Page 1

I O

T R I U M P H E

Raising the bar: Student research takes learning to a new level By Sarah Briggs Jef Knight had dreamed of composing music since he was in junior high. This past summer, the music major finally got his chance. Working under Albion music professor Andrew Bishop, himself an award-winning composer and performer, Knight began with rudimentary themes only a few measures long. As the summer progressed, he developed those musical ideas into several compositions including one for string quartet. “At the beginning of the summer,” he says, “I had never imagined writing for a string quartet, but the theme was so well suited to it that I had to try. So I began writing, and it came along remarkably. Before I knew it, it was essentially finished.” Another piece written for flute and cello, suggesting a “conversation” between a kookaburra and a crocodile, reflects his interest in things Australian. (Knight is now studying “down under” on an offcampus program.) Next spring, he hopes to participate in a concert devoted to student compositions.

D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

In reading Mark Twain’s novels, English major Anne Starr was puzzled by the fact that, even though the celebrated author was surrounded by strong, independent women throughout his life, such women are a rarity in his books. A notable exception, Starr observes, is the main character in the little-known work, Eve’s Diary. Eve, as Twain depicts her, is an accomplished, attractive and confident woman who “has emotional depth and intellectual superiority over Adam.” Starr’s fascination with this character, and her discovery that almost no other scholarship exists on Twain’s views on gender, prompted her to devote this past summer to research on the author’s portrayals of women in the context of his life and times. Conducted under the guidance of English professor Hal Wyss, her research will likely lead to a senior honors thesis.

Summer 2000 turned out to be memorable in many ways for psychology students Julia Ogg and Kami Marsack, who spent 10 weeks conducting research with Albion professor Jeff Wilson. The hundreds of trials they ran testing the effects of Ginkgo biloba on rats’ memory processes and decision-making led to some impressive results—so impressive in fact that the students wound up as co-authors of an article with Wilson, published in an international neuroscience journal, detailing their findings. However, Wilson thinks that, beyond these immediate successes, the students’ experience will leave a lasting impression: they now will more fully appreciate “the day-to-day experience of uncovering nature’s mysteries.”

Under the guidance of American literature specialist Hal Wyss, English major Anne Starr used her summer research fellowship from Albion’s Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity to delve into novelist Mark Twain’s portrayal of women. Through her research, she says, “I was able to form what I feel is a solid, original theory about Twain.”

As these students have discovered, a college education, above all, should be about pursuing your intellectual passions and learning to think in original ways. While that happens, of course, in classroom discussions, and in exposure to new books and experiences, research may be the best catalyst of all. Recognizing that research can both stimulate and expand learning, Albion, under its Vision, Liberal Arts at Work, has established the new Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity (FURSCA).

3


4

I O

T R I U M P H E

A program like FURSCA is critical to a top-notch undergraduate institution. By providing students the opportunity to engage in those activities that they will undertake as graduate students or professionals in their particular fields, FURSCA broadens the students’ education in a manner not possible in the classroom. And even for those students who will never engage in scientific or creative activities in their careers, the experience of having done so, or of vicariously experiencing it through their friends’ involvement in FURSCA-supported programs, provides an appreciation for scholarship that will serve them (and society) well as they make informed political, administrative or personal decisions. — Jeff Wilson, professor of psychology

“The name of the program defines what we’re about,” says Dale Kennedy, who serves this year as FURSCA’s faculty director. “FURSCA exists exclusively for the benefit of our students. Our intent is to promote original work in all fields.” Unlike many research programs geared primarily to upperclassmen, FURSCA assists students at all points in their academic career. About 25 first-year students each year are selected as Student Research Partners, an apprenticeship that pairs them with a faculty mentor and engages them in a project related to that professor’s research or creative area. Sophomores, juniors and seniors may apply for grants to pay for research-related travel and materials as well as for FURSCA’s flagship Summer Research Fellowship Program. In the latter, students spend up to 10 weeks on campus, working with a faculty mentor on original research or creative projects. Through its extensive program of grants and fellowships, FURSCA in the past three years has funded projects for more than 200 students, representing every academic department and many

D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

interdisciplinary programs. This past summer, FURSCA sponsored its largest number of research fellows to date, 68 students from 16 different departments and programs. While the students all have faculty guidance, they work quite independently in defining their projects and carrying them out. “FURSCA gives students a chance to test their wings and see what they can do,” says English professor Hal Albion student researchers have the opportunity to present the results of Wyss. “I can serve as a resource their work to the campus community during the annual Elkin R. Isaac person, but it’s the student who must Research Symposium. May graduate Erik Love, a sociology major, spoke take the lead in the project. For at the 2001 symposium on how masculine roles are changing in people who are going to continue to contemporary Israel. learn after they graduate, I think being able to take that kind of English major Bethany Buchholz relished the time responsibility is essential. That’s true of the humanishe spent on her own this past summer writing short ties, the sciences, the social sciences . . . it’s the fiction and poetry. independent effort students put in that’s most meaningful.”

Creative vision: Bringing the arts into the community While others see only problems with the old grain mill in the heart of downtown Albion, Lynne Chytilo and David DiVincenzo see only possibilities. Chytilo, an art professor at Albion, and DiVincenzo, an art history major, spent this past summer exploring the options for creating a community arts venture in Albion and found much to like in the gritty, late 19th-century mill and grain elevator as a potential location for the enterprise. For DiVincenzo, whose work was sponsored by the College’s Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity, the project was an ideal chance to apply what he had learned about art and arts management in a “real-world” setting. It proved to be a mind-stretching experience in many ways. “I knew every day that I had to be thinking in a way I hadn’t thought before,” he observes. Chytilo, who was once a self-employed potter and cooperative art gallery owner, and DiVincenzo share a passion for taking art into the broader community. That commitment comes through in the mission statement they developed for their initiative: “[This project] is a College-community venture to provide the Albion community with needed access and exposure to the

artistic experience . . . and to unite Albion College, the City of Albion, and area communities through joint contribution to, and enrichment and promotion of, the visual arts in the Greater Albion area.” After considering a number of different directions for the project, the pair decided to test the idea of establishing a glassblowing studio that would employ artists in the field and offer educational opportunities for art students in the local schools and at the College, as well as for the general public. In addition to public demonstrations, the studio would host traveling exhibits and sell art glass. Glassblowing seemed an especially attractive choice, “because it is such an exciting and visual art form,” according to Chytilo. As part of their research, Chytilo and DiVincenzo visited art galleries in Chicago and across Michigan and observed the operation of studios such as the Michigan Hot Glass Workshop and the Oxbow Glassblowing Studio. They became convinced that their venture could become self-sustaining, and it seemed to mesh well with Albion’s industrial past, particularly since Corning Glass had a manufacturing plant in the city for many years.

DiVincenzo also conducted extensive research on the Internet and at the College library and the Albion Public Library’s local history room. The next step was to garner community support for their idea. They knew that Albion’s mid-Michigan location was an advantage—the only other glassblowing studios in the state that are open to the public are at Dearborn’s Greenfield Village and in Saugatuck on Michigan’s west coast. “There’s nothing like this,” Chytilo insists. “There are art schools that offer glassblowing, and there are individuals who have glass studios, but this combination of art and education is unique.” They already had encouragement from the Greater Albion Alliance’s Arts and Culture Action Team. That group was in the process of opening Kids ’n Stuff, an interactive children’s museum downtown, and saw the glassblowing studio as a natural companion to the museum. DiVincenzo then began preparing presentations for other local decision-makers including the Downtown Development Authority and the City Planner’s Office.


I O

T R I U M P H E

D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

interests while they are still under“It was rather empowering to see graduates. how much I could accomplish on my FURSCA projects tend to be own, with only myself to edit and highly collaborative. In some revise,” she observes. instances, a faculty member may Anthropologist Elizabeth Brumfiel, have set his or her research agenda who regularly serves as a student and then will involve an entire team research mentor, thinks the summer of students in carrying out different fellows especially benefit from their aspects of that agenda. Each team “total immersion in their research.” member contributes to the project’s “There’s a lot of virtue,” she says, success. Psychologist Jeff Wilson “in being a fanatic, in being really notes that his student assistants intense about what you do.” During “bring their own perspective and the school year, she adds, students are opinions to the research, helping to easily distracted by other activities shape the research and interpret and commitments, but, as FURSCA Jennifer Kuebler says that her research experiences at Albion will be helpful preparation for results in manners that might not scholars, they can devote themselves graduate school and her future career in college teaching. The chemistry major was one of have occurred to me.” entirely to their projects. 12 Albion students who made research presentations with their faculty mentors last spring at At other times, the faculty Student Anne Starr agrees. “To the American Chemical Society’s national meeting in San Diego. member may serve primarily as a have 10 weeks dedicated to one sounding board for the student, subject—there’s a depth to that that’s offering new directions to pursue or hard to gain when you’re in class. work. Along the way, students often learn what it is new resources to examine. As she developed her ideas That has been really rewarding. I feel like I’m getting they want to do—or perhaps don’t want to do—in a on Mark Twain’s writing, Anne Starr says that her inboth breadth and depth of knowledge.” future career. depth discussions with adviser Hal Wyss, a specialist Doing original research exposes students not only to “There have been cases,” Cook recalls, “where on late 19th- and early 20th-century American literathe larger issues of a given scholarly field but to that students have done a summer project and have come ture, sharpened her thinking and helped her find the field’s everyday realities as well, according to Jenny away thinking, ‘Yes, this is exactly where I belong—I right focus for her project. Cook, who has coordinated FURSCA’s programs since can’t wait to get to graduate school.’” “Dr. Wyss allowed me the freedom to research 1999. Because it emphasizes hands-on learning, she But there have also been times when students have facets of this topic that interested me and the guidance says, research helps students gain a much better discovered that a particular field is not for them. The needed to keep me on track,” Starr observes. “It was understanding of how a scientist sets up a research latter experience, Cook believes, is no less valuable for exciting to share new information with him and then protocol or how an artist plans and executes a new those students since it allows them to redirect their (continued on p. 6) D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

to complete an internship in arts For DiVincenzo, the presentations management through the New York were an eye-opening introduction to the Arts Program in another year, and political side of arts management. eventually to pursue a career as a “I knew ahead of time that each gallery or museum director. person we met with had his or her own Right now, the duo has joined agenda,” he says. “It was the idea of with other Albion faculty and how to compromise—what ideas are students in applying for a grant essential.” He learned how to anticipate from the National Conferences on the concerns of a particular audience, Undergraduate Research. The grant and he discovered how essential it is to would fund additional summer have “done your homework” and to research on how small towns can demonstrate in-depth knowledge of improve their economic climate and your subject. overall “quality of life.” While a downtown location for the Chytilo and DiVincenzo think facility seemed to be the consensus Art professor Lynne Chytilo and student researcher David DiVincenzo devoted this past their arts venture could become a choice, finding an available building summer to their quest to establish a community-based glassblowing studio in Albion. In catalyst for business development that could be converted at an affordable addition to conducting feasibility studies for the studio, they explored possible locations for downtown by attracting tourism. price was another matter. Impressed by the venture including the late 19th-century grain mill and elevator in downtown Albion (in “I’m gratified how excited the grain mill’s long history and its background). people are about this project,” setting near the Kalamazoo River, Chytilo says. Chytilo and DiVincenzo began a And DiVincenzo adds, “It provides an outlet [in the feasibility study for the site and, along the way, learned still searching for the financial backing they would arts] that people wouldn’t have otherwise.” about the complexities of economic development as need to purchase and renovate a space for the studio. —Sarah Briggs well as building codes and fire regulations. They are The experience has already been rewarding, DiVincenzo says, regardless of its outcome. He plans

5


6

I O

T R I U M P H E

discuss what it meant, how it fit into the big picture, and what new questions it raised. Through this process of research and discussion, I was able to form what I feel is a solid, original theory about Twain—something I would have never believed possible!” FURSCA faculty director Dale Kennedy says that the program has brought a new level of professionalism to student research at Albion. The substantial stipend the summer fellowships carry, she says, underscores the fact that students are expected to approach the work seriously and with an eye toward meaningful results. And the fellowships give the program increased credibility in the world beyond the campus. Kennedy notes that students who have served as FURSCA scholars have a built-in advantage when they go on to apply for prestigious programs such as the National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Undergraduates.

Jeff Wilson maintains that participation in FURSCA gives students an edge in applying for graduate school as well. “Research experience, especially when it results in a documented finished product such as a publication or a presentation at a professional meeting, opens the door for graduate school.” Most FURSCA projects are broader in scope and more complex than anything the students might have attempted before. Succeeding in the face of such a challenge “is a huge confidence-builder,” according to student researcher Mollie Nothnagel. “I never thought of myself as being able to tackle such a big project. . . . I’ve never done anything on this scale before. . . . It’s nice to know that I can do this and that when I make it to graduate school I’ll be able to do research well.”

Nothnagel hopes her work this past summer on recent Disney animated films and what they reflect about perceptions of women’s roles in society will eventually result in a paper to be presented at a national research forum for undergraduates in the communication field. Student participation in such events has become common. Over the past two years, FURSCA student researchers have presented their work at national or international meetings of such groups as the American Chemical Society, American Society of Ichthyologists & Herpetologists and American Elasmobranch Society, Entomological Society of America, Geological Society of America, American Psychological Society and International Society for Optical Engineering, as well as at the National Conferences on Undergraduate Research. The FURSCA students also have the

Environmental protection: Exploring the potential of ‘green’ chemistry It’s one of life’s paradoxes that the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, while bringing so many benefits to human health, also results in waste products that can pollute our environment and, in the long run, endanger our lives. Albion College chemistry professor Cliff Harris is combining his professional interests with his concern for the environment to develop two groundbreaking, environmentally-friendly chemical processes that may someday change the way many drugs and other new materials are manufactured—with new production methods that are not only far gentler to the environment, but also more economical than previous methods. “As chemists, we have a moral responsibility to help preserve and protect life on this planet,” Harris says. “It’s clear to me that we cannot continue as we have for the past three centuries. Population growth is beginning to exhaust the resources of developing nations. In addition, an increasing rate of resource consumption in more developed nations compounds the damage that those nations inflict, even though their populations are quite stable. High population multiplied by high consumption multiplied by outdated technology is a recipe for global disaster.” Harris believes controlling population growth and reducing rates of consumption are necessary parts of the solution, but science will also be a crucial factor. “I certainly want to believe that science and technology can make life sustainable on earth far into the future,” he says, “but that means we must find processes that don’t harm the environment.” Harris also wants to expose his students to cuttingedge chemistry, and so for three of the last four summers he has recruited teams that have worked sideby-side with him in the lab. The students each have a particular assignment that extends some aspect of Harris’s work, thus giving them the opportunity to perform original research. Most of them have received fellowships in support of their work from the Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity.

One project deals with triphenylphospine oxide (TPO), a common waste product created during pharmaceutical manufacturing. TPO creation is known to be extensive throughout the industry. TPO is created during a process called the Wittig reaction, in which a phosphorus-based chemical is used to force the combination of different chemical compounds, thus producing various drugs. The phosphorus ends up as a byproduct: TPO. Created from mined phosphorus and carbon extracted from crude oil, “TPO is like a Styrofoam cup—we use it once and toss it out, and that’s a waste,” Harris explains. He believes that TPO in landfills will eventually deteriorate into toxins such as phenol. It’s irresponsible, Harris says, to use nonrenewable resources this way with no thought to the byproducts being created. “I would like to make it so that all the waste being produced now is recycled.” Harris is developing a chemical process whereby TPO is allowed to react with an organometallic, and the resulting compound is then separated into two parts: a phosphorus ylide and a useful byproduct, such as zinc oxide. The phosphorus ylide would then be combined with a ketone to simultaneously produce the desired pharmaceutical and reproduce TPO—which is instantly reused to repeat the cycle. To the non-chemist this sounds a little like a perpetual motion machine, but Harris is ready with a more prosaic example: Imagine this process as the manufacture of a shoe. TPO is the clamp that holds the shoe leather (the organometal) during manufacture. The shoe (the pharmaceutical) is made, taking a small piece from the clamp (now changed to phosphorus ylide). Once the shoe is released from the clamp, a new small piece is refitted to the clamp and it’s ready to use again. Harris claims that in the current process “we throw away a clamp for every shoe we make.” This past summer, three undergraduate chemistry majors each worked on combining a different organometallic with TPO, under Harris’s guidance.

“The less information we found [in the journal review] stage, the more exciting it became, because we realized how little research had been done in this area,” says chemistry major Jennifer Kuebler, who has assisted Harris on this project since fall 2000. Along with the journal review and research experiments, Kuebler also found that she enjoyed training the students who joined the project as it progressed. She became the team’s “resident expert” on using the College’s new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer to analyze compounds for the presence and type of phosphorus, and was able to help the team assess their results and work through problems when they arose. “I enjoyed having a leadership role. It has been a great experience for me,” says Kuebler, who hopes someday to teach chemistry at the college level. “I really like [teaching], where I’m helping people, especially helping people to do something that I really care about.” While advancing Harris’s research, his students are also receiving an insider’s view of life as a professional scientist. “My research group,” Harris explains, “is organized to maximize the student’s independence, while requiring safety to be the first priority at all times. Newer group members directly assist more experienced students who are running experiments to answer chemical questions. These experienced students look to me for theory, techniques and daily guidance, but they are constantly passing on the knowledge they have just received to others. It turns out this is exactly how doctors, lawyers, psychologists, businesspeople and almost everyone else—including scientists—actually work in the real world.” For Harris, the best part of research is the sense of discovery, knowing that he and his students are trying to accomplish something that has never been done before.


I O

opportunity to share their results on campus during the annual Elkin R. Isaac Research Symposium. All of the students holding summer fellowships meet weekly to discuss their projects with their peers. In any given week, the presentations might deal with topics ranging from perceptions of fairness in the justice system to the environmental impact of river dams in the Pacific Northwest, and from analysis of fossils in southwestern Michigan limestone deposits to modern Western views of Kabuki theatre. “It was amazing to see what everyone else was doing,” notes Mollie Nothnagel. “It was a huge commonality.” Research is mainly about creative problem-solving, regardless of what discipline you’re in, notes Dale

Kennedy. “When you have a critical mass of students doing research, as we do during the summer, the students can interact with each other.” Students who are going through the same experiences can often provide useful suggestions, and sometimes muchneeded moral support, to one another when difficulties arise. And, she adds, proximity can also create healthy competition. “The students set the bar for each other.” Kennedy believes that FURSCA’s impact can be seen across the campus. “Our faculty has a strong tradition of doing topflight research. What FURSCA does is broaden our concept of research to include a whole range of scholarly and creative activities, and engage our students in this work in ways that simply would not be

T R I U M P H E

possible without FURSCA’s financial backing. I think FURSCA energizes us as a learning community.” Kennedy regularly exchanges information with colleges that have similar programs, and says FURSCA has attracted considerable attention off-campus as well. “My colleagues at other institutions are closely following FURSCA’s progress,” Kennedy says. “We clearly are on the leading edge of a movement to expand and encourage independent student research.” Securing a $10-million endowment for the Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity is one of the goals of LIBERAL ARTS AT WORK: CHALLENGING MINDS, TRANSFORMING LIVES, Albion’s $120-million capital campaign announced last April. D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

That’s not to say they “That’s why scientists don’t find occasional love research,” he obobstacles in their path. serves. “They realize, Learning how to cope with ‘No one knows what’s those obstacles is also part going to happen, and I of the process. can be the one to figure “Dr. Harris’s dedication it out.’” to this project was really That drive to “figure it inspiring for us,” says out” keeps Harris motipsychology major Rany vated, despite odds that Aburashed, one of three may not be in his favor. students—none of them “Most organic chemists chemistry majors—who think there’s no chance worked with Harris on the this will work, and for boronic acid project this good reason,” he notes summer. Aburashed, who cheerfully. “And for TPO plans to attend medical itself, it very likely won’t. school next fall, recalls a But if we modify the Chemistry professor Cliff Harris takes a team approach to research. Together, he and his students—drawn from a time when two weeks’ molecular architecture of variety of class years and majors—are developing environmentally-friendly processes that may have applications worth of promising the catalyst we should be in many aspects of industrial chemistry. experiments turned out to able to make it work. We be based on flawed data. have evidence that this sufficiently pure for laboratory work, “we are produc“Dr. Harris sent us home at two in the afternoon—we can be done.” ing a lot of it,” he says, and this capability has attracted [were frustrated] and didn’t know what to do.” Harris’s second research interest is based on an interest and support from some chemical companies. Around midnight, Aburashed got a call from Harris. equally novel discovery. Expanding on the work of a Harris’s process, he says, is comparable to “stopping “He had been thinking all night about what went Nobel laureate chemist, Harris discovered that he could a stick of dynamite after it’s blown up three-quarters of wrong, and when he thought he figured it out, he called disrupt a process called trialkyl borane oxidation, the way—and then discovering a diamond left behind.” us. It couldn’t wait until nine the next morning.” causing it to produce two useful alcohols and a boronic He and his students presented their findings for the first Harris’s focus, says Aburashed, “taught me a lot about acid. time at the American Chemical Society national using all you’ve got when you have a problem that has The potential of this process for creating boronic meeting in San Diego last spring. to be solved.” acids is “unbelievably important” to chemists for two As with his other project, Harris depends heavily on “[This research] was a good exercise in using the reasons. First, says Harris, boronic acids are central to student assistance to test the effects of different creative process, because when we would hit a wall, we the chief reaction used by organic chemists today. The compounds upon his reaction. “The students and I are had to find a way to get around that wall,” continues Suzuki chemical reaction is the basis for the “greening” full collaborators on these projects,” he says. “Once I biology major Nick Gilpin. Adds psychology major of numerous chemical processes, by allowing chemical teach them the techniques, they do the experiments, James Jostock, “We kind of mixed fun with chemistry reactions to take place in water rather than in toxic bring the data to my office, and we try to make sense of and came out with good results. It was a good sumsolvents. Second, some boronic acids are currently what nature is doing. Together, we make progress mer.” difficult to produce, and sell for $300-400 per gram. So much, much faster than we would working indepen—Jake Weber while the boronic acid Harris has produced is not yet dently.”

7


4

I O

T R I U M P H E

A program like FURSCA is critical to a top-notch undergraduate institution. By providing students the opportunity to engage in those activities that they will undertake as graduate students or professionals in their particular fields, FURSCA broadens the students’ education in a manner not possible in the classroom. And even for those students who will never engage in scientific or creative activities in their careers, the experience of having done so, or of vicariously experiencing it through their friends’ involvement in FURSCA-supported programs, provides an appreciation for scholarship that will serve them (and society) well as they make informed political, administrative or personal decisions. — Jeff Wilson, professor of psychology

“The name of the program defines what we’re about,” says Dale Kennedy, who serves this year as FURSCA’s faculty director. “FURSCA exists exclusively for the benefit of our students. Our intent is to promote original work in all fields.” Unlike many research programs geared primarily to upperclassmen, FURSCA assists students at all points in their academic career. About 25 first-year students each year are selected as Student Research Partners, an apprenticeship that pairs them with a faculty mentor and engages them in a project related to that professor’s research or creative area. Sophomores, juniors and seniors may apply for grants to pay for research-related travel and materials as well as for FURSCA’s flagship Summer Research Fellowship Program. In the latter, students spend up to 10 weeks on campus, working with a faculty mentor on original research or creative projects. Through its extensive program of grants and fellowships, FURSCA in the past three years has funded projects for more than 200 students, representing every academic department and many

D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

interdisciplinary programs. This past summer, FURSCA sponsored its largest number of research fellows to date, 68 students from 16 different departments and programs. While the students all have faculty guidance, they work quite independently in defining their projects and carrying them out. “FURSCA gives students a chance to test their wings and see what they can do,” says English professor Hal Albion student researchers have the opportunity to present the results of Wyss. “I can serve as a resource their work to the campus community during the annual Elkin R. Isaac person, but it’s the student who must Research Symposium. May graduate Erik Love, a sociology major, spoke take the lead in the project. For at the 2001 symposium on how masculine roles are changing in people who are going to continue to contemporary Israel. learn after they graduate, I think being able to take that kind of English major Bethany Buchholz relished the time responsibility is essential. That’s true of the humanishe spent on her own this past summer writing short ties, the sciences, the social sciences . . . it’s the fiction and poetry. independent effort students put in that’s most meaningful.”

Creative vision: Bringing the arts into the community While others see only problems with the old grain mill in the heart of downtown Albion, Lynne Chytilo and David DiVincenzo see only possibilities. Chytilo, an art professor at Albion, and DiVincenzo, an art history major, spent this past summer exploring the options for creating a community arts venture in Albion and found much to like in the gritty, late 19th-century mill and grain elevator as a potential location for the enterprise. For DiVincenzo, whose work was sponsored by the College’s Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity, the project was an ideal chance to apply what he had learned about art and arts management in a “real-world” setting. It proved to be a mind-stretching experience in many ways. “I knew every day that I had to be thinking in a way I hadn’t thought before,” he observes. Chytilo, who was once a self-employed potter and cooperative art gallery owner, and DiVincenzo share a passion for taking art into the broader community. That commitment comes through in the mission statement they developed for their initiative: “[This project] is a College-community venture to provide the Albion community with needed access and exposure to the

artistic experience . . . and to unite Albion College, the City of Albion, and area communities through joint contribution to, and enrichment and promotion of, the visual arts in the Greater Albion area.” After considering a number of different directions for the project, the pair decided to test the idea of establishing a glassblowing studio that would employ artists in the field and offer educational opportunities for art students in the local schools and at the College, as well as for the general public. In addition to public demonstrations, the studio would host traveling exhibits and sell art glass. Glassblowing seemed an especially attractive choice, “because it is such an exciting and visual art form,” according to Chytilo. As part of their research, Chytilo and DiVincenzo visited art galleries in Chicago and across Michigan and observed the operation of studios such as the Michigan Hot Glass Workshop and the Oxbow Glassblowing Studio. They became convinced that their venture could become self-sustaining, and it seemed to mesh well with Albion’s industrial past, particularly since Corning Glass had a manufacturing plant in the city for many years.

DiVincenzo also conducted extensive research on the Internet and at the College library and the Albion Public Library’s local history room. The next step was to garner community support for their idea. They knew that Albion’s mid-Michigan location was an advantage—the only other glassblowing studios in the state that are open to the public are at Dearborn’s Greenfield Village and in Saugatuck on Michigan’s west coast. “There’s nothing like this,” Chytilo insists. “There are art schools that offer glassblowing, and there are individuals who have glass studios, but this combination of art and education is unique.” They already had encouragement from the Greater Albion Alliance’s Arts and Culture Action Team. That group was in the process of opening Kids ’n Stuff, an interactive children’s museum downtown, and saw the glassblowing studio as a natural companion to the museum. DiVincenzo then began preparing presentations for other local decision-makers including the Downtown Development Authority and the City Planner’s Office.


I O

T R I U M P H E

D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

interests while they are still under“It was rather empowering to see graduates. how much I could accomplish on my FURSCA projects tend to be own, with only myself to edit and highly collaborative. In some revise,” she observes. instances, a faculty member may Anthropologist Elizabeth Brumfiel, have set his or her research agenda who regularly serves as a student and then will involve an entire team research mentor, thinks the summer of students in carrying out different fellows especially benefit from their aspects of that agenda. Each team “total immersion in their research.” member contributes to the project’s “There’s a lot of virtue,” she says, success. Psychologist Jeff Wilson “in being a fanatic, in being really notes that his student assistants intense about what you do.” During “bring their own perspective and the school year, she adds, students are opinions to the research, helping to easily distracted by other activities shape the research and interpret and commitments, but, as FURSCA Jennifer Kuebler says that her research experiences at Albion will be helpful preparation for results in manners that might not scholars, they can devote themselves graduate school and her future career in college teaching. The chemistry major was one of have occurred to me.” entirely to their projects. 12 Albion students who made research presentations with their faculty mentors last spring at At other times, the faculty Student Anne Starr agrees. “To the American Chemical Society’s national meeting in San Diego. member may serve primarily as a have 10 weeks dedicated to one sounding board for the student, subject—there’s a depth to that that’s offering new directions to pursue or hard to gain when you’re in class. work. Along the way, students often learn what it is new resources to examine. As she developed her ideas That has been really rewarding. I feel like I’m getting they want to do—or perhaps don’t want to do—in a on Mark Twain’s writing, Anne Starr says that her inboth breadth and depth of knowledge.” future career. depth discussions with adviser Hal Wyss, a specialist Doing original research exposes students not only to “There have been cases,” Cook recalls, “where on late 19th- and early 20th-century American literathe larger issues of a given scholarly field but to that students have done a summer project and have come ture, sharpened her thinking and helped her find the field’s everyday realities as well, according to Jenny away thinking, ‘Yes, this is exactly where I belong—I right focus for her project. Cook, who has coordinated FURSCA’s programs since can’t wait to get to graduate school.’” “Dr. Wyss allowed me the freedom to research 1999. Because it emphasizes hands-on learning, she But there have also been times when students have facets of this topic that interested me and the guidance says, research helps students gain a much better discovered that a particular field is not for them. The needed to keep me on track,” Starr observes. “It was understanding of how a scientist sets up a research latter experience, Cook believes, is no less valuable for exciting to share new information with him and then protocol or how an artist plans and executes a new those students since it allows them to redirect their (continued on p. 6) D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

to complete an internship in arts For DiVincenzo, the presentations management through the New York were an eye-opening introduction to the Arts Program in another year, and political side of arts management. eventually to pursue a career as a “I knew ahead of time that each gallery or museum director. person we met with had his or her own Right now, the duo has joined agenda,” he says. “It was the idea of with other Albion faculty and how to compromise—what ideas are students in applying for a grant essential.” He learned how to anticipate from the National Conferences on the concerns of a particular audience, Undergraduate Research. The grant and he discovered how essential it is to would fund additional summer have “done your homework” and to research on how small towns can demonstrate in-depth knowledge of improve their economic climate and your subject. overall “quality of life.” While a downtown location for the Chytilo and DiVincenzo think facility seemed to be the consensus Art professor Lynne Chytilo and student researcher David DiVincenzo devoted this past their arts venture could become a choice, finding an available building summer to their quest to establish a community-based glassblowing studio in Albion. In catalyst for business development that could be converted at an affordable addition to conducting feasibility studies for the studio, they explored possible locations for downtown by attracting tourism. price was another matter. Impressed by the venture including the late 19th-century grain mill and elevator in downtown Albion (in “I’m gratified how excited the grain mill’s long history and its background). people are about this project,” setting near the Kalamazoo River, Chytilo says. Chytilo and DiVincenzo began a And DiVincenzo adds, “It provides an outlet [in the feasibility study for the site and, along the way, learned still searching for the financial backing they would arts] that people wouldn’t have otherwise.” about the complexities of economic development as need to purchase and renovate a space for the studio. —Sarah Briggs well as building codes and fire regulations. They are The experience has already been rewarding, DiVincenzo says, regardless of its outcome. He plans

5


6

I O

T R I U M P H E

discuss what it meant, how it fit into the big picture, and what new questions it raised. Through this process of research and discussion, I was able to form what I feel is a solid, original theory about Twain—something I would have never believed possible!” FURSCA faculty director Dale Kennedy says that the program has brought a new level of professionalism to student research at Albion. The substantial stipend the summer fellowships carry, she says, underscores the fact that students are expected to approach the work seriously and with an eye toward meaningful results. And the fellowships give the program increased credibility in the world beyond the campus. Kennedy notes that students who have served as FURSCA scholars have a built-in advantage when they go on to apply for prestigious programs such as the National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Undergraduates.

Jeff Wilson maintains that participation in FURSCA gives students an edge in applying for graduate school as well. “Research experience, especially when it results in a documented finished product such as a publication or a presentation at a professional meeting, opens the door for graduate school.” Most FURSCA projects are broader in scope and more complex than anything the students might have attempted before. Succeeding in the face of such a challenge “is a huge confidence-builder,” according to student researcher Mollie Nothnagel. “I never thought of myself as being able to tackle such a big project. . . . I’ve never done anything on this scale before. . . . It’s nice to know that I can do this and that when I make it to graduate school I’ll be able to do research well.”

Nothnagel hopes her work this past summer on recent Disney animated films and what they reflect about perceptions of women’s roles in society will eventually result in a paper to be presented at a national research forum for undergraduates in the communication field. Student participation in such events has become common. Over the past two years, FURSCA student researchers have presented their work at national or international meetings of such groups as the American Chemical Society, American Society of Ichthyologists & Herpetologists and American Elasmobranch Society, Entomological Society of America, Geological Society of America, American Psychological Society and International Society for Optical Engineering, as well as at the National Conferences on Undergraduate Research. The FURSCA students also have the

Environmental protection: Exploring the potential of ‘green’ chemistry It’s one of life’s paradoxes that the manufacture of pharmaceuticals, while bringing so many benefits to human health, also results in waste products that can pollute our environment and, in the long run, endanger our lives. Albion College chemistry professor Cliff Harris is combining his professional interests with his concern for the environment to develop two groundbreaking, environmentally-friendly chemical processes that may someday change the way many drugs and other new materials are manufactured—with new production methods that are not only far gentler to the environment, but also more economical than previous methods. “As chemists, we have a moral responsibility to help preserve and protect life on this planet,” Harris says. “It’s clear to me that we cannot continue as we have for the past three centuries. Population growth is beginning to exhaust the resources of developing nations. In addition, an increasing rate of resource consumption in more developed nations compounds the damage that those nations inflict, even though their populations are quite stable. High population multiplied by high consumption multiplied by outdated technology is a recipe for global disaster.” Harris believes controlling population growth and reducing rates of consumption are necessary parts of the solution, but science will also be a crucial factor. “I certainly want to believe that science and technology can make life sustainable on earth far into the future,” he says, “but that means we must find processes that don’t harm the environment.” Harris also wants to expose his students to cuttingedge chemistry, and so for three of the last four summers he has recruited teams that have worked sideby-side with him in the lab. The students each have a particular assignment that extends some aspect of Harris’s work, thus giving them the opportunity to perform original research. Most of them have received fellowships in support of their work from the Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity.

One project deals with triphenylphospine oxide (TPO), a common waste product created during pharmaceutical manufacturing. TPO creation is known to be extensive throughout the industry. TPO is created during a process called the Wittig reaction, in which a phosphorus-based chemical is used to force the combination of different chemical compounds, thus producing various drugs. The phosphorus ends up as a byproduct: TPO. Created from mined phosphorus and carbon extracted from crude oil, “TPO is like a Styrofoam cup—we use it once and toss it out, and that’s a waste,” Harris explains. He believes that TPO in landfills will eventually deteriorate into toxins such as phenol. It’s irresponsible, Harris says, to use nonrenewable resources this way with no thought to the byproducts being created. “I would like to make it so that all the waste being produced now is recycled.” Harris is developing a chemical process whereby TPO is allowed to react with an organometallic, and the resulting compound is then separated into two parts: a phosphorus ylide and a useful byproduct, such as zinc oxide. The phosphorus ylide would then be combined with a ketone to simultaneously produce the desired pharmaceutical and reproduce TPO—which is instantly reused to repeat the cycle. To the non-chemist this sounds a little like a perpetual motion machine, but Harris is ready with a more prosaic example: Imagine this process as the manufacture of a shoe. TPO is the clamp that holds the shoe leather (the organometal) during manufacture. The shoe (the pharmaceutical) is made, taking a small piece from the clamp (now changed to phosphorus ylide). Once the shoe is released from the clamp, a new small piece is refitted to the clamp and it’s ready to use again. Harris claims that in the current process “we throw away a clamp for every shoe we make.” This past summer, three undergraduate chemistry majors each worked on combining a different organometallic with TPO, under Harris’s guidance.

“The less information we found [in the journal review] stage, the more exciting it became, because we realized how little research had been done in this area,” says chemistry major Jennifer Kuebler, who has assisted Harris on this project since fall 2000. Along with the journal review and research experiments, Kuebler also found that she enjoyed training the students who joined the project as it progressed. She became the team’s “resident expert” on using the College’s new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer to analyze compounds for the presence and type of phosphorus, and was able to help the team assess their results and work through problems when they arose. “I enjoyed having a leadership role. It has been a great experience for me,” says Kuebler, who hopes someday to teach chemistry at the college level. “I really like [teaching], where I’m helping people, especially helping people to do something that I really care about.” While advancing Harris’s research, his students are also receiving an insider’s view of life as a professional scientist. “My research group,” Harris explains, “is organized to maximize the student’s independence, while requiring safety to be the first priority at all times. Newer group members directly assist more experienced students who are running experiments to answer chemical questions. These experienced students look to me for theory, techniques and daily guidance, but they are constantly passing on the knowledge they have just received to others. It turns out this is exactly how doctors, lawyers, psychologists, businesspeople and almost everyone else—including scientists—actually work in the real world.” For Harris, the best part of research is the sense of discovery, knowing that he and his students are trying to accomplish something that has never been done before.


I O

opportunity to share their results on campus during the annual Elkin R. Isaac Research Symposium. All of the students holding summer fellowships meet weekly to discuss their projects with their peers. In any given week, the presentations might deal with topics ranging from perceptions of fairness in the justice system to the environmental impact of river dams in the Pacific Northwest, and from analysis of fossils in southwestern Michigan limestone deposits to modern Western views of Kabuki theatre. “It was amazing to see what everyone else was doing,” notes Mollie Nothnagel. “It was a huge commonality.” Research is mainly about creative problem-solving, regardless of what discipline you’re in, notes Dale

Kennedy. “When you have a critical mass of students doing research, as we do during the summer, the students can interact with each other.” Students who are going through the same experiences can often provide useful suggestions, and sometimes muchneeded moral support, to one another when difficulties arise. And, she adds, proximity can also create healthy competition. “The students set the bar for each other.” Kennedy believes that FURSCA’s impact can be seen across the campus. “Our faculty has a strong tradition of doing topflight research. What FURSCA does is broaden our concept of research to include a whole range of scholarly and creative activities, and engage our students in this work in ways that simply would not be

T R I U M P H E

possible without FURSCA’s financial backing. I think FURSCA energizes us as a learning community.” Kennedy regularly exchanges information with colleges that have similar programs, and says FURSCA has attracted considerable attention off-campus as well. “My colleagues at other institutions are closely following FURSCA’s progress,” Kennedy says. “We clearly are on the leading edge of a movement to expand and encourage independent student research.” Securing a $10-million endowment for the Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity is one of the goals of LIBERAL ARTS AT WORK: CHALLENGING MINDS, TRANSFORMING LIVES, Albion’s $120-million capital campaign announced last April. D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

That’s not to say they “That’s why scientists don’t find occasional love research,” he obobstacles in their path. serves. “They realize, Learning how to cope with ‘No one knows what’s those obstacles is also part going to happen, and I of the process. can be the one to figure “Dr. Harris’s dedication it out.’” to this project was really That drive to “figure it inspiring for us,” says out” keeps Harris motipsychology major Rany vated, despite odds that Aburashed, one of three may not be in his favor. students—none of them “Most organic chemists chemistry majors—who think there’s no chance worked with Harris on the this will work, and for boronic acid project this good reason,” he notes summer. Aburashed, who cheerfully. “And for TPO plans to attend medical itself, it very likely won’t. school next fall, recalls a But if we modify the Chemistry professor Cliff Harris takes a team approach to research. Together, he and his students—drawn from a time when two weeks’ molecular architecture of variety of class years and majors—are developing environmentally-friendly processes that may have applications worth of promising the catalyst we should be in many aspects of industrial chemistry. experiments turned out to able to make it work. We be based on flawed data. have evidence that this sufficiently pure for laboratory work, “we are produc“Dr. Harris sent us home at two in the afternoon—we can be done.” ing a lot of it,” he says, and this capability has attracted [were frustrated] and didn’t know what to do.” Harris’s second research interest is based on an interest and support from some chemical companies. Around midnight, Aburashed got a call from Harris. equally novel discovery. Expanding on the work of a Harris’s process, he says, is comparable to “stopping “He had been thinking all night about what went Nobel laureate chemist, Harris discovered that he could a stick of dynamite after it’s blown up three-quarters of wrong, and when he thought he figured it out, he called disrupt a process called trialkyl borane oxidation, the way—and then discovering a diamond left behind.” us. It couldn’t wait until nine the next morning.” causing it to produce two useful alcohols and a boronic He and his students presented their findings for the first Harris’s focus, says Aburashed, “taught me a lot about acid. time at the American Chemical Society national using all you’ve got when you have a problem that has The potential of this process for creating boronic meeting in San Diego last spring. to be solved.” acids is “unbelievably important” to chemists for two As with his other project, Harris depends heavily on “[This research] was a good exercise in using the reasons. First, says Harris, boronic acids are central to student assistance to test the effects of different creative process, because when we would hit a wall, we the chief reaction used by organic chemists today. The compounds upon his reaction. “The students and I are had to find a way to get around that wall,” continues Suzuki chemical reaction is the basis for the “greening” full collaborators on these projects,” he says. “Once I biology major Nick Gilpin. Adds psychology major of numerous chemical processes, by allowing chemical teach them the techniques, they do the experiments, James Jostock, “We kind of mixed fun with chemistry reactions to take place in water rather than in toxic bring the data to my office, and we try to make sense of and came out with good results. It was a good sumsolvents. Second, some boronic acids are currently what nature is doing. Together, we make progress mer.” difficult to produce, and sell for $300-400 per gram. So much, much faster than we would working indepen—Jake Weber while the boronic acid Harris has produced is not yet dently.”

7


8

I O

T R I U M P H E

Albion’s Dow Analytical Science Laboratory represents By Sarah Briggs D. TRUMPIE PHOTOS

The Dow Analytical Science Laboratory, dedicated last April, brings together in one location sophisticated instruments for every science field represented at Albion. Installed in renovated space in Norris Science Center, the lab supports teaching and research activities by our faculty and students, and will also be made available to area high school science students. It represents the first step in a comprehensive program to upgrade the College’s science facilities.

Before the installation of Albion’s new Dow Analytical Science Laboratory, chemistry professor Andrew French and his students would run a series of reactions in their lab one day, take the products to a major university lab for analysis the next day, and, with luck, get their results back on the third day. The process meant irritating delays, extra expense and many unnecessary dead-ends in their work. Now, with the addition of the Dow Lab, and its sophisticated equipment including a 400MHz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer, French has cut the time for this entire process to about four hours. He and his undergraduate research team never need to leave campus, and, best of all, they can see immediately if a reaction is not working and make the necessary adjustments to get back on track. “The availability of the NMR unit on campus has really sped up how we do research,” French says. “That will lead to faster publications and to a more meaningful research experience for our students.” Biologist Ken Saville has experienced the same benefits in his research on fruit-fly genetics. Now that he can use the Dow Lab’s DNA sequencer, he has found he can be far more productive. “The DNA sequencer allows me to do all of the steps of my research ‘in house,’” Saville explains. “Previously, I had to send samples out to be sequenced, at a cost of $30 per sample, which was very cumbersome and expensive.” The 2,300-square-foot lab, dedicated in April, was made possible by extensive renovations on the main floor of the Norris Science Center, built in 1969. The new facility is the first step in a far-reaching plan to upgrade and renovate all of Albion’s science facilities over the next decade. Made possible by a $2-million grant from the Midland-based Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation during a previous capital campaign, the lab is a scientist’s paradise, housing some of the latest high-tech instruments for each of the fields represented at Albion. It reflects the current trend toward research collaborations involving people from many different disciplines. This possibility for cross-

The Dow Analytical Science Laboratory instruments are used by our students in science classes and while conducting independent research. Included in the lab are:

Using the Dow Lab’s new gamma ray spectrometer, Albion physicist Martin Ludington (left) and student researcher Kyle Kidder measure the amount of radon in water samples. Radon, a radioactive element produced by the decay of uranium, is found in most samples of ground water. In large quantities, it is a health hazard that can cause cancer. Kidder worked with Ludington this past summer and is continuing his research in a directed study this fall. Undergraduates, even those at major research universities, rarely have access to a gamma ray spectrometer.

• • • • • • • • • • •

400MHz Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer Liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer Gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer Time-resolved fluorescence spectrometer Ultraviolet/visible spectrometer Ion chromatograph DNA sequencer X-ray fluorescence and x-ray diffraction spectrometers Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer Gamma ray spectrometer Silicon Graphics Octane 2 Visual Workstation


I O

T R I U M P H E

‘The Vision in action’

Albion chemist Andrew French and student researcher Crystal Ingison used the College’s new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer this past summer in their research on the synthesis of chiral compounds containing iodine. French also plans to introduce his organic chemistry students to high-field NMR techniques this fall. fertilization across the sciences is one of the lab’s chief advantages, according to chemist Craig Bieler, who also serves as the Dow Lab director. “It sparks new ideas for research, new approaches to problems that may not have occurred to us before,” he says. The lab’s interdisciplinary focus also makes sense in light of the College’s new Vision, Liberal Arts at Work. “The Vision stresses interdisciplinary studies,” notes Andrew French. “The Dow Lab allows the science faculty to think about working at the interfaces of these disciplines.” He believes the lab will become “a fruitful place to grow” for both students and faculty. Physicist Martin Ludington used the lab’s gamma ray spectrometer this past summer for his research testing for the presence of radon in water samples, but he would eventually like to expand that work to include other areas. “I can see us using the spectrometer for analysis of biological and geological samples in the future,” he says. “This will give me a chance to help other faculty and students with their work and give me new challenges and opportunities to learn more about the applications of my field.” The lab was used this past summer for faculty and student research, not only in chemistry and physics but also in biology and environmental science. Beginning this fall, it will also be used extensively for teaching. “The lab is going to be busy this year,” says Craig Bieler. In planning the facility, Albion’s faculty emphasized that the lab should be completely accessible to students, even those in their first and second years. French, for instance, will have his sophomore chemistry students use the NMR spectrometer for analysis of organic compounds. Biochemist Chris Rohlman’s students this year will use one of the lab’s ultraviolet/ visible spectrometers to analyze molecules in metabolic systems and the DNA sequencer to study a human gene that causes an inherited disorder. The lab’s Silicon

Working under the guidance of Albion geneticist Ken Saville, Julie Woolworth is using the Dow Lab’s genetic analyzer in her studies of DNA damage and subsequent repair in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Here she explains her use of DNA sequencing to biologist Luti Erbeznik (left) and student Kami Marsack. Similar equipment made sequencing the human genome possible.

Graphics visual workstation will enable students in computer science professor David Reimann’s upperlevel classes to visualize three-dimensional objects in a virtual-reality environment, and students in his First-Year Seminar, “Innovations in Imaging,” to learn how computerized graphics have made possible new types of imaging including threedimensional views of the interior of the human body. The lab’s open design—one entire wall is glass—makes it possible for students and others Ellen Wilch, Geology Department technician, instructs Jason Kennedy in the visiting the building to view teaching and research operation of the x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. This instrument is used to analyze the composition of solid samples; it can detect as little as parts-per-million of many activities as they happen. elements. Students and faculty at Albion have used it to study Antarctic volcanic In addition to lab benches rocks, chemical changes accompanying deformation of rocks, lead contamination of and instrumental work soils and sediments, and heavy metal concentrations in plant leaves and seeds. stations, the lab has a conference space that will allow a seminar class to move easily from group graduate school and a career, since they will already be discussion to experimentation and that will support familiar with instruments on a par with those being research team meetings. used by professionals in their field. Not only will Albion students have complete handsFinally, Bieler foresees that the lab will become an on use of the lab’s equipment, but Bieler hopes to bring “experimental” space in still another way. As the in area high school science students to use the lab planning proceeds on the remaining improvements in facilities for such activities as water quality analysis, Albion’s science facilities, the Dow Lab can be a materials analysis and environmental monitoring. testing ground for designing the teaching and research Bieler believes the lab will be an inviting place to spaces that will best serve the needs of the future. work—and one that will stimulate increased interest in “Ideas may come out of our experiences in the Dow studying science at Albion. He also sees significant Lab that we couldn’t even fathom before,” he conadvantages for our science students as they go on to cludes.

9


10

I O

T R I U M P H E

A R O U N D

C A M P U S D. TRUMPIE PHOTO

President Mitchell reflects on September events As I look back over the tragic events of Sept. 11 and our response to those events, I want you to know how proud I am of our faculty, staff, and students and how privileged I feel to lead this extraordinary college. As I’m sure you have experienced in your own lives, we here on campus have gained a heightened sense of unity, tolerance, and compassion as a result of this difficult time in our nation’s history. Through convocations and special music, panel discussions and prayers, we have drawn on our liberal arts heritage to respond thoughtfully to these events, and we have drawn on our strength as a community to support one another in dealing with our mutual sense of loss. During an all-campus forum held on the evening of Sept. 11, Torin Alexander, our College chaplain, prayed: “Strengthen us to face and confront what is and is to come. Keep alive in us the best of our hopes and dreams for today and tomorrow. Dreams of what it means to be the family of humanity, dreams and visions of peace, wholeness, and love.” That would be my prayer for you as well. —President Peter T. Mitchell, ’67

From construction on Albion College’s second Habitat for Humanity House to window-washing at the Albion Public Library to painting projects in local parks and much more, Albion College students volunteered their time for numerous community organizations during the annual City Service Day Aug. 19. Jason Colgrove and Zach Baselle (foreground) were among the Albion students who helped install flooring and walls in the Habitat for Humanity house that day.

News in brief Albion College this fall met its goal for the first-year class by enrolling 451 students, drawn from Michigan, 14 other states and 15 foreign countries. Included in that number are the first five Distinguished Albion Scholars, selected from a pool of 85 students who competed for this honor. In addition to excelling academically, the Distinguished

Albion moves into top 100 colleges in rankings

Albion students and faculty members will continue to conduct environmental studies of the Rice Creek watershed, thanks to a State of Michigan grant of $184,000 to the Calhoun Conservation District. The College’s Institute for the Study of the Environment received $67,500 of that total to advance its research on the factors causing degradation of the creek, which is a tributary of the Kalamazoo River. Io Triumphe first reported on the Rice Creek project in the fall 2000 edition.

Ritter speaks at Opening Convocation

To round out its William Atwell Brown, Jr. and Mary Brown Vacin First-Year Experience, Albion College this year has added a convocation series that will bring distinguished speakers to campus throughout the fall semester. Trustee William Ritter, ’62, senior minister at the First United Methodist Church in Birmingham, launched the series with his address at the Opening Convocation Aug. 30. Later this semester, the College will host attorney-turned-author Debra Dickerson for a convocation on her book, An American Story, the selection for this year’s Richard M. Smith Common Reading Experience. Also during the Opening Convocation, Albion conferred an honorary doctor of humane letters degree on William Stellman. Retired from a career as a patent attorney, Stellman has donated a Celestron telescope and other astronomical equipment to Albion, along with the funding for an observatory to house the instruments.

Albion College is ranked among the top 100 best liberal arts colleges in the country in the 2002 U.S. News and World Report “America’s Best Colleges” guide, published in September. “America’s Best Colleges” is the most popular national college guide. The top-100 ranking also places Albion in tier two in the “national liberal arts college” category, up from tier three in previous years. In addition, Albion is listed as a top-30 “Best Value” in the guide under the heading, “Great Schools at Great Prices.” In explaining this year’s higher ranking, President Peter T. Mitchell noted that all the indices that U.S. News uses have shown consistent improvement at Albion College in the past few years. “This is a powerful affirmation of the Albion College Vision, because it is attracting national attention, as we knew it would,” said Mitchell. “Although we’re very pleased, this came as no surprise to Albion College. The numbers indicate that we are in the top half of tier two. And next year will be even better— we know that our rates for freshman retention and graduation are up considerably over last year.” The recognition will benefit the College in diverse ways, according to Mitchell. “The tier-two ranking will have a positive effect on recruitment and fund raising. People like to support a winner, and students like to be at a place that is recognized for quality.”

Albion Scholars demonstrated exceptional achievement in scientific research, the fine arts, and/or community service. Retention of current students was the highest in recent years, bringing the College’s total enrollment to 1,548.

Albion is listed as a top-30 “Best Value” in the U.S. News and World Report “America’s Best Colleges,” 2002 Edition.

Correction In the summer 2000 Io Triumphe, Valerie Safstrom was omitted when we identified the 16 students who participated in the Holocaust studies trip to Poland in May. We apologize for the oversight.


I O A R O U N D

New faculty and staff appointed Academic Affairs The following individuals have been named to administrative positions within the Academic Affairs Division. ■ Royal Ward, vice president for academic affairs and dean of the faculty. A professor of theatre, Ward has also taught in the Honors Institute and the William Atwell Brown, Jr. and Mary Brown Vacin FirstYear Experience program in the 22 years he’s spent at Albion. Among many activities in service to the College, Ward serves as organist for College convocations and other special events. ■ Douglas Goering, associate dean of the faculty. Goering has been a faculty member in the Department of Art and Art History since 1986, including serving a six-year stint as department chair. Goering has contributed to numerous faculty committees, and was named Kappa Alpha Theta’s Outstanding Professor for 1996. ■ Leonard Berkey, associate dean for the Vision. A member of the Department of Anthropology and Sociology since 1978, he served for several years as department chair. He also served twice as the acting director of the Gerald R. Ford Institute for Public Policy and Service and has directed off-campus study programs in Europe and the Middle East. ■ W.C. “Butch” Dyer, director of the Carl A. Gerstacker Liberal Arts Institute for Professional Management. Dyer spent the past seven

Thanks, Robin! Albion sports information director Robin Hartman, known to Briton sports fans for his entertaining radio broadcasts and his colorful writing about Albion athletics, recently left the College to pursue his interests in broadcasting full-time. He continues, however, as the “Voice of the Britons” for our SportsNet football broadcasts, heard over several Michigan radio stations and online at Yahoo! Sports. Retired Albion coach Morley Fraser said recently that having breakfast with Robin Hartman “is like having breakfast with Ernie Harwell.” The comparison with WJR’s legendary sports announcer is apt. Like Harwell, Hartman is a consummate broadcaster. In his football play-by-play, he not

years as president of the Michigan Manufacturing Technology Center; previous to that, he held management positions with Westinghouse and Ex-Cell-O. Dyer holds an M.B.A. from Ashland University. ■ Karla Hammond, interim director of the William C. Ferguson Center for TechnologyAided Teaching. Hammond brings practical experience from working for over 10 years in education, most recently for Calhoun Intermediate School District as an education consultant with an emphasis in distance learning. A 1990 graduate of Albion College, she completed a master’s at Michigan State University. New tenure-track faculty at Albion include the following. ■ Andrew Christopher, assistant professor of psychology. Christopher has spent the past two years teaching psychology at Anderson College, where he was recognized by the students last year with the “Second Mile” award for outstanding teaching and service. A social psychologist, Christopher is currently conducting research on how the Protestant work ethic and materialism affect attitudes and perception. He holds an M.B.A. from Southern Methodist University and master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Florida, Gainesville. ■ Eva Kuttenberg, assistant professor of foreign languages. Kuttenberg’s teaching experience includes both college and highschool level German, English and Spanish. She has taught German literature at Bryn Mawr College and, most recently, at the University of Dallas. Along with a focus on Austrian writers, Kuttenberg has been interested in pedagogy for language teachers. Kuttenberg has an advanced degree from Karl Franzens Universitat in Austria, and also earned master’s and doctoral degrees from New York University. ■ Dean McCurdy, assistant professor of biology. McCurdy brings seven years’ teaching experience at Carleton University in Canada, Bowdoin College and Bates College. His research is centered on marine parasitology, examining how parasites change their hosts’ behaviors. McCurdy is a graduate of Acadia University of Nova Scotia and holds a doctorate from Carleton University. ■ Michael Meloth, associate professor of education. Meloth spent the past 14 years affiliated with the University of Colorado’s

only brings alive every pass, tackle and touchdown for his listeners but shares his encyclopedic knowledge of a Briton sports tradition that stretches back more than 100 years. And like Harwell, he is totally devoted to what he does. Hartman’s passion for Briton athletics has shown through in the hundreds of news and feature stories he has written over the past 14 years and in special publications he helped produce including “Fyte Onne: 110 Years of Briton Football” and recent works chronicling the history of the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association. All of us at Albion are deeply grateful for his many enduring contributions to the advancement of Albion athletics. —Sarah Briggs

T R I U M P H E

11

C A M P U S

School of Education, where he focused on educational psychology and learning and development instruction. He has worked in Thailand, Indonesia and South Korea, and was a visiting scholar at Edith Cowan University in Perth, Australia. Meloth earned a master’s degree from San Francisco State University and a doctorate from Michigan State University. ■ Zulema Moret, assistant professor of foreign languages. Moret has taught language, literature, linguistics and pedagogy at a variety of educational institutions in Venezuela, Spain and the U.S., in addition to instruction done through Spain’s Ministry of Education. Moret’s current scholarship focuses on Latin American literature. A graduate of Argentina’s Universidad de Buenos Aires, Moret holds a doctorate from the Universidad del Pais Vasco in Spain. ■ Ronney Mourad, instructor of religious studies. Along with teaching experience at Calvin College, Mourad has served as editorial assistant to the Journal of Religion. A scholar of various areas of religious philosophy, Mourad’s studies include French, German and Greek texts. Mourad has a master’s degree in divinity from the University of Chicago and is currently a doctoral candidate there. ■ Christopher Rohlman, associate professor of chemistry. After spending the past 10 years as assistant and associate professor of chemistry at Pomona College, where he received a teaching excellence award in 1995, Rohlman returns to his home state to teach biochemistry. Rohlman’s current research interest focuses on RNA structural studies. He is a graduate of Oakland University and holds a doctorate in biological chemistry from the University of Michigan. ■ William Rose, assistant professor of political science. A specialist on constitutional law and American political thought, Rose has spent the past three years teaching at the University of Toledo. He has also taught at Mount Holyoke and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where, in addition to his faculty appointment, he taught classes with the university’s Prison Education Project. Rose received a law degree from the University of Toledo and a doctorate in political science from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. ■ Jamie Walter, assistant professor of psychology. Walter has taught previously at the University of Maine and St. Mary’s College of Maryland. A developmental psychologist, Walter has a special interest in the emotional development of preschoolers. She earned a doctorate at the University of Maine. ■ Andrew Bishop, who has been a visiting instructor of music since 1999, has been named to a tenure-track position as assistant professor of music.

Coverage of the fall sports season will be included in the winter edition of Io Triumphe.

Institutional Advancement

Enzer

Lee

Lindemood

Monson

■ Jennifer Enzer, Web editor. Enzer brings five years’ experience in Web-based information services. Most recently she worked for Argus Associates in Ann Arbor as a Web information architecture consultant for Fortune 500 companies. A graduate of Hope College, she holds an M.I.L.S. degree from the University of Michigan. ■ Robert Lee, sports information director. Lee comes to Albion after serving for four years as Muskingum College’s sports information director. A graduate of Ohio University, Lee received a master’s degree from Ohio State University where he also worked in sports information. ■ Abigail Lindemood, assistant director of alumni and parent relations and annual giving. A 2001 graduate of Albion College, Lindemood has been associated with alumni and parent relations activities since her freshman year. She was a member of the Student Association for Alumni and studied Albion College alumni and students for a psychology practicum. ■ Amy Monson, assistant director of alumni and parent relations and annual giving. Monson has worked previously as a corporate librarian for Eastman Kodak and Xerox. She is a graduate of Buffalo State College.

Student Affairs ■ Diane Ariza, assistant dean of multicultural affairs. Ariza brings more than 15 years’ experience in recruitment, multicultural affairs and enrollment management at the University of Nebraska, Western Michigan University and Oakland University. She has also taught courses on race relations, gender studies and sociology. Ariza holds master’s and doctoral degrees from Western Michigan University.


12

I O

T R I U M P H E

A L B I O N O T E S

Class notes deadline

Since retirement in 1996, he and his wife, Barbara Bain Mills, ’56, have traveled two to three months a year. They live in Glendale, CA.

The deadline for class notes appearing in this issue of Io Triumphe was Aug. 15, 2001. Notes received after that date will appear in the next issue.

Herbert Smith, ’58, retired after 37 years at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, TX, where he served as director of the Department of Medical Illustration and Audiovisual Education and as director of Web development. In 1999 he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association of Medical Illustrators and in 2000 received the Louis Schmidt Award from the BioCommunications Association for his career achievements. He and wife, Susan, live in Houston, and can be reached by e-mail at: herb@moonmountaingroup.com.

Class news 50-54 Rosemary Renshaw Davidson, ’52, has been recognized for her quilting excellence by being voted “Quilter of the Year 2000” by the Calhoun County Quilters Guild. She was also featured in Scene Magazine’s “Creative Native” series and is active in the First United Methodist Church of Battle Creek, singing in the choir and belonging to the United Methodist Women. Her quilted wall hangings were recently on display in the church parlor. She lives in Battle Creek. Myron Yonker, ’53 and his wife, Mary, live in Elberta, AL, and are both retired teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages. Since retiring as clergy from the Southern Indiana Conference in 1995, they have enjoyed the Methodist Church’s Volunteers in Mission opportunities. Mission work has taken them to locations such as Iquique, Chile; Bolivia; and Milan, Italy.

55-59 Jack Hanford, ’56, has written a book called Bioethics from a Faith Perspective, and expected it to be available in fall 2001. The book is the result of teaching biomedical ethics during the last three decades. He is currently a faculty member at Ferris State University. Jack and his wife, Marilyn Brackett Handford, ’57, live in Big Rapids. Harold Mills, ’56, was elected president of Oakmont Country Club in Glendale, CA. He is chairman of the Pastoral Housing Endowment fund at his church.

B. David Wilson, ’58, a Kalamazoo allergist, was re-elected as a delegate to the American Medical Association during the Michigan State Medical Society annual House of Delegates meeting. He will serve a two-year term on the 26-member Michigan delegation to the American Medical Association’s House of Delegates. He is a past president of the Michigan State Medical Society. A graduate of Wayne State University School of Medicine, he is on staff at Bronson Methodist Hospital and Borgess Medical Center in Kalamazoo. He and his wife, Nancy, live in Portage.

60-64 James Canfield, ’64, has won the “Excellence in Teaching” award in university-wide competition at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. He has taught in the Department of Political Science at the university for 32 years. He credits his mentor and friend, the late Julian Rammelkamp of Albion’s History Department, for encouraging him to enter the profession of college teaching. He and his wife, Rae, live in Plover, WI, and can be reached by email at: jcanfield@uwsp.edu.

65-69 John Foss, ’65, has been appointed to the La-Z-Boy, Inc. Board of Directors. He holds a master’s degree in business administration from the University of

‘Who wants to be a millionaire?’ Well, back on June 5, it was Amy Proctor Mantyla, ’91, as she took the “hot seat” next to host Regis Philbin on the popular television quiz show. During her appearance on the show, Mantyla won $64,000, answered 11 questions correctly, and walked away from the 12th question, which would have been for $125,000 (and which she said she could have answered correctly). All she wanted to do, she recalls, was have her name on the screen for answering the “fast finger” question quickly. She was shocked when she came in with the fastest response and so made it to the hot seat. She is a guidance counselor at Harrison High School in Farmington Hills and is married to Pete Mantyla.

Michigan and lives in Tecumseh with his wife, Janis. Robert Townsend, ’65, has been hired as the co-interim library director for the Missaukee District Library. He holds an education specialist degree from Michigan State University, and is a retired educator from the Regional Education Media Centers. He and his wife, Carole, live in Cadillac.

70-74 Marsha Gentry-Pointer, ’73, was named principal of the Leadership and Business Academy at Manual High School in Denver, CO. She has been with the Denver Public Schools for 22 years, and an assistant principal for six years. She and her husband, Pete, live in Denver. James Everett, ’74, was named Volunteer of the Year for Idaho’s Big Brother/Big Sister organization in 2001. Jim works as CEO of the Boise YMCA, where since 1987 he has spearheaded the building of a second YMCA facility at a cost of $12-million and overseen an $8.6-million renovation of the city’s downtown YMCA building. Membership has also more than tripled. He lives in Boise, ID, with his wife, Linda.

75-79 William Cummins, ’75, is the center manager at Oregon 4-H Conference and Education Center. The center is home to a diverse clientele including school, church and social service organizations. He took this job after serving 17 years as a camping services professional for the YMCA. He and his wife, Caroline, live in Salem, OR, with their daughter.

80-84

Homecoming news and notes The Winter 2001-02 edition of Io Triumphe will cover Homecoming and the reunions for classes ending in “1” and “6.” Reunion class notes will also appear in that issue. John Dunn, ’84, helped establish a charitable foundation in Chelsea that encourages academic excellence and athletic achievement by providing scholarships to Chelsea High School athletes. He and his wife, Anna, live in the Chelsea area.

Anne Marie Karmazin Schoonhoven, ’87, and her husband, Richard, are enjoying living in the Hudson Valley and welcome contact from Albion classmates. They can be reached at 613 Crab Apple Lane, New Windsor, NY, 12553.

Virginia Fallis, ’84, has recently joined The Alford Group, a full-service consulting firm for the non-profit community, as a senior consultant. She will be working with organizations throughout Michigan and in northern Ohio. She previously had worked for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, University Liggett School and Oakwood Healthcare Systems, as well as Albion College. She lives in Royal Oak.

Michael Domzalski, ’88, joined his family-owned business, B.F. Domzalski Insurance, over three years ago. Now, he is set to take over the St. Clair Shores agency, which has been in his family for 115 years and five generations. He has been president of the Macomb County Independent Insurance Agents for two years, and lives in Royal Oak.

85-89 Brian “Bubba” Graham, ’86, completed his first year of teaching at East Lansing High School. Subject areas include U.S. history, world civilizations and world religions. He resides in East Lansing. Keith James, ’86, has joined the law firm of Butzel Long as a senior attorney practicing in the Bloomfield Hills office. He concentrates his practice in the areas of labor and employment law and commercial litigation. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin Law School, he is admitted to practice in federal and state courts for Michigan and Wisconsin. He and his wife, Sherrie, live in Farmington Hills.

Andrew Schmidt, ’88, has accepted a position as an animator for Pixar Animation Studios. His wife, Martina, works for Dreamworks, and the couple resides in the Oakland, CA. Together they travel to Europe to see family and friends. Patrick Briggs, ’89, has accepted a position with Cadillac Area Public Schools as the assistant superintendent in charge of business operations. He received his master’s in educational leadership from Saginaw Valley State University in May. He and his wife, Kimberli Fink Briggs, ’90, can be reached at 601 South Lake Dr., Cadillac, MI, 49601. Stephen Brooks, ’89, resides in Hilliard, OH, with his wife, Wendy, and two children. He changed careers after 12 years in corporate banking, when he joined Coughlin Enterprises as vice president.

Beth Falkner-Brown, ’80, of Willoughby, OH, was appointed chairperson of the Board of Trustees for Pathways, Inc. She is director of community health, Lake Hospital System. Mark Lundgren, ’80, has just finished his first year teaching vocal music at Standish-Sterling Central High School and Middle School. He and his wife, Rita, live in Omer. Mark Edington, ’83, was ordained to the priesthood in the Episcopal Church on May 26, 2001, and was elected a member of the Council on Foreign Relations in June. Currently the senior administrator in the Center for the Study of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School, he serves concurrently as the first Epps Fellow and chaplain to Harvard College in The Memorial Church at Harvard University. Mark and his wife, Judith Hadden Edington, ’82, live in Cambridge, MA.

A quail-hunting expedition on the Ashburn Hills Plantation in Georgia brought these Albion friends together. Pictured are: Bruce Broquet, ’79, of Anchorage, AK, Stan Ryder, of Atlanta, GA, Paul Huth, ’77, of Grosse Pointe Farms, Henry “Hank” Huth, ’79, of Riverside, CT, Tim McCaughey, ’79, of Grosse Pointe Park, and Tim Nolan, brother of Kathleen Nolan, ’84.


I O

T R I U M P H E

A L B I O N O T E S

Susan Dombrowski, ’89, is employed as a staff scientist/bioinformatics training specialist at the National Center for Biotechnology Information, a division of the National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. She would love to hear from old friends, and can be reached at: 2000 Huntington Ave., #1519, Alexandria, VA, 22303; e-mail: drdbrow@hotmail.com

90-94 Laura Meixner Cole, ’90, has been promoted to associate professor of chemistry as well as receiving tenure at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. Laura received a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from the University of Florida. She and her husband, Scott,

live in Stevens Point, WI, and would love to hear from old friends. They can be reached by e-mail at: lcole@uwsp.edu.

County Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program. She lives in Dallas with her husband, Tim, and their two children.

Patrick Maher, ’90, is living in Thailand and is conducting research on brain deformities found in fossilized gecko remains. He is attempting to prove his theory that the climactic change 5000 years ago in the Siam basin resulted in the expansion of gecko skulls and, in turn, brain deformity. The findings will be presented to a group of researchers in Bangkok at an academic conference in January 2002.

Sara Griffin, ’91, has graduated from Loyola University with a master of arts in pastoral counseling. Sara also has an M.Div. from Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary, and is an ordained minister in the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church. She is employed part-time at the Horizon Community Services Clinic, Chicago, as their client services coordinator.

Jennifer Schomer Reemtsma, ’90, has been appointed assistant principal of Greenbriar Elementary School in Fort Worth, TX, for the 2001-02 school year. She spent the previous year as the education coordinator for the Dallas

Dan Wilcox, ’91, has joined Bay Street Orthopedics in Petoskey, after completing his orthopedic residency in June. He and his wife, Joelle Drader Wilcox, ’91, and their two children have moved to Petoskey.

Lisa Burns Johnson, ’92, in October will celebrate three years with GMAC Insurance as a territory sales manager and five years of marriage with her husband, Bill. They live in Jackson, and are preparing for their annual Jimmy Buffet trip with Ann Stacey, ’90. Sarah Paukstis, ’92, has earned her Ph.D. in chemical physics from Georgia Institute of Technology. She has accepted employment with a biophotonics company in Norcross, GA. Robert Barr, ’93, has been made a partner in the law firm Dettelbach, Sicherman & Baumgart. The firm is located in Cleveland, OH, and specializes in bankruptcy law. He and his wife, Jill Martindale Barr, ’93, live in University Heights, OH. Stephen Sheridan, ’93, now practices medicine in Hillman after earning his

The rest of the story, part II In the summer 2001 Io Triumphe, we challenged our readers to help identify the first five of these photos. Their responses are below. And we have sent a $25 gift certificate from the Albion College Bookstore to Marilynn Miller Justice, ’60, for submitting the winning caption for photo #6.

1

4

Bells and whistles . . . Dean Smith, ’47, writes that this photo was taken in 1958 at his family’s home in Albion. Pictured (from left) are College organist F. Dudleigh Vernor, ’14; Dean Smith; his father, C. Reginald Smith; and College Choir director David Strickler. The organ pipe pictured was removed from the old College Chapel when Goodrich Chapel was constructed. It was presented to Vernor as a retirement gift, recognizing his service to Albion (19251958) as teacher of organ. “To our surprise,” says Smith, “Dud told us that the pipe was in the same key as the ‘Sweetheart of Sigma Chi’ song, and it was [part of] the chapel organ [at the time he composed] the music to the ‘Sweetheart’. Presently the organ pipe is at the Sigma Chi national headquarters.”

Why is this man smiling? According to the summer 1975 Albionews, John Huff, ’75, then president of the College’s Student Senate, “for more than three years . . . waged a frustrating battle with Amtrak and government officials to include a train stop for local citizens and Albion College students. His efforts paid off on May 23 when the first Albion stop was made by Amtrak, replete with bands, hundreds of local citizens and champagne for those boarding the train in Albion.” And there’s more: now, more than 25 years later, the train still stops twice a day in Albion.

Kelson Zehr, ’93, of Lansing, received a master’s degree in counseling from Oakland University in 1999. Kelson is a nationally certified and limited licensed professional counselor working as a consultant for Genex Services. Matthew Altman, ’94, of Bay City, received a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Chicago in June 2001. He is an assistant professor of philosophy at Drury University in Springfield, MO.

All work and no play? Dan Boggan, ’67, and Donna Grout Mouzard, ’69, were on a study date in Stockwell Memorial Library when this photo was taken in 196566. Boggan has gone on to city manager posts on both the East and West Coasts and today is chief operating officer of the NCAA and a College trustee. Mouzard, now living in Quebec, reports she is the mother of two grown children and a faculty member at Heritage College in a three-year early childhood education program.

3

2

All dressed up and no place to go? Phyllis Wagner Gore Houghton, ’41, a member of the select Madrigal Singers (pictured) directed by Dr. Theodore Vosburgh, recalls that they “performed in churches, at Susanna Wesley Hall at Christmas and Thanksgiving, and in the chapel. It was a harmonious group both musically and in friendships. . . . Sixty-one years later I still remember these madrigal friends with warm memories.” And, she says, she is still singing at age 82. Thomas Andrews, ’40, editor of the 1940 Albionian, wrote to say that the singers also performed an “Albion ’Round the World” program on WJR-Radio on Feb. 13, 1940.

M.D. degree at Wayne State University School of Medicine. His wife, Meredith Haar, ’96, a graduate of the University of Michigan Dental School, practices dentistry in Hillman. They live in Alpena, and Stephen has taken interest in the genealogy of his family. He would like to thank professor Deborah Kanter of the History Department at Albion College for teaching him the importance of preserving the past.

6

5 Trojan horse, Albion-style . . . Unfortunately, no one responded to our query about the winner of the Volkswagen-stuffing contest shown in this April 1979 photo. We’ll keep hunting for that answer.

Thanks to Marilynn Miller Justice, ’60, for submitting her winning caption for this photo: “Hanging around Albion is an enlightening experience.”

13


14

I O

T R I U M P H E A L B I O N O T E S

95-99 Brian Kneeland, ’95, has been hired by E.M. Shorts guitars in Wichita, KS, to repair guitar and violin family instruments. He is planning on setting up a small workshop to build custom-order acoustic guitars and mandolins. He

would love to hear from friends at 2510 E. Lincoln #203, Wichita, KS, 67211. Philip McCorkle, ’95, has graduated from Indiana University School of Dentistry. He began working as an associate in Grand Rapids, starting midJuly.

Kathryn Catros, ’96, has graduated magna cum laude from Boston College of Law. She took the Massachusetts Bar exam in July, and then began employment with the Boston law firm of Palmer and Dodge, specializing in labor and employment law. She lives in Chestnut Hill, MA.

All in the family conference for the latter group in St. Louis last year. High school seniors often choose colleges and Back on campus this fall, Jennifer is now serving as a universities based on the majors, locations and sizes resident assistant in Seaton Hall and is a member of of enrollment at the institutions. But for the Ballard Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority. sisters, who hail from Richton Park, Ill., pens first While both sisters would like to see increased attracted them to Albion. diversity on campus, they think Albion is a “good “I have a thing for pens. I collect them,” Deon college that really caters to families.” Ballard, ’01, says. “Albion’s booth at the Prairie Deon also points to her directed study on gender State college fair was handing out purple pens. So I and racial bias in standardized testing as one of her had my older sister, Monique, who was a senior at favorite Albion memories. “I worked one-on-one with the time, send for information about the college. It a psychology professor, Rachel Laimon, on something sounded good and two years later I followed her we both cared about. It was a great experience.” there.” It’s fair to say that for Deon and Jennifer Ballard, Monique and Deon’s success at Albion, Deon and their older sister, Monique, Albion College was says, also convinced their youngest sister, Jennifer, the “write” choice. to enroll. “We’re a close family and wanted to be —Lynsey Kluever, ’01 together.” Monique graduated in 1999 with majors in psychology and English and works at the Chicago Board of Trade. Deon graduated last May with a degree in psychology and is attending the Illinois School of Psychology to become a psychologist. Jennifer, ’04, is a biology major who plans on becoming a pediatrician. The sisters have shared many of the same interests. Deon introduced Jennifer to Black Student Alliance and Safer Sex Peer Education. Both Deon Ballard, ’01 Monique Ballard, ’99 Jennifer Ballard, ’04 women attended a national

Building the Albion legacy in your family If you are already part of a historic family involvement with Albion College, or if you’d like to start such a tradition in your family, here are two new benefits that will be of interest: ■ Albion College will waive the $20 application fee for any legacy student who applies for admission. ■ A $1,500 Alumni Grant will be awarded to all incoming students whose family includes at least one Albion alumna/alumnus (sister, brother, father, mother, grandparents). This grant, offered without regard to financial need, is renewable for all four years. To qualify, the student simply needs to indicate his or her family’s alumni status when submitting the application. We welcome campus visits at any time. Please contact the Admissions Office at 800/858-6770, and we will make all arrangements. For more information online, visit: www.albion.edu/admissions/.

Roopam Chowdhury, ’96, is the senior account executive on the Sony account for Young and Rubicam Advertising, in southern California. Roopam lives in Huntington Beach, CA, and has been accepted to the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business in the M.B.A. program. He would enjoy hearing from classmates at: roopam_chowdhury@irv.yr.com. Matthew Stockdale, ’97, graduated from Wake Forest University School of Law in 2000. He and his wife, Amy, have recently moved to Greensboro, NC, where he is an assistant public defender. Jane Williams, ’98, graduated from Louisiana State University Law School in May, finishing up her term as class president. She has accepted a position as an assistant district attorney for Terrebonne Parish in Houma, LA, beginning immediately upon completion of the Louisiana Bar exam. Sheila Rector, ’99, received a master of science degree in journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism in August 2000. Last October, she joined the Detroitbased public relations and marketing firm of Marx Layne & Co., and has been promoted to account executive. She can be reached by e-mail at: sheilarector@hotmail.com.

Faculty and friends Mary Lou Franklin, wife of former Albion College dean of the chapel, Wilbur Franklin, would enjoy hearing from Albion friends. Bill Franklin passed away April 29, 2000. Mary Lou lives at 3905 Glenmere Dr., Youngstown, OH 44511-3515. Mary Jane Glathart, died on June 18, 2001 in Kalamazoo. She was a schoolteacher who taught in the Albion Public Schools for all grades. After retiring, she worked at Albion College in the Registrar’s Office and Admissions Office. She was also an organist and choir director at St. James’ Episcopal Church in Albion. Her husband, Albion physics professor J.L. Glathart, preceded her in death. She is survived by one daughter and three grandchildren.

Weddings Pamela Collins, ’83, to Michael Woodroffe on Oct. 7, 2000 in Ann Arbor. Albion guests in attendance included Dan Ames, ’83, Janet Sedor Ames, ’85, and Tina Mertes Bonney, ’96. Pam is president of Collins Consulting, a management consulting firm she founded in 1992 with its headquarters in Ann Arbor. Michael is president of Meadowbrook International, a reinsurance brokerage firm based in Hamilton, Bermuda. The couple plans on dividing their time between Ann Arbor and Bermuda. Pam can be reached at: pwoodroffe@collinsconsult.com. Maggie Warner, ’84, to Thomas Slovik on Dec. 2, 2000. Maggie has a stepdaughter, Kayla, 12. Maggie works for the 10-county Girl Scout Council in Lima, OH, as event/site registrar. The family lives in Lima. Elizabeth “Lilly” Neilson, ’85, to Owen Fischler on April 19, 2001. Alumni in attendance included Cynthia Carr Falardeau, ’86. Elizabeth works for Ray Schuler Advertising Co. in Elkhart, and Owen works for Flex-Pak in Indianapolis. They live at 1333 E. Beardsley Ave., Elkhart, IN 46514; telephone: 219/2624029; e-mail: lilly@galaxyinternet.net. Cathi Zimmer, ’88, to Jeff Myer on June 9, 2001 in Elmhurst, IL. Cathi received her master’s in information science in 2000 and is working for a private equity firm in Boston. Jeff is a hardware engineer for Cisco Systems. The couple resides in Burlington, MA, and can be reached by e-mail at: cmyer@cobblestone-pe.com. Mark Abbott, ’89, to Demetra Aposporos on Sept. 5, 1999 in Washington, DC. Alumni in attendance included Randall Thomas, ’88, and Cindy Larkin Kazee, ’88. Since their marriage, Mark and Demetra have split their time between Washington, DC, where Demetra works as an editor for National Geographic magazine, and Pittsburgh, PA, where Mark is a doctoral candidate in cultural anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh. Currently, they are on a year-long research trip to Russia as well as visiting relatives in Greece. Mark would love to hear from Albion friends and can be reached at: mabbott@pitt.edu.

Application fee waiver available Alumni who wish to encourage talented high school students to apply for admission at Albion may obtain copies of the College’s Application Fee Waiver form by calling Marsha Whitehouse at the Admissions Office, 800/858-6770, or sending e-mail to mwhitehouse@albion.edu. Please be sure to include your complete name, daytime telephone number and fax number in your message. The student should attach the Application Fee Waiver form to his or her completed application in lieu of the application fee. This step is a simple and easy way you can assist Albion’s admissions efforts!


14

I O

T R I U M P H E A L B I O N O T E S

95-99 Brian Kneeland, ’95, has been hired by E.M. Shorts guitars in Wichita, KS, to repair guitar and violin family instruments. He is planning on setting up a small workshop to build custom-order acoustic guitars and mandolins. He

would love to hear from friends at 2510 E. Lincoln #203, Wichita, KS, 67211. Philip McCorkle, ’95, has graduated from Indiana University School of Dentistry. He began working as an associate in Grand Rapids, starting midJuly.

Kathryn Catros, ’96, has graduated magna cum laude from Boston College of Law. She took the Massachusetts Bar exam in July, and then began employment with the Boston law firm of Palmer and Dodge, specializing in labor and employment law. She lives in Chestnut Hill, MA.

All in the family conference for the latter group in St. Louis last year. High school seniors often choose colleges and Back on campus this fall, Jennifer is now serving as a universities based on the majors, locations and sizes resident assistant in Seaton Hall and is a member of of enrollment at the institutions. But for the Ballard Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority. sisters, who hail from Richton Park, Ill., pens first While both sisters would like to see increased attracted them to Albion. diversity on campus, they think Albion is a “good “I have a thing for pens. I collect them,” Deon college that really caters to families.” Ballard, ’01, says. “Albion’s booth at the Prairie Deon also points to her directed study on gender State college fair was handing out purple pens. So I and racial bias in standardized testing as one of her had my older sister, Monique, who was a senior at favorite Albion memories. “I worked one-on-one with the time, send for information about the college. It a psychology professor, Rachel Laimon, on something sounded good and two years later I followed her we both cared about. It was a great experience.” there.” It’s fair to say that for Deon and Jennifer Ballard, Monique and Deon’s success at Albion, Deon and their older sister, Monique, Albion College was says, also convinced their youngest sister, Jennifer, the “write” choice. to enroll. “We’re a close family and wanted to be —Lynsey Kluever, ’01 together.” Monique graduated in 1999 with majors in psychology and English and works at the Chicago Board of Trade. Deon graduated last May with a degree in psychology and is attending the Illinois School of Psychology to become a psychologist. Jennifer, ’04, is a biology major who plans on becoming a pediatrician. The sisters have shared many of the same interests. Deon introduced Jennifer to Black Student Alliance and Safer Sex Peer Education. Both Deon Ballard, ’01 Monique Ballard, ’99 Jennifer Ballard, ’04 women attended a national

Building the Albion legacy in your family If you are already part of a historic family involvement with Albion College, or if you’d like to start such a tradition in your family, here are two new benefits that will be of interest: ■ Albion College will waive the $20 application fee for any legacy student who applies for admission. ■ A $1,500 Alumni Grant will be awarded to all incoming students whose family includes at least one Albion alumna/alumnus (sister, brother, father, mother, grandparents). This grant, offered without regard to financial need, is renewable for all four years. To qualify, the student simply needs to indicate his or her family’s alumni status when submitting the application. We welcome campus visits at any time. Please contact the Admissions Office at 800/858-6770, and we will make all arrangements. For more information online, visit: www.albion.edu/admissions/.

Roopam Chowdhury, ’96, is the senior account executive on the Sony account for Young and Rubicam Advertising, in southern California. Roopam lives in Huntington Beach, CA, and has been accepted to the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business in the M.B.A. program. He would enjoy hearing from classmates at: roopam_chowdhury@irv.yr.com. Matthew Stockdale, ’97, graduated from Wake Forest University School of Law in 2000. He and his wife, Amy, have recently moved to Greensboro, NC, where he is an assistant public defender. Jane Williams, ’98, graduated from Louisiana State University Law School in May, finishing up her term as class president. She has accepted a position as an assistant district attorney for Terrebonne Parish in Houma, LA, beginning immediately upon completion of the Louisiana Bar exam. Sheila Rector, ’99, received a master of science degree in journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism in August 2000. Last October, she joined the Detroitbased public relations and marketing firm of Marx Layne & Co., and has been promoted to account executive. She can be reached by e-mail at: sheilarector@hotmail.com.

Faculty and friends Mary Lou Franklin, wife of former Albion College dean of the chapel, Wilbur Franklin, would enjoy hearing from Albion friends. Bill Franklin passed away April 29, 2000. Mary Lou lives at 3905 Glenmere Dr., Youngstown, OH 44511-3515. Mary Jane Glathart, died on June 18, 2001 in Kalamazoo. She was a schoolteacher who taught in the Albion Public Schools for all grades. After retiring, she worked at Albion College in the Registrar’s Office and Admissions Office. She was also an organist and choir director at St. James’ Episcopal Church in Albion. Her husband, Albion physics professor J.L. Glathart, preceded her in death. She is survived by one daughter and three grandchildren.

Weddings Pamela Collins, ’83, to Michael Woodroffe on Oct. 7, 2000 in Ann Arbor. Albion guests in attendance included Dan Ames, ’83, Janet Sedor Ames, ’85, and Tina Mertes Bonney, ’96. Pam is president of Collins Consulting, a management consulting firm she founded in 1992 with its headquarters in Ann Arbor. Michael is president of Meadowbrook International, a reinsurance brokerage firm based in Hamilton, Bermuda. The couple plans on dividing their time between Ann Arbor and Bermuda. Pam can be reached at: pwoodroffe@collinsconsult.com. Maggie Warner, ’84, to Thomas Slovik on Dec. 2, 2000. Maggie has a stepdaughter, Kayla, 12. Maggie works for the 10-county Girl Scout Council in Lima, OH, as event/site registrar. The family lives in Lima. Elizabeth “Lilly” Neilson, ’85, to Owen Fischler on April 19, 2001. Alumni in attendance included Cynthia Carr Falardeau, ’86. Elizabeth works for Ray Schuler Advertising Co. in Elkhart, and Owen works for Flex-Pak in Indianapolis. They live at 1333 E. Beardsley Ave., Elkhart, IN 46514; telephone: 219/2624029; e-mail: lilly@galaxyinternet.net. Cathi Zimmer, ’88, to Jeff Myer on June 9, 2001 in Elmhurst, IL. Cathi received her master’s in information science in 2000 and is working for a private equity firm in Boston. Jeff is a hardware engineer for Cisco Systems. The couple resides in Burlington, MA, and can be reached by e-mail at: cmyer@cobblestone-pe.com. Mark Abbott, ’89, to Demetra Aposporos on Sept. 5, 1999 in Washington, DC. Alumni in attendance included Randall Thomas, ’88, and Cindy Larkin Kazee, ’88. Since their marriage, Mark and Demetra have split their time between Washington, DC, where Demetra works as an editor for National Geographic magazine, and Pittsburgh, PA, where Mark is a doctoral candidate in cultural anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh. Currently, they are on a year-long research trip to Russia as well as visiting relatives in Greece. Mark would love to hear from Albion friends and can be reached at: mabbott@pitt.edu.

Application fee waiver available Alumni who wish to encourage talented high school students to apply for admission at Albion may obtain copies of the College’s Application Fee Waiver form by calling Marsha Whitehouse at the Admissions Office, 800/858-6770, or sending e-mail to mwhitehouse@albion.edu. Please be sure to include your complete name, daytime telephone number and fax number in your message. The student should attach the Application Fee Waiver form to his or her completed application in lieu of the application fee. This step is a simple and easy way you can assist Albion’s admissions efforts!


I O

T R I U M P H E

15

A L B I O N O T E S

Timothy Royle, ’89, to Kimberly Qualls on May 13, 2000 in Midland. (See accompanying photo.) Chris Wheeler, ’89, to Theresa Gorecki on June 2, 2001. Chris is senior ad consultant for Valpak & Associates. Theresa is a second grade teacher in Mt. Clemens. The couple resides in Macomb Township. Sheryl Nielsen, ’90, to Robert Parrish on Oct. 21, 2001 in Allegan. Sheryl is a bookkeeper for Al’s Excavating, Inc. in Hamilton. Robert is a custodial/ maintenance worker at Allegan County Intermediate School District. The couples resides in Allegan. Elisa Jensen, ’91, to Stephan Wuench on June 24, 2000. Donna Potchynok Finn, ’90, was in the wedding party. Karen Fox Festa, ’91, was in attendance. The couple resides in Brighton. Matthew Morgan, ’92, to Tri Mulyani on Dec. 1, 2000. Matthew is the owner

and operator of Morgan Architectural Services. Tri is employed at Black Rhino International. The couples lives in Eaton Rapids. Brian Sheehy, ’94, to Patricia Kozyra on Sept. 16, 2000 in Hamtramck. John Mank, ’94, was in the wedding party. Brian is the owner of Pinnacle Financial Group. Patricia is a diabetes specialty sale representative with Takeda Pharmaceuticals. The couples resides in Grosse Pointe Woods.

delivery nurse at Good Samaritan Hospital. The couple would love to hear from old friends at: 900 W. Grove Parkway, Apt. 2026, Tempe, AZ 85283 or by e-mail at: rcurc@hotmail.com. (See accompanying photo.) Eric Johnson, ’96, to Kara Willson on March 31, 2001 in Winter Park, FL. Albion alumni in attendance included Michael Jehle, ’96. The couple lives in Millersburg, OH, where Eric is a dentist.

Christina McMillan, ’95, to David Newman on April 20, 2001 in Richmond. Diane Gai, ’95, was in the wedding party. Christina is employed at Montessori Stepping Stones in Mt. Clemens. David is employed by TI Group Automotive Systems in Warren. The couples lives in Marine City.

Jennifer Simmons, ’99, to Mark Niesen on Aug. 5, 2000 in Lapeer. Amy Niesen Gentner, ’96, and Katherine Niesen, ’05, were in the wedding party. Proud parents include William Simmons, ’74. Jennifer is a student at Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine. Mark is employed at Deloitte and Touche Consulting. The couple resides in Auburn Hills.

Pamela Wadsworth, ’95, to Rosario Curcuru, ’96, on May 12, 2001 in Lansing. They now live in Tempe, AZ, where Rosario is a financial analyst for Intel Corp., and Pamela is a labor and

Sarah Schmidt, ’99, to Rob Fuller in Bloomington, IN, on July 2, 2000. (See accompanying photo.)

Wedding Album See accompanying notes for details. Pamela Wadsworth, ’95, to Rosario Curcuru, ’96, on May 12, 2001. (Left to right) Darcie DeGrow Clapp, ’95, Jill Walters, ’96, Kori Griffin Stockoski, ’96, Eleni Marsh, ’97, Dave Stockoski, ’96, Rosario Curcuru, ’96, Bradly Toth, ’96, Pamela Wadsworth, ’96, Kristen Olsen Toth, ’96, Sheila Cummings, ’95, Terry Browder, ’96, Shane Cavanaugh, ’95, Susan Quinn, ’95, Kimberly Lohuis, ’95.

The production of the latest Purple Rose film, SuperSucker, found five Albion graduates at work on the set. Bob Brown, ’77, (second from left) has become a partner with film actor Jeff Daniels in the production company and served as executive producer of SuperSucker, which was shot last spring in Jackson. Also working on the film were: (from left) Thor Leach, ’01, production assistant; Sarab Kamoo, ’91, actress; Matt Molitor, ’94, set production assistant; Michael Somers, ’97, unit production manager’s assistant. Daniels, who also operates the Purple Rose Theater in Chelsea, has served as a visiting artist at Albion.

The Albion Network William Hight, ’59, is looking for students who served on WANR, the campus radio station between the

years 1955-58. He can be reached at 106 Monroe Ave., Belle Mead, NJ 08502; e-mail: w.c.hight@att.net.

“The Albion Network” is a cross between want ads and the “personal” ads sometimes run in newspapers or magazines. If you would like to locate a long lost friend or if you need to contact your fellow alumni for any other reason, this is the way to do it—free of charge. The next Io Triumphe will be mailed in December. Name __________________________________ Class year _____________ (Please print name)

Timothy Royle, ’89, to Kimberly Qualls on May 13, 2000. (Seated, left to right) Timothy Royle, ’89, Kimberly Royle, Tim MacKay, ’69. (Standing) Linda Prior Lauderbach, ’66, Thomas Beird, ’86, Erin Mead Lauderbach, ’91, William Lauderbach, ’64, Robert Royle, ’59, William Taylor, ’91, David Marcinkowski, ’92, Megan Royle, ’95, John Ferris, ’89, Pamela Gee Royle, ’60, Kenneth George, ’90, Thomas Bres, ’89, Jonathan Lauderbach, ’91, Michael Royle, ’92, Tamara Transue Royle, ’63, James Royle, ’63, Julie Kneeland Taylor, ’91. Sarah Schmidt, ’99, to Rob Fuller on July 2, 2000. (Front row, left to right) Graham Wilczewski, ’99, Chad Abbuhl, ’98, Katina Hamann, ’99, Hisham Awan, ’99. (Second row, beginning at center of photo) Rebecca Salus, ’99, Meredith Manning, ’99, Kimberly Halbeisen, ’99, Abby Marsden, ’99. (Third row) Amy Schmidt Stille, ’97, Alison Wills, ’99, Jaime Maciag, ’98, Laura Meech, ’99, Karen Paradise, ’99, Jaime Corte, ’98, Sarah Schmidt Fuller, ’99, Claudina Iacobelli, ’98, Peter Schmidt, ’98, David Sehnert, ’99.

Street _________________________________________________________ City _____________________________ State _______ ZIP _____________ E-mail address _________________________________________________ Wording for ad to appear in “The Albion Network”: (Keep to 60 words or less. If you want your address to appear in the ad, be sure to include it in your ad copy.)

Send to: Editor, Io Triumphe, Office of Communications, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224; or via e-mail, to classnotes@albion.edu. Be sure to include your full name, class year, address (geographic and e-mail) and telephone number in your e-mail message.


18

I O

T R I U M P H E A L B I O N O T E S

Baby Britons Rachel Nicole was adopted May 30, 2000 by David, ’74, and Susan Konopka Giffin, ’75. She joins sisters Stacey, 14, Erin, 12, and brother Peter, 10. The entire family traveled to the People’s Republic of China to welcome Rachel from the Shaoyan People’s Welfare Institute in Hunan, China. David is a podiatrist in private practice, and Susan stays active managing office and home. The family resides in Denver. Delaney Laurada on Jan. 31, 2001 to David and Laurada Boehl Edwards, ’78. She joins twin sisters Landon and Riley. The family lives in Grafton, WI.

B R A V O

T O

Thomas Joseph on May 24, 2001 to Thomas and Charlotte Liioi Hartzell, ’84. He joins big sisters Katie, 8, and Susan, 5. The family lives in Grosse Pointe Woods. Harrison MacDonald on April 10, 2001 to Harley and Shelagh Smith Luplow, ’84. He joins big brother Harley Jr., 5, and big sister Serena, 2. Shelagh is an interior designer for Patricia Wood & Co., and Harley is a financial advisor for Boyne Resorts USA. The family lives in Harbor Springs. Darius Akeakamai on Dec. 28, 2000 to Tom and Vicki Arii Soo Hoo, ’84. He joins big brother Caleb, 2. The family lives in Haiku, HI, and can be reached by e-mail at: tvsoohoo@hotmail.com.

B R I T O N S

In “Bravo to Britons,” our intent is to highlight the noteworthy, the unusual and the entertaining. We welcome submissions from all quarters. The only requirement is that an Albion alumnus/alumna must be involved in the story. Send your nominations, clearly marked for “Bravo to Britons” to: Editor, Io Triumphe, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224. If an item is not received by the deadline for one issue, it will be held for possible inclusion in the next. The editor reserves the right to determine which submissions are selected for publication. Kirk Johnson, ’92, executive director of Friends of Allegheny Wilderness in Pennsylvania, was the prime mover behind the installation last August of an historical marker honoring Howard Zahniser, one of the strongest advocates of the National Wilderness Preservation System Act of 1964. An article in the Pittsburgh PostGazette recognized Zahniser’s work this way: “As one of the tall timbers in a national conservation movement that was just budding half a century ago, Zahniser was an early proponent of the ethic that without untrammeled wilderness, mankind would be materially and spiritually impoverished. “He also believed that legislation to ensure permanent wilderness protection was a necessity, so its preservation would not be subject to whim, political expediency or greed. “Patiently, over eight years and 66 drafts, he forged a document and a consensus so strong that the Wilderness Act remains virtually unchanged today, 37 years after it was passed, 373-1, by the U.S. House of Representatives.” Also present for the dedication of the historical marker was Walt Pomeroy, ’70, executive director of the Pennsylvania Organization for Watersheds and Rivers, headquartered in Harrisburg. The historical marker, located near Tionesta, Pa., is just one of several projects Johnson has initiated to increase awareness of the need for protected wilderness areas in this region of the Allegheny Mountains. Johnson says the Forest Service will revise its management plan for the region over the next couple of years, and he is proposing that a 4,100acre tract of old growth forest be added as wilderness. (Contact Johnson at alleghenyfriends@earthlink.net or www.pawild.org for more information.)

Caroline Sophia on March 15, 2001 to Kellee and John Howey, ’86. She joins big sister Anna, 2. Proud relatives include David, ’93, and Sarah Howey Thewes, ’94. The family resides in Trenton. Jennifer Lee on June 14, 2001 to Luke and Laura Counterman Huelskamp, ’86. Jennifer joins big sister Tess, 6, and big brother Henry, 3. Alumni relatives include aunt Suzanne Counterman Wright, ’85, and uncle David Caffo, ’86. The family lives in Lansing and can be reached by e-mail at: laura.huelskamp@ht.msu.edu. Kenneth Stiles on Dec. 20, 2000 to Griffin Derryberry and Katherine Stiles, ’86. The family lives in Palo Alto, CA. Sophie Jean on March 23, 2001 to Jeffrey and Karolyn Johnson Henry, ’87. She joins big sister Kate. Kary started her own busines services firm and has both corporate and private clients. The family lives in Deerfield, IL, and can be reached by e-mail at: kjhenry@mw.sisna.com. Dylan Tyler on Feb. 13, 2001 to Todd and Lisa Kalember Peverall, ’87. The family resides in Raleigh, NC, and can be reached by e-mail at: lisapeverall@hotmail.com. Benjamin Kyle on March 4, 2001 to Tim and Laurel Doolittle-Vuglar, ’88. Benjamin joins sister Mikaela, 4. The family lives in Island Lake, IL, and can be reached by e-mail at: micky30@attglobal.net. Jack Henry on May 31, 2001 to Susan and Stuart Forsyth, ’88. The family lives in Flushing. Kaylee Lucille on March 27, 2001 to Dennis and Cinthia Larkin Kazee, ’88. She joins big brother Zachary, 3. The family lives in Sacramento, CA, where Cindy and Dennis own and operate a telecommunication contract engineering firm.. Helena Paris on May 2, 2001 to Demetra Aposporos and Mark Abbott, ’89. Helena and her parents are on a yearlong research trip to Russia as well as visiting relatives in Greece. The family lives in Washington, DC. Daniel David on June 16, 2001 to David and Bonnie Harris Bem, ’89. He joins big sister Sarah, 2. Proud aunts and uncles include Eric, ’93, and Roberta Stumpf Harris, ’93, and Keith and Amy Harris Watson, ’90. The Bem family lives in Royal Oak, and would love to hear from classmates at: dbbem@yahoo.com. Griffin Ainsworth on Feb. 27, 2001 to Jeff and Betsy Vance Foster, ’89. He joins brother Spencer, and sister Morgan. The family lives in Arlington, VA. Madeline Grace on Jan. 26, 2001 to Gregory and Marie Hammond Law, ’89. The family lives in Telluride, CO. Karina Wilhelmina on Sept. 3, 2001 to Alexia and Oktavijan Minanov, ’89.

Shutterbugs, take note . . . The Department of Art and Art History is looking for additional 35mm cameras to loan to students in photography classes. Cameras should be in good working condition and must have full capabilities for manual settings (shutter speed and aperture). If you would like to donate a camera for this purpose, please send it to: Department of Art and Art History, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224.

She joins brother Alexander, 3. Oktavijan is a cardiothoracic surgeon, and Alexia is a pediatrician. The family lives in New York City. Pierce Erskine on June 13, 2001 to Christina and Matthew Terry, ’89. Pierce joins his brother Parker, 1. The family lives in Charlotte, NC, and can be reached by e-mail at: matthew.terry@firstunion.com. Benjamin Leibov and Emma Bailey on July 16, 2001 to Lisa and Morris Arvoy, ’90. Moe is director of media relations at Albion College. The family lives in Marshall. Emily Madelyn Marie on April 3, 2001 to James and Donna Potchynok Finn, ’90. She joins brother Nicholas, 5, and sister Sarah, 3. The family lives in Shelby Township. Jessica Lynn on Feb. 26, 2001 to John and Meredith Mitchell Gornto, ’90. She was welcomed by big brother Mitchell and big sister Lauren. The Gorntos live in Tampa, FL, where Meredith is a stay-at-home mom. Meredith can be reached by e-mail at: mer0224@aol.com. Elizabeth Jane on July 9, 2001 to Michael and Kay Courter Behm, ’91. Ellie joins big brother, Jack, 2. The family resides in Flint. Jackson Richard on April 24, 2001 to Robert, ’93, and Kristin Kontz Cooney, ’91. Rob and Kris are both engineers at Ford Motor Co. in Dearborn. The family lives in Canton, and can be reached by e-mail at: rjcooney@peoplepc.com. Alexander Patrick on Feb. 17, 2001 to Patrick and Krista Miller Farris, ’91. Proud godmother is Jennifer Miller Hill, ’89. Krista can be heard reporting the news on WINK FM and AM 1400 WINC. She also teaches a variety of fitness classes. The Farris family lives in Winchester, VA. Derrick Hunter on March 10, 2001 to Ron and Lauri Glass Fetz, ’91. He joins big sister Danielle. Lauri is a project manager with EDS in Troy. The family lives in Shelby Township and can be reached by e-mail at: lr_fetz@hotmail.com.

Payton James on Oct.11, 2000 to Todd and Beverly Lucas Propst, ’91. Beverly is an attorney practicing school law at the law firm of Mickes, Tueth, Keeney, Cooper, Mohan and Jackstadt, PC in Chesterfield, MO. The family lives in O’Fallon, IL. Beverly would like to hear from classmates and can be reached by e-mail at: bevpropst@yahoo.com. Morgan Elizabeth on Jan. 13, 01 to Kyle and Lisa Williams Smith, ’91. The family lives in Wyoming. Lillian Joy on March 21, 2001 to Kenneth and Susan Magnuson Beech, ’92. Her uncle and godfather is Brian Bailey, ’84. The family lives in Cleveland, OH. Caleb Lido, on Aug. 12, 2001 to Aaron Geister and Sheila “Molly” Bucci, ’92. Caleb joins twin siblings Jacob and Natalie. Molly is a general practice attorney with the law firm of McGovern and Bucci, PC in Richmond. The family lives in Macomb Township and can be reached by e-mail at: vucci@massnet1.net. Ryan James on March 22, 2001 to James, ’93, and Nichole Scott Gallagher, ’92. Proud relatives include Jeffrey Scott, ’85, Judson Scott, ’86, Jason Scott, ’89, and Joy Rifenberg Scott, ’90. The family lives in Plymouth. John “Jack” Patrick on April 12, 2001 to Ryan and Claire Skoski Roudebush, ’92. Jack joins big sisters Olivia, 4, Grace, 1, and godmother Jennifer Storr, ’92. The family lives in Indianapolis, IN, and can be reached by e-mail at: claire919@hotmail.com. Elijah Benjamin on April 26, 2001 to Matthew and Caroline Ducharme Engelbert, ’93. Eli joins his twin sisters, Ariel and Zoey, 2. The family lives in Ann Arbor. Elaina Marie on Nov. 21, 2000 to Andrew, ’93, and Amy Watts Karpenko, ’95. Andrew is an otolaryngology resident at the Detroit Medical Center, and Amy is a dentist in Lincoln Park. They would love to hear from friends and can be reached by e-mail at: karpenko@ameritech.net.


I O

T R I U M P H E

19

A L B I O N O T E S

Brianne Louise on July 13, 1999 to Brian and Deanna Tingley Kendall, ’93. Deanna completed her qualifying exams and began her doctoral dissertation in German at Vanderbilt University. The Kendalls have moved to 5140 Joe Bond Trail, Murfreesboro, TN 37129 and can be reached by e-mail at: deanna.l.tingley@vanderbilt.edu. Alexandria Rae on Dec. 7, 2000 to Mark, ’93, and Nicole Swartzmiller Tithof, ’94. The family lives in Northville and can be reached by e-mail at: nrst@aol.com. Cameron Jack on March 14, 2001 to Amy and Robert “Brodie” Burris, ’94. Cameron joins brother Tobin, 5, and sister Maya, 2. Brodie has a private practice in oriental medicine in Ann Arbor, where the family lives. Sarah Louise on June 26, 2001 to Jill and Paul Rhude, ’94. The family lives in Fort Gratiot. Ethan Joseph Gale on Jan. 16, 2001 to Brian, ’95, and Krista Hammerbacher Haapala, ’96. The family lives in Portland, ME. Abigail Ann on Feb. 22, 2001 to Sean and Jennie Ciesielski Mooney, ’95. The family lives in Oxford and can be reached by e-mail at: jmooney24@yahoo.com. Abigail Elizabeth on Feb. 16, 2000 to Heather and Stephen Martin, ’96. Proud relatives include Michael Martin, ’82. The family lives in Temperance. Joseph Preston on Jan. 16, 2001 to Mark, ’97, and Jennifer Iles Wagner, ’97. The Wagner family lives in Ann Arbor. Hannah Noelle on June 15, 2001 to Christopher and Mary Garner Durant, ’98. Mary is the marketing manager for Corporate Business Systems in Columbus, OH. The family lives in Hilliard, OH, and can be reached by e-mail at: cmdurant@cs.com.

Obituaries Alma Howe Bundy, ’22, on June 1, 2001, in St. Joseph. She taught English in Republic for one year and later taught home economics and English at Manistique High School. An active member of the First United Methodist Church of Manistique and the United Methodist Women, she was also a member of the Ida Chapter 54 O.E.S. of Manistique where she held many star points. She is survived by two sons, six grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Hortense Guilford Appleyard, ’30, on July 12, 2001, in Davidson, NC. After graduating from Albion, she received a master’s degree from Western Michigan University. She taught English and French in South Haven and then worked for Van Buren County Social Services until 1974. She was active in the First

Congregational Church and the South Haven Scot Club for many years. She received the Samaritan of the Year award from The Samaritan Counseling Center in 1996. She is survived by two sons, six grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren. Charles Greer, ’34, on March 30, 2001, in Guthrie, KY. A retired plant engineer with B.F. Goodrich Co., and a former Clarksville city councilman, he was also an active member of the Trinity Episcopal Church, past president and lieutenant governor of the Clarksville Civitan Club, past president of the Montgomery County Conservation Club and a member of the Tennessee Conservation League. He was also involved in the Queen City Masonic Lodge #761, the Al Menah Temple of Nashville and the Michigan Chapter of Triangle Engineering. He is survived by one son, one daughter, two grandchildren, four step-grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Gaetana “Tana” Magnotta Reynolds, ’36, on July 1, 2001, in Jackson. A former teacher at Okemos High School and at St. John Catholic School in Albion until the early 1980s, she was also part-owner and operator of the Snack Shop in Albion and had worked at the Albion Beverage Co. and Kroger Co. She also wrote a weekly column for the Journal of Albion. She is survived by six sons, four daughters, 29 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Pauline Miller Fischer Hughes, ’39, on April 23, 2001 in Phoenix, AZ. She is survived by her husband, Wilford, and their family. James Bristah, ’40, on July 6, 2001, in Grosse Pointe. An activist for peace and social justice, he was drafted for military service during World War II and was sent to federal prison for two years for refusing to serve. A graduate of ColgateRochester Divinity School, he served in parish ministry and later was executive secretary of the Board of Christian Social Concerns for the Detroit Conference of the United Methodist Church. He founded the Swords Into Plowshares Peace Center and Gallery in Detroit. He is survived by his wife, Emily, and four daughters. M. Emogene Kaiser Callahan, ’42, on March 12, 2001, in Lansing. She was a member of Delta Gamma sorority. She is survived by a son, Dennis Callahan, ’64, a daughter, two grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. John Cartwright, ’50, on April 26, 2001, in West Bloomfield. During the Korean War, he served in the Air Force from 1950 to 1953. After graduating from the Detroit College of Law in 1956, he worked in the office of the general counsel at Ford for 35 years. An active Republican, he was appointed as chairman of the party’s 19th congressional district and was a frequent delegate to national conventions. He is survived by his wife, Beverly Yates Cartwright, ’52, two sons, a daughter and seven grandchildren.

Donald Griffin, ’54, on June 3, 2001, in Redford Township. A retired Ford Motor Co. engineer, he was involved in the Meals on Wheels program and had a lifelong passion for travel and gardening. Before his 29 years as a designer of manual transmissions for Ford, he worked at Detroit Diesel, Reliance ADT, and Michigan Tool. He also taught engineering classes at Henry Ford Community College. Donald held a master’s in mechanical engineering from Wayne State University. He is survived by his wife, Loys, seven children, 18 grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. William Moss, ’54, on May 8, 2001, in Petoskey. An active ham radio operator and a national weather spotter, he was a long-time member of the Straits Area Radio Club. He was also a member of St. Francis Church, and past member of the Holy Name Society. He is survived by his wife, Enid, two daughters, two sons and nine grandchildren. Graham Foster, ’57, on May 1, 2001, in Naples, FL. After practicing dentistry in Tecumseh from 1966 to 1993, he retired to Bonita Springs, FL. He was also quite active in the community, serving as a member of the Tecumseh Country Club, the Exchange Club, as a Cub Scout leader, and as a member of the First Presbyterian Church. After

graduating from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry in 1960, he had served in the Army Dental Corps for six years, including one year in Korea as a major. He is survived by his wife, Francis, three sons and three grandchildren. Marilyn Crandell Schleg, ’58, on July 18, 2001, in Grand Blanc. She was a member of St. Paul Lutheran Church and Kappa Delta sorority at Albion, where she continued her close ties. She graduated with Phi Beta Kappa honors from Albion and received two master’s degrees. She volunteered for many years with the American Cancer Society and retired from Hurley Medical Center in 1992 as a medical librarian. She is survived by her husband, Edward, two children and two grandchildren. With her family, she created an endowment for the archivist position at the Albion College library. Edgar Lincoln III, ’65, on June 10, 2001, in Chicago. An investment banker, he was also an accomplished pianist. He held an M.B.A. from Wayne State University. He is survived by a son and a daughter. Larry Willis, ’65, on May 31, 2001. He was born in Grass Lake, where he worked as a dairy farmer until completing his master’s in business administration degree at the University

of Michigan in 1970. He began his accounting practice in 1973, and his firm, Willis and Willis, thrived for almost 25 years. He is survived by his wife, Barbara Rice Willis, ’65, a daughter and a son. Karen Kusse Posey, ’67, on June 9, 2001, in Rochester. She ws a member of Alpha Chi Omega sorority. She is survived by her husband, Les, three children and a sister, Patricia Kusse Perry, ’69. Cary “Beaver” Morton, ’68, on June 11, 2001, in Sarasota, FL. After graduating from Albion College, he received a degree from the American Institute of Foreign Trade in Phoenix, AZ. He is survived by three children. David McSwain, III, ’78. He was a resident of Detroit. After attaining his degree from Albion, he pursued a career in photography. He then earned his doctor of osteopathy degree in 1988 from Des Moines University Osteopathic Medical Center. He later became director of the family practice residency at Mount Clemens General Hospital. He was active in many community health organizations. An avid sports enthusiast and member of Delta Sigma Phi fraternity, he loved the theater and created Dr. David’s Traveling Medicine Show. He is survived by his wife, Kayoko, and two daughters.

News for Albionotes Please use the space below to send your news about promotions, honors, appointments, marriages, births, travels and hobbies. When reporting information on deaths, please provide date, location, and Albion-connected survivors and their class years. Use of this form will help guarantee inclusion of your news in an upcoming issue of Io Triumphe. We try to process all class note information promptly, but please note that the Albionotes deadline falls several weeks prior to publication. If your information arrives after the deadline for a given issue, it will be held and included in the succeeding issue. Name __________________________________________________________ Class year _____________________ (Please print name)

Home address _________________________________________________________________________________ City _______________________________________________________ State ___________ ZIP ______________ Home telephone _______________________________ Home e-mail address _______________________________ Business address _______________________________________________________________________________ City ________________________________________________________ State ___________ ZIP _____________ Business telephone ____________________________ Business e-mail address _____________________________ (Or simply attach a copy of your business card.) Check here if this is a new address. Also, if you have a winter address that is different from your permanent address, indicate it in the space below along with the months when you reside at that address.

News notes

Send to: Editor, Io Triumphe, Office of Communications, Albion College, 611 E. Porter St., Albion, MI 49224; or via e-mail to: classnotes@albion.edu. Be sure to include your full name, class year, address (geographic and e-mail) and telephone number in your e-mail message.


16

I O

T R I U M P H E

E B A C D E

Matt Rader, ’88, and his children, Ethan and Abigail.

G F Jean and Tony Taffs. Tony is a professor emeritus of music.

H J I K

Susan Stuewer, ’70, and Laurel Weinman, ’01.

Abbe Lindemood, ’01, and Emily Rostash, ’01.

L


I O

T R I U M P H E

17

M N O

Distinctive

Gifts

from the Albion College Bookstore

ORDER FORM — GIFTS FROM ALBION COLLEGE A 01-200. Youth crewneck sweatshirt by Champion. Gray with purple tackletwill embroidered lettering. S-XL ........................................... $27.98 B 01-201. Adult pique polo shirt by Gear. Butter, navy or black with embroidered “Albion College” in contrasting stitching. S-XL ......... $49.98 C 01-202. Youth hooded sweatshirt by Third Street. Gray with purple and yellow stripe. Zip neck. S-XL .... $29.98 Albion College glass Christmas ornaments. Boxed sets of two ornaments in two different styles. Purple and gold with insignia in contrasting color. D 01-203. Ornaments for “Mom” and “Dad.” ...................................... $9.99/set E 01-204. Ornaments with College seal ........................................... $9.99/set F 01-205. Adult sweater by Whalerknits. 100% cotton with ribbed neck and cuffs. Cream with purple and gold embroidered “Albion College” lettering. S-XL ........................................... $64.98 G 01-206. Adult hooded jacket by Storm Duds. Water-resistant nylon shell with cotton lining. Zip front. Purple with white stripes and lettering. S-XL ........................................... $44.98

H 01-207. Albion College blanket with emblematic shield. 54x84. Gray with purple screen print ...................... $29.98 I 01-208. Adult fleece pullover by Gear. Polyester. Stone or medium gray with embroidered “Albion College” lettering in dark gray. S-XL, ..................... $49.98

Ordered by: Name ______________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________________ State _______ Zip _____________ Daytime Credit Card Phone (_______) ______________________________ Signature ______________________________________

J 01-209. Adult T-shirt by Jansport. Purple or black with white screenprinted lettering on front and sleeve. S-XXL ........................................ $24.98

Please fill in below for charge orders Account No.(all digits please ) from your credit card

K 01-210. Adult Big Cotton sweatshirt by Gear. Gray heather with raised gray, white and purple “Albion College” lettering. S-XXL ........................................ $39.98

Ship to:

L 01-211. Adult sweatshirt by Gear. Gold with purple felt tackle-twill embroidered lettering or purple with gold lettering. S-XXL ................. $54.98

Check one

VISA MASTERCARD American Express Discover Check or money order enclosed Credit Card Expiration Date __________________________

(if other than yourself) Name ______________________________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________________ State _______ Zip _____________

Quantity Item No.

Description (including color)

Size

Unit Price

M 01-212. Albion College lanyard. Purple with gold lettering ............. $4.98 N 01-213. Albion College license plate. Metallic gold with purple lettering ......................................... $4.49 O 01-214. Albion College “Alumni” license plate holder. Metallic silver frame with purple and gold lettering ......................................... $9.98

Merchandise Total

Shipping Charges

6% Sales Tax

$4.99 for one item Add $.99 for each additional item. Questions? Please call 517/629-0305, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Shipping Charge

Total

Allow 2-4 weeks for delivery Items may change slightly due to manufacturer’s updating. Like items will be substituted. Make checks payable to: Albion College Bookstore

Return this order form to: Albion College Bookstore, 4867 Kellogg Center, Albion, MI 49224

Total Price


20 12

I O

T R I U M P H E

T H E

In keeping with the theme of Albion College’s Vision, Liberal Arts at Work, we are offering a series of profiles of Albion students and alumni who exemplify “liberal arts at work” in their daily lives. These profiles will appear in

B A C K

P A G E

Research is quickly becoming a way of life for Albion chemistry and physics major Dan Holland. He spent his first year on campus as a Student Research Partner for chemistry professor Craig Bieler, and then in summer 2000 received a fellowship from the Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity. Those awards became stepping stones for his latest honor: this past summer, he was one of only about 100 students nationwide selected for NASA’s Undergraduate Student Research Program. Holland spent two months at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral,

Florida, studying fireretardant material that may go into the next generation of space shuttles. “It was a great opportunity,” he says, “to have a role in the space program. I even got a ‘front row seat’ for the launch of the space shuttle, Atlantis.” This fall he is pursuing still other research interests at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. “Thanks to these experiences, which have helped me make informed decisions about my future, I am convinced that a career in chemistry research is right for me.”

each issue of Io Triumphe.

Dan Holland, a great example of

LIBERAL ARTS AT WORK

Dates you won’t want to miss Off-campus events

On-campus events

Call the Office of Alumni and Parent Relations at 517/629-0448 for details on these off-campus events.

Through Dec. 2

Nov. 28 “Celebrating Liberal Arts at Work” An Albion Evening in Detroit All Detroit area alumni, parents, and friends are invited to this special program at the Detroit Institute of Arts.

Dec. 18 Chicago Area Alumni Event Cheer on the Britons at their basketball game vs. North Park University, 7:30 p.m. (Central Time)

Dec. 21-22 Elmhurst (Ill.) Holiday Tournament Here’s another opportunity to support our Briton men’s basketball team during their road trip to Illinois.

Art Exhibit: “Traces” Photographs and Sculptural Elements by Gary Wahl Bobbitt Visual Arts Center

Nov. 14-17 Theatre: The Fantasticks 8 p.m., Herrick Center

Nov. 18 Symphony Orchestra Concert 4 p.m., Goodrich Chapel

Nov. 30 Symphony Band and Jazz Band Concert 8 p.m., Goodrich Chapel

Dec. 2 Festival of Lessons and Carols 7 p.m., Goodrich Chapel

Dec. 5 Sing-Along Messiah 7 p.m., Goodrich Chapel

For information on all Briton sports events, visit: www.albion.edu/sports/.

ALBION INSTITUTE

Come back to Albion this spring for a special educational weekend! Program highlights for the next Albion Institute planned for April 18-20, 2002 ■ Take mini-seminars led by current Albion College faculty members ■ Share thoughts over dinner as part of a book discussion group ■ Enjoy the company and fellowship of other Albion alumni and friends If you have been curious about previous Albion Institute sessions, here’s your chance to experience this program based on Albion’s Vision, Liberal Arts at Work. For more information, contact the Office of Alumni and Parent Relations, telephone: 517/629-0448; e-mail: mstarkey@albion.edu.

Io Triumphe! A magazine for alumni and friends of Albion College  

Fall 2001 edition

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you