to say that you have done at the end of the day? Our answer is that we would like to be on a path to a fuller, richer life. For us, one of the important paths is through giving.

Betsy Sturm Gauss, ’58 A retired teacher who spent most of her career in the Albion Public Schools, Betsy now lives in Lake Wales, Fla. Since my retirement, the Lord has been guiding me to use and expand my knowledge in my field of expertise, the multi-sensory approach to teaching persons who process information differently. What a need there is! It is estimated that this includes 10-15 percent of our population. My volunteer work involves directing a mentoring/ tutoring ministry that originally was started by our pastor’s wife five years ago at the First United Methodist Church in Lake Wales, Fla. Two years later, as a member of the church and the Lake Wales Literacy Council, I arranged for the two groups to collaborate, and I became director of the program. I train the volunteer tutors to use multi-sensory techniques to work with 25 children from kindergarten through second grade on a one-to-one basis for an hour each Tuesday and Thursday afternoon for approximately 20 weeks of the school year. Our students are targeted by the teachers in two of our area schools, and I work closely with the schools to track the students’ progress. Our purpose is to reinforce the skills the children are expected to develop at their particular grade level as well as mentor them in Christian values. While we can’t specifically pinpoint the benefits of our work, the teachers and parents tell us that we are making a difference. Watching the children succeed and seeing how God is working through our volunteer tutors is tremendously rewarding. With such a program, so many more children can be reached, and many adults are given the opportunity to use their God-given talents to support and care for these children. In addition, I am on the training team for the READ Polk literacy initiative which impacts the adult community. We train volunteers for the three Polk County literacy councils to work primarily with adults in the county. This, along with tutoring and mentoring a Puerto Rican couple, is a continuation of my involvement in adult literacy work in Calhoun County, Michigan.


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Ron Yonker, ’53 Ron is an ordained Methodist minister. He and his wife, Mimi, a graduate of Millsaps College in Mississippi, are now retired and live in Walhalla, S.C. Seeds planted by caring parents, teachers and so many other friends who believed in me led me to a calling that eventually grew into a career of Christian service in South America, China and many parts of the United States. Sharing fully in this ministry were Mimi, my soulmate and wife of 46 years, and our four children. Together, we have pursued education and pastoral ministry, and, along the way, we did what we could to combat poor health conditions, unemployment and injustice. We were blessed to love and be loved by the good folks who welcomed us into their communities and hearts. While in South America, Mimi and I began our practice of supporting those who are imprisoned, and since returning to the U.S., we have been active with Prisoner Visitation and Support, a nationwide alternative ministry. We have worked with inmates at a federal maximum security facility near Terre Haute, Ind., and more recently have visited at the federal prison camp in Pensacola, Fla. and the federal prison in Atlanta. Our fluency in Spanish has allowed us to work with inmates from Latin America, and we often contact their loved ones abroad to let them know how their husbands, sons or fathers are faring. It is not unusual to meet a person who has not had a visit in decades. Shortly after graduating from college, we began our mission work in schools in Mexico and Chile, and later in Bolivia. In addition, from 1990 to 1992, the bishop granted us an assignment to teach English at the Fujian Agricultural University in Fuzhou, China, under the sponsorship of the Amity Foundation, a service organization of the Christian church in China and the National Council of Churches of Christ—USA. Given our experience as educators, it naturally followed that we would continue to teach in retirement. Since retiring in 1995, we have become active in Volunteers in Mission (VIM), a voluntary outreach program of the United Methodist Church, and have been given opportunities to help out as teachers of English at a primary-secondary school in Iquique, Chile and at an agricultural and technical school in

Bolivia’s tropical rain forest. In 2000, we also spent two months in Milan, Italy, where I served under VIM as pastor of the international congregation of the Methodist Church. While we have chosen to work within the church and public education, we wholeheartedly believe that serving others is something each of us can do, whatever our callings and gifts, and regardless of profession. It has been nine years since we retired. Jokingly we notice that we are “reallytired.” We are retired, look retired and feel retired! At the same time, we are aware of the un-retiring grace of God, enabling whoever is available to lend a hand and loving heart. Mimi and I thank God for his loving and enabling presence in our lives and in the lives of all those with whom we have been privileged to live.

Marcus LaPratt, ’98 Marcus is president of Singers of United Lands (www.singersofunitedlands.org). He lives in Albion. My sister and I had never hugged as tightly as we did the morning of Sept. 14, 2001. She dropped me off at the Kalamazoo airport where I took the first flight since 9/11 from Kalamazoo to Chicago to Los Angeles to Fresno. I was scheduled to tour for three months as a singer with a Christian music ministry team called Celebrant Singers, based near Fresno. For three months I traveled with Celebrant Singers from California to Maine via the Rockies, the Midwest and the East Coast. Our tour then continued along the eastern seaboard to Miami. From there our team of 22 people (7 singers, 10 instrumentalists, support staff and a sign language interpreter) spent two weeks in Haiti before returning to Florida. The last three weeks of the tour took us from Miami back to Fresno via the Louisiana bayou country, the plains of Texas, the Arizona/Mexican border, the Grand Canyon and L.A. Each 24-hour period of that three-month tour was virtually the same daily routine, just in a different

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location: Arrive in a new town in the afternoon, set up equipment, check sound system, have a short rehearsal, eat dinner with hosts, perform a concert, travel to host family’s home and try to sleep, get on tour bus by 9 a.m., drive to the next town. Though tiring mentally and physically, it’s a lifestyle with the potential for changing many lives. As a singer with this ministry organization, I had the opportunity, every night, to tell people about my Christian faith. In addition to praying with people all across the country and sharing personal stories of religion and faith and commitment, I also experienced three months of personal soul-searching and seeking direction in my own life from God. Many people who came to our performances used me as an instrument to reconnect with a spiritual devotion they may have had at one time—something I said or sang about may have triggered them to seek God’s guidance in their own life. And some people were introduced to a spiritual commitment through me because I shared how God was an integral part of my life. Ultimately, those three months helped to prepare me for what would come next in my life. Some may refer to it as a “calling” or a “sign.” At the end of this tour with Celebrant Singers, I felt God directing me to use all of the gifts I felt I’d been given and put them to work in one project. For the next two years I worked full-time at Starr Commonwealth in Albion as a music specialist. And every moment that I wasn’t working at Starr I spent developing Singers of United Lands (SOUL), a nonprofit organization, based in Albion, whose mission is to foster international relationships through the powerful medium of vocal music. SOUL is a team of five singers, each from a different continent. Together we accomplish the organization’s mission by sharing with communities in schools and churches the music that is native to our respective countries. We also fulfill the mission by sharing with people our similarities and differences through discussions and workshops that focus on a variety of topics from linguistics to current world events to food and culture. And although SOUL is not a religiously-affiliated organization, it highlights each of our represented cultures including religions and lifestyles. SOUL hopes to have a team of four different singers tour each year for up to eight months all across the United States. Our current tour will take us into at least seven different states and possibly to Alberta, Canada. We’ll be working with students from early elementary through graduate-level. And our hope is that SOUL will continue to grow in reputation and success while maintaining its main office in Albion, a town that celebrates cultural diversity and education.

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The way we were D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

Remembering the Parker Inn’s heyday LIFE MAGAZINE PHOTOS COURTESY OF P. FOX

Munger Place, known to generations of Albion alumni

(At right and below)

as the Parker Inn, will be maintained as an apartment

Life magazine covered

and office building by the College, which recently

this father-daughter

purchased the property.

dance sponsored by Delta Zeta sorority at

College now owns former Parker Inn

the Parker Inn in the

Munger Place, the property known through most of its history as the Parker Inn, has become part of Albion College’s holdings under a purchase agreement reached in December 2003 by owner Rick Munger and Colchester Properties, Inc., a nonprofit, wholly owned subsidiary of Albion College for real estate interests. “Munger Place is one of Albion’s most attractive buildings with a proud heritage and valuable contemporary impact on the city,” said President Peter Mitchell. “We certainly did not want this landmark building to be purchased by an entity outside the city that might not have the same interest or concern for its being maintained as one of Albion’s treasures.” Opened in 1926 and named for local industrialist Harry Parker, the four-story hotel originally had 71 guest rooms, a public dining room and a grand ballroom. Located on Michigan Avenue (formerly U.S. 12) just a few blocks from Albion College’s campus, the Parker Inn attracted travelers on their way between Detroit and Chicago, as well as many College parents and visitors. With the construction of I-94, business at the hotel declined, and in the 1970s it was converted into an apartment and office building. In 1986 Albion businessman Rick Munger purchased the property and renamed it Munger Place. Mitchell affirmed the College’s dedication to maintaining a quality building while continuing to contribute positively to the Albion community. “The College is committed to help revitalize our community and to ensure a promising future for Albion,” he said. “Purchasing Munger Place, keeping it on the tax rolls, and maintaining the facility as a high-quality apartment complex for working adults who choose to be near the downtown and the College is a win-win for economic development and historic preservation.”

war,” the jukebox

mid-1940s. Since “the orchestra was out to

provided the evening’s music, supplemented by entertainment by the sorority members.

Like the madeleine in Marcel Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past, the Parker Inn, now known as Munger Place, evokes many memories of college days in Albion for these graduates.

J

ust after my high school graduation in 1952, my father, who had a private pilot’s license, asked if I would like to fly to Albion to check out the campus. I was already registered and accepted at Hope College, but thought the trip with my dad would be special, so I accepted his offer. We discovered that Albion did not have an airport, so we landed in Marshall where we were met by Frank Bonta, ’49, from the Admissions Office, and I started my Albion experience at Schuler’s for dinner. Then we went to the lovely old Parker Inn for the night (both on the College’s expense account!). The next morning we had a tour of the campus and that did it! I signed on the dotted line and have never been sorry. The next four years of my life at Albion were really special.


PHOTO COURTESY LOCAL HISTORY ROOM, ALBION PUBLIC LIBRARY

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Located on Michigan Avenue (formerly U.S. 12) just a few blocks from Albion College’s campus, the Parker Inn attracted travelers on their way between Detroit and Chicago,

two years in order to take a full-time job at Albion’s radio station, WALM. The Parker Inn was most impressive in those days. We held business lunches there for the radio station, and my parents always stayed there for visits and graduation. Because I lived off-campus and stayed in Albion all summer to do my radio job (I was first the news director and Uncle Fred on the “Little Red Barn” show each day, and was program director by my senior year), the Parker Inn provided the closest thing to a homecooked meal for me between September 1957 and June 1959. The Parker Inn always seemed to me like an extension of the Albion campus. I am so glad to see it now officially part of Albion. —Jim Beasley, ’59, Pewaukee, Wisc.

The Parker Inn was the really upscale place in Albion when we were enrolled in the ’50s. Cedric and I were living in married student housing on Porter Street (the old World War II barracks on the railroad tracks) when he was hired as a bartender for the private club located in the Parker Inn. Since Ced did not drink and had no idea how to mix drinks, Bill VanDeusen, ’52, an Albion athlete who also was employed at the club and had recommended him for the job, gave him a bartender’s guide to study for one day before reporting to work that night. Bill had told him not to worry since most people just ordered straight shots. Well, wouldn’t you know, the first drink order by one of Albion’s leading socialites was a Gibson. Ced thumbed hurriedly through the book hoping his frustration and page flipping would go unnoticed, but he could not find a reference to a Gibson. After concocting a strange mixture of several types of alcohol and throwing in an olive, he served it up. Needless to say, the lady’s reaction to the drink was immediate and unpleasant; she spit it out. Thus ended Cedric’s career as a bartender and launched him into a more appropriate part-time job as a referee, which served him well in the coaching field. So the Parker Inn played a role in preparing him for his future—by firing him. —Cedric and June Luke Dempsey, ’54, ’54, La Jolla, Calif.

In 1945-46, my good friend, Perry Porter, ’49, was a waiter at the Parker Inn. Because he was so responsible, the manager often asked him to recruit friends to fill in for absentees. I was tapped a few times to fill in on weekends, especially on busy Saturday nights. Tips were not very generous then, but one glorious night a young man gave me $5—a really special event. —Dorothy Hallenbeck Carpenter, ’47, Vermontville, Mich.

I remember that the Parker Inn had a flurry of excitement when oil was discovered in the area. The men who were involved in the oil business all stayed at the Parker Inn. We were very impressed with the expensive cars and men in suits going in and out. It was all very mysterious and very impressive to the college “girls.” —Glenna VanderMeer Paukstis, ’59, Ludington, Mich.

Do I remember the Parker Inn? I was one of the sopho-

during the late afternoon and evening hours. This helped me pay for my Albion College education and study at the same time when the hotel traffic was slow. One of my jobs entailed getting a police permit to shoot the many pigeons nesting over the front door area. Otherwise, customers got more than they planned on. —Dick Hockstad, ’59, Grand Blanc, Mich.

I have many memories of that grand old hotel. Probably

I stayed at the Parker Inn one night in late 1946 or early

College visitors.

I transferred to Albion from Wayne State for my final

The next generation would have said, “It was a blast.” I don’t remember what our term would have been, but it was and still is a very special time at the old Parker Inn. —Patti Webb Fox, ’47, Bellaire, Mich.

mores in the fall of 1955 who was housed there on the third floor until East Hall was completed. Jean Wrisley [now Jean Wrisley Damman, ’58] and I shared a room that had only a double bed, one chair, a small dresser and a sink. There was no room to walk around, much less to study or to store our clothes. It was a very long walk to Baldwin Hall and meals. One advantage at first was that the rooms had phones. However, our use of the phones was soon cut off, and all phone calls had to go through the housemother. The poor woman spent her day walking up and down the hall getting girls to come to the phone! —Mary Ellen Heath Rivers Barber, ’58, Grand Rapids, Mich.

as well as many

Here I am, 50 years later and still happy that my father and Frank Bonta introduced me to Albion College. I am also delighted that grand old hotel will be preserved by our College.—Carolyn Gilbert Habel, ’56, Traverse City, Mich.

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The Parker Inn provided me with a job as desk clerk

the main one is that it was one of the great places to play my accordion before an audience that often included college professors and town leaders. On one occasion when I began courting my wife, Dorothy McEvoy, ’59, she went with me. So I played “Dark Eyes” just for her. That made it a special occasion. (I think I also played “Lover,” but I’m not so sure about that.) I played my way through college and medical school with the accordion—at all types of dinners, shows, service clubs, etc. I toured with Ed Sullivan, and one summer I played each weekend at a dinner club in Bay View while taking organic chemistry (again). —Joseph Serra, ’56, Stockton, Calif.

The Parker Inn was the site of at least one of Alpha Pi of Sigma Chi’s annual Sweetheart Ball dinner-dances while I was at Albion, probably in 1944 or 1945. Must have been a good dinner-dance since I usually don’t remember things that far back. My wife, Janice, tells me I didn’t take her to it, and, if I did attend, it must have been with some other gal! I recall there was a private club in the hotel, frequented by some of Albion’s more mature returning G.I.s. Of course, being brought up a good Methodist-Episcopalian, I was unaware of or disinterested in such matters until my return from military duty a few years later. Then, when I began dating Janice, a staunch Free Methodist Alpha Chi Omega, there was no point in caring about the club any longer. —Neal, ’49, and R. Janice Montgomery McCue, ’50, Harbor Springs, Mich.

Memories of the Parker Inn abound, but my favorite is one very special Delta Zeta dance that was held there in 1945. Most of the male students were off to World War II, and the Air Corps cadets had already left, so what were girls to do? We invited our dads to be our dates! When Jane Kompass, ’47, invited her dad, he thought it was such a great idea that it should be shared. He notified Life magazine, and—in tune with one of their features at that time—“Life Came to the Party.” The Parker Inn jumped that night. Smiling reporters were interviewing everywhere, and all the interviewees were smiling too. Photographers clicked shots of dads jitterbugging with their daughters, moms peeking around the door to the ballroom, daughters entertaining moms and dads with little skits. Though the story never ran in the magazine, Life sent us many of the prints which reappear every time Delta Zetas have a reunion.

1947 when I came to Albion for a job interview at the Albion Recorder which was the first step in my being able to enroll at Albion. To the best of my recollection it was the first night I’d ever stayed in a hotel. The next day, after getting the job (interviewed by Albion grads Jack Bedient, ’25, and George Mather, ’32), I walked over to the campus and met (no appointment) registrar Marvin Pahl, ’30, enrolled (subject to high school transcript being okay, no SATs), then walked down to Kresge Gym and met Dale Sprankle who promised me a job working in the dining room at Susanna Wesley Hall. Also, for three semesters I lived in a rooming house near downtown and passed the Parker Inn often on my way to work at Susie. —Bud Johns, ’51, San Francisco, Calif.

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h, the good old Parker Inn. After my uncle, Frank Dean, ’31, purchased the Parker Inn, our family frequently ate there for a special Sunday dinner outing. Our family consisted of Dad and Mother [C. Reginald and Ethel Dean Smith, ’24] and four boys. At that time the kitchen was in the basement, and there was a long flight of stairs from the kitchen to the main dining room. The stairway was probably 10 feet or so wide and closed off from the dining room by a pair of swinging doors. The steps, as I recall, were shallow terrazzo construction which added to the difficulty of mastering the climb to the dining room level. One of these Sunday visits stands out in particular detail. Our order had been taken, and we were enjoying the sunny atmosphere of the dining room while waiting for our dinner. It was a real treat for all of us to go out to eat in a formal dining room, and the Inn was the perfect place. We were all primped and prim in our Sunday best, having just been to church. We were in the middle of a humorous bit of conversation about some family event when we were startled by the crashing of metal trays and dinnerware resounding from behind the double doors obviously descending all the way down those terrazzo steps to the kitchen level. We snickered together and commented, “That is probably our dinner.” Only seconds later the manager approached our table and made the sober announcement that our dinner would be delayed. The Parker Inn was host to many community and College social events. It was also a central spot for conventions, and over time there were a few that attracted large numbers. I am delighted to learn of the College’s acquisition of this great Albion landmark. —Dean Smith, ’47, Ann Arbor, Mich.

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Faculty earn statewide honors For their leadership of the “Victory for Kids” playground project last fall, Albion College faculty members Leslie Cavell (art history) and Luti Erbeznik (biology) have received a 2004 Faculty/Staff Community ServiceLearning Award from Michigan Campus Compact. This prestigious annual award, the highest the organization bestows on faculty and staff in Michigan, recognizes outstanding contributions in community service-learning. Cavell and Erbeznik invested energy, creativity and many hours of time in leading the construction of a state-of-the-art 10,000square-foot play area at Victory Park. Recruiting and organizing more than 1,500 volunteers, obtaining donations in excess of $125,000 and planning a six-day build, Cavell and Erbeznik brought together people of widely varying ages, skill levels and educational and ethnic backgrounds to work shoulder-to-shoulder.

The pair was honored during an evening awards reception Feb. 5 in Grand Rapids. In addition, Albion professor Suellyn Henke (education) recently was awarded a Michigan Campus Compact Venture Grant for a project titled “Children Learning Science through Community Collaboration.” Preservice elementary teachers from Albion College will collaborate with the Albion community’s Kids ‘N’ Stuff museum in order to design interactive, hands-on science exhibits for second-grade elementary students. Henke is one of 10 award recipients this year for Venture Grants ranging up to $2,500. Albion College is a founding member of Michigan Campus Compact, a non-profit organization that promotes civic engagement among Michigan college students.

National media tap Albion experts By Morris Arvoy Whether they are giving their perspectives on the war in Iraq or the fragile ecosystem of the Florida Keys, Albion College professors and staff often serve as expert sources for media ranging from local newspapers to national cable networks to international broadcast news services. On March 9 David Hawsey, Albion’s vice president for enrollment, appeared in a USA Today article called “Colleges getting wise to games applicants play.” He commented on the extreme methods some applicants use to get noticed by admissions staffs. USA Today has a greater national reach than any other newspaper in the country. Why would it—and other media outlets, for that matter—turn to Albion College for expertise? Mary Beth Marklein, the higher education reporter for USA Today who wrote the story, said sources like Hawsey are valuable to her work. “David obviously knew what he was talking about,” Marklein said after her article was printed. “But I think for me the most important thing—the thing I liked best—was that he added a wrinkle. When I started piecing this whole story together, it was David who added the wrinkle that ‘demonstrated interest’ by students is getting a little crazy. He made me see that when it starts happening at a nice school like Albion . . . this can be a little bit troubling, and kind of a new thing for a lot of these colleges. That was very helpful for me.” While appearances by Albion “experts” in publications such as USA Today can spread the name of the College to thousands of people nationwide, just as important are the everyday appearances by faculty and staff in local and regional media outlets in Albion, the state and the Midwest. In this presidential election year, two of Albion’s most frequently sought after political experts are Myron Levine and Andrew Grossman. Levine, the Justin L. and Marjorie Wardell Sleight and Norman R. and Alethea E. Sleight Professor of Political Science and Leadership Studies, appears regularly on BBC Radio commenting on the American political scene. A BBC commentator for the past four years,

Levine most recently was interviewed about President George Bush’s poll ratings. In February, he participated in a panel discussion on the depiction of the White House on television and in the movies that aired on C-SPAN. Levine, a contributor to the 2003 book, The West Wing: The American Presidency as Television Drama, discussed the presidency and Washington politics as seen in the popular NBC television series and in motion pictures. Grossman, chair and associate professor of political science and the author of Neither Dead Nor Red: Civil Defense and American Political Development During the Early Cold War and a forthcoming book on homeland security, has brought his expertise on terrorism and homeland security to a number of publications and broadcast media over the past year, including USA Today, the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Tribune, and the Detroit News. Most recently, ABC radio news interviewed Grossman in February, and interviews aired repeatedly on leading Detroit radio station WJR. Presidential elections and national security are not the only topics Albion experts are called on to discuss. President Peter Mitchell, ’67, is frequently interviewed by the media for local, regional and national stories. During this academic year alone, Mitchell has appeared in everything from the Albion Recorder—discussing the College’s purchase of Munger Place, among other things—to the Chronicle of Higher Education, commenting on the role of athletics at NCAA Division III colleges and universities. Sometimes staff are the story. When the low-carb diet craze hit Albion, several dieting Albion staff members were quoted in a lengthy article in the Jackson Citizen-Patriot in February discussing the ups and downs of Dr. Atkins and his friends. Finally, not all Albion experts appear in news stories. Jeffrey Carrier, W.W. Diehl Trustees’ Professor of Biology and a worldrenowned shark expert, is a case in point. Carrier, who often involves Albion students in his research on nurse sharks off the Florida Keys, was featured during the Feb. 27 airing of the popular National Geographic series “Crittercam Chronicles.” Carrier’s book, The Biology of Sharks and Their Relatives, was published in March by CRC Press.

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Hands-on learning Y. THIEU PHOTO

(Above) Biologist Jeff Carrier enthusiastically shares his interest in all forms of marine life with his students. Recently, he introduced one of his classes to his own special-recipe seaweed salad to underscore the importance of marine research. “The students all say they’ve never eaten seaweed before,” explains Carrier, “and then I point out that a lot of foods, including ice cream, are made with ingredients taken from seaweed.” Over spring break, Carrier also led a group of students and faculty to south Florida for a look at endangered coastal habitats. T. LINCOLN PHOTOS

Seventeen students in Albion’s Institute for the Study of the Environment, with faculty Tim Lincoln, Doug White, Wes Dick, David Green and Lisa Roschek, got a firsthand look at the problem of coastal erosion during a spring break trip to the Louisiana bayou country. They toured wetlands in Mandalay National Wildlife refuge (above) and learned about current efforts to combat the degradation of coastal areas at the U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center in Lafayette. Careful mapping done in this lab (below) has documented the alarming rate of wetland loss in the area.


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Feminist writer Gloria Steinem headlines symposium April 15 Activist and feminist icon Gloria Steinem will deliver Albion College’s annual Elkin R. Isaac Student Research Symposium keynote address at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 15 in Goodrich Chapel. The speech caps a day of research presentations by more than 70 students from the sciences, social sciences, humanities and fine arts. The College’s annual Honors Convocation will take place at 10:30 a.m. Thursday morning in Goodrich Chapel. Combining a passion for women’s rights with a talent for journalism, Steinem has been one of the most important, eloquent and controversial voices of the last century. In 1971 she founded Ms. magazine, which views contemporary issues from a feminist perspective. Steinem continues to serve as a contributing editor. Steinem has had an equally distinguished career in political activism. She was a convener of the historic 1971 Women’s Political Caucus, supported the founding of the Coalition of Labor Union Women, and is president of Voters for Choice. She also established the Ms. Foundation for Women. She rose to prominence in the 1960s, working as a freelance journalist, writing for the television show “That Was the Week That Was,” and eventually becoming a founding editor of New York magazine. She is the author of several books, including Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions. John Porter, ’53, a nationally respected leader in education and the former president of Eastern Michigan University, will present “Educational Leadership for the 21st Century,” as the Elkin R. Isaac Lecturer on Wednesday, April 14, at 7:30 p.m. in the Bobbitt Visual Arts Auditorium. Porter, who also served as the Michigan state superintendent of public instruction, received four presidential appointments to commissions addressing higher education, employment and mental health issues, and was elected president of the Council of Chief State School Officers. He received the Albion College

Gloria Steinem

Wesley Dick, Albion College professor of history and an activist in the Albion community since the late 1960s, received the NAACP President’s Award at the College-Community Martin Luther King, Jr., commemoration at Albion’s Bethel Baptist Church Jan. 18. The award honors Dick’s “outstanding service and commitment to human and civil rights.” Dick, who joined the College’s History Department in 1968, came to Albion with his wife, Leslie, from Seattle. Recently, he has led an interdisciplinary research project called “Boom, Bust, Recovery: Explorations of Albion, Michigan—The Last Half Century,” with funding from the National Conferences on Undergraduate Research and the Lancy Foundation. Under the guidance of Dick and other faculty mentors, 11 students last

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President Cedric Dempsey, ’54, will participate in the panel, along with former Albion coach and Isaac Symposium namesake Elkin Isaac, ’48. Also included on the program are President Peter Mitchell, ’67; David Neilson, ’66, Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association commissioner; June Dempsey, ’54, educator and Athletic Hall of Fame inductee; Lisa Roschek, Briton women’s soccer coach and associate athletic director; and Troy VanAken, executive assistant to the president for athletics at Albion. The College has recently established the Cedric W. and June Luke Dempsey Endowed Professorship,

and the Dempseys will be on campus in April to initiate the professorship in a visiting capacity.

For more information on the Isaac Symposium events, go to: www.albion.edu/library/Isaac/ or call: 517/629-0445.

John Porter

Distinguished Alumni Award in 1970, an honorary degree in 1973 and the Athletic Hall of Fame’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2003. An active member of the College’s Board of Trustees for 15 years, he is now an honorary trustee. A endowed professorship has been created in his honor in the College’s Shurmur Education Institute. A panel discussion on the past, present and future of college athletics will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 13, in Norris 101 as an additional component of the Isaac Symposium week. Former NCAA Elkin Isaac

Check out these sites on the Web! Science Web cam www.albion.edu/sciencedrive/webcam/ You soon will be able to watch the daily progress of construction on Kresge Hall, a four-story addition to Albion’s science complex. The new Web cam will be operational by April 30!

“Speaking of Science” www.albion.edu/sciencedrive/speaking_of_science.asp In these video clips, you’ll hear what President Peter Mitchell, ’67, and science faculty and students have to say about the impact of the $39-million science complex improvements that begin later this spring. The clips are accessible whether you have a high-speed or dial-up connection. Also available (after April 30) will be a video clip featuring “Science in Action” at Albion today.

“Science Explorations” www.albion.edu/ac_news/ (click on Science Explorations)

Cedric Dempsey

June Dempsey

Local NAACP honors history professor’s civil rights efforts By Morris Arvoy

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summer examined the community’s history in the areas of race relations, education and economic development. “As teachers and historians, Leslie and I have come to appreciate the rich history of Albion’s black community,” Dick said upon receiving the award. “Indeed, one can witness the American dream by studying Albion’s history. To carry out this mission, we have relied on the generosity of Albion’s African American citizens in sharing their stories. As a result, we have been able to share the history of Albion’s diversity with Albion College students and colleagues and with the community. . . .” Dick has been active with the Albion NAACP branch on many fronts over the years, working on voter registration, protests, discrimination cases and affirmative action as well as combating racial profiling and hate crimes. “Racial issues are not ancient history,” he said. “The struggle for justice goes on!”

From high-profile research to offbeat interests, “Science Explorations” introduces you to Albion alumni, faculty and students who are making a name for themselves in science.

James Curtis offers 2004 MLK lecture

Sixty years after graduating from Albion College, Albion native James Curtis, M.D., ’44, (left) returned to present his perspective on the non-violent struggle for civil rights, as the College’s 2004 Martin Luther King, Jr., convocation speaker Jan. 20. He is pictured with E. Lee Feller, ’47, and President Peter Mitchell, ’67. Curtis is a professor emeritus of Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons and a graduate of the University of Michigan Medical School. He is the author of Affirmative Action in Medicine: Improving Health Care for Everyone (2003).

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Women’s basketball captures first-ever MIAA title; divers head to nationals By Bobby Lee Albion College is a member of the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA) and NCAA Division III. Find Briton sports on the Web at www.albion.edu/sports.

Women’s basketball: Albion enjoyed a historic season from the time the MIAA coaches anointed the Britons as the preseason favorite to win the league championship in early November. Albion, which had never been a preseason favorite much less a league champion, reeled off a school-record nine consecutive wins to open the season. Even more impressive than the 9-0 record was the 23-point average margin of victory. The championship aspirations seemed to go up in smoke when the Britons squandered second half leads in losses at Hope and Calvin and suffered an overtime loss to Kalamazoo at Kresge Gymnasium in the first half of the MIAA’s double round-robin regular season schedule. Albion recovered by winning seven of its final eight regular season games and then by defeating Adrian, Hope and Calvin to claim its first MIAA Tournament title and clinch the league’s automatic bid to the NCAA Division III Tournament. Albion trailed Calvin, 45-42, with less than two minutes remaining in the MIAA Tournament title game when junior guard Vanessa Thompson rallied the Britons by hitting a three-point field goal despite a hand in her face and scoring a layup off a Calvin turnover. Despite losing to Wilmington (Ohio) in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, Albion finished the season with a school-record 23 wins against just six losses. Albion was rewarded for its outstanding season by placing three student-athletes on the All-MIAA team at season’s end. Junior guard Sarah Caskey was named to the all-league first team for the second consecutive year. She scored 402 points, the second-highest single season total in Briton women’s basketball history, and was the fourth-leading scorer in the MIAA (league games only), averaging 13.6 points in 14 contests. Caskey also ranked among the MIAA leaders in steals (first, .279 per game), assists (tied for third, 3.64 per game), free throw percentage (third, .812) and three-point field goals made (tied for fifth, 1.71 per game). Senior forward Jocelyn Zappala and firstyear center Ruthie Sventickas were selected to the all-league second team. Zappala finished sixth in the MIAA in rebounding, averaging 6.9 boards per game. Zappala scored in double figures in four league games, including 19 points against Kalamazoo Jan. 7, and a double-double of 14 points and 10 rebounds against Alma Jan. 3. Sventickas finished 20th in the MIAA in scoring (averaging 8.9 points per game) and rebounding (averaging 4.4 rebounds per game). Sventickas emerged in Albion’s three games in the MIAA Tournament, averaging 10.7 points on 43.8 percent (14 of 32) shooting from the field. Sophomore guard Jaime Fornetti was added to the list of honorable mention players in the MIAA by the league coaches. Doreen Belkowski completed her third season as head coach.

ing 3.42 in 12 regular season league games) and ranked second in blocked shots (1.67 per game), third in rebounding (7.2 boards per game), fourth in assists (3.83 per game) and fifth in field goal percentage (.552). He posted five double-doubles on the season, including 13 points and 11 rebounds in a D. TRUMPIE PHOTO home victory over Calvin in January. DePree pulled down 20 rebounds in a game versus the Savannah College of Art & Design (Georgia) in December, and scored 20 points at Olivet. Thomas was Albion’s leading scorer, averaging 17.1 points per game. He connected on nearly 40 percent of his shots from the field (155 of 389) and on 80.5 percent of his opportunities from the free throw line (103 of 128). Thomas exploded for 34 points against DePauw (Indiana) Dec. 6, and for 30 points at North Park (Illinois) Dec. 18. In MIAA play, Thomas scored more than 20 points in three contests. His scoring high in league play was 24 points at Adrian Feb. 14. Thomas finished tied for fifth in the MIAA in steals (1.75 per game) and tied for seventh in three-point field goals made (1.5). Crawford earned a position on the all-league second team. He came on strong during the second half Junior guard Sarah Caskey was named to the all-league first of the league season, shooting team for the second consecutive year. She scored 402 points, better than 50 percent from the the second-highest single season total in Briton women’s field in 13 of the Britons’ final basketball history, and was the fourth-leading scorer in the 14 contests. He scored 21 MIAA (league games only).

points in the home victory over Olivet Jan. 31, and scored 14 points and grabbed 13 rebounds in the victory at Hope Feb. 7. Seniors Marcus Gill and Joe Finland were added to the list of honorable mention players by the league coaches. Mike Turner completed his 30th season as head coach.

Swimming and diving: Boosted by school-record performances by sophomore John Fodell in the 100- and 200-yard breaststroke, and a pair of runner-up finishes by first-year diver Dan Fradeneck, Albion’s men’s squad finished third in the MIAA Championships, Feb. 19-21. The Briton men posted a total of 296 points. Fodell lowered the school record in the 100 breaststroke with a time of 59.56 seconds in the preliminaries. He finished fourth in the event, posting a time of 59.71 seconds in the Friday evening final. Fodell took second place in the 200 breaststroke with a school-record time of 2:09.94. He also finished seventh in the 200-yard individual medley with a time of 2:01.62 in the consolation final. Fradeneck finished second in the 1- and 3meter diving events. His score on the 1-meter board was 455.70, while his 3-meter score was 452.40. Joining Fradeneck in scoring in diving was first-year athlete Brandon Reiss, who earned third place in both events. Both young divers competed in the NCAA Division III Championships March 18-20, with Fradeneck earning honorable mention All-America status in the 3-meter event (15th place) and Reiss achieving honorable mention All-America status in 1-meter diving (19th).

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Men’s basketball: Albion posted 20 wins, marking the second time the Britons have reached the milestone in back-to-back seasons. The Britons’ 42 victories over the last two seasons represent the highest win total in consecutive seasons for the men’s basketball program, eclipsing the 41 wins set by the 1977-78 and 1978-79 squads. The Britons posted a 9-3 record in MIAA play and finished one game behind Hope in the regular season standings. Albion shot 53 percent from the field and received a career-high 20 points from senior guard Marcus Gill to post its second win in as many seasons over Hope at the Holland Civic Center. In the MIAA Tournament, Albion breezed past Alma in the first round, thanks to 56 percent shooting from three-point range. The Britons couldn’t continue the hot shooting in the semifinals as they were bounced from the bracket by Calvin. Calvin, the eventual league tournament champion, went on to the NCAA playoffs. Albion was rewarded for its season by placing three student-athletes on the All-MIAA team. Juniors Travis DePree and Michael Thomas repeated as firstteam selections, while sophomore Brandon Crawford was voted to the second team. DePree, who was the only Briton to start all 27 games during the 2003-04 season, led the MIAA in steals (averag-

Fradeneck

MIAA first-team selection Travis DePree (42) was the only Briton to start all 27 games during the 2003-04 season. He led the MIAA in steals and ranked third in rebounding and fifth in field goal percentage. He posted five double-doubles on the season.

Reiss

Junior Will Green placed in three individual swimming events at the MIAA Championships. He was third in the 500-yard freestyle (4:43.53), sixth in the 200-yard freestyle (1:45.58) and fifth in the 1,650-yard freestyle (16:53.41). Also posting top six individual finishes for the Albion men, sophomore Andrew Davidson finished third in the 200-yard butterfly (2:01.22), sophomore A.J. Dancho was sixth in the 500-yard freestyle (4:49.75) and first-year swimmer Chase Bacon was sixth in the 200-yard butterfly (2:03.91). The Briton women finished sixth in the MIAA Championships with 193 points in the three-day meet. First-year diver Lindsay Brown won the individual title in 1-meter diving with a final score of 367.15. She was second in 3-meter diving with a score of 380.23. Senior Erin Spiro placed in three individual events. She was second in the 100-yard backstroke, third in the 400-yard individual medley and fourth in the 200-yard butterfly. Hope won the league championship for both the men and the women. Keith Havens completed his 15th season as head coach of the men’s and women’s squads.


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Class notes deadline The deadline for class notes appearing in this issue of Io Triumphe was Jan. 31, 2004. Notes received after that date will appear in the next issue.

Class news 51 Sara Dobie Collins, ’51, is involved in local history activity in Arlington, VA. She is also involved in oral history interviewing for the local library collections, responding to questions directed to the Arlington Historical Society. Sara serves on the boards of the Black Heritage Museum of Arlington and the Northern Virginia Association for History. She lives in Arlington.

53 David Yoh, ’53, has been working with the Peace Temple in Benton Harbor since December 2003. He retired in 1995, and has since worked with three different parishes in interim positions. David also helps his wife, Mary, with her business, appraising antiques and conducting estate sales in Saugatuck and Holland. They live in Saugatuck and celebrated their 50th anniversary last fall.

55 Nan Collier, ’55, traveled to Bolivia to spend time with her daughter and her family. This past fall, she took courses at Trinity College and Christ Church College, both at Oxford University. Her grandsons were very impressed that she

ate her meals in the dining hall at Christ Church where the Harry Potter movies were filmed. Nan lives in Kingston, RI. Marilyn Pearson Johnson, ’55, has been elected to the board of Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois (LPCI). Marilyn and her husband, Carl, have lived in the Galena (IL) historic district since 1970. They own and have restored five buildings, the oldest dating to the early Indian traders, and Marilyn has researched its owners and uses since the mid-1820s. They maintain an art gallery of Carl’s paintings in an 1874 storefront on Galena’s Main Street and live above.

56 David Sennema, ’56, has traveled to China and the Panama Canal with his wife, Martha. The book that they authored, Columbia, South Carolina: A Postcard History, continues to sell well in their local market. They continue to collect, buy and sell antique postcards, participating in shows in South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia. They had a visit last summer from Bill Lipke, ’58, while he was in the area attending the Spoleto Festival in Charleston, SC. The Sennemas live in Columbia, SC. Carol Elder Steinhart, ’56, retired from a series of science writing and editing jobs at the University of Wisconsin. She now enjoys volunteering at the university arboretum and helping with string classes at the neighborhood elementary school. Carol plays chamber music and enjoys spending time with her dog. She lives in Madison, WI.

57 Mary Carney Brown, ’57, has been appointed to the Natural Resources Commission by Gov. Jennifer Granholm. The commission establishes general policies for the Department of Natural Resources and hires the department’s director. Mary retired in 1994 after 18 years of public service in the House of Representatives. She has

received numerous awards and honors, including being named “Conservationist of the Year” by the Mackinac Chapter of the Sierra Club and “Legislator of the Year” by the Michigan Townships Association. Mary lives in Kalamazoo.

59 Wayne and Barbara Morris Bauer, both ’59, are retired educators. They live in Carefree, AZ, and can be reached by e-mail at: Bbauer@fastq.com. Dale Brubaker, ’59, is a professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He is the author of Creative Curriculum Leadership: Inspiring and Empowering Your School Community. Dale and his wife, Barbara Stewart Brubaker, ’60, live in Greensboro, NC, and can be reached by e-mail at: dlbrubak@uncg.edu. Sue Alcorn Madison, ’59, volunteers as a fossil preparator at the National History Museum. She is also involved with RockySpot Rescue, a local dog rescue group. Sue and her husband, John, live in Norman, OK. Jim Nelson, ’59, has retired after 42 years in the United Methodist ministry, the last 21 years as director of the Wesley Foundation at Drake University. He and his wife, Carolyn, celebrated with a trip to England. They live in Des Moines, IA. Gayle Smith, ’59, has been a volunteer at Southern Virginia University (SVU) since 1998. She is currently the director of the Southern Sem Alumnae Association. Gayle has previously worked with SVU as an education teacher and assistant dean of admissions. She also worked as an elementary school teacher in California and Michigan for eight years and taught math at Utah Valley State College for one year. Gayle was also an associate real estate broker in Michigan for more than 20 years. She is very active in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, having served two full-time missions to the Netherlands and Germany. Gayle lives in Lexington, VA. Ann Deyo Weatherby, ’59, retired from St. Louis Public Schools in 2001 after 34 years of teaching in several locations. She is also a volunteer at Trident Literacy Association, tutoring adults in reading. Ann and her husband, David, moved to Charleston, SC, where they enjoy walking their dogs, gardening and taking piano lessons.

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Attending a mini-reunion at Glacier National Park in July 2003 were these Class of 1958 alumnae: (from left) Nancy Chalker-Tennant, Paula Johnson Diggs, Beth Heuman Beauchamp, Margaret Hanson Kotting, Judy Jamieson, Judy Gallagher Jones.

Barbara Hosley Brana, ’60, has been retired for 13 years. She plays flute and piccolo in several Detroit-area community bands. Barbara also plays in ensembles and is a member of the Dearborn Vocal and Handbell Choirs. She traveled to Scotland with the Dearborn First Presbyterian Church Choir in 2002. Her brother, William “Bill” Hosley, ’63, is a chemist at the main campus of Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. Barbara lives in Dearborn Heights.

Janese Dible-Weinmann, ’60, traveled to Ireland, England and Wales in 2003 with her husband, Jim, their three children and their families. Jim retired from Canton City Schools in Canton, OH, in 1989. They divide their time between North Fort Myers, FL, and Canton, OH. Jan can be reached by email at: jw6319bby@prodigy.net.

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Marilynn Munt Hill, ’60, retired in June 2003 after 25 years of teaching physical education. She is active with the YMCA and the Mission Bay Yacht Club. Her husband, Joe, is semi-retired, and they enjoy traveling. They live in San Diego, CA.

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In “Bravo to Britons,” our intent is to highlight the noteworthy, the unusual and the entertaining. We welcome submissions from all quarters. The only requirement is that an Albion alumnus/alumna must be involved in the story. Send your nominations, clearly marked for “Bravo to Britons” to: Editor, Io Triumphe, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224. If an item is not received by the deadline for one issue, it will be held for possible inclusion in the next. The editor reserves the right to determine which submissions are selected for publication. Phyllis Harrison-Ross, ’56, has been named this year’s recipient of the American Psychiatric Association’s Solomon Carter Fuller Award, honoring an African American whose life and work has benefited the quality of life for black people. As the award recipient, she will deliver the Solomon Carter Fuller Lecture during the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association in May 2004. Trained as an adult and child psychiatrist as well as a pediatrician, Phyllis has devoted most of her 35-year career to addressing the needs of the underserved populations of New York City. Since 1973, she has directed the Metropolitan Hospital Community Mental Health Center, leading a multi-disciplinary staff of 600 physicians and other health care professionals. This municipal psychiatric center serves a population of one million persons from midtown Manhattan to Harlem. She has also consulted extensively on mental health programs and policy issues in the U.S. and in Europe and has been involved in television programming on parenting and the delivery of mental health services. The author of two books, Phyllis is an emerita professor of psychiatry and behavioral health services at the New York Medical College and was also associated with Columbia University and Cornell University. She is a former president of the Black Psychiatrists of America and also served on the Governing Council of the American Hospital Association and on the board of Children’s Television Workshop. She lives in New York City. Robert Bartlett, M.D., ’60, was recently elected a member of the National Academy of Science’s Institute of Medicine (IOM). Election to the IOM is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of medicine and health. Bartlett (whose life and career were highlighted in the winter 2002-03 Io Triumphe) joins a select group of less than 1,300 medical professionals nationwide, recognized for their distinctive contributions to health through biomedical or social sciences research or leadership in the health professions. Among Bartlett’s many contributions to his profession is the development of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a process that uses artificial organs to sustain life until a patient’s own injured or diseased organ heals or can be replaced. Currently, Bartlett serves as professor of surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School, director of critical care/general surgery and director of surgical intensive care at the U-M Health System. He has been honored with numerous awards for his teaching and research (he received the American Surgical Association’s Medallion for Scientific Achievement in April 2002), and has authored more than 450 articles, monographs, chapters and books.

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Class of ’63 Reunion photo now available Anyone who wishes to obtain an 8x10 copy of the Class of 1963 digital reunion photo from Homecoming 2003 may do so by sending $5.00 to the Office of Alumni and Parent Relations. Be sure to include your name and preferred mailing address with your order. Please make checks payable to Albion College. (You also may view photos from the reunion at: www.albion.edu/ alumni/scrapbook/homecoming0363.asp .)

R. Bruce Lacey, ’60, retired in June after 30 years as a professor of microbiology at Mississippi University for Women. He and his wife, Jennet, live in Columbus, MS.

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Charlotte Knuth Zuzak, ’61, recently won third place for her short story, “Old Porches and Homemade Bread,” published in Hodgepodge magazine. She has been named short story laureate for the summer of 2004 by Verses magazine. Charlotte has traveled to the Loire Valley of France and the Amalfi Coast of Italy. A resident of Grove City, PA, she continues to serve as organist for her church and accompanist for music students at Grove City College.

62 Margaret Barry-Bashur, ’62, owns Multi Media Consultants, a consulting and production media company in Troy and Farmington. Her brothers are Jack and Leroy Barry, both ’54. Jack is retired from the practice of medicine and now serves as CEO of Health Plus in Michigan. Leroy is still a practicing surgeon. Margaret lives in Troy. Sharon Cathey-Gibson, ’62, was named Kiwanian of the Year. Her club won the top honors for California,

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Hawaii and Nevada during her presidency. She is also a college professor, running the reading clinic for area children who are having difficulties learning to read. She lives in Reno, NV.

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Kay Evans Bruns, ’63, made a career and company change in 2003. She now works for New York Life Insurance Co. as an agent and registered representative. Kay retired from CUNA Mutual Life. She qualified during 2003 for membership in the Million Dollar Round Table. Kay sings alto with the Madrigal Chorale in Southfield, and traveled to Italy with them in the summer of 2002. She also went on a Scotland choir tour in the summer of 2002 with the choir of First Presbyterian Church of Royal Oak. Kay enjoys spending time with her granddaughter and lives in Southfield.

64 Jim Burch, ’64, retired in 2000 after 31 years with the Exxon Co. He enjoys oil painting, knife and jewelry making and antiques. Jim is also working to outfit a big game hunting camp. He and his wife of 40 years, Susie Knickerbocker Burch, ’65, travel quite a bit to visit their children in California, Kansas and England. They have eight grandchildren. The Burches live in Billings, MT.

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David Green, ’64, a visiting professor of chemistry at Albion, has been chosen by the Analytical Laboratory Managers Association (ALMA) to receive its Distinguished Service Award for Laboratory Management, the highest award given by ALMA. David is only the second laboratory manager in the country ever to be chosen for this award. He received this award at ALMA’s annual meeting in Pittsburgh recently, where he was invited to give the address at the award banquet. David was the manager of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory from 1982 until 2001. He is past president and treasurer of ALMA and served on the Board of Directors until 2001. He served as editor of Managing the Modern Laboratory from 1995 until 2003.

Theodore Fleming, ’64, professor of biology at the University of Miami, was a featured speaker at a one-day symposium on “Bat-Plant Relationships,” sponsored by the Linnean Society of London in November 2003. Ted has studied plant-animal interactions in the American tropics and Sonoran Desert for more than 30 years. In December, he spent two weeks in the People’s Republic of China as a guest of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. While there he attended a scientific conference at the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden in southwestern China.

65 Margaret Brown Doolittle, ’65, has been selected to receive the 2004 Mason Chamber of Commerce Excellence in Teaching Award. She has taught for 24 years in the Mason Public School System, 22 of them as a kindergarten teacher. Margaret has three children and two grandchildren and lives in Mason. Jane Gobeske Franseth-Millar, ’65, was named the executive director of Northern Community Mediation. She provides leadership for the disputeresolution programs it offers in Emmet and Charlevoix counties. Jane previously worked for Charlevoix-Emmet Intermediate School District. She has a master’s degree from St. Lawrence University and a doctorate from Eastern Michigan University. Between them, she and her husband, Bill, have six children and four grandchildren. They live in Petoskey.

66 Janice Eymer Kessler, ’66, is now “happily unemployed” after working at JoAnn Fabrics for 15 years. She and her husband, Jerry, recently celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary with family and friends. They have three sons and four grandchildren. They live in Sault Ste. Marie and enjoy camping, fishing and gardening. Bill Miller, ’66, retired and moved to Virginia Beach, VA, after 37 years of working in higher education, the last 22 years with the College Board. He goes to Marathon, FL, each winter. His goal is to swim in either the Atlantic Ocean or the Chesapeake Bay for as many months of the year as possible. He can be reached by e-mail at: bill2212@hotmail.com.

67 Duane Dobbert, ’67, had a book published, Halting the Sexual Predators Among US: Preventing Attack, Rape and Lust Homicide. He is a senior professor at Florida Gulf Coast University, where he is responsible for the criminal forensic studies curriculum. Duane is also an adjunct professor in Capella University’s Ph.D. program in human services. He and his wife, Joyce, have four grandchildren. They split their time between Angola, IN, and Naples, FL. He also enjoys fly fishing.

Trying out the links in Ballybunion, County Kerry, Ireland last spring were: (from left) Mike Sequite, ’75, Morris Arvoy, ’90, Mark Garrison, ’71, James Slager (former Albion College director of counseling), William Hileman, ’72, James Kingsley, ’63, Charles Arey, ’72, and Mike Turner, ’69.

68 Kim Cuniberti, ’68, is a realtor with Weichert Realtors in Ridgefield, CT. Since 1985, he has run a mail order business for modern U.S. stamps called Contemporary Coils, specializing in plate numbers and errors on coil and self-adhesive stamps. Kim and his wife, Nancy, celebrated their 30th anniversary in August. They have three children. They have lived in Ridgefield for 28 years. Ronald Kloustin, ’68, is regional director of an international consulting company in Michigan. He received an M.B.A. and has held several senior marketing positions in the consulting business. Ronald and his wife, Karen, have two children. They have traveled to Hawaii and live in West Bloomfield. Brenda Belson Lazarus, ’68, is spending the 2003-04 academic year as a Fulbright Senior Scholar at the University of Qatar in Doha, Qatar. She is teaching graduate classes at the university and working with local schools on the inclusion of children with special needs into general education classrooms. Brenda has also conducted a review of the university’s graduate special education diploma program. Her permanent home is in Naples, FL.

69 Roger Aikin, ’69, was appointed general counsel at Community Bank of Central California in Salinas, CA. He retired from the U.S. Navy in 1998. He lives in Aptos, CA, and can be reached by e-mail at: wen523@aol.com.

70 Eric Britner, ’70, retired from education in July 2003 after 31 years as a teacher, coach and administrator. He and his wife, Connie, moved to Jackson in December.

71 Tim Blood, ’71, has traveled with his family to Britain and Costa Rica, as well as several places in the United States. Since 1996, they have been creating a digital holiday greeting card with photos of their adventures from the past year. He lives in Eugene, OR. Falinda Hartsuff Geerling, ’71, earned her Ph.D. from Michigan State University College of Education in November 2003. For the past five years she has taught full-time at Spring Arbor University School of Adult Studies. Her son, Ben, ’98, works in computer programming in the Detroit area. Falinda lives in Grand Rapids.

72 Kristina Shue Barker, ’72, is working with her husband in commercial real estate. Previously she was a dental hygienist. She lives in Charlotte, NC. Ruth Ann Clay Stover, ’72, has opened a family-owned restaurant in downtown Lima, OH, called The Meeting Place on Market. They use all their own recipes and serve and sell gourmet coffees. The restaurant has a European atmosphere, patterned after her junior year experience in Europe. She lives in Lima.

73 Kalista Hartsuff Castine, ’73, retired after a 30-year career in special, adult and community education, teaching and administration. She is now working parttime at the library. She lives in Grandville and can be reached by e-mail at: castinek@comcast.net.


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Giving made easy How do Albion’s donors make gifts? You might be surprised at the variety of ways. Last year, more than half of the College’s alumni—and many friends, parents, current and emeritus faculty and staff members, and every single trustee—gave to Albion. While most gifts are made in the form of cash, including checks and gifts made using MasterCard, Visa, or Discover debit and credit cards, others are made in the form of transfers of stocks, bonds, or mutual fund shares, often to the tax advantage of the donors. Other people make gifts of real estate that they no longer want or need. Others give personal property, including books for the library, artwork, and scientific or historical artifacts. Each year, Albion is the beneficiary of bequests from estates. These gifts come as a result of provisions made in wills and trusts by forward-thinking people. The College also receives benefits from people’s life insurance policies and retirement funds, wherein Albion is named as one beneficiary of these assets. Some planned gifts, including gift annuities or charitable remainder trusts, may be created during the donors’ lives but only take effect upon the deaths of the donors. Such gifts provide an income for life (at very favorable rates) for the donors and also provide significant tax advantages. If you are interested in exploring some of the planned gift options described above, you can do so at your own pace by logging onto our Web site at www.albion.edu. Once there, click on “Giving to Albion” and then click on “Planned Giving” in the center of the page. Some of the pages there will let you actually calculate estimated tax, income and other results of such a gift.

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Dan Siler, ’66, was named as an honoree on the National Aviation and Space Exploration Wall of Honor at the Udvar-Hazy Center (National Air and Space Museum) in Washington, DC, in December 2003. His aviation career began with the United States Air Force, and for his service in combat in Vietnam he received the Distinguished Flying Cross in 1969. It was that military honor that led to this recognition at the National Air and Space Museum. After leaving the Air Force, Dan continued his career with Delta Airlines, retiring in September 2003 as a senior captain on the Boeing 767-400ER after 31 years of service. A certified IBM/Lotus application developer and systems administrator, Dan recently founded Aviation Suppliers, a group of experienced aviation consultants. In partnership with IBM, his firm is now creating a data network for worldwide aviation. He lives in Watkinsville, GA.

74 Paul Pomeroy, ’74, has been certified in financial management by The Institute of Management Accountants. He holds an M.B.A. from Michigan State University and is a CMA. He had held management positions at Kraft Foods, Frito-Lay and Union Pacific Railroad Co. Paul and his wife, Linda, live in Highland Village, TX, and he has two children.

75 Robert Basselman, ’75, has been hired as an assistant varsity football coach at St. Joseph High School. He is responsible for wide receivers and defensive backs. Robert is currently employed as a registered broker and financial consultant for A.G. Edwards & Sons,

These alumni gathered on the steps of the Goodrich Club during last fall’s Homecoming celebration: (front row, left to right) Ellen Miller Vartian, ’73, Alex Simon, ’73, Steve Maslanik, ’74, Robert Plantrich, ’73, Elliott Renguso, ’73, Mark Branch, ’73; (second row) Marsi Parker Darwin, ’74, David Thomas, ’73, Polly Schweinsberg Moore, ’73, William Tarrant, ’73, John Rose, ’73; (third row) Martha Pierson, ’73, and Eric Snell, ’73. Inc., in the St. Joseph office. He lives in St. Joseph. Elizabeth Emack-Bohanon, ’75, retired from Marriott International in May 2003 after 27 years in sales and marketing. She and her husband, David, recently took an eight-day white water rafting trip through the Grand Canyon. She lives in Marietta, GA, and can be reached by email at: liberino@comcast.net. Michael Trout, ’75, is the director of global engineering for The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. He lives in Uniontown, OH.

76 John Coyle, ’76, is the business manager for Birch Run Area Schools. He previously worked as a financial services representative for Metropolitan Life Insurance Corp. John has also held positions in the Bridgeport-Spaulding Community Schools, Alma Public Schools and the Saginaw Township Community Schools. He has a master’s degree from Central Michigan University. He lives in Hope. Jill Clawson Golden, ’76, received the Pediatrician of the Year Award for the Easley (SC) Hospital System in December. Jill heads the neonatal nursery and outpatient clinic for the Easley Hospital System. She is also a professor at the University of South Carolina Medical School. She lives in Easley. Stanton Michels, ’76, has cut back to part-time work as a pediatric hospitalist to pursue a master’s degree in medical administration. He lives in Honolulu, HI.

77 CORRECTION: Craig Wells, ’77, directed the outdoor history/musical/ dance production of “Viva El Paso,” an outdoor performance that celebrates the many cultures that have settled in El Paso, TX, over the past 400 years. He continues to work at the University of Texas at El Paso as director of advancement for the College of Liberal Arts. Craig and his partner, Gregory, live in El Paso.

78 Mark Tompkins, ’78, principal of Wealthy Elementary School in East Grand Rapids, served on a panel of experts at a live town hall meeting with Gov. Jennifer Granholm that aired on WGVU television in Grand Rapids in October 2003. He has been a member of a United Way project to support early learning initiatives in West Michigan and that involvement led to his appearance at the town hall meeting. He and his wife, Marsha Rosewarne Tompkins, ’79, have three children and live in East Grand Rapids.

80 Jeanne Halliday-Owens, ’80, earned a master’s degree in clinical social work in May 2003. She is working for United Family Services as a counselor/therapist in Charlotte, NC, where she lives.


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Giving made easy How do Albion’s donors make gifts? You might be surprised at the variety of ways. Last year, more than half of the College’s alumni—and many friends, parents, current and emeritus faculty and staff members, and every single trustee—gave to Albion. While most gifts are made in the form of cash, including checks and gifts made using MasterCard, Visa, or Discover debit and credit cards, others are made in the form of transfers of stocks, bonds, or mutual fund shares, often to the tax advantage of the donors. Other people make gifts of real estate that they no longer want or need. Others give personal property, including books for the library, artwork, and scientific or historical artifacts. Each year, Albion is the beneficiary of bequests from estates. These gifts come as a result of provisions made in wills and trusts by forward-thinking people. The College also receives benefits from people’s life insurance policies and retirement funds, wherein Albion is named as one beneficiary of these assets. Some planned gifts, including gift annuities or charitable remainder trusts, may be created during the donors’ lives but only take effect upon the deaths of the donors. Such gifts provide an income for life (at very favorable rates) for the donors and also provide significant tax advantages. If you are interested in exploring some of the planned gift options described above, you can do so at your own pace by logging onto our Web site at www.albion.edu. Once there, click on “Giving to Albion” and then click on “Planned Giving” in the center of the page. Some of the pages there will let you actually calculate estimated tax, income and other results of such a gift.

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Dan Siler, ’66, was named as an honoree on the National Aviation and Space Exploration Wall of Honor at the Udvar-Hazy Center (National Air and Space Museum) in Washington, DC, in December 2003. His aviation career began with the United States Air Force, and for his service in combat in Vietnam he received the Distinguished Flying Cross in 1969. It was that military honor that led to this recognition at the National Air and Space Museum. After leaving the Air Force, Dan continued his career with Delta Airlines, retiring in September 2003 as a senior captain on the Boeing 767-400ER after 31 years of service. A certified IBM/Lotus application developer and systems administrator, Dan recently founded Aviation Suppliers, a group of experienced aviation consultants. In partnership with IBM, his firm is now creating a data network for worldwide aviation. He lives in Watkinsville, GA.

74 Paul Pomeroy, ’74, has been certified in financial management by The Institute of Management Accountants. He holds an M.B.A. from Michigan State University and is a CMA. He had held management positions at Kraft Foods, Frito-Lay and Union Pacific Railroad Co. Paul and his wife, Linda, live in Highland Village, TX, and he has two children.

75 Robert Basselman, ’75, has been hired as an assistant varsity football coach at St. Joseph High School. He is responsible for wide receivers and defensive backs. Robert is currently employed as a registered broker and financial consultant for A.G. Edwards & Sons,

These alumni gathered on the steps of the Goodrich Club during last fall’s Homecoming celebration: (front row, left to right) Ellen Miller Vartian, ’73, Alex Simon, ’73, Steve Maslanik, ’74, Robert Plantrich, ’73, Elliott Renguso, ’73, Mark Branch, ’73; (second row) Marsi Parker Darwin, ’74, David Thomas, ’73, Polly Schweinsberg Moore, ’73, William Tarrant, ’73, John Rose, ’73; (third row) Martha Pierson, ’73, and Eric Snell, ’73. Inc., in the St. Joseph office. He lives in St. Joseph. Elizabeth Emack-Bohanon, ’75, retired from Marriott International in May 2003 after 27 years in sales and marketing. She and her husband, David, recently took an eight-day white water rafting trip through the Grand Canyon. She lives in Marietta, GA, and can be reached by email at: liberino@comcast.net. Michael Trout, ’75, is the director of global engineering for The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. He lives in Uniontown, OH.

76 John Coyle, ’76, is the business manager for Birch Run Area Schools. He previously worked as a financial services representative for Metropolitan Life Insurance Corp. John has also held positions in the Bridgeport-Spaulding Community Schools, Alma Public Schools and the Saginaw Township Community Schools. He has a master’s degree from Central Michigan University. He lives in Hope. Jill Clawson Golden, ’76, received the Pediatrician of the Year Award for the Easley (SC) Hospital System in December. Jill heads the neonatal nursery and outpatient clinic for the Easley Hospital System. She is also a professor at the University of South Carolina Medical School. She lives in Easley. Stanton Michels, ’76, has cut back to part-time work as a pediatric hospitalist to pursue a master’s degree in medical administration. He lives in Honolulu, HI.

77 CORRECTION: Craig Wells, ’77, directed the outdoor history/musical/ dance production of “Viva El Paso,” an outdoor performance that celebrates the many cultures that have settled in El Paso, TX, over the past 400 years. He continues to work at the University of Texas at El Paso as director of advancement for the College of Liberal Arts. Craig and his partner, Gregory, live in El Paso.

78 Mark Tompkins, ’78, principal of Wealthy Elementary School in East Grand Rapids, served on a panel of experts at a live town hall meeting with Gov. Jennifer Granholm that aired on WGVU television in Grand Rapids in October 2003. He has been a member of a United Way project to support early learning initiatives in West Michigan and that involvement led to his appearance at the town hall meeting. He and his wife, Marsha Rosewarne Tompkins, ’79, have three children and live in East Grand Rapids.

80 Jeanne Halliday-Owens, ’80, earned a master’s degree in clinical social work in May 2003. She is working for United Family Services as a counselor/therapist in Charlotte, NC, where she lives.


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Kirk Jabara, ’80, is active with small businesses as a consultant, business owner and mergers/acquisition specialist. He is working with Equity Ltd., a mid-market M & A firm. Prior to 1998, Kirk was a business consulting partner with Arthur Andersen. He and his wife, Lynne, also own and run the Boyne Co-op True Value store in Boyne City. They have two children and live on Lake Charlevoix.

82 Joseph Ales, ’82, has been an optometrist for 17 years and bought Optik Birmingham (MI) in 2001. His firm recently gained media attention for marketing vintage eyeglass frames from the 1920s to the 1980s. Joseph studied at the Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago. He previously worked in California for two years before returning to Michigan. He lives in Waterford.

83 Diane Stanton-Rich, ’83, and her family are living in Kobe, Japan. They are starting their second of four years there. She is teaching English at a Japanese university. Diane continues to compose songs, write books, do puppet shows and perform magic tricks. She and her husband, Mike, have a son. Stephen Watkins, ’83, was nominated for the U.S. Small Business Administration’s “Financial Services Advocate of the Year” by a Fortune small business columnist. Stephen is the CEO of Entrex, a centralized financial monitoring and reporting structure that allows stakeholders to easily find, research, track and manage private companies. He lives in Light House Point, FL.

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84 Mary Beth Hartmann Halushka, ’84, has been appointed to a position on the Troy (MI) Board of Education. She is a former assistant vice president of the Michigan National Corp. Mary Beth has also served as treasurer for the Troy Foundation for Education Excellence and has been a member of Albion’s Alumni Association board. She is a former member of the board of the North Oakland County Girl Scouts Council and a former gubernatorial appointee to the Michigan State Industries Advisory Board. She lives in Troy. Maral Toukhanian Mamassian, ’84, is one of the designers for “Celebrate Today,” a home-decorating show that airs on Detroit Public Television. She works on the show with two of her friends. The show focuses on temporary home enhancements for holidays and special occasions. Maral lives in Beverly Hills. Elizabeth Swenor, ’84, has joined the staff of Cheboygan Memorial Hospital as a family practice physician. She completed her residency at Pinnacle Health System in Harrisburg. She began her career as an elementary school teacher and taught sixth grade at Borland Road Elementary School in Imlay for five years and fifth grade at Cedar Street Elementary School in Kalamazoo for two years. She earned her master’s degree from Michigan State University in 1991. She lives in Pellston.

85 Kate Dale, ’85, won the grand prize in the Weber Q “Where Will You Do It?” essay contest. Her essay described using the Q, Weber’s portable gas grill, on her float in The Coney Island Mermaid Parade. The grand prize sent her and

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Anna Van Bruggen Thompson, ’80, has been the executive director of fine arts programming at the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University in Minnesota for the past five years. She received the second annual North American Performing Arts Managers and Agents (NAPAMA) Award for Excellence in Presenting the Performing Arts in January 2004. Anna serves as a board member for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Minnesota, VSA arts of Minnesota and the vocal ensemble Cantus. She previously served for six years on Albion’s Alumni Association board. Anna is a frequent speaker at the regional and national level and is also published in the field. She is a member of several dance and music organizations and has facilitated music commissions for many musicians, orchestras and dance companies. Anna lives in St. Cloud, MN.

three friends to The Four Seasons in Maui for a week. She is also being featured in an upcoming documentary which chronicles the weeks leading up to and the day of the 2002 Mermaid Parade. Kate continues her work as properties supervisor at The Juilliard School. She lives in Brooklyn, NY. Elizabeth Jamieson, ’85, has been installed as one of the State Bar of Michigan Representative Assembly officers for 2003-04. She practices with the firm of Varnum, Riddering, Schmidt & Howlett, LLP, in Grand Rapids, where she focuses on creditor rights, including bankruptcy law and collection litigation. A certified facilitative mediator, she has also been active in State Bar work and the Grand Rapids Bar Association. Elizabeth earned her law degree from the Detroit College of Law in 1988. She lives in Caledonia.

86 Mary Ellen Ahmad, ’86, celebrated her first year in business as owner of Aria Booksellers in downtown Howell. She spent about 10 years selling cosmetics and another 10 years working for her father’s packaging design company, Swallow & Associates, in Hartland. Mary lives in Howell. Steve Halter, ’86, is employed as a loan officer at Fifth Third Bank, where he has worked since 1988. He has lived in western Michigan since 1995. He and his wife, Patti, have been married since 1994. They enjoy golfing, and have visited Walt Disney World five times since 1997. They live in Belmont and can be reached by e-mail at: Steven.Halter@53.com.

88 CORRECTION: Jill Manning Morrill, ’88, is a homemaker and tutors middle school students. She previously taught elementary school for 12 years. She is active with the Cystinosis Research Network. Jill earned a master’s degree in science and language arts. She and her husband, Brian Morrill, ’82, have been married for 11 years and have two children. They can be reached at: 974 Princeton Blvd. SE, East Grand Rapids, MI 49506-3123.

90 Jeffrey DeWeerd, ’90, is employed by Foote Health Systems as a solo practitioner in their Leslie office. He lives in Mason and can be reached by email at: deweerdj@msu.edu.

91 Janeen Duckett, ’91, is an executive producer at the CBS-owned station in the Dallas-Ft. Worth market. She lives in Coppell, TX.

You can save on taxes while saving for your child’s education! Albion College is one of more than 200 participating institutions in the Independent 529 Plan, a prepaid college tuition plan tailored for private colleges. By contributing to an Independent 529 account you can set aside tomorrow’s tuition at less than today’s prices, and the account generates no federal income tax liability if used as intended. The prepaid tuition may be used at any of the participating colleges. To obtain more information on the Independent 529 Plan, administered by TIAA-CREF Trust Co., FSB, call 888/718-7878 or visit www.independent529plan.org.

Independent 529 Plan was named a “Best Product of 2003” by BusinessWeek.

Christine Dykgraaf, ’91, has earned master’s degrees from the University of Michigan and the University of Arizona. She is now a Ph.D. student at the University of Arizona in library science with a focus on Middle East collections. Christine is also a lecturer in the Near Eastern Studies Department at the University of Arizona, teaching courses on Islamic thought and Middle East humanities. She lives in Tucson, AZ.

92 Victoria Philp Cornwell, ’92, graduated with an M.B.A. from the University of Phoenix in 1999. She has recently been named cathedral campaign associate director and marketing manager with the Archdiocese of Detroit, Department of Development. She and her husband, David, have two sons. The family lives in Harper Woods and can be reached by e-mail at: cornwell.victoria@aod.org.


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Elyse Semerdjian, ’92, finished her Ph.D. in Middle Eastern history, graduating with distinction from Georgetown University. Her dissertation, entitled “Off the Straight Path: Gender, Public Morality and Legal Administration in Ottoman Aleppo Syria,” was given the Syrian Studies Association best dissertation prize for 2003. She is currently an assistant professor of Islamic history at Whitman College in Washington. She lives in Walla Walla, WA, and can be reached by e-mail at: semerdve@whitman.edu. Connolly Sherwood, ’92, continues to teach Title One Reading at Maddox Elementary School in Englewood, CO. She was chosen to become a district literacy coordinator, and continues to chair Maddox’s Child Support Team. The team determines and assists with implementation of appropriate interventions for students who are exhibiting educational and emotional difficulties. She lives in Denver, CO, and can be reached by e-mail at: connolly_sherwood@yahoo.com.

93 Maureen Hildebrandt Bauer, ’93, is the manager of sales development for Costa Cruise Lines, based in Hollywood, FL. She lives in Willoughby Hills, OH, and can be reached at by e-mail at: tauntemoe@msn.com. Jonathan Beeton, ’93, served as a deputy press secretary on Gen. Wesley Clark’s presidential campaign. He was Clark’s Michigan press secretary leading up to the Michigan Democratic caucus on Feb. 7. Jonathan has also worked on other Democratic campaigns in Michigan. His wife, Kathleen Koerner Beeton, ’93, is an urban planner III for the City of Alexandria, VA. Jerry Johnson, ’93, has been appointed to the position of executive director for communications and development for the Genesee Intermediate School District. He will work with the Genesee County Superintendents Association, focusing on legislative relations and grant development, as well as marketing and public relations efforts. Since 1998, he has worked as the president and executive director of Priority Children. He previously worked as project director of Calhoun County Communities in Schools, Inc. from 1995 to 1998. He lives in Grand Blanc. Michelle Jones, ’93, lives in Kailua, HI, with her husband, Bill Browne, and a son, and can be reached by e-mail at: msmjones3@hotmail.com. Zia Mollabashy, ’93, graduated from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law in 2002. He passed the bar exams in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. He spent over three years in South Korea, teaching English as a second language. Zia and his wife, Jinhee, have a daughter, and they live in Terre Haute, IN.

94 Beckett Broh, ’94, received her Ph.D. in sociology from Ohio State University in 2003. She is working as a program evaluator, conducting educational research for the Ohio legislature. She and her partner have lived in Columbus for eight years. Beckett can be reached by e-mail at: bbroh@hotmail.com. Tanya Kurinij Murphy, ’94, is a stayat-home mom. She previously worked for Ford Motor Co. as the planning and distribution manager in the Cincinnati regional sales office. Tanya and her husband, Mike, were married in July 2002, and they have a daughter. They live in Maineville, OH, and can be reached by e-mail at: tanyammurphy@msn.com. Megan Murray, ’94, is a third-grade teacher at Washington Gardner Elementary School in Albion. She coauthored a book with a colleague, Understanding the Pattern of Life. She lives in Albion. Tom Reason, ’94, teaches science at Pinckney High School and also coaches track and baseball. He recently completed his first book on training athletes. Tom finished his final thesis at Wayne State University, where he received his master’s degree in marketing research. He and his wife, Stacy, have been married for four years and have a son. They live in Pinckney and can be reached by e-mail at: treason@pcs.k12.mi.us. Paul Twydell, ’94, is completing his neurology residency at Henry Ford Hospital. He lives in St. Clair Shores and can be reached by e-mail at: mariner71@yahoo.com.

95 CORRECTION: Michelle Britton, ’95, is a producer for NBC News. She reports on stories for “NBC Nightly News,” “Today” and MSNBC. She was nominated for two National News and Documentary Emmy Awards for her work in 2003. She lives in Chicago, IL, and can be reached by e-mail at: michellekbritton@hotmail.com. Rachael Hill, ’95, is an investment advisor with a local investment firm. She lives in Missoula, MT, and can be reached by e-mail at: rachaelhill@hotmail.com.

96 Matthew Courser, ’96, received his Ph.D. in political science from Ohio State University in August 2003. He manages the Columbus, OH, office of a national non-profit research firm. He can be reached by e-mail at: mcourser@pire.org. Jeff Karczewski, ’96, deals with automotive suppliers from around the world as an electrical buyer with General Motors worldwide purchasing. During

his spare time, he writes songs with Paul “P.J.” Adams, ’98. He also spends time with Rob Gray, ’96, Josh Webb, ’96, and Mike Kobylarz, ’96. He lives in Sterling Heights, and can be reached by e-mail at: 6fs@excite.com. Jeff Moore, ’96, became a fellow of the Society of Actuaries in August. He is an actuary at Nationwide Insurance Co. Jeff and his wife, Kenadi Myers Moore, ’96, live in Powell, OH.

97 David Barber, ’97, completed his master’s degree in economics. He works as a statistician for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. David has moved to Paris, France, and can be reached by e-mail at: odoketa@softhome.net. Carla Dreyer, ’97, received her doctorate in psychology from Xavier University in Cincinnati in August 2002 and obtained her license as a psychologist in the State of Ohio in October 2003. She is working as a staff psychologist at Court Clinic Forensic Services in Cincinnati and is also an adjunct professor in forensic psychology at Northern Kentucky University. Carla lives in Cincinnati and can be reached by e-mail at: carladreyer@yahoo.com. Michael McKenney, ’97, lives with his wife, Cristina, in Phoenix, AZ, and can be reached by e-mail at: mikeatccscs@aol.com.

98 Mary Garner Durant, ’98, was promoted to assistant director of admissions at DeVry University’s Columbus, OH, campus, where she has worked for three years. Mary and her husband, Christopher, enjoy traveling.

They have a daughter and live in Hilliard, OH. She can be reached by email at: mdurant@devrycols.edu.

99 Michelle Martin, ’99, graduated from the Wayne State University Law School and is now an attorney in Berkley. She lives in Troy. Kristin Moilanen, ’99, received her master’s degree in psychology from the University of Nebraska in 2002 and is now working on her Ph.D. She lives in Lincoln, NE. Kevin Shehan, ’99, is a first-year law student at George Mason University School of Law in Arlington, VA. He lives in Arlington. Julie Vecchio, ’99, is pursuing a master’s degree in marine biology at the College of Charleston in South Carolina. She can be reached by e-mail at: ponte_vecchio@hotmail.com.

00 Berkley Browne, ’00, is serving as the vice president/chief operating officer for P.R. Browne & Associates, LLC. She previously worked as a missionary with a ministry called The Impact Movement. She lives in Detroit.

01 Lindsay Adams, ’01, began law school at the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law in August. She lives in Grosse Pointe Farms. Kimberly Curtis Moore, ’01, received her teaching certificate for Ohio

licensure. She is teaching physical education and health at Grove City (OH) High School. Kimberly lives in Columbus, OH.

02 Sarah Granlund, ’02, is pursuing an M.A. degree in English and publishing and an M.F.A. degree in creative writing at Rosemont College. In October, her first short story was published by a magazine with national circulation. She lives in Philadelphia, PA. Anwar Imam, ’02, is in his second year of law school at Loyola University Chicago School of Law. Anwar lives in Chicago, IL. Lindsay Resky, ’02, is in her last year of pharmacy school and is completing her clerkship rotations. She lives in Byron. Katie Roberts, ’02, has joined the staff of the County Line Reminder, based out of the Ortonville office. She works as a reporter, covering Brandon Township, Ortonville and Groveland Township. She lives in Lapeer. Andrew Smerczak-Zorza, ’02, is teaching English in Japan for two years. He is working at a junior high school in the Nagano prefecture, home of the ’98 Winter Olympics. Yukiko Tanaka, ’02, is finishing her master’s degree in piano performance in CUNY Brooklyn College. She is also very active as a soloist, chamber musician and piano teacher. Yukiko has become a faculty member at a music school called Musika. Her solo piano recital was in February at Japanese American United Church in Manhattan as a fund-raising concert for the church. She lives in New York.

(continued on p. 20)

Do you have access to the Online Alumni Directory? Anyone who has made a gift to Albion College between July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2004 can have access to the Online Alumni Directory. This directory is updated nightly with new information and changes. Simply send an e-mail to alumnidirectory@albion.edu, and we will send you a password. If you have not yet made a gift to Albion College this year, you can still get access to the Online Alumni Directory by making your donation today! You can even make your gift online via our secure Web site: https://secure.albion.edu/giving/ . For more information about the Online Alumni Directory, go to:

http://secure.albion.edu/instadvan/alumdir/ .

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College of Art and Design. Stephen is a scientist at Rayonier in Jessup, GA. The couple lives in Richmond Hill, GA. Elana Luberto, ’96, to John Waugh on Oct. 11, 2003 in Ann Arbor. Albion alumni in attendance include Amy Schmidt Stille, ’97, Jen Troell Morris, ’96, and Todd Morris, ’95. The couple lives in East Lansing. Matthew Lynn, ’96, to Amanda Schugars on July 19, 2003. Matthew is a treatment counselor at Starr Commonwealth. Amanda is a teacher for Battle Creek Public Schools. The couple lives in Battle Creek.

Homecoming 2004—Oct. 22-24 Come back to Albion for all the great events at Homecoming Weekend: Distinguished Alumni Awards Ceremony, Hall of Fame

Meredith March, ’97, to Kevin Kropf on Dec. 27, 2003 in Zeeland. Albion alumni in the wedding party included maid of honor Lynne March, ’89, matron of honor Anessa Songer, ’98, and groomsman Nathan March, ’98. Meredith teaches sixth grade at Endeavor Academy in Battle Creek, and Kevin is the associate director of the Gerstacker Institute at Albion College. The couple lives in Albion.

Kezlarian Herrick, ’69, and Dennis Herrick, ’69. Ryan is the music producer for NBC’s “Last Call with Carson Daly,” and Maggie works in network news and MSNBC advertising sales. The couple lives in New York City. Patricia Moyer, ’99, to Jason Fowler on Aug. 30, 2003 in Adrian. Maid of honor was Melissa Mann, ’99. Patricia is a full-time manager for Adrian Big Boy and a full-time student at Sienna Heights. She is pursuing a teacher certificate in business education and mathematics. The couple lives in Adrian. Erica Peterson, ’99, to Jeff Garbacz, ’99 on Jan. 18, 2003. Jeff earned his doctorate of physical therapy from the University of Michigan in December 2002. He is the clinic director at Physiotherapy in Livonia. Jeff also teaches the Holistic Treatment of the Knee seminar for Great Lakes Seminars. Erica took a new job at Forbes Magazine as an advertising sales representative. The couple lives in Royal Oak.

Natalie Papcun, ’02, to Kyle Gasiorowski on Jan. 17, 2004. Natalie is currently working as a registered nurse at Children’s Hospital of Michigan. They live in Orion Township. Marlyce Goff, ’03, to Eric Serges, ’02, on May 31, 2003. Alumni in attendance included Megan Broom, ’03, Steve Champine, ’01, Angela Livaditis, ’03, Sosi Hagopian, ’03, Victoria Johnson, ’03, Courtney Cole, ’03, Bryan Johnson, ’03, Ben Feeney, ’02, Andrew Neidlinger, ’02, Mike Knight, ’02, Gabriel Salimi, ’02, Hannon Hogan, ’03, Josh Weimer, ’02, Jennifer Purucker, ’02, and Sarah Hruska, ’02. The couple lives in Swartz Creek. Rebecca Reichle, ’03, to Dennis VanCleve, ’02, on July 26, 2003 in Lansing. Dennis is attending graduate school in meteorology at Florida State University. They live in Tallahassee, FL, and can be reached by e-mail at: rcr10@alumnimail.albion.edu.

Awards dinner, class reunions (class years ending in “4” and “9,” 1954-1999), and a football match-up with Wisconsin Lutheran. Watch www.albion.edu/alumni/homecoming2004.asp for more event details and access to specially designed class reunion Web pages.

Robin Theryoung, ’02, graduated from Western Michigan University in December 2003 with a master’s degree in blind rehabilitation teaching. She is currently a resident athlete at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO, where she is training for the 2004 Athens Paralympics. Sally Trombly, ’02, is finishing up a year and a half of employment as the registrar at the Plumas County Museum in Quincy, CA, where she lives.

03 Rosemary Beyer, ’03, is attending law school in Lansing where she lives. Sarah Ellis, ’03, had two art pieces accepted for the 23rd Annual Statewide Alma College Print Competition. One of her pieces, “Cross Section,” was chosen for a purchase award. In January 2004, the prints began a twelve-month tour of Michigan. She is an art student who also studies biology, as much of her inspiration comes directly from studying nature. Sarah lives in Springport. Bill Howland, ’03, is working for the St. Clair County Drain Commissioner’s Office. He is part of a two-county team that is conducting Illicit Discharge Elimination Programs (IDEP) in area watersheds. He lives in Ferndale. Nathan Newman, ’03, is attending graduate school at Texas A&M University at Kingsville, TX. His research assistantship is on white-tail deer and is taking place on two private ranches near Carrizo Springs, TX.

James Robbins, ’03, is the sports editor for LA View, a new weekly newspaper in the Lapeer area. He lives in Metamora. Ashley Smith, ’03, is currently working for Interlochen Arts Academy in northern Michigan as a hall counselor. She is also the manager of the academy orchestra.

Weddings Nancy Hilts Deane, ’62, to Edward Bohac on June 28, 2003 in Sterling, CO, where they live. Both are retired and enjoy traveling, playing golf and keeping in touch with their many friends and family members. Jay Arbaugh, ’91, to Jennifer Reynolds on Aug. 9, 2003 in Ohio. Jay is the principal of Fostoria Middle School and Jennifer is a music teacher for the Apple Creek School District. They live in Ashland, OH. Lisa Meisel, ’94, to David White on April 26, 2003. Alumni in attendance included maid of honor, CJ Robison, ’94, and Josh Deegan, ’94. Lisa works for the Federal Reserve Bank and completed her M.B.A. at Wake Forest University. David is a health care consultant with a local company. The couple lives in Charlotte, NC, and can be reached by e-mail at: lisa.a.white@rich.frb.org. Stephen Boller, ’96, to Catherine Ramsdell on Dec. 6, 2003. Alumni in the wedding included Martha Ramsdell Vartanoff, ’90, Lori Jacobs Koslosky, ’93, and Mike Koslosky, ’91. Catherine is a professor of liberal arts at Savannah

Candace Kos, ’00, to Patrick Harrington, ’98, on April 5, 2003 in Chicago, IL. Among the many alumni in attendance were: Jason Branham, ’98, John Peters, ’99, Dave Pasick, ’99, Allison Wood, ’99, and Nicole Haas, ’99. Candace is a production manager for Clarity Visual Systems in Chicago. The couple lives in Chicago. Jessica Savanna, ’98, to George Lemmon, ’98, on Aug. 23, 2003 in Manchester. Jessica works for an investment banking firm specializing in institutional sales. George is a senior representative for SunLife Financial. They live in Chicago, IL. Jane Williams, ’98, to Charles KriegPatrick Chauvin on July 20, 2002. Shawn Lacasse Mehrens, ’98, was in the wedding party, and Jennifer Wojtas Konopka, ’98, attended the wedding. Charlie works for an insurance defense firm in New Orleans, and Jane is an assistant district attorney for Terrebonne Parish. They live in Destrehan, LA. Amy Hailey, ’99, to Chris Hohlbein, ’99, on June 28, 2003 in Northville. Albion students and alumni in attendance included Lisa Surma, ’99, Lori Surma, ’99, Eddie Ward II, ’99, Virgil Petty, ’99, Margaret McCormick, ’00, Kara Ganota, ’00, Andrea Hailey, ’06, and Paul Dobbs, ’60. Amy teaches Spanish at Clarkston High School and recently completed her master’s degree in education at the University of Michigan. Chris has taught physical education at Dublin Elementary School in Walled Lake for four years. He recently completed his master’s degree at Marygrove College. The couple lives in Auburn Hills and can be reached by e-mail at: ahailey@umich.edu. Maggie Kuhn, ’00, to Ryan Kadro, ’99, in the summer of 2002. Albion alumni who attended the wedding included Marissa Nieman, ’02, Lesly Wilberding, ’01, Caren Wood, ’00, Jon Easley, ’00, Allison Bennett Roelofs, ’00, Kurt Roelofs, ’00, Laila Legue, ’00, Katie Mangus, ’00, Ian Kesler, ’99, Jeff Herrick, ’98, Anne Bruce Herrick, ’98, Todd Paxton, ’99, Dan Arndt, ’97, Jeff Blake, ’97, Nancy

Mary Simpson, ’99, to Dan Milne on July 26, 2003 in Racine, WI. Mary is pursuing her M.B.A. through an executive program at Purdue University and working at Warren Industries. The couple lives in Lafayette, IN. Jennifer Daniels, ’00, to Stuart Umberger on June 21, 2003 in Grand Rapids. Jennifer is a marketing coordinator for the commercial real estate services firm of Colliers, Turley, Martin and Tucker in Indianapolis, where she and Stuart live. Nicole Cooper, ’01, to Dennis Harmon on June 22, 2002. Albion alumni in attendance included Lacey Sischo, ’01, Allison Moore, ’01, Kristin Timpner, ’00, Adam Beers, ’01, Andrea Leonardis, ’01, Tracy Gray, ’01, Shannon Seibert, ’01, Adrienne Doyle, ’03, Heidi Schulte, ’02, Crystal Shaw, ’01, Stacey Burmeister, ’01, Kate Gurney Reskevics, ’99, and Tiffany Caldwell, ’99. The couple lives in Canton. Miracle Hurley, ’01, to Scott Balsitis on Aug. 24, 2003. Albion alumni in attendance included Elizabeth Astras Geshel, ’00, Katherine Brimmer Stinar, ’01, and Theron Stinar, ’02. Scott is a dissertator at the University of Wisconsin in cellular/molecular biology, and Miracle is employed at the Arbor Covenant Church as director of youth ministries. They live in Madison, WI. Amy Vogtmann, ’03, to Andrew Schupska, ’01, on May 17, 2003 in Holt. Amy attends Michigan State University Veterinary Technician Program and is an independent consultant for May Kay Cosmetics. Andrew is an actuary for Auto Owners Insurance Co. in Lansing. They live in Holt. Marnie Harte, ’02, to Sean Hackney, ’02, on Dec. 20, 2003 in East Lansing. Albion students in the wedding party included Brittany Harte, ’05, Meaghan Thomas, ’01, William Sisco, ’02, and Ben Schaefer, ’03. Marnie is attending law school, and Sean is a designer at Circuit City’s corporate offices. The couple lives in Richmond, VA.

Baby Britons William Webb on May 20, 2003 to Edward and Patricia Webb Pentecost, both ’85. He joins sisters Emily, 10, and Katie, 2, and brother Hayden, 8. The Pentecosts live in Cleveland Heights, OH. Brian on Jan. 10, 2004 to Griffin Derryberry and Katherine Stiles, ’86. The family lives in Mountain View, CA. Nathan Michael on Jan. 9, 2004 to Jim, ’87, and Lisa Valente Cox, ’88. He joins older brothers Ben, 11, and Nick, 9. The family lives in Mansfield, OH. Alexandra Mishawne born on Jan. 5, 2003 in Russia and adopted on July 14, 2003 by Rob and Mishawne Pope Hoisington, ’87. Allie joins big brothers Tyler, 11, Connor, 8, and Noah, 3. The Hoisingtons live in Fairport, NY, and can be reached by e-mail at: shoisington2001@aol.com. Kathryne Elizabeth on Aug. 22, 2003 to Jeffrey and Bethann Cunningham Woollard, ’87. She joins big brother Andrew. The Woollards live in Columbus, OH. Julia Judd on July 1, 2003 to Mike and Mary Judd Hazen, ’88. Julia was welcomed by her sister Molly. The family lives in Libertyville, IL. Henry Silas on Nov. 11, 2003 to Betsy Daub and Susanna Short, ’88. He joins big sister Mattie Elizabeth. The family lives in St. Paul, MN, and can be reached by e-mail at: daubshort@earthlink.net. Risto William on Oct. 8, 2003 to Ulla and Brian Crouse, ’89. He joins older siblings Robert and Maria. They live in Phoenix, MD. Grace Ellen on Sept. 7, 2003 to Paul and Blakely Burns Meyers, ’89. She joins sisters Emma, 3, and Rachel, 1. John Meyers, ’81, is her godfather. The family lives in Reston, VA, and can be reached by e-mail at: blakelymeyers@comcast.net.


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Wedding Album See accompanying notes for details. Meredith March, ’97, to Kevin Kropf on Dec. 27, 2003. Pictured are Albion College alumni and staff at the wedding. (Front row, left to right) Norris March, ’64, Susan Hocking March, ’66, Anessa Songer, ’98, Nathan March, ’98, Lynne March, ’89, Meredith March Kropf, ’97, Kevin Kropf, Alex Carroll, ’03, Tony Mastromonaco, ’03. (Second row) George Carlyle, ’98, Kelly Stevens Carlyle, ’97, Ryan Maki, ’98, Alison Farmer Maki, ’97, Lisa Rizak, ’97, Stephanie Liebold Lemmen, ’97, Joan Hawsey, Mandy Konkle, Laurel Weinman, ’01, Jim Conway, ’87, Kristi Brierly, Mira Wood, ’02, Katie Gustavson, ’05, Sarah Metzler, ’01, Roberta Carothers, ’01, Abby Brown, ’01, Peg Mitchell Turner, ’69. (Third row) Deb Kellar, Doug Kellar, David Hawsey, Susie Stuewer, ’70, Morris Arvoy, ’90, Jason Whalen, ’00, Travis Balzer, ’00, John Stadelman, ’99, Lance Coleman, ’91, Eric Petroelje, ’01, Joe Zessin, ’05, Jody May, Mike Turner, ’69.

Candace Kos, ’00, to Patrick Harrington, ’98, on April 5, 2003. (Left to right) Sharon Laing, ’98, Angela Landolt, Jillian Harrington, Bonnie Tawse, Brooke Walters, Candace Kos, ’00, Patrick Harrington, ’98, John Harrington, Craig Labuhn, ’99, Justin Matter, ’97, Josh Parker, ’98.

Jessica Savanna, ’98, to George Lemmon, ’98, on Aug. 23, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Matt Corona, ’99, Kirk Rosin, ’98, Jessica Savanna Lemmon, ’98, George Lemmon, ’98, Allison Neckers, ’98, Jaime Corte Christopher, ’98. (Second row) Robb Smith, ’98, Matt Damman, ’97, Nathan March, ’98, Anessa Songer, ’98, Nick Christopher, ’98, Gabriela Vettraino, ’98, Krista Vollmerding, ’98, Melissa Grace Scheib, ’98, Hillary Butcher, ’98, Claudina Iacobelli, ’98. (Third row) Annie Topie, ’01, T.J. Whitehouse, ’99, Jason Thomas, ’00, Debbie Haan, ’99, Chris Friggens, ’98, Eloise Whitlock Schumacher, ’99, Scott Schumacher, ’99, Jeff Irwin, ’98, Dave Stark, ’98, Kim Krzyzaniak Stark, ’97. Jane Williams, ’98, to Charles KriegPatrick Chauvin on July 20, 2002. (Left to right) Jennifer Wojtas Konopka, ’98, Jane Williams Chauvin, ’98, Shawn Lacasse Mehrens, ’98.

Patricia Moyer, ’99, to Jason Fowler on Aug. 30, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Jamie Justus, ’99, Amanda Tratechaud Drobot, ’99, Karin Messing, ’99, Patricia Moyer-Fowler, ’99, Melissa Mann, ’99. (Second row) Laura Somogyi, ’99, Nicholas Moyer, ’03, and Jason Fowler.

Rebecca Reichle, ’03, to Dennis VanCleve, ’02, on July 26, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Lewis Cardenas, ’02, Ashley Smith, ’03, Liz Vogel, ’04, Melissa Timm, ’03, Rebecca Reichle, ’03, Dennis VanCleve, ’02, David Hansen, ’03, Rachel Todd, ’04, David Friday, ’04, Melanie Heying, ’03. (Second row) Robin Theryoung, ’02, Dan Williams, ’05, Alisha Cusack, ’05, Kjersti DeVries, ’05, Carolyn Matthei, ’02, Erin Olgren, ’03, Abigail Gilbert, ’03, Greta Elenbaas, ’03, Ethnee Petrucco, ’01, Christopher Taylor, ’02, Jennifer Beeler, ’04, Andrew Smerczak-Zorza, ’02, Kurt Medland, ’02.

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College of Art and Design. Stephen is a scientist at Rayonier in Jessup, GA. The couple lives in Richmond Hill, GA. Elana Luberto, ’96, to John Waugh on Oct. 11, 2003 in Ann Arbor. Albion alumni in attendance include Amy Schmidt Stille, ’97, Jen Troell Morris, ’96, and Todd Morris, ’95. The couple lives in East Lansing. Matthew Lynn, ’96, to Amanda Schugars on July 19, 2003. Matthew is a treatment counselor at Starr Commonwealth. Amanda is a teacher for Battle Creek Public Schools. The couple lives in Battle Creek.

Homecoming 2004—Oct. 22-24 Come back to Albion for all the great events at Homecoming Weekend: Distinguished Alumni Awards Ceremony, Hall of Fame

Meredith March, ’97, to Kevin Kropf on Dec. 27, 2003 in Zeeland. Albion alumni in the wedding party included maid of honor Lynne March, ’89, matron of honor Anessa Songer, ’98, and groomsman Nathan March, ’98. Meredith teaches sixth grade at Endeavor Academy in Battle Creek, and Kevin is the associate director of the Gerstacker Institute at Albion College. The couple lives in Albion.

Kezlarian Herrick, ’69, and Dennis Herrick, ’69. Ryan is the music producer for NBC’s “Last Call with Carson Daly,” and Maggie works in network news and MSNBC advertising sales. The couple lives in New York City. Patricia Moyer, ’99, to Jason Fowler on Aug. 30, 2003 in Adrian. Maid of honor was Melissa Mann, ’99. Patricia is a full-time manager for Adrian Big Boy and a full-time student at Sienna Heights. She is pursuing a teacher certificate in business education and mathematics. The couple lives in Adrian. Erica Peterson, ’99, to Jeff Garbacz, ’99 on Jan. 18, 2003. Jeff earned his doctorate of physical therapy from the University of Michigan in December 2002. He is the clinic director at Physiotherapy in Livonia. Jeff also teaches the Holistic Treatment of the Knee seminar for Great Lakes Seminars. Erica took a new job at Forbes Magazine as an advertising sales representative. The couple lives in Royal Oak.

Natalie Papcun, ’02, to Kyle Gasiorowski on Jan. 17, 2004. Natalie is currently working as a registered nurse at Children’s Hospital of Michigan. They live in Orion Township. Marlyce Goff, ’03, to Eric Serges, ’02, on May 31, 2003. Alumni in attendance included Megan Broom, ’03, Steve Champine, ’01, Angela Livaditis, ’03, Sosi Hagopian, ’03, Victoria Johnson, ’03, Courtney Cole, ’03, Bryan Johnson, ’03, Ben Feeney, ’02, Andrew Neidlinger, ’02, Mike Knight, ’02, Gabriel Salimi, ’02, Hannon Hogan, ’03, Josh Weimer, ’02, Jennifer Purucker, ’02, and Sarah Hruska, ’02. The couple lives in Swartz Creek. Rebecca Reichle, ’03, to Dennis VanCleve, ’02, on July 26, 2003 in Lansing. Dennis is attending graduate school in meteorology at Florida State University. They live in Tallahassee, FL, and can be reached by e-mail at: rcr10@alumnimail.albion.edu.

Awards dinner, class reunions (class years ending in “4” and “9,” 1954-1999), and a football match-up with Wisconsin Lutheran. Watch www.albion.edu/alumni/homecoming2004.asp for more event details and access to specially designed class reunion Web pages.

Robin Theryoung, ’02, graduated from Western Michigan University in December 2003 with a master’s degree in blind rehabilitation teaching. She is currently a resident athlete at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, CO, where she is training for the 2004 Athens Paralympics. Sally Trombly, ’02, is finishing up a year and a half of employment as the registrar at the Plumas County Museum in Quincy, CA, where she lives.

03 Rosemary Beyer, ’03, is attending law school in Lansing where she lives. Sarah Ellis, ’03, had two art pieces accepted for the 23rd Annual Statewide Alma College Print Competition. One of her pieces, “Cross Section,” was chosen for a purchase award. In January 2004, the prints began a twelve-month tour of Michigan. She is an art student who also studies biology, as much of her inspiration comes directly from studying nature. Sarah lives in Springport. Bill Howland, ’03, is working for the St. Clair County Drain Commissioner’s Office. He is part of a two-county team that is conducting Illicit Discharge Elimination Programs (IDEP) in area watersheds. He lives in Ferndale. Nathan Newman, ’03, is attending graduate school at Texas A&M University at Kingsville, TX. His research assistantship is on white-tail deer and is taking place on two private ranches near Carrizo Springs, TX.

James Robbins, ’03, is the sports editor for LA View, a new weekly newspaper in the Lapeer area. He lives in Metamora. Ashley Smith, ’03, is currently working for Interlochen Arts Academy in northern Michigan as a hall counselor. She is also the manager of the academy orchestra.

Weddings Nancy Hilts Deane, ’62, to Edward Bohac on June 28, 2003 in Sterling, CO, where they live. Both are retired and enjoy traveling, playing golf and keeping in touch with their many friends and family members. Jay Arbaugh, ’91, to Jennifer Reynolds on Aug. 9, 2003 in Ohio. Jay is the principal of Fostoria Middle School and Jennifer is a music teacher for the Apple Creek School District. They live in Ashland, OH. Lisa Meisel, ’94, to David White on April 26, 2003. Alumni in attendance included maid of honor, CJ Robison, ’94, and Josh Deegan, ’94. Lisa works for the Federal Reserve Bank and completed her M.B.A. at Wake Forest University. David is a health care consultant with a local company. The couple lives in Charlotte, NC, and can be reached by e-mail at: lisa.a.white@rich.frb.org. Stephen Boller, ’96, to Catherine Ramsdell on Dec. 6, 2003. Alumni in the wedding included Martha Ramsdell Vartanoff, ’90, Lori Jacobs Koslosky, ’93, and Mike Koslosky, ’91. Catherine is a professor of liberal arts at Savannah

Candace Kos, ’00, to Patrick Harrington, ’98, on April 5, 2003 in Chicago, IL. Among the many alumni in attendance were: Jason Branham, ’98, John Peters, ’99, Dave Pasick, ’99, Allison Wood, ’99, and Nicole Haas, ’99. Candace is a production manager for Clarity Visual Systems in Chicago. The couple lives in Chicago. Jessica Savanna, ’98, to George Lemmon, ’98, on Aug. 23, 2003 in Manchester. Jessica works for an investment banking firm specializing in institutional sales. George is a senior representative for SunLife Financial. They live in Chicago, IL. Jane Williams, ’98, to Charles KriegPatrick Chauvin on July 20, 2002. Shawn Lacasse Mehrens, ’98, was in the wedding party, and Jennifer Wojtas Konopka, ’98, attended the wedding. Charlie works for an insurance defense firm in New Orleans, and Jane is an assistant district attorney for Terrebonne Parish. They live in Destrehan, LA. Amy Hailey, ’99, to Chris Hohlbein, ’99, on June 28, 2003 in Northville. Albion students and alumni in attendance included Lisa Surma, ’99, Lori Surma, ’99, Eddie Ward II, ’99, Virgil Petty, ’99, Margaret McCormick, ’00, Kara Ganota, ’00, Andrea Hailey, ’06, and Paul Dobbs, ’60. Amy teaches Spanish at Clarkston High School and recently completed her master’s degree in education at the University of Michigan. Chris has taught physical education at Dublin Elementary School in Walled Lake for four years. He recently completed his master’s degree at Marygrove College. The couple lives in Auburn Hills and can be reached by e-mail at: ahailey@umich.edu. Maggie Kuhn, ’00, to Ryan Kadro, ’99, in the summer of 2002. Albion alumni who attended the wedding included Marissa Nieman, ’02, Lesly Wilberding, ’01, Caren Wood, ’00, Jon Easley, ’00, Allison Bennett Roelofs, ’00, Kurt Roelofs, ’00, Laila Legue, ’00, Katie Mangus, ’00, Ian Kesler, ’99, Jeff Herrick, ’98, Anne Bruce Herrick, ’98, Todd Paxton, ’99, Dan Arndt, ’97, Jeff Blake, ’97, Nancy

Mary Simpson, ’99, to Dan Milne on July 26, 2003 in Racine, WI. Mary is pursuing her M.B.A. through an executive program at Purdue University and working at Warren Industries. The couple lives in Lafayette, IN. Jennifer Daniels, ’00, to Stuart Umberger on June 21, 2003 in Grand Rapids. Jennifer is a marketing coordinator for the commercial real estate services firm of Colliers, Turley, Martin and Tucker in Indianapolis, where she and Stuart live. Nicole Cooper, ’01, to Dennis Harmon on June 22, 2002. Albion alumni in attendance included Lacey Sischo, ’01, Allison Moore, ’01, Kristin Timpner, ’00, Adam Beers, ’01, Andrea Leonardis, ’01, Tracy Gray, ’01, Shannon Seibert, ’01, Adrienne Doyle, ’03, Heidi Schulte, ’02, Crystal Shaw, ’01, Stacey Burmeister, ’01, Kate Gurney Reskevics, ’99, and Tiffany Caldwell, ’99. The couple lives in Canton. Miracle Hurley, ’01, to Scott Balsitis on Aug. 24, 2003. Albion alumni in attendance included Elizabeth Astras Geshel, ’00, Katherine Brimmer Stinar, ’01, and Theron Stinar, ’02. Scott is a dissertator at the University of Wisconsin in cellular/molecular biology, and Miracle is employed at the Arbor Covenant Church as director of youth ministries. They live in Madison, WI. Amy Vogtmann, ’03, to Andrew Schupska, ’01, on May 17, 2003 in Holt. Amy attends Michigan State University Veterinary Technician Program and is an independent consultant for May Kay Cosmetics. Andrew is an actuary for Auto Owners Insurance Co. in Lansing. They live in Holt. Marnie Harte, ’02, to Sean Hackney, ’02, on Dec. 20, 2003 in East Lansing. Albion students in the wedding party included Brittany Harte, ’05, Meaghan Thomas, ’01, William Sisco, ’02, and Ben Schaefer, ’03. Marnie is attending law school, and Sean is a designer at Circuit City’s corporate offices. The couple lives in Richmond, VA.

Baby Britons William Webb on May 20, 2003 to Edward and Patricia Webb Pentecost, both ’85. He joins sisters Emily, 10, and Katie, 2, and brother Hayden, 8. The Pentecosts live in Cleveland Heights, OH. Brian on Jan. 10, 2004 to Griffin Derryberry and Katherine Stiles, ’86. The family lives in Mountain View, CA. Nathan Michael on Jan. 9, 2004 to Jim, ’87, and Lisa Valente Cox, ’88. He joins older brothers Ben, 11, and Nick, 9. The family lives in Mansfield, OH. Alexandra Mishawne born on Jan. 5, 2003 in Russia and adopted on July 14, 2003 by Rob and Mishawne Pope Hoisington, ’87. Allie joins big brothers Tyler, 11, Connor, 8, and Noah, 3. The Hoisingtons live in Fairport, NY, and can be reached by e-mail at: shoisington2001@aol.com. Kathryne Elizabeth on Aug. 22, 2003 to Jeffrey and Bethann Cunningham Woollard, ’87. She joins big brother Andrew. The Woollards live in Columbus, OH. Julia Judd on July 1, 2003 to Mike and Mary Judd Hazen, ’88. Julia was welcomed by her sister Molly. The family lives in Libertyville, IL. Henry Silas on Nov. 11, 2003 to Betsy Daub and Susanna Short, ’88. He joins big sister Mattie Elizabeth. The family lives in St. Paul, MN, and can be reached by e-mail at: daubshort@earthlink.net. Risto William on Oct. 8, 2003 to Ulla and Brian Crouse, ’89. He joins older siblings Robert and Maria. They live in Phoenix, MD. Grace Ellen on Sept. 7, 2003 to Paul and Blakely Burns Meyers, ’89. She joins sisters Emma, 3, and Rachel, 1. John Meyers, ’81, is her godfather. The family lives in Reston, VA, and can be reached by e-mail at: blakelymeyers@comcast.net.


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Wedding Album See accompanying notes for details. Meredith March, ’97, to Kevin Kropf on Dec. 27, 2003. Pictured are Albion College alumni and staff at the wedding. (Front row, left to right) Norris March, ’64, Susan Hocking March, ’66, Anessa Songer, ’98, Nathan March, ’98, Lynne March, ’89, Meredith March Kropf, ’97, Kevin Kropf, Alex Carroll, ’03, Tony Mastromonaco, ’03. (Second row) George Carlyle, ’98, Kelly Stevens Carlyle, ’97, Ryan Maki, ’98, Alison Farmer Maki, ’97, Lisa Rizak, ’97, Stephanie Liebold Lemmen, ’97, Joan Hawsey, Mandy Konkle, Laurel Weinman, ’01, Jim Conway, ’87, Kristi Brierly, Mira Wood, ’02, Katie Gustavson, ’05, Sarah Metzler, ’01, Roberta Carothers, ’01, Abby Brown, ’01, Peg Mitchell Turner, ’69. (Third row) Deb Kellar, Doug Kellar, David Hawsey, Susie Stuewer, ’70, Morris Arvoy, ’90, Jason Whalen, ’00, Travis Balzer, ’00, John Stadelman, ’99, Lance Coleman, ’91, Eric Petroelje, ’01, Joe Zessin, ’05, Jody May, Mike Turner, ’69.

Candace Kos, ’00, to Patrick Harrington, ’98, on April 5, 2003. (Left to right) Sharon Laing, ’98, Angela Landolt, Jillian Harrington, Bonnie Tawse, Brooke Walters, Candace Kos, ’00, Patrick Harrington, ’98, John Harrington, Craig Labuhn, ’99, Justin Matter, ’97, Josh Parker, ’98.

Jessica Savanna, ’98, to George Lemmon, ’98, on Aug. 23, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Matt Corona, ’99, Kirk Rosin, ’98, Jessica Savanna Lemmon, ’98, George Lemmon, ’98, Allison Neckers, ’98, Jaime Corte Christopher, ’98. (Second row) Robb Smith, ’98, Matt Damman, ’97, Nathan March, ’98, Anessa Songer, ’98, Nick Christopher, ’98, Gabriela Vettraino, ’98, Krista Vollmerding, ’98, Melissa Grace Scheib, ’98, Hillary Butcher, ’98, Claudina Iacobelli, ’98. (Third row) Annie Topie, ’01, T.J. Whitehouse, ’99, Jason Thomas, ’00, Debbie Haan, ’99, Chris Friggens, ’98, Eloise Whitlock Schumacher, ’99, Scott Schumacher, ’99, Jeff Irwin, ’98, Dave Stark, ’98, Kim Krzyzaniak Stark, ’97. Jane Williams, ’98, to Charles KriegPatrick Chauvin on July 20, 2002. (Left to right) Jennifer Wojtas Konopka, ’98, Jane Williams Chauvin, ’98, Shawn Lacasse Mehrens, ’98.

Patricia Moyer, ’99, to Jason Fowler on Aug. 30, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Jamie Justus, ’99, Amanda Tratechaud Drobot, ’99, Karin Messing, ’99, Patricia Moyer-Fowler, ’99, Melissa Mann, ’99. (Second row) Laura Somogyi, ’99, Nicholas Moyer, ’03, and Jason Fowler.

Rebecca Reichle, ’03, to Dennis VanCleve, ’02, on July 26, 2003. (Front row, left to right) Lewis Cardenas, ’02, Ashley Smith, ’03, Liz Vogel, ’04, Melissa Timm, ’03, Rebecca Reichle, ’03, Dennis VanCleve, ’02, David Hansen, ’03, Rachel Todd, ’04, David Friday, ’04, Melanie Heying, ’03. (Second row) Robin Theryoung, ’02, Dan Williams, ’05, Alisha Cusack, ’05, Kjersti DeVries, ’05, Carolyn Matthei, ’02, Erin Olgren, ’03, Abigail Gilbert, ’03, Greta Elenbaas, ’03, Ethnee Petrucco, ’01, Christopher Taylor, ’02, Jennifer Beeler, ’04, Andrew Smerczak-Zorza, ’02, Kurt Medland, ’02.

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Ava Renee on July 29, 2003 to Mike and Kathy LeGray Risch, ’89. She joins big sister Zoe, 3. The family lives in Redondo Beach, CA. Emily Grace on Aug. 13, 2003 to Brian and Kara Kuuttila Shuell, ’89. The Shuells live in Brighton. Natalie Karin and Gabrielle Gretchen on Oct. 17, 2003 to Dennis, ’90, and Amy Johnston Hackett, ’91. They join big sisters Abigail, 5, and Lauren, 3. The family lives in Pinckney. Brady Matthew on Jan. 16, 2004 to James and Jennifer Marcelli Higgins, ’90. He joins older siblings Jimmy and Meg. The family lives in Tolland, CT. Sophie Hannah on June 9, 2003 to Zied and Dana Wurtz Lajnef, ’90. Dana is a stay-at-home mom after teaching middle school language arts for 10 years. The family lives in Grand Blanc. Benjamin Paul on Oct. 9, 2003 to Robert and Michelle Diener Wales, ’90. Benjamin joins big sister Kennon, 5. They live in Savage, MN. Jacqueline Elise on May 28, 2003 to Jonathan and Elizabeth Roelant Cotter, ’91. She was welcomed by Joshua Nicholas, 7, Rachel Elizabeth, 5, and Ezekiel Joseph, 3. Proud relatives

include uncle Charles Roelant, ’00. The family lives in Sault Sainte Marie. Ali Catherine on Nov. 1, 2003 to Darryl and Tia Payne Duerbusch, ’91. She joins big brother Reed McIntyre, 3. Tia is a group sales executive for Humana, Inc. in Troy. The family lives in Macomb and can be reached by e-mail at: tiaduerbusch@yahoo.com. Nicholas Anthony on Dec. 13, 2003 to Vincent and Michelle Lancaster Giordano, ’91. He joins big brother Nathan, 5. The family lives at: 16 Fairview Ave., Ellington, CT 06029. Stephen Joseph on Sept. 12, 2003 to Michael and Caroline Vitale Jones, ’91. Alumni relatives include Lisa Vitale, ’93. The family lives in Clifton, NJ, and can be reached by e-mail at: vitaleca@hotmail.com. Jeremy Albert on Sept. 18, 2003 to Eric and Andrea Chambers Klooster, ’91. He joins big brother Ryan. The Kloosters live in Ann Arbor and can be reached by e-mail at andrea_klooster@hotmail.com. Marshall on Jan. 12, 2003 to Beth and Scott McFarland, ’91. He joined Mason, 6, and Mara, 4. The McFarlands live in Berrien Springs and can be reached by e-mail at: scotbeth@juno.com.

Hannah Margaret on Nov. 9, 2003 to Marcia and Steve Miller, ’91. The Millers live in Loveland, OH. Noah Alexi born on Feb. 11, 2003 in Russia and adopted on Aug. 11, 2003 by Rich and Kristine Hubert Needleman, ’91. Kristine is working part-time for the Institute for Safe Medication Practices as a medication safety analyst. Rich is the investigational drug pharmacist at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, PA. The family lives in Warrington, PA. Troy Lucas on Oct. 8, 2003 to Michael and Beverly Lucas Propst, ’91. Troy joins big brother Payton James, 3. Beverly works as corporate counsel for Graybar Electric Co., in St. Louis, MO. The family lives in O’Fallon, IL, and can be reached by e-mail at: bevpropst@yahoo.com. Luke on July 29, 2003 to Molly and Josh Baker, ’92. The family lives in Hamilton, NY. Megan Kaye on Sept. 19, 2003 to Mark, ’91, and Melisa DeWit Smith, ’92. The Smiths live in Lake Orion. Margaret Catherine on Sept. 24, 2003 to Ned and Kristen Manning Flanagan, ’92. She joins big brother Michael, 2. The Flanagans live in Glen Ellyn, IL.

News for Albionotes Please use the space below to send your news about promotions, honors, appointments, marriages, births/adoptions, travels and hobbies. When reporting information on deaths, please provide date, location, and Albion-connected survivors and their class years. Use of this form will help guarantee inclusion of your news in an upcoming issue of Io Triumphe. We try to process all class note information promptly, but please note that the Albionotes deadline falls several weeks prior to publication. If your information arrives after the deadline for a given issue, it will be held and included in the succeeding issue. Name __________________________________________________________ Class year _____________________ (Please print name)

Home address _________________________________________________________________________________ City _______________________________________________________ State ___________ ZIP ______________ Home telephone _______________________________ Home e-mail address _______________________________ Business address _______________________________________________________________________________

Anthony Michael on Oct. 21, 2002 to Bryan and Monika Hrabowy-Arnold, ’92. Bryan manages Microsoft projects for Convergys, Inc. After teaching for several years, Monika is a stay-at-home mom. The family lives in Tucson, AZ, and can be reached by e-mail at: monikatucson@earthlink.net. Gabrielle Renn on Nov. 5, 2003 to Jennifer and Scott Kenney, ’92. The family lives in Ypsilanti and can be reached by e-mail at: skenney@excite.com. Sophie Davis on Sept. 22, 2003 to Daniel, ’92, and Wynne Davis Martin, ’94. She was welcomed by older brother Aidan, 2, and alumni relatives Jon, ’91, and Lesley Davis Addison, ’92. The Martins live in Grand Haven and can be reached by e-mail at: wynner11@chartermi.net. Megan Cathryn on June 26, 2003 to Darren and Paige Davis Riopelle, both ’92. Megan joins her brother Jack, 5. Proud relatives include Chris Riopelle, ’91, Brit Davis, ’96, and Joe Riopelle, ’04. Darren is a dentist in private practice. Paige manages the dental office and other business ventures. The family lives in Midland. Charlie James on Dec. 29, 2003 to Kevin and Heidi Martin Scanlon, ’92. He joins big brother Patrick, 1. They live in Glen Ellyn, IL. Alyssa Catharine on Nov. 13, 2003 to Fred, ’93, and Michelle Lifford Khoury, ’95. The family lives in Hudson, OH. Alexa Grace on June 22, 2003 to Mark, ’93, and Nicole Swartzmiller Tithof, ’94. She joins big sister Alexandria, 3. They live in Northville, and can be reached by e-mail at: nrst@aol.com. Fox Jay on Oct. 23, 2003 to Bruk, ’93, and Penny Eveningred Weymouth, ’94. Proud aunt and godmother includes Taylor Weymouth Hanton, ’97. The family lives in Great Falls, MT. Alex Michael on Aug. 7, 2003 to Christopher, ’95, and Deborah Sprunk Merz, ’94. Alex joins big sister Alyssa. The family lives in Swartz Creek and can be reached by e-mail at: merz@thepentagon.com. Maggie Louise on Nov. 26, 2003 to Matt and Joy McVey Mills, ’94. She joins big brother Gabriel, 2. They live in Otsego.

City ________________________________________________________ State ___________ ZIP _____________ Business telephone ____________________________ Business e-mail address _____________________________ (Or simply attach a copy of your business card.) Check here if this is a new address. Also, if you have a winter address that is different from your permanent address, indicate it in the space below along with the months when you reside at that address.

News notes

Kiera Rose in May 2003 to Mike and Tanya Kurinij Murphy, ’94. Tanya is a stay-at-home mom. She previously worked for Ford Motor Co. as the planning and distribution manager in the Cincinnati regional sales office. They live in Maineville, OH, and can be reached by e-mail at: tanyammurphy@msn.com. Anthony Thomas on Oct. 21, 2003 to Tony and Meg Tobin Sacchetti, ’94. The family lives in Quincy, MA. Annika Elizabeth on Nov. 21, 2003 to David and Becky Camp Baker, ’95. The Bakers live in Grand Rapids.

Send to: Editor, Io Triumphe, Office of Communications, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224; or via e-mail to: classnotes@albion.edu. Be sure to include your full name, class year, address (geographic and e-mail) and telephone number in your e-mail message.

Abigail Kathryn on Nov. 16, 2003 to Patrick, ’95, and Leslie Kohn Drueke, ’97. The family lives in Grand Rapids.

Avery Nicholas on Sept. 13, 2003 to Frank, ’95, and Janae Koerber Fear, ’98. They live in Owosso. Evan Brian on Aug. 29, 2003 to Brian, ’95, and Krista Hammerbacher Haapala, ’96. Evan joins big brother Ethan. The family lives in Portland, ME, and can be reached by e-mail at kristahaapala@yahoo.com. James Damian on Sept. 21, 2003 to Dominic and Helen Quenneville Kiomento, both ’95. Helen and Dominic are both family physicians and practice medicine in rural health clinics. The family lives in Cincinnati, OH. William on Dec. 5, 2003 to Bill and Krisinda Snyder Palazzolo, ’95. Krisinda is a physician assistant in oncology at the University of Michigan. The family lives in Grass Lake and can be reached by e-mail at: krisinda@med.umich.edu. Kyle Austin on Aug. 31, 2003 to Laura and Jon Ritterbush, ’95. Kyle’s Web site is online at http://kyle.ritterbush .com. Jon is a UC Foundation assistant professor and systems administrator at the Lupton Library, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. The family lives in Ringgold, GA. Julia Mae on July 31, 2003 to Lori and Tyler Schulze, ’95. Tyler is the director of business development at Primedia Consumer Media and Magazine Group. They live in Redondo Beach, CA. Matthew Edward on Aug. 17, 2003 to Michael and Melissa Bittner Schwartz, ’95. He joins big sister Samantha, 9. Melissa is a senior account manager at Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. The family lives in Romeo. Cameron Thomas on Nov. 7, 2003 to Angela and Thomas Ivan, ’96. Thomas is in his family medicine residency. The family lives in Durant, OK. Emma Faye on Oct. 8, 2003 to Michelle and Josh Lippert, ’96. Emma joins sister Lauren, 4. The Lipperts live in Naples, FL. Katherine Marie on Nov. 13, 2003 to Michelle and Todd Mortlock, ’96. The family lives in Farmington Hills and can be reached by e-mail at: tmortlock@juno.com. Brendan Theodore on Oct. 28, 2003 to Steve and Jacqueline Worosz Paquette, ’96. He joins his sister Caitlin Shannon, 2. Jacqueline works part-time at Starbucks Coffee Company. The family lives in Lake Orion. Andrew Ray on Oct. 18, 2003 to Billy and Carrie Greenwald Beduhn, ’98. They live in Grand Rapids. Jackson Henry on Aug. 26, 2003 to Jeffrey and Anne Bruce Herrick, both ’98. Proud family members include grandparents Nancy Kezlarian Herrick, ’69, and Dennis Herrick, ’69. The family lives in Birmingham. Samuel Robert on April 9, 2003 to Aaron and Erin Eldridge Simon, ’98. Aaron works for New York Life. Erin has decided to be a stay-at-home mom. She is also working toward her master’s degree in early childhood education at


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Western Michigan University. The family lives in Portage. Ryan Matthew on Sept. 4, 2003 to Matt and Jennifer Ralston Swanson, both ’98. The Swansons live in Mooresville, IN. Taylor Michelle on Sept. 21, 2003 to Jeff and Rachel Scherer Trenta, both ’98. The family lives in Pontiac. Holden Elijah on Jan. 13, 2004 to Shawn and Jennifer Rummel Bleiler, ’99. Jennifer received her M.L.I.S. in August 2003. Shawn is finishing his master’s in environmental studies. The family lives in Rolla, MO.

Obituaries Donald Hughes, ’33, on Oct. 21, 2003, in Manistee. He was employed in the shoe business for most of his life, working at Snyder Shoe Store and Loker’s Shoe Store, both in Manistee. Donald was an avid card player and loved the outdoors. He was inducted into the Manistee Bowlers Hall of Fame, and was a member of the Manistee Elks Lodge and the Manistee Golf and Country Club. He is survived by his wife, Bernice, two children, five grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Margaret Bell Jackson, ’33, on Nov. 4, 2003, in Traverse City. She taught at the Michigan School for the Blind and later for the local public schools. She had also worked for Auto Owners in Lansing and was a member of St. Casimir Catholic Church in Lansing. She is survived by three children and two grandchildren. Marion “Pat” Rector, ’38, on Sept. 30, 2003 in Midland. He was a research chemist with The Dow Chemical Co for 37 years. He was a lifelong member of Boy Scouts of America and First United Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife, Ardyce Chaffin Rector, ’38, four children, five grandchildren, two stepgrandchildren and a great-granddaughter. Betty Bush Butler, ’39, on Sept. 26, 2003 in Flint. She was a member of Delta Gamma sorority, Chapter AY of PEO and the Needlework Guild. She served for many years as choir mother at First Presbyterian Church of Flint. She was a sports enthusiast and a member of the Flint Golf Club for many years. She is survived by a son, a daughter, Victoria Butler McCarthy, ’74, and two grandchildren, Nikell McCarthy, ’03, and Bush Butler McCarthy, ’05. Barbara “Bobbie” Ringelberg Stoppert, ’39, on Oct. 16, 2003. She began her teaching career in Averill and Laporte before moving to the Midland Public Schools where she taught for over 20 years at Chestnut Hill Elementary School. Retiring in 1976, she and her husband, Robert Stoppert, ’39, moved to Pinellas Park, Florida and later Largo. She is survived by three children, including Robert Stoppert, ’61, eight grandchildren and two step-grandchildren. (See also notice on Robert Stoppert, ’39.)

Robert Stoppert, ’39, on Oct. 25, 2003, in Spring Lake. He was a longtime teacher and coach at Midland High School, leading the football team to a pair of undefeated seasons en route to state championships in 1957 and 1968. Bob was inducted into the Michigan High School Football Coaches Hall of Fame in 1973 and gained entry into the Midland County Sports Hall of Fame in 1990. He was also inducted into the Michigan High School Coaches Hall of Fame in 1989. Bob’s 1968 state championship football team was inducted into the Midland County Sports Hall of Fame in 2002. He was a member of the Midland Lions Club for 56 years and was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. Married for 65 years to Barbara Ringelberg Stoppert, ’39, he is survived by three children, including Robert Stoppert, ’61, eight grandchildren and two step-grandchildren. (See also notice on Barbara Ringelberg Stoppert, ’39.)

Myrtle Crouse Reul, ’47, on Oct. 10, 2003. She earned her doctorate in education from Michigan State University (MSU) and completed postdoctoral studies at the University of Michigan. Myrtle taught at MSU for 15 years. She joined the faculty at the University of Georgia in 1968, where she was a professor of social work. Myrtle was also an EEO/affirmative action officer and served on the President’s Advisory Council. She authored 10 books and more than 100 articles. She lived in Athens, GA. She is survived by a daughter, two grandsons and three great-grandchildren.

Alan Wilber, ’40, on Oct. 21, 2003, in Falls Church, VA. He retired in 1961 from the U.S. Air Force, where he earned the rank of colonel. Alan later worked for defense agencies. He was a member of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Arlington, VA. Alan is survived by his wife, Marjorie, four children and nine grandchildren.

Kenneth Davis, ’52, on Nov. 1, 2003, in Sarasota, FL. He graduated from Berkley University School at Yale in New Haven, CT. Kenneth was an associate rector for Church of the Nativity in Florida and a former rector of Church of the Holy Spirit in Osprey, FL. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn, four children and eight grandchildren.

Bonnie Berryman Gilbert, ’41, on May 21, 2002, in Jacksonville, FL. A longtime resident of Port Huron, she taught elementary school for many years in the Port Huron Area School District until her retirement in 1985. Bonnie was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She is survived by two children, including Thomas Perry, ’69, and three stepchildren.

Kenneth Groves, ’52, on Nov. 23, 2003, in Midland. After graduating from Albion, he joined the U.S. Navy. Kenneth received his Ph.D. in chemistry from Michigan State University in 1959. He worked at The Dow Chemical Co., Martin-Marietta and Union Carbide in Charleston, WV. Kenneth returned to Dow Chemical Co. as a research chemist in 1965 and retired in 1992. He is survived by his wife, Delores, a daughter and son-in-law, Tammy Groves Muir and Rick Muir, both ’80, a daughter, Robbyn Groves Durance, ’85, and a son, Ken Groves, ’88. He is also survived by eight grandchildren.

Marcia Udell, ’41, on Nov. 3, 2003, in Marshall. She was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church and its Altar Guild, of which she was its past chairwoman. Marcia was also a member and past treasurer of the Mary Marshall Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Calhoun County Genealogical Society. She had traveled to all 50 states and many foreign countries. Marcia is survived by her sister and two cousins. Dorotha VanGorden Siler, ’43, on Dec. 7, 2003. A longtime Albion resident, she was a teacher for the Albion Public Schools for several years. She was a member of the ELT Club, Review Club and St. James Episcopal Church. She is survived by her husband, Daniel Siler, ’42, three sons, including Dan Siler, ’66, and Barry Siler, ’67, eight grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. Clara Morrison Strayer Henderson, ’46, on July 7, 2003, in Mishawaka, IN. She was an active member of Delta Gamma sorority and taught for many years in the Buchanan school system. Clara was a member of the Buchanan Little Theatre, the Buchanan library board and a board member of the Niles Open Door. An avid reader, she was a member of the Seepewa Reading Club. She is survived by three children, three step-children, four grandchildren, two step-grandchildren and a great-grandson.

Janet Curley Morton, ’48, on Nov. 30, 2003, in Superior Township. She taught singing in the Detroit Public Schools for 20 years. She was a member of the Women’s National Farm and Garden Association of Plymouth. She is survived by her husband, Louis, two sons, and four grandchildren.

Nicholas Wurmlinger, Jr., ’52, on Nov. 6, 2003. Nicholas was a teacher and coach for six years with the CroswellLexington school district. He later worked with the Southgate school district, spending 34 years as a teacher and 19 years as a coach. He was one of the first directors of the Southgate Adult Community Education program. In 1997, Nicholas became a member of the Southgate Alumni Football Hall of Fame and the Michigan High School Football Coaches Association Hall of Fame. He earned a master’s degree from Eastern Michigan University. Nicholas was a member of the Southgate Kiwanis Club and was a 43-year member of St. Pius X Catholic Church. After he retired from education, he spent six years as a legislative assistant to former state Rep. Joseph Palamara. He lived in Southgate. He is survived by his wife, Norma, four children, and 10 grandchildren. James Vance, ’53, on Oct. 26, 2003, in St. Joseph. He joined the U.S. Army in 1946. In 1963, he became a safety manager with Safety Services in Kalamazoo. James was instrumental in the development of Eaton Park in Lincoln Township. He retired in 1993 from Safety Centers Inc. in South Holland, IL, as a safety consulting engineer. James was inducted into the St. Joseph High School Hall of Fame in

1993. He was a member of First Congregational Church and was a 51year member of the St. Joseph Elks Lodge. James is survived by his wife, Joyce, two children, two step-children, two grandchildren and two stepgrandchildren. Joseph Purslow, ’59, on Nov. 25, 2002. He had retired from the Equitable Life Assurance Co. and was doing volunteer work for several local organizations, especially in the area of computers. He lived in Guilford, CT. He is survived by his wife, Janis, two children, four grandchildren, his mother and a sister, Pamela Purslow Orton, ’63. Marianne Calderone Sztengel, ’62, on Nov. 10, 2003, in Traverse City. She made her home in Petoskey for 12 years, and spent summers in northern Michigan. Marianne loved animals, and she and her daughters spent many years showing horses. She is survived by her husband, Victor, three daughters, and two grandchildren. Joseph “Tom” Balistrere, ’66, on Dec. 10, 2003, in Waynesboro, PA. He earned a master’s degree from Eastern Michigan University and a master’s degree from Shippensburg University in Shippensburg, PA. He was employed as a physical education instructor and coach at Eastern Michigan University, Albion College and Mount St. Mary’s College (Maryland), and at high schools in Michigan and Pennsylvania. He concluded his career as a coach at Fairfield High School in Fairfield, PA. He was a member of St. Andrew Catholic Church in Waynesboro and was vice president of the Maryland

Association of Collegiate Athletic Directors. He is survived by his wife, Charlene Pflager Balistrere, ’66, two sons, and four grandchildren. Joseph O’Brien, ’71, on July 21, 2003. A defense trial attorney for 30 years, he was a member of the State Bar of Michigan, the Detroit Metropolitan Bar Association and the Board of Governors of the Association of Defense Trial Counsel. Joseph had a passion for music, playing the guitar and singing with his wife and daughters. He performed with the Forum Shoppers, a quartet composed of lawyers who specialized in legal parodies. Joseph is survived by his wife, C. Rachel Cargo O’Brien, ’71, and two daughters.

Faculty and friends Virginia Rose Steen, on Dec. 19, 2003, in Casper, WY. She was widely honored for her work on behalf of her husband, Alann, who was one of four people kidnapped in Beirut, Lebanon, in 1987. The Detroit News named her Michiganian of the Year in 1991. She and her husband helped to light the national Christmas tree in Washington, DC, that year. They received the State Bar of Michigan’s Liberty Bell Award in 1992. Virginia taught art history at Albion College in 1991-92 and later taught at Casper College and the University of Wyoming. She is survived by her husband and a daughter.

Verle Anderson Klungness, ’50, passed away on Jan. 18, 2004. A longtime resident of Florence, WI, she taught high school in the Upper Peninsula. She was a lifelong member of Trinity United Methodist Church and was very generous to civic projects and local charities. She was also a member of PEO for more than 40 years. Verle and her husband, James, former chairman of Albion’s Board of Trustees, established the Upper Peninsula Scholarship program at the College and provided significant funding for the Ferguson Building as well as other building projects. She is survived by her husband, two children, Kraig Klungness, ’76, and Barbara Klungness, ’79, and three grandchildren. “Verle was a wonderful wife, mother and friend,” said President Peter Mitchell. “Her genuine kindness was infused with a terrific sense of humor. She was fun to be with due to her varied interests and her ability to speak her mind in an upbeat but candid manner. Verle loved Albion College, her family and the Upper Peninsula, and her legacy will be to remind us to look for the best in everyone we encounter.” Fred Neumann passed away on Jan. 4, 2004, and his wife, Kathryn Neumann, on Jan. 6, 2004. Fred had been an Albion College trustee for 40 years, serving as chairman from 1970 to 1977, and he received an honorary doctorate from Albion in 1978. He was employed with the Fruehauf Corp. for 30 years, including three years as executive vice president, and later was chairman of Walter Machine and Screw Co. in Detroit. Kay was a former school teacher and a homemaker. They lived in Grosse Pointe and were active in the Grosse Pointe Memorial Church. The Neumanns are survived by a son, Rick Neumann, ’67, five grandchildren, including Katy Neumann, ’96, and three great-grandchildren. “We have lost a gracious couple whose impact on Albion College has been significant in governance, generosity and compassion,” commented President Peter Mitchell. “An astute businessman and a thoughtful advocate for students, Fred was an excellent trustee. He served for 40 years, including seven as chairman, and had been an honorary trustee since 1988. I think of Fred and his lovely wife, Kay, as a true gentleman and gentle lady. They were most considerate and supportive of the Mitchell family during our transition to the presidency in 1997.”


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Western Michigan University. The family lives in Portage. Ryan Matthew on Sept. 4, 2003 to Matt and Jennifer Ralston Swanson, both ’98. The Swansons live in Mooresville, IN. Taylor Michelle on Sept. 21, 2003 to Jeff and Rachel Scherer Trenta, both ’98. The family lives in Pontiac. Holden Elijah on Jan. 13, 2004 to Shawn and Jennifer Rummel Bleiler, ’99. Jennifer received her M.L.I.S. in August 2003. Shawn is finishing his master’s in environmental studies. The family lives in Rolla, MO.

Obituaries Donald Hughes, ’33, on Oct. 21, 2003, in Manistee. He was employed in the shoe business for most of his life, working at Snyder Shoe Store and Loker’s Shoe Store, both in Manistee. Donald was an avid card player and loved the outdoors. He was inducted into the Manistee Bowlers Hall of Fame, and was a member of the Manistee Elks Lodge and the Manistee Golf and Country Club. He is survived by his wife, Bernice, two children, five grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Margaret Bell Jackson, ’33, on Nov. 4, 2003, in Traverse City. She taught at the Michigan School for the Blind and later for the local public schools. She had also worked for Auto Owners in Lansing and was a member of St. Casimir Catholic Church in Lansing. She is survived by three children and two grandchildren. Marion “Pat” Rector, ’38, on Sept. 30, 2003 in Midland. He was a research chemist with The Dow Chemical Co for 37 years. He was a lifelong member of Boy Scouts of America and First United Methodist Church. He is survived by his wife, Ardyce Chaffin Rector, ’38, four children, five grandchildren, two stepgrandchildren and a great-granddaughter. Betty Bush Butler, ’39, on Sept. 26, 2003 in Flint. She was a member of Delta Gamma sorority, Chapter AY of PEO and the Needlework Guild. She served for many years as choir mother at First Presbyterian Church of Flint. She was a sports enthusiast and a member of the Flint Golf Club for many years. She is survived by a son, a daughter, Victoria Butler McCarthy, ’74, and two grandchildren, Nikell McCarthy, ’03, and Bush Butler McCarthy, ’05. Barbara “Bobbie” Ringelberg Stoppert, ’39, on Oct. 16, 2003. She began her teaching career in Averill and Laporte before moving to the Midland Public Schools where she taught for over 20 years at Chestnut Hill Elementary School. Retiring in 1976, she and her husband, Robert Stoppert, ’39, moved to Pinellas Park, Florida and later Largo. She is survived by three children, including Robert Stoppert, ’61, eight grandchildren and two step-grandchildren. (See also notice on Robert Stoppert, ’39.)

Robert Stoppert, ’39, on Oct. 25, 2003, in Spring Lake. He was a longtime teacher and coach at Midland High School, leading the football team to a pair of undefeated seasons en route to state championships in 1957 and 1968. Bob was inducted into the Michigan High School Football Coaches Hall of Fame in 1973 and gained entry into the Midland County Sports Hall of Fame in 1990. He was also inducted into the Michigan High School Coaches Hall of Fame in 1989. Bob’s 1968 state championship football team was inducted into the Midland County Sports Hall of Fame in 2002. He was a member of the Midland Lions Club for 56 years and was a veteran of the U.S. Navy. Married for 65 years to Barbara Ringelberg Stoppert, ’39, he is survived by three children, including Robert Stoppert, ’61, eight grandchildren and two step-grandchildren. (See also notice on Barbara Ringelberg Stoppert, ’39.)

Myrtle Crouse Reul, ’47, on Oct. 10, 2003. She earned her doctorate in education from Michigan State University (MSU) and completed postdoctoral studies at the University of Michigan. Myrtle taught at MSU for 15 years. She joined the faculty at the University of Georgia in 1968, where she was a professor of social work. Myrtle was also an EEO/affirmative action officer and served on the President’s Advisory Council. She authored 10 books and more than 100 articles. She lived in Athens, GA. She is survived by a daughter, two grandsons and three great-grandchildren.

Alan Wilber, ’40, on Oct. 21, 2003, in Falls Church, VA. He retired in 1961 from the U.S. Air Force, where he earned the rank of colonel. Alan later worked for defense agencies. He was a member of St. Michael’s Episcopal Church in Arlington, VA. Alan is survived by his wife, Marjorie, four children and nine grandchildren.

Kenneth Davis, ’52, on Nov. 1, 2003, in Sarasota, FL. He graduated from Berkley University School at Yale in New Haven, CT. Kenneth was an associate rector for Church of the Nativity in Florida and a former rector of Church of the Holy Spirit in Osprey, FL. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn, four children and eight grandchildren.

Bonnie Berryman Gilbert, ’41, on May 21, 2002, in Jacksonville, FL. A longtime resident of Port Huron, she taught elementary school for many years in the Port Huron Area School District until her retirement in 1985. Bonnie was a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She is survived by two children, including Thomas Perry, ’69, and three stepchildren.

Kenneth Groves, ’52, on Nov. 23, 2003, in Midland. After graduating from Albion, he joined the U.S. Navy. Kenneth received his Ph.D. in chemistry from Michigan State University in 1959. He worked at The Dow Chemical Co., Martin-Marietta and Union Carbide in Charleston, WV. Kenneth returned to Dow Chemical Co. as a research chemist in 1965 and retired in 1992. He is survived by his wife, Delores, a daughter and son-in-law, Tammy Groves Muir and Rick Muir, both ’80, a daughter, Robbyn Groves Durance, ’85, and a son, Ken Groves, ’88. He is also survived by eight grandchildren.

Marcia Udell, ’41, on Nov. 3, 2003, in Marshall. She was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church and its Altar Guild, of which she was its past chairwoman. Marcia was also a member and past treasurer of the Mary Marshall Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Calhoun County Genealogical Society. She had traveled to all 50 states and many foreign countries. Marcia is survived by her sister and two cousins. Dorotha VanGorden Siler, ’43, on Dec. 7, 2003. A longtime Albion resident, she was a teacher for the Albion Public Schools for several years. She was a member of the ELT Club, Review Club and St. James Episcopal Church. She is survived by her husband, Daniel Siler, ’42, three sons, including Dan Siler, ’66, and Barry Siler, ’67, eight grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. Clara Morrison Strayer Henderson, ’46, on July 7, 2003, in Mishawaka, IN. She was an active member of Delta Gamma sorority and taught for many years in the Buchanan school system. Clara was a member of the Buchanan Little Theatre, the Buchanan library board and a board member of the Niles Open Door. An avid reader, she was a member of the Seepewa Reading Club. She is survived by three children, three step-children, four grandchildren, two step-grandchildren and a great-grandson.

Janet Curley Morton, ’48, on Nov. 30, 2003, in Superior Township. She taught singing in the Detroit Public Schools for 20 years. She was a member of the Women’s National Farm and Garden Association of Plymouth. She is survived by her husband, Louis, two sons, and four grandchildren.

Nicholas Wurmlinger, Jr., ’52, on Nov. 6, 2003. Nicholas was a teacher and coach for six years with the CroswellLexington school district. He later worked with the Southgate school district, spending 34 years as a teacher and 19 years as a coach. He was one of the first directors of the Southgate Adult Community Education program. In 1997, Nicholas became a member of the Southgate Alumni Football Hall of Fame and the Michigan High School Football Coaches Association Hall of Fame. He earned a master’s degree from Eastern Michigan University. Nicholas was a member of the Southgate Kiwanis Club and was a 43-year member of St. Pius X Catholic Church. After he retired from education, he spent six years as a legislative assistant to former state Rep. Joseph Palamara. He lived in Southgate. He is survived by his wife, Norma, four children, and 10 grandchildren. James Vance, ’53, on Oct. 26, 2003, in St. Joseph. He joined the U.S. Army in 1946. In 1963, he became a safety manager with Safety Services in Kalamazoo. James was instrumental in the development of Eaton Park in Lincoln Township. He retired in 1993 from Safety Centers Inc. in South Holland, IL, as a safety consulting engineer. James was inducted into the St. Joseph High School Hall of Fame in

1993. He was a member of First Congregational Church and was a 51year member of the St. Joseph Elks Lodge. James is survived by his wife, Joyce, two children, two step-children, two grandchildren and two stepgrandchildren. Joseph Purslow, ’59, on Nov. 25, 2002. He had retired from the Equitable Life Assurance Co. and was doing volunteer work for several local organizations, especially in the area of computers. He lived in Guilford, CT. He is survived by his wife, Janis, two children, four grandchildren, his mother and a sister, Pamela Purslow Orton, ’63. Marianne Calderone Sztengel, ’62, on Nov. 10, 2003, in Traverse City. She made her home in Petoskey for 12 years, and spent summers in northern Michigan. Marianne loved animals, and she and her daughters spent many years showing horses. She is survived by her husband, Victor, three daughters, and two grandchildren. Joseph “Tom” Balistrere, ’66, on Dec. 10, 2003, in Waynesboro, PA. He earned a master’s degree from Eastern Michigan University and a master’s degree from Shippensburg University in Shippensburg, PA. He was employed as a physical education instructor and coach at Eastern Michigan University, Albion College and Mount St. Mary’s College (Maryland), and at high schools in Michigan and Pennsylvania. He concluded his career as a coach at Fairfield High School in Fairfield, PA. He was a member of St. Andrew Catholic Church in Waynesboro and was vice president of the Maryland

Association of Collegiate Athletic Directors. He is survived by his wife, Charlene Pflager Balistrere, ’66, two sons, and four grandchildren. Joseph O’Brien, ’71, on July 21, 2003. A defense trial attorney for 30 years, he was a member of the State Bar of Michigan, the Detroit Metropolitan Bar Association and the Board of Governors of the Association of Defense Trial Counsel. Joseph had a passion for music, playing the guitar and singing with his wife and daughters. He performed with the Forum Shoppers, a quartet composed of lawyers who specialized in legal parodies. Joseph is survived by his wife, C. Rachel Cargo O’Brien, ’71, and two daughters.

Faculty and friends Virginia Rose Steen, on Dec. 19, 2003, in Casper, WY. She was widely honored for her work on behalf of her husband, Alann, who was one of four people kidnapped in Beirut, Lebanon, in 1987. The Detroit News named her Michiganian of the Year in 1991. She and her husband helped to light the national Christmas tree in Washington, DC, that year. They received the State Bar of Michigan’s Liberty Bell Award in 1992. Virginia taught art history at Albion College in 1991-92 and later taught at Casper College and the University of Wyoming. She is survived by her husband and a daughter.

Verle Anderson Klungness, ’50, passed away on Jan. 18, 2004. A longtime resident of Florence, WI, she taught high school in the Upper Peninsula. She was a lifelong member of Trinity United Methodist Church and was very generous to civic projects and local charities. She was also a member of PEO for more than 40 years. Verle and her husband, James, former chairman of Albion’s Board of Trustees, established the Upper Peninsula Scholarship program at the College and provided significant funding for the Ferguson Building as well as other building projects. She is survived by her husband, two children, Kraig Klungness, ’76, and Barbara Klungness, ’79, and three grandchildren. “Verle was a wonderful wife, mother and friend,” said President Peter Mitchell. “Her genuine kindness was infused with a terrific sense of humor. She was fun to be with due to her varied interests and her ability to speak her mind in an upbeat but candid manner. Verle loved Albion College, her family and the Upper Peninsula, and her legacy will be to remind us to look for the best in everyone we encounter.” Fred Neumann passed away on Jan. 4, 2004, and his wife, Kathryn Neumann, on Jan. 6, 2004. Fred had been an Albion College trustee for 40 years, serving as chairman from 1970 to 1977, and he received an honorary doctorate from Albion in 1978. He was employed with the Fruehauf Corp. for 30 years, including three years as executive vice president, and later was chairman of Walter Machine and Screw Co. in Detroit. Kay was a former school teacher and a homemaker. They lived in Grosse Pointe and were active in the Grosse Pointe Memorial Church. The Neumanns are survived by a son, Rick Neumann, ’67, five grandchildren, including Katy Neumann, ’96, and three great-grandchildren. “We have lost a gracious couple whose impact on Albion College has been significant in governance, generosity and compassion,” commented President Peter Mitchell. “An astute businessman and a thoughtful advocate for students, Fred was an excellent trustee. He served for 40 years, including seven as chairman, and had been an honorary trustee since 1988. I think of Fred and his lovely wife, Kay, as a true gentleman and gentle lady. They were most considerate and supportive of the Mitchell family during our transition to the presidency in 1997.”


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Jeff Kotas, ’98, Letitia Watson Kotas, ’98, Katy Neumann, ’96, and Dorothy Burch, ’98.

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Freddy, ’06, and Jeffrey Moore, ’07, sons of Sandra and Donald Moore, ’72.


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FROM THE ALBION COLLEGE BOOK STORE A 04-100. Adult crewneck sweatshirt by Gear. Gray with purple and gold screen print lettering “Albion College Alumni.” S-XXL. ........................................... $39.98

M 04-112. Adult hooded sweatshirt from Champion. Dark gray with purple embroidered lettering “Albion College” outlined in white. S-XXL. ............................ $49.98

B 04-101. Adult hooded sweatshirt by Champion. Eggplant purple with white screen print lettering “Albion College.” S-XXL. ........................................... $34.99

N 04-113. Adult hooded sweatshirt from Jansport. Dark gray with purple embroidered lettering “Albion Britons” outlined in white. Sweatshirt also available in black, white and purple with purple lettering outlined in gold. S-XXL. ................ $49.98

C 04-102. Car flag by TeamFlag. Purple flag with gold screen print lettering “A.” Attaches to car window. ................... $7.99 D 04-103. Graduation teddy bear by It’s All Greek to Me. Teddy bear features black cap and gown and white screen print lettering “Albion College.” Bear available in gray, light brown or dark brown. ............................................. $19.98

O 04-114. Adult hooded sweatshirt from Gear. Gray with purple screen print lettering “Albion College.” S-XXL. ....... $49.98 P 04-115. Adult hooded sweatshirt from Champion. Light blue with navy blue screen print lettering “Albion College” outlined in white. S-XXL. .............. $34.99

E 04-104. License plate frame by MCM Group. Silver frame features purple background with gold lettering “Albion College Alumni.” .............................. $9.98

Q 04-116. Adult t-shirt from Gear. Gray shirt with purple screen print lettering “Albion College” outlined in gold. S-XXL. ........................................... $14.98

F 04-105. Adult polo shirt by Gear. Collared shirt features three buttons and the Albion College logo embroidered in purple and gold. Available in butter yellow, black and white. M-XXL. ....... $34.98

R 04-117. Adult t-shirt from Jansport. Dark gray shirt with purple and gold screen print lettering “Albion College Britons.” S-XXL. ........................................... $14.98

G 04-106. Water bottle from Nalgene. Bottle is 32 oz., and is shatterproof and odor resistant. Available in teal, green, yellow and pink. ............................. $14.98 H 04-107. Travel mug from MCM Group. Purple mug is 20 oz. with white screen print lettering and a white lid. ........... $7.98 I 04-108. Water bottle from MCM Group. Purple bottle is 32 oz. with white screen print lettering and a white lid. ........... $7.98 J 04-109. Women’s tank top from Gear. Tank top features spaghetti straps and a built-in shelf bra. Purple screen print lettering “Albion College.” Available in butter yellow or gray. S-XL. .......... $14.98 K 04-110. Women’s skinny tee from Gear. Gray shirt with purple screen print lettering “Albion College.” S-XL. .......... $16.98 L 04-111. Women’s shorts from U-Trau. Gold shorts feature drawstring waist with white and purple screen print lettering “Albion College” on left leg. S-XL. .............................................. $17.98

Y 04-124. White ceramic 24 oz. coffee house mug. Features purple screen print lettering “Albion College.” ............... $8.98 Z 04-125. White ceramic 11 oz. mug. Features purple and gold screen print lettering of the Albion College logo. .................................................. $5.98

ORDER FORM — GIFTS FROM ALBION COLLEGE Ordered by: Name ______________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________________ State _______ Zip _____________ Daytime Credit Card Phone (_______) ______________________________ Signature ______________________________________ Please fill in below for charge orders Account No.(all digits please ) from your credit card Check one

VISA MASTERCARD American Express Discover Check or money order enclosed Credit Card Expiration Date __________________________

Ship to:

(if other than yourself) Name ______________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________

S 04-118. Adult visor from Merge Left Caps. Tan visor with purple embroidered lettering “Albion College.” Flexible fit. ..................................... $17.98

City ___________________________________________________________ State _______ Zip _____________

Quantity Item No.

Description (including color)

Size

Unit Price

T 04-119. Adult cap from University Square. White cap with purple embroidered lettering “Albion College Alumni.” Adjustable. ...................................... $14.98 U 04-120. Adult cap from Merge Left Caps. Purple cap with gold embroidered lettering “Albion College Alumni.” Adjustable. ...................................... $17.98 V 04-121. Adult cap from Merge Left Caps. White cap with purple and gold embroidered lettering “Albion College Alumni.” Adjustable. ...................... $17.98 W 04-122. Adult cap from Merge Left Caps. Purple cap with gold embroidered lettering “Albion Est. 1835.” Adjustable. ...................................... $22.98 X 04-123. Adult cap from Merge Left Caps. Purple cap with purple embroidered lettering “Albion College” outlined in gold. Adjustable. ...................................... $17.98

Merchandise Total

Shipping Charges

6% Sales Tax

$4.99 for one item Add $.99 for each additional item. Questions? Please call 517/629-0305, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Shipping Charge

Total

Allow 2-4 weeks for delivery Items may change slightly due to manufacturer’s updating. Like items will be substituted. Make checks payable to: Albion College Bookstore

Return this order form to: Albion College Bookstore, 4867 Kellogg Center, Albion, MI 49224

Total Price


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And pipes filled the hall . . . After a lengthy restoration, Albion’s chancel organ literally took center stage during a rededication concert in Goodrich Chapel Feb. 15. Celebrated organist Marilyn Mason, Organ Department chair at the University of Michigan, performed the first half of the concert. With the dramatic Toccata and Fugue in D Minor by Bach and Widor’s Toccata, Mason reminded concertgoers of the organ’s exceptional sound and range. However, the organ pipes—and the splendid sound they made—soon had some competition. Midway through the first half of the concert, a heating system pipe burst in the balcony, causing the ensuing 60 minutes of music to be accompanied by the constant sound of rushing water. Nonetheless, the College’s Symphony Orchestra, with organist (and vice president for academic affairs) Royal Ward, carried on, performing two works including Saint Saens’ Symphony No. 3, “The Organ.” The orchestra is directed by James Ball, associate professor of music. The E.E. Horner Memorial Organ, built by the M.P. Moeller Co., was installed during the construction of Goodrich Chapel in 1958. The original dedication concert was played by Alexander Schreiner, then organist at the Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City. In the recent restoration, the organ console was replaced. Thanks to modern technology, it is now smaller, easier to move and more reliable. The instrument’s stops have been augmented with a 64-level memory, giving it a capacity of over 3,000 adjustable presets. However, the pipe work and the sound of the organ remain the same. J. WEBER PHOTO

University of Michigan organist Marilyn Mason was the featured artist during the rededication concert for the College’s E.E. Horner Memorial Organ. The College’s Symphony Orchestra also played two works for orchestra and organ. Some of the Goodrich Chapel chancel organ’s 3,462 pipes. The organ was built by the M.P. Moeller Co., the largest organ manufacturer in the world at the time.

Alumni board members represent diverse experiences By Coletta Nelson Thomas, ’76 Immediate Past President Alumni Association Board of Directors Quite a few years ago, I was invited to run for a position on the Albion College Alumni Association Board of Directors. I did so. I lost. One might expect that I would be devastated. I was not. I knew that if there were another way that I could serve Albion, it would present itself. That opportunity occurred when I was appointed to

the board to finish the term of an elected board member who had to withdraw. That was eight or so years ago. I was on the Alumni Association board before my son came to Albion in 1997. I was still on the board when he graduated. He has just finished his master’s in clinical psychology. I’m still on the board. This April will be my last board meeting, and I’m already experiencing “alumni board withdrawal.” This is unusual for me since I consider myself a pragmatic person (my son says that “Klingon” would be a better description). I believe that we all make our contributions, and when it’s time to leave, we move on to the next thing. Though I still feel that way, it will be difficult to close this chapter because my experiences here have been rich. During my tenure, I’ve met many

people, experienced the first Albion Institute, slept at Bellemont Manor, attended opening convocations and Elkin Isaac Symposium lectures, sat in the president’s box at football games (free popcorn), served as board president and traveled with the board to Sarasota, Chicago and New York. All of those have been marvelous experiences, but the best and most valuable experiences have come through the relationships I’ve developed with other board members. There’s a wonderfully diverse mixture of class decades represented by board members. One of the neatest things is to compare my own Albion experience with those of alumni who attended Albion before and after I did. It has been fascinating to discover that we have a lot of common

experiences, but also some very different ones. I love to listen to and reflect on what those who came before me have to share about Albion, and I smile with the wisdom that age and experience bring when I listen to what younger generations have to say. Usually, I’m thinking about how fast it all changes. I have enjoyed my time on the board, and though this chapter is closing, I won’t have a lot of time to dwell on it. This fall I begin doctoral studies in clinical psychology, and that will keep me busy. However, I will always make Albion a priority in my life. As has been my habit for the past 28 years, I will come to Homecoming, and I’ll be looking forward to reuniting with not only my classmates but all of my alumni board friends as well. Until then, go Brits!


Io Triumphe! A magazine for alumni and friends of Albion College