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Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 1

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Page 2 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Complete Automotive Repair

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The Shell Rock River Watershed District was formed June 25, 2003 by citizen petition. The Shell Rock River Watershed area drains into the Shell Rock River, which flows into the Cedar, Iowa and Mississippi Rivers. The District is 246 square miles all within Freeborn County and it is home to Albert Lea and 5 small towns. The District is blessed with 12 lakes, many are wetlands a few acres in size. There are 4 main lakes: Pickerel (715 acres) Lake Chapeau (175 acres) Goose (82 acres) Fountain Lake (500 acres) Albert Lea Lake (2,600 acres) School Section (69 acres) Halls (57 acres) Sugar (62 acres) Church (29 acres) Eberhardt (20 acres) Upper and Lower Twin (406 acres total) Current water quality monitoring program: 18 stream sites • 9 lake sites • 2 city storm water sites

The Shell Rock River Watershed District purchased “Big AL,” a hydraulic dredge, in 2012. How dredging works: Hydraulic dredging, which uses suction pumps and piping to move dredged material and water from the lake bottom directly to a storage or disposal site, is the best technique for sediment removal. The dredged material is typically disposed of at a permitted solid waste facility or off-site location. It can also be reused as fill, road sub-base, or in land applications.

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4

Table of contents

10 13 17 23 34 36 37 40 42 43 45

Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 3

Vern Eide Chevrolet sheds old look by remodeling its building Lou-Rich installs another laser cutter, but this one slices metal tubes The hard part is over for downtown; merchants are set for a new Broadway The Linders needed a spiral staircase; now making them is business Senior housing providers across the region are upgrading their facilities See photographs of workers from Ulland Bros. doing road construction A woman helps her aunt with a liquor store and ends up buying it Meet the family behind the new Western wear store at Northbridge Mall Being small is no big deal for Diana’s Diner, but customers are The Mills Theater south of the border adds a second screen Service is top priority at Karl’s Carquest on East Main Street Ventura Foods reaps benefits of investing in packaging equipment

Look for columns from: • Albert Lea City Manager Chad Adams • ALEDA Director Ryan Nolander • Local Chamber Director Randy Kehr • State Chamer V.P. William Blazar • DEED Commissioner Katie Clark Sieben • SCORE mentor Dean L. Swanson © 2013 Albert Lea Tribune Media

On the cover: Shanna Eckberg, administrator at Thorne Crest Retirement Community, graciously agreed to appear on our chalkboard cover. Tim Engstrom had the cover concept. Brandi Hagen photographed Eckberg. Kathy Johnson made it happen.


Page 4 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Trent Tenner, left, a foreman from Ice Metric Contracting out of Big Lake works with Eric Zeman on phase one of the building remodeling project at Vern Eide Chevrolet.

Micah Bader

An overhaul for the building

Vern Eide dealer sheds the look from the Flaherty days

By Micah Bader

After operating in Albert Lea for two years, Vern Eide Chevrolet decided it was time to overhaul its entire building. “It will be the nicest facility around when we’re done with it,” Vern Eide general sales manager Paul Schuster said. “It’s going to be awesome.”

The car dealership decided to embark on a two-phase remodeling project. Phase one is upgrading the exterior facia. Phase two is remodeling the interior. The auto dealership is at 2527 Bridge Ave. In fall 2011, Sioux Falls, S.D.-based Vern Eide Motorcars bought Flaherty Auto & Truck Center. Denis Flaherty owned the business since 1998 and still owns Flaherty Hi-

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507-377-1659–Office • 507-377-1650–Fax 507-373-4665–Home

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Tech Motorwerks at 2501 Hi Tec Ave. Schuster said phase one is happening right now. It includes new exterior panels, along with a blue line across the top of the building and a new blue awning over the front entrance to add color. As part of phase two the service area will be expanded with three new areas for customers to pull in for no-appointment oil changes.

Things

You

“Customers will be able to drive right into the building, get out with climate control and walk into the customer lounge,” Schuster said. The existing sales offices will be moved to the building’s upper level to make additional room for the customer lounge, which Schuster said is his favorite part of the project. The

Enjoy your home away from home

Didn’t Know

You Wanted

Fall issue now available

Continued on Page 9


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 5

Economic development in A.L. relies on independence

The Albert Lea Economic Development Ryan Agency consists of two Nolander separate agencies, the Albert Lea Port AuthoriDevelopment ty and Greater Jobs Inc. View The port is a political subdivision of the state of Minnesota and was created in 1987. Greater Jobs Inc is a private not-for-profit development corporation created in 1943 as Jobs Inc. Working together as ALEDA, our mission is to create jobs and enhance the tax base of the city of Albert Lea and all of Freeborn County. Greater Jobs Inc. started as a pilot project of the National Chamber of Commerce in 1943. It was a response to the economic problems that might occur when the war ended because there was a fear of increased unemployment nationwide. Jobs Inc. was part of a community effort outlined in the Albert Lea Plan (written in 1944) to meet goals of job retention and economic development. Jobs Inc. continued using the Albert Lea Plan as its model with success for years. In 1975, Jobs Inc. directors formed a new corporation that was called the Albert Lea Industrial Development Corporation. Due to the similarity of both organizations, the board of directors of Jobs Inc. and the ALIDC chose to restructure both entities, the name of the new corporation would later be called Greater Jobs Inc. In 1987, the Albert Lea Port Authority was established. Greater Jobs Inc. was able to team with the newly created Albert Lea Port Authority to construct spec buildings. Throughout their history, the Port Authority and Greater Jobs Inc. have built numerous industrial spec buildings which continue to draw new and relocating business and industry to Albert Lea and Freeborn County today. In September 2003, a decision was made by board members to combine the various local economic development entities under one organization in order to function in a more seamless manner, and to utilize the strengths of each organization. At that time, the Albert Lea Economic Development Agency was created. ALEDA is self-funded, relying on income from rentals, sales, investments and memberships. ALEDA does not rely on the city or county for funding nor use its taxing authority to meet obligations. This is a unique model

compared to other cities and counties. Not only does ALEDA not levy a tax but it pays property taxes. ALEDA will pay more than $200,000 in property taxes in 2014 and is projected to pay more than $250,000 in 2015. The separation of ALEDA and the city allows ALEDA to take on significant development activity on behalf of the city and county without requiring the city or county to be liable for those development activities. For example, the new ALEDA Industrial Park was paid for in cash and is not a burden on the taxpayer. The ALEDA board consists of seven members. Two members are Albert Lea City Council members and a third member is a former councilor. The Albert Lea city manager and the county administrator are ex-officio members. When ALEDA was created in 2003, it was decided the board would set policy, advise staff and review projects based on the merits and long-term benefits to the community. Since its establishment in 2003, ALEDA has experienced continuous growth. As of June 2013, ALEDA has $17 million in assets primarily in commercial buildings and developable land. This is an increase of over $6 million since 2003. ALEDA owns buildings with a total of 258,000 square feet; approximately 93 percent of that space is leased, including the most recently built 62,500-square-foot spec building in the ALEDA park. In recent years, ALEDA has assisted more than two dozen businesses with loans to expand, change ownership or start a new business. ALEDA has also helped to process city loans for existing businesses, and has been involved in four tax-increment-financing projects, adding jobs and tax revenue for the county. Today ALEDA serves as the mechanism where the county, city and the private sector work together for economic development in Albert Lea and Freeborn County with the mission “To provide and promote services and resources to retain, expand, create and attract businesses, increase tax base and create quality employment opportunities in Freeborn County.” Ryan Nolander is the executive director of the Albert Lea Economic Development Agency.

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Page 6 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Exquisite Food & Fine Wines A first class dining establishment that reflects the influence of classic French & Italian cuisine, and current California trends. We offer a diverse selection of over 100 imported & domestic wines. Full Cocktail Service also available.

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Hats - Jackets Sweats - Denims Mittens - Blankets Business Logos

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Create, Educate, Promote & Showcase the Arts 224 South Broadway Ave., PO Box 313 • Albert Lea, MN 56007 507-373-5665 alartcenter@gmail.com • www.thealbertleaartcenter.org

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507-379-3421


Freeborn County by the numbers

Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 7

2010 census: 31,255 Change from 2000: down 4.1 percent Median age: 44.2 Races: White, not Hispanic/Latino: 84.3 percent Hispanic/Latino: 8.8 percent Black: 0.7 percent American Indian: 0.2 percent Asian: 0.8 percent Pacific Islander: 0.1 percent Other race: 3.4 percent Two or more races: 1.7 percent Households: 13,177 Housing units: 14,231 Owner-occupied housing units: 10,089 Renter-occupied housing units: 3,088 Family households: 8,555 with children: 3,249 Husband-wife family: 6,833 with children: 2,187 Male household, no wife: 605 with children: 322 Female household, no husband: 1,117 with children: 740 Non-family households: 4,622 Living alone: 3,961 Households with children: 3,542 Households with people 65 years and older: 4,278 Average household size: 2.32 Average family size: 2.85 Median household income (2000): $36,964 Median family income (2000): $45,142 Per capita income (2000): $18,325 Population below poverty line (2000): 8.4 percent Square miles: 722.63 Founded: Feb. 20, 1855 Named for: William Freeborn, a territorial legislator from Red Wing who later resided in Montana and then California. County seat: Albert Lea Courthouse address: 411 S. Broadway Ave., Albert Lea Courthouse phone: 507-377-5116 Railroads: Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern (Canadian Pacific), Union Pacific Highways: Interstate 90, Interstate 35, U.S. Highway 65, U.S. Highway 69, Minnesota Highway 13, Minnesota Highway 251, Minnesota Highway 109 2012 census estimate: 31,054

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Page 8 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

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Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 9

Micah Bader

Paul Schuster, the general manager at Vern Eide Chevrolet, stands in front of the building during phase one of a remodeling project. Trent Tenner, left, and Eric Zeman of Ice Metric Contracting out of Big Lake work to install the buiding’s new facia in the background.

Continued from Page 4 new lounge will include a coffee bar, a two-sided fireplace and a children’s play area. “It’s going to give that nice homey feel when you come in here,” Schuster said. The children’s play area will have a glass divider so parents can supervise their children. Items in the

children’s play area will be determined at a later date, but they could include Legos and a TV set, Schuster said. Vern Eide has hired several companies to work on the project. Ice Metric Contracting form Big Lake was brought in to work on building’s facia. However, Vern Eide also hired Mike Thompson of Thompson Electric, a company from Albert Lea, to

Trent Tenner, right, a foreman from Ice Metric Contracting out of Big Lake holds an exterior building panel while Eric Zeman uses a level during phase one of the remodeling project at Vern Eide Chevrolet.

work on the building’s interior. The exterior of the building is scheduled to be completed this fall, Schuster said. The interior is planned to be finished this winter. “Our timetable is always a moving target,” he said. Schuster declined to mention the cost of the project. Schuster has been the dealership’s general manager since it was bought

from Flaherty Auto & Truck Center in November of 2011. He has worked for Vern Eide for 10 years. Vern Eide has been family owned for 47 years. It has other locations in Sioux Falls and Mitchell, S.D. The dealership offers new Chevrolet vehicles along with a variety of used vehicles, which can include domestic and foreign manufacturers.

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Page 10 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

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The new tube laser machine will help Lou-Rich create products themselves instead of paying outside suppliers to cut tubing.

373-6161

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Laser precision Lou-Rich installs machine that cuts tubes

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Lou-Rich had been spending about $500,000 each year to buy laser-cut tubes for various projects. Then they thought they should see if a tube laser machine would be a good investment, and they were right. The new six-axis tube laser machine cost about $400,000 to set up, which means the return on investment will be swift for the manufacturing company. Manufacturing Engineer Van Schultz said this is the fifth laser cutting machine the company has bought, but it’s the first that can cut metal tubing. “The other four are flat sheet lasers,” Schultz said. The new machine, which is about 75 feet long, was installed at the factory earlier in September. Schultz said three technicians got special training for the machine’s software in Chicago before practicing on the machine. The machine should be up and running around Oct. 1. Those three techs are Dustin Sche-

By the numbers • 4,000 watt power supply • 3/4 of an inch to 6 inch diameters are the tube size capability of the new laser • 26 feet long is the longest length of tube the laser can handle • $400,000 is the approximate cost of installing the tube laser machine • 75 feet is the approximate length of the machine

wring, a five-year employee, Kyle Anderson, a one-year employee, and Trent Lunning, a 15-year employee of Lou-Rich. Schultz said they know that one full shift will use the machine, and they hope to have another shift working the machine by the end of the year. Laser cut tubing technology has been around for about 10 years, Schultz said. And a lot of the companies that ask Lou-Rich to manufacture items utilize tubing in their design. Before, either Lou-Rich would pay an outside supplier to cut


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 11

We keep it local...

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Shown is just half of the new tube laser machine at Lou-Rich. The whole machine is about 75 feet long to accommodate large lengths of steel, stainless steel and aluminum.

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From left, Kyle Anderson, Dustin Schewring and Trent Lunning, train on the new tube laser machine at Lou-Rich.

tubing or Lou-Rich employees would use a bandsaw to cut slots and holes into metal tubing, then have other employees weld it. “This machine does all that, and then it’s done,” Schultz said. Schultz has been at Lou-Rich since 2006. He hails from central Illinois, and first came to Albert Lea to work at Progress Casting which has since closed. As manufacturing engineer he has helped install big projects like this tube laser machine and the state-of-the-art paint line. He and other engineers look at the factory floor to decide where to place new machines, go through the bid process, and manage any construction or installation. His favorite part of working there? “I think it’s new processes, learning those processes,” Schultz said.

Change is always happening at Lou-Rich, but Schultz said he finds that exciting. The industry is changing fast with the advent of new technology. Schultz said the traditional way of the past was to have an employee at a machine that would make one simple part. Now, technicians have to know more about computers and software because machines do so much more. “We have to have more skilled people,” Schultz said. “Equipment is getting more and more complex.” Schultz said with this new machine the company will be prepared for all kinds of customer orders, but sometime in the future the company will probably look at updating some of the flat sheet lasers. Newer lasers use fiber optics instead of mirrors to transfer the laser beam.

To learn more about our Assisted Living options and to schedule a personal tour, Call (507) 373-5600.

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Page 12 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Suspensions, Bed Liners, Programmers, 1000+ Accessory Brands Custom Wheels & Tires featuring

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Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 13

Construction crews work in early September at the corner of Broadway and William Street in Albert Lea.

Sarah Stultz

They are ready to reopen

After a lost summer, downtown Albert Lea is set to shine

By Sarah Stultz

Albert Lea business owners on Broadway have seen mixed impacts from the reconstruction of the street and sidewalk this summer. While some businesses have continued to see a steady flow of customers coming through their doors during the more than $4 million construction, others said they have seen a significant decrease. “The worst was during the time

when our block was torn up,” said Steve Andersen, co-owner of the 112 on Broadway. Andersen said he fixed up his rear entrance and tried to advertise more, but to no avail. “When you have construction signs up and you have sidewalks that are part there and part not, you have an obstacle some people are not willing to do.” His block, on Broadway from William Street to Clark Street, opened at the end of August, and he said he’s

already seen a difference in business. “In the first couple days of this week, we’re up over 50 percent of the last couple weeks,” he said the first week in September. Kathy Sabinish, co-owner of FramesR-Us, said she has seen a drop in people just stopping in to browse in her store but people have still been calling ahead and stopping in with projects or pictures they need framed. She said business has been better than she anticipated it would be during the construction.

“I’m surprised at how many people will walk,” Sabinish said. “They will go the extra block. They’re not bashful.” She has been utilizing her back alley to drop off projects to customers. Laurie Boyer, owner of New to You consignment on North Broadway, said though she was concerned at first about the effect the construction would have on her business, sales kept up. Many customers used her back entrance to enter the building. Continued on Page 14


Page 14 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

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Downtown Albert Lea was pretty quiet in early September on Broadway from William Street to Main Street during construction.

Continued from Page 13 Gareth Hataye, optometrist at InnoVision Eyecare, said he has not seen a major decline in customers. He said though he does not see as many people walking past the building, most of his business is done by appointments. “In that part it’s good because

we’re not depending on the traffic,” Hataye said. Despite the impact on each of the business owners, all agreed they would be happy when the construction is complete. Andersen said he is glad the project has taken place. “In the long run, absolutely no question, it’s the right thing,” he said.

We offer a complete line of Hardware, Power & Hand Tools

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Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 15

A blackhoe sits in front of Stadheim Jewelers in early September in downtown Albert Lea.

Celebration is scheduled for Oct. 12 A celebration is in the works in downtown Albert Lea as the reconstruction on Broadway comes to a close. Slated for Oct. 12, Celebrate Albert Lea will kick off in the morning with The Color Dash 5k starting on North Broadway. The event is still in the planning stages but is expected to begin at 10 a.m., said Susie Petersen, executive director of the Albert Lea Convention and Visitors Bureau. A group called Youth 1st, which advocates for values-based activities for youth, is organizing the event, with half of the proceeds to benefit the high school weight room and the other half to go toward starting a Youth 1st chapter in Albert Lea. The dash is expected to begin and end in the northernmost block of Broadway Avenue near Fountain Street, will go west on Fountain Street to Lakeview Boulevard and continue around Fountain Lake. At one point, participants will turn around and head back toward Broadway. Petersen said organizers are hop-

ing to get 500 people to participate. Mark Arjes, founder of Youth 1st, said runners and walkers are invited to attend. To register, go online to www.thecolordash5k.com and scroll down to see a list of upcoming locations. In addition to The Color Dash, Petersen said the Downtown Association may have sidewalk sales, the American Legion may host a flea market, Prairie Wind Coffee may sponsor swing dancing and the Albert Lea Art Center is expected to have an art sale, flea market and face painting. There may be other activities as well, along with food from downtown businesses for sale. A street dance is slated for 7 p.m. with a country-rock group. “What we’re hoping is just to celebrate the new streetscape,” Petersen said. “And to have the businesses enjoy people downtown. They have gone through a lot.” She said all of the main street and sidewalk work will be completed, and the trees and planters are also expected to be in place. The streetlights will not yet be installed.

Sarah Stultz

SERVING FREEBORN COUNTY

County Administrator........................................................................................ 377-5116 County Attorney............................................................................................... 377-5192 County Sheriff...................................................................................................377-5205 County Recorder................................................................................................377-5130 Auditor............................................................................................................... 377-5121 Treasurer’s Office............................................................................................... 377-5117 Public Health.................................................................................................... 377-5100 Highway Engineer............................................................................................. 377-5188 Veterans Service Office..................................................................................... 377-5184 County Assessor................................................................................................377-5176 Environmental Services.................................................................................... 377-5186 Court Services...................................................................................................377-5137 Human Services............................................................................................... 377-5400 Vehicle & Driver’s License Center..................................................................... 377-5126 Burn/Building/Feedlot Permits......................................................................... 377-5186 Marriage, Birth & Death Certificates.................................................................377-5130 Passports...........................................................................................................377-5130 WIC...................................................................................................................377-5289 University of MN Extension Service................................................................. 377-5660 County Fair Office.............................................................................................373-6965 Freeborn Cty Museum and Historical Village...................................................373-8003 Ditch Inspector................................................................................................ 256-4256 Victim’s Crisis Center....................................................................................... 377-5460

24 hr Crisis Hotline.......................................................................................... 373-2223 Building Manager.............................................................................................. 377-5114

www.co.freeborn.mn.us freeborn county government center 411 s broadway • 377-5116 police-fire-medical-sheriff-state patrol emergency: 911


Page 16 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

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City infrastructure is going through upgrades

There are many ways that cities can improve economic development. Chad One specific example is Adams working with or utilizCity ing a local economic View development authority, port authority or local development organization. The city of Albert Lea has the good fortune to work with the Albert Lea Economic Development Agency, which encompasses the Albert Lea Port Authority and Greater Jobs Inc. While we will continue to partner with ALEDA to grow jobs in Albert Lea, cities also have tools and methods to strengthen the local economy. One particular example is improving and maintaining infrastructure. In the past few years, we have made significant improvements to roads that serve the ALEDA Industrial Park, completed the new and longer airport runway that also includes a more serviceable taxiway, and are near completion with the Broadway reconstruction and streetscape project. Work is also underway or will begin soon on Bridge Avenue to improve access and traffic control to the new Kwik Trip and to align Plaza Street to Bridge Avenue as a more safe and accessible intersection to serve our local business and industry. While it took several months to complete the Kwik Trip site plan and transportation plan, the city took the opportunity to negotiate an agreement that would both provide safe access to the area, and limit taxpayer expense for the project. The Kwik Trip store will be a great use for that site and will create jobs and tax base for the community. We negotiated the construction of a traffic signal at the Sykes and Bridge Avenue intersection without any city taxpayer dollars being used. The value of the new traffic signal is about $300,000 that the developer is solely contributing to complete this fall. Clear, flexible and diverse zoning along with enforcement of land use regulations serve as another example to attract and maintain quality tax base in the community. In response to the National Citizen Survey, completed in spring 2012, the city recognized that we needed to be more active with economic development, attracting quality development

and tax base and to enforce our nuisance ordinances. Details of the National Citizen Survey are available on the city’s website at www. cityofalbertlea.org and guided the city to create a two-year work plan and goals to improve these services. The downtown has been identified as a high priority by the Albert Lea City Council the past few years to revitalize and establish as a destination place. The city replaced aging sewer and water infrastructure that was over 80 years old and is installing amenities to attract more business and activity. Some of those amenities include pedestrian-friendly intersections, plaza areas for community events and improvements to Fountain Lake Park, with stairwells serving as seating for performances in the park. The park improvements will create a larger boat dock to provide better access for residents to frequent downtown businesses, restaurants and events at the Marion Ross Performing Arts Center. In addition to the infrastructure and streetscape improvements on Broadway, the city continues to work on attracting a developer to occupy the Freeborn Bank and Jacobson buildings. Engaging the public in more community project decision making was also a direct objective resulting from the National Citizen Survey. The city solicited public engagement in both the Broadway project and more recently in the Freeborn Bank building project. As it relates to zoning and land use, we are presently working on enhancing the Interstate Development District zoning ordinance to make it more clear and flexible to attract jobs and tax base and are creating a zoning designation called the Diversified Central District that will provide more flexibility and allow more density to be built around the perimeter of the downtown. The city believes that providing more flexible and diverse options in land use, such as mixed uses and construction of market rate rental housing will lead to a stronger and sustainable local economy. Chad Adams is the city manager for Albert Lea.


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 17

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John Linder, left, watches his sons and an employee go over plans. His sons are Jared, center, and Jody, right.

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By Julie Seedorf WELLS — John Linder, a Wells area farmer, never expected that his quest for a spiral staircase for his new house 25 years ago would lead to a new business adventure for his family. When Linder was building his new home, he could not find a free-standing spiral staircase, so he decided to build one. When people showed interest in his staircase, Linder and his family created some brochures and sent them out but did not get much response. A few years later the Linders decided to build a prototype staircase that was adjustable to various heights and radiuses. Once that was complete, pictures were taken and with the help of his sons, additional Continued on Page 19

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Page 18 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

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Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 19

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Shown are examples of spiral staircases that Linder Enterprises has built around the country.

Continued from Page 17 brochures were made with some with computer modeling. Again, brochures were sent out to various architects and builders, and they began to start picking up some jobs. One of the first large ones was for the University of Minnesota, Duluth. In the 25 years since Linder Enterprises was started in their barn in rural Wells, it has expanded to a shop in Wells, then moved, because they need more space, to its present location at 3200 Third Avenue in Mankato. Not only do the Linders create custom spiral staircases, they also create custom entrance gates, art sculptures and other specialty items. Linder Enterprises’ customer base reaches from New York to the West Coast. They have built staircases for Disney, Universal and TNT Movie

Industry, along with private customers. They average 25 to 35 jobs a year depending on the complexity of the job. Linder and his sons, Jody and Jared, who are co-owners, employ approximately 20 employees. They use steel, brass, copper and glass in their productions. Being raised on a farm, and working on that farm, the Linder boys never thought about the creativity that might become a part of their lives in their later years. The artistry seen in their work is a shared collaboration between the architect and them. The Linders use their imagination in the design but make sure it is functional but artistic. Occasionally they like to go crazy to see what they can create. According to the Linder family, one of their most interesting projects was the spiral staircase that they

built for the Big Well Museum in Greensburg, Kan. It is the world’s largest hand-dug well. The staircase extends six stories down and two stories up. Continued on Page 52

One of the most challenging jobs was for the University of Maryland because, according to Jody and Jared, “It is never ending.” The project has a lot of complexity, and it has been a learning experience. “No more finished paint,” stated Jody and Jared simultaneously. It takes approximately two weeks to many months to complete a project depending on its complexity. It is then shipped in one piece by semi to the job site. The challenge at times has been to get it into a building.

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Page 20 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Respecting the past...

• 40 Independent living apartments • 32 Assisted living apartments • 84 Skilled beds

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Freeborn County labor market by the numbers

Description Period Data Population 2011 31,172 2011 -83 Population Working age (18-64) 2001-2011 average 58.1% Population over 24 with diploma 2007-2011 average 87.3% Pop. speaks English less than 2.3% a21 “very well” 2007-2011 average Labor force December 2012 16,482 Per capita income 2007-2011 average $24,409 2011 12,290 Annual average employment 2nd Q 2012 12,308 Quarter average employment Employment change 2nd Q 2012 -204 from prior year Mean travel time to work 2007-2011 average 18 min. Unemployed December 2012 920 December 2012 5.6% Unemployment rate Pop. below poverty 2007-2011 average 11% Initial claims for December 2012 194 unemployment insurance Initial claims change December 2012 -14% from prior year Average weekly wage 2011 $643 Source: Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development

Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 21

County rank 35 35 55 69 35 53 34 34 61 50 44 35

Business establishments Dodge County: 421 Freeborn County: 817 Faribault County: 453 Mower County: 859 Steele County: 1,001 Waseca County: 501 Winnebago County: 320 Worth County: 171 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 data Note: Establishments means a single physical location with paid employees at which business is conducted or industry performed and does not include government.

Freeborn County establishments by employees 1-4 404 5-9 185 10-19 121 20-49 68 50-99 24 100-249 10 250-499 3 500-999 2 1,000 and up 0 Total 817

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Page 22 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

*literacypartners.org

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The Albert Lea Tribune proudly supports the Newspapers In Education (NIE) program which supplies area schools with free newspapers to encourage literacy, broaden student community awareness and equip educators with a powerful tool for teaching. The Albert Lea Tribune is committed to covering half the cost of this program. We depend on community-minded businesses, organizations and subscribers for the remainder. The economic health and development of our community and your business depends on quality education for our students. They are tomorrow’s consumers, employers and leaders.


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 23

This rendering is a preview of what the entrance of the Fountain Lake facility of St. John’s Lutheran Home will look like when completed. Work is set to begin this fall or next spring.

It’s the new style

Senior housing goes through changes as boomers get older By Tim Engstrom The field of senior housing in the country has changed over the last 30 years, from being one-size-fits-all nursing homes to apartments and condominiums described as assisted living and independent living. But for all the changes, nothing is like what’s to come as the baby boomers retire. Albert Lea’s senior living providers are gearing up for the wave. Thorne Crest Retirement Community plans to build a new wellness center and parking garage, in addition to remodeling hallways and its lobby. St. John’s Lutheran Home plans to build a second campus overlooking Fountain Lake, which will include what it calls a “town center.” Prairie Senior Cottages, based in Minnetonka, is entering the Albert Lea market by building a new facility. Good Samaritan Society has installed sensors. Oak Park Place offers flexi-

Special Report ble floor plans. Scot Spates, administrator of St. John’s Lutheran Home, said the change in the industry is noticeable. In 1995, Minnesota had 45,700 licensed nursing home beds, according to the Department of Health. In 2009, there were 33,100. The department also tracks buildings for providers of senior housing with services, and it says there were 186 such buildings in 1996. There were 1,450 in 2009. Spates said that in the old days people spent their last weeks and months at the nursing homes. It was a place of long-term care before they died. Now, the mission is to get people out of the nursing home. He said 52 percent of residents at St. John’s are discharged back to their home. “That’s a huge shift,” he said. Continued on Page 24

The interior of the indoor park of St. John’s Fountain Lake facility overlooks the lake and is in the “town center” of the facility.


Page 24 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Continued from Page 23

That home might be a house, but often it is an apartment geared for seniors, sometimes elsewhere on the St. John’s campus, such as the Knutson Place apartments. When many nursing homes were built 55 to 60 years ago, many rooms were designed for double occupancy, with four people sharing bathrooms. “People have pretty much said, ‘That’s not what we want,’” Spates said. “People need some privacy.” It was one major reason that assisted living facilities were so successful, he said. They were designed to provide more dignity to living, with care services available if and when the residents needed it. “Now people didn’t have to live with a roommate. For example, they could stay up and watch Jay Leno if they wanted to,” he said. The baby boomers are beginning to retire. The front end is age 67. In about 10 years, this large demographic will begin to enter the retirement communities and have increased needs for health care. Minnesota and the rest of the country “is not at all prepared to deal with this,” Spates said.

The view of St. John’s Fountain Lake facility as seen from Edgewater Park. The senior housing is to be on land that formerly had been the back nine holes of the Albert Lea Country Club.

In some ways, though, many places are changing to what they believe boomers want. A big one, Spates said, is wellness. Exercise rooms and fitness instructors are being added to senior living facilities in addition to

health care that gets people back on their feet. “People want to live in their homes as long as they possibly can,” he said. Thorne Crest hired a wellness director in 2010. Weston Hulst was the

first of his kind in Albert Lea and remains the only one among the senior housing services in the region. Three in four adults 60 or older engage in physical activity at least once a week to maintain their health,

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according to research firm Penn Schoen Berland. “The future consumer is going to know a lot more about aging well,” the firm states in its survey “The United States of Aging.” Karen Anderson is the sales and marketing director for Thorne Crest, and she said the expansion plans include a wellness center. Presently, the wellness director uses a room on the second floor. “The seniors of tomorrow are a lot more health-conscious,” Anderson said. In the 1970s, seniors sought housing after retirement, while now they want to stay in their homes as long as possible, Anderson said. Once they sell their house, then they want places that appeal to their needs as they age. Senior housing these days aims to target younger boomers preparing for retirement, said Thorne Crest Administrator Shanna Eckberg, and then accommodate them when they move out of their homes and their needs change. Some need just prepared meals. Some need full assisted living. “Wellness is at the core of our strategies,” she said.

Thorne Crest A building on their campus at Hawthorne Street and Garfield Avenue that Eckberg and Anderson call “convent” or some know as the “Cresthome” was slated to be torn down this month. It is where American Baptist Homes of the Midwest, the nonprofit owner of Thorne Crest, plans to build the wellness center. The garages will be torn down, too, and turned into an attached, heated, covered parking garage with room for 61 cars. Starting in November or early December, renovations are set to begin

311 West Main • Albert Lea, MN 507-373-1000

Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 25

on the entire campus, giving entrances, rooms and common areas a remodel or replacement. Talk about the changes began in 2009, Eckberg said. A remodeling of the wing that aligns Garfield Avenue took place in 2010. American Baptist Homes of the Midwest in 1974 added two stories onto a vacant building that once had been a Catholic school and turned it into what was called a continuing care facility, a place with senior housing where residents can transition into nursing home care. Eckberg said the concept was new during a time when nursing homes prevailed and said it is an example of how American Baptist Homes aims to stay ahead of the trends in the industry. Today, Thorne Crest is licensed for 52 beds of nursing home care. The place has 81 apartments for senior living and 55 for independent living. It also offers home health care. After the remodeling, the nursing home will continue with the same numbers. Otherwise, Thorne Crest will offer 86 apartments, of which 28 will be assisted living and the rest independent living.

Continued on Page 26

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Page 26 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Continued from Page 25

Thorne Crest sits on 5 acres and doesn’t have the land that St. John’s and Good Samaritan Society have. On the other hand, they do offer the advance of being in the community and connected to a neighbor. “People like to have neighbors,” Anderson said. The new Thorne Crest is slated to have a bistro, a greenhouse with a patio, a theater that doubles as a chapel, a pool, a hot tub, locker rooms, an outside garden for walking, a car wash, that heated garage and a man cave. The man cave is a place to play pool, watch sports on TV, do woodworking projects, things like that. Additional parking will get the employees’ cars off the street. “We are just making it better for people living here now and in the future,” Eckberg said.

St. John’s The board of directors for St. John’s considered what they wanted to provide 10 years from now when shaping the plans for the Fountain Lake project, Spates said. They wanted it to be more like home. They wanted staff to be in close proximity to patients. They wanted it to not seem institutional. For instance, instead of big cafeterias, it will have cozy dining rooms. “Instead of 80 in a room, they will have 14 people,” Spates said. The design phase is complete, and he said work could start this fall, but it could be postponed until spring. He said 41 people have signed up on a waiting list. He said of those, 35 are interested in the independent living, which will look out over Edgewater Park and Fountain Lake. He also has field interest in owner-occupied duplexes on the campus but not part of the main facility. Factoring that about a third to a half of seniors are married and the rest live alone, from 156 to 175 people would reside at the Fountain Lake facility when full. The new facility has a wing for nursing home residents. There will be three stories with 28 rooms on a floor. The first floor is dedicated to short stays. Another wing is for assisted living or at least housing with services. It features two floors with 16 rooms to a floor. The wing for independent living will have two stories with 20 apartments on each floor. It will have

This rendering shows what the entryway to “town center” of the Fountain Lake facility that St. John’s Lutheran Home intends to build. Work is slated to begin either this fall or early spring. The new campus will abut Edgewater Park on land that once was the back nine of the Albert Lea Country Club golf course.

underground parking. All three wings are connected by what St. John’s calls the “town center.” It features a therapy area that includes a wellness center with equipment for people 55 and older. Membership is automatic for residents but might be open to the public, too, Spates said. The town center plans call for a large group gathering space, miniature golf, a porch, a coffee shop facing Fountain Lake, a cafe, a store, a library and, possibly, a lounge with a pool table, card tables and TV sets. A family room will serve for birthday celebrations and other occasions. Many of the offices and support service rooms are to be in the town center, and so will the kitchen that serves the dining area for the independent living building. Spates said the entire facility will be served by underground corridors and separate elevators. Gone will be the days of seeing laundry and garbage containers rolling through the same hallways as residents. Dining

carts will go up separate elevators from residents. Often, preparation on meals will begin in one kitchen, but finish in one closer to the rooms so that the aroma of food lingers through the halls and rooms. He said the town center aims to serve physical, spiritual, intellectual and social needs. St. John’s is licensed for 170 beds in its main nursing home area. It then offers 48 senior apartments at Knutson Place, and it has 19 condominiums at Luther Place. Residents at Knutson and Luther can get care when they need it, and send it away when they don’t. However, it’s not assisted living as the state defines it: primarily three meals a day, bathing assistance and medications assistance. People would come to St. John’s asking for assisted living, but it doesn’t offer it. Spates said some insurance policies will cover assisted living, even if it might be more than what the senior needs. “We are missing out on a whole group of people,” he said.

Starting out, the Fountain Lake facility will have 76 beds for nursing home, each with private bathrooms, rather than shared. Eventually, the plan is to gut the second floor of the Highway 13 facility and remodel it as housing for seniors with a limited income.

Good Samaritan Society Bancroft Creek Estates is one of two senior living facilities on the campus of Good Samaritan Society of Albert Lea. The facility was upgraded in January with new furnishings, art, flooring and window treatments. The kitchen was remodeled and new exercise equipment is planned, said Administrator Katie Davis. One way Good Samaritan Society is preparing for the needs of new retirees is by offering what it calls Senior Living College, an opportunity for seniors to learn from college-level professors. Some examples of courses are “World Religious Traditions,” “Painting Bold Beautiful Plans and Amazing Floral” and “Those Dirty Rats: Organized Crime


in America.” The senior interact with instructors over the World Wide Web and email. Good Sam has new sensors, Davis said, that assist nurses in identifying changes in routines and behavior that can identify a health risk. This can be sleep quality, activity levels and even bathroom visits. “Identifying problems in these areas can significantly improve health-related outcomes,” Davis said. Good Samaritan Society is licensed for 108 nursing home beds, and it offers 24 assisted living apartments and 44 housing-with-services apartments.

Oak Park Place Many baby boomers are making decisions for their parents, said Jasmine Rogness, regional marketing director for Oak Park Place. Ultimately, the parents decide, but the boomers are influencers. “Sometimes the children have a desire for fancier things, even if the parent desires less,” she said. These decisions, Rognes said, are going to influence where boomers choose to live when they leave their homes. The Oak Park Place community in Albert Lea offers 16 memory care rooms and 48 assisted living. The activities lineup includes a walking club, yoga, pilates and a Wii video game league. Wii Bowling is popular. “It’s about wellness, keeping people active, engaged and happy,” Rognes said. She said many boomers are looking for an atmosphere not too different from home, and because Oak Park Place is just 10 years old, it is flexible in its floor plans. Part of the design when it was built was to have a home-like feel, not institutional or overly large. Village Cooperative Built in 2006, this 50-unit complex on the east side of Albert Lea was the first senior housing in town to offer wireless Internet. Joan Anderson, resident manager, said Village Cooperative offers independent living and doesn’t have a nursing or activities staff. It is for seniors who don’t want to manage a house anymore. Still, the residents band together with committees to hold activities, such as Bone Builders, an exercise class with certified instructors. The wireless Internet was hardly used when the complex opened, but now, Anderson said, it is popular, especially for following grandchildren on Facebook. Prairie Senior Cottages This 18-unit facility at the west end of Fountain Street has room for 20 people. It opened at the beginning of September and specializes in memory care. Julie Wood-Lobb, director of Prairie Senior Cottages in Albert Lea, said she has worked in large senior-housing facilities and said some design might appeal to boomers seeking a place for parents but most of what they offer is geared toward caring for victims of Alzheimer’s disease and other memory loss conditions.

Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 27

Tim Engstrom

Thorne Crest remodeled one section of its senior housing facility three years ago. Upcoming work, slated to begin this fall, will bring the entire place to look much like this example apartment.

“No one self-refers to memory care. It’s only going to be chosen for them,” Wood-Lobb said. One side of Prairie Senior Cottages seems like a lakehouse and the other seems like a farmhouse. They aim to seem familiar like a home. No hallways come to dead ends. Food is cooked in an open kitchen. She said she has worked in large facilities. “We feel small is better,” she said.

Moratorium Minnesota has had a moratorium on nursing home beds for 28 years. The moratorium is a concern for Minnesota as the boomers age. The moratorium means providers cannot add nursing home units, which are counted in terms of beds, though they can other forms of senior housing all they want. Nursing homes provide full care, with nurses in the halls, while other forms offer various levels of care. Spates said Freeborn County has about the right number of beds, but some counties, like Mower County, are “underbedded.” That results in seniors entering nursing home care sometimes having to find it in another community. Spates said in about 10 to 15 years, Freeborn County could find itself to be an underbedded county.

A staff member at Prairie Senior Cottages slices eggs in the kitchen while others prepare lunch for the residents. The kitchens are in the open, and the tables are not in a big institutional dining room. Instead, they seem more like tables found in any house.


Page 28 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 Friday, September 27, 2013

138 Years...

137 Years... 136 Years... 132 Years... 121 Years... 116 Years... Farmers mutual Insurance co. Manchester, MN Phone: 826-3425

Dave Pederson, Mgr.

www.edwardsironworkers.com

In business since 1876

112 Years... 111 Years... 110 Years... Christian & Peterson

Attorneys at Law Phillip A. Kohl Mark A. Anderson John T. Hareid Kevin H. Siefken

314 So. Broadway (507) 373-2345 In business since 1901

Hemmingsen

TranSfEr inc.

Alden, MN Phone 874-3160 In business since 1902

101 Years... 100 Years... Comfort Specialists since 1912

Credit Bureau of Albert Lea • collections • credit reporting

1430 Frank Avenue Albert Lea Phone 373-2264 Since 1912

Brad & Vickie edwin owners/Managers 131 S. newton Albert Lea, Mn 56007

507-373-2325 cbalcollects.com in business since 1913

Manchester Hartland Telephone Co.

826-3212

Community Service Since 1903

96 Years...

St. Theodore Catholic Church 315 E. Clark St. Sat. 5:15 pm Mass Sun. 9:30 a.m. Broadcast Mass 11:00 a.m. Spanish Mass

2580 Bridge Ave. 373-3938

The Voice for BuSineSS!

110 Years... 107 Years... “Your locally owned Community Bank”

507-297-5461 Emmons, MN Since 1903

94 Years...

men's & ladIes aPParel, unIForms, tuxedos

AMERICAN LEGION

northBrIdge mall

Charitable Gambling

In Albert Lea Since 1917

Albert leA Freeborn County ChAmber oF CommerCe

Member F.D.I.C.

wIth InnovatIon & dIstInctIon

1006 so. Broadway alBert lea Phone 373-4030

In business since 1892

ALBERT LEA • 373-1481 EMMONS • 297-5461

In FreeBorn county sInce 1906

94 Years... AMERICAN LEGION

POST 264 GLENVILLE, MN

License No. A-00213

Since 1919 License #B-01304-001

808 W. Front St. Albert Lea, MN (507) 373-1411

Albert Lea Newspapers www.albertleatribune.com

Since 1897

106 Years... 101 Years... All of

serving you!

www.securitybankmn.com

142 N. Broadway, Albert Lea

373-7993

memorIals

Of Albert Lea

377-6868 Since 1907

94 Years... 1410 Olsen Dr. Phone 373-6650

Mick Delger Cal Johnson

MEMBER FDIC

HARTLAND, MN 845-2233 FREEBORN, MN 863-2371 ALBERT LEA, MN 373-1945 Since 1912

94 Years... FIRST LuTHERAN CHuRCH 301 w. clark • 373-6424

WELCOME TO WORSHIP Sundays, 8:00am Traditional 9:15am Blended 10:30am Praise & Worship Thursday, 6:30p.m.

www.albertleaelectric.com Original business started in 1919 Since 1919 • www.flcal.org


93 Years... “Always providing quality service to the construction industry.”

www.ulland.com

Asphalt Paving • Site Grading Road & Driveway Construction

Albert Lea 373-1960 Also available a wide variety of aggregate & landscaping stone for pickup or delivery

80 Years... Morris Furniture, a part of Albert Lea's history. Celebrating 80 Years. Hours: Mon—Wed 9—6, Thurs 9—7; Fri 9—6; Sat 9—5; Sun 12—4 507-373-6434

www.morrisfurniture.com 1909 E. Main, Albert Lea

65 Years...

“Building the Future By Preserving the Past” 65 years of Preserving, Interpreting & Displaying the History of Freeborn County.

1031 Bridge Avenue Albert Lea, MN Incorporated 1948

59 Years...

91 Years... Not sure what to do next?

Let us help. Albert leA/ellendAle new richlAnd

507-373-2461

www.bonnerupfuneralservice. com

507-373-4526

90 Years... Peterson, Savelkoul, Kolker, Haedt & Benda Ltd. Attorneys at Law

211 So. Newton • 373-6491 www.albertlealaw.com

Douglas R. Peterson, Donald W. Savelkoul, Matthew L. Benda, Daniel L. Kolker, Stephanie A. Haedt Since 1923

78 Years...

1731 Margaretha (507) 373-6485

Voted Best Golf Course 2004-2012

101 Richway Dr. Albert Lea, MN 507-373-1061 www.greenlea.com

58 Years...

377-2000 www.americana insurance.com

1651 Olsen Drive Albert leA

373-3981 Since 1926

2501 E. Main, Albert Lea www.fmcs.coop

Our Power is the People

Earning your trust day by day.

294-3244 373-6418 Kiester Albert Lea

63 Years...

SHOFF C hirOprACtiC

Promoting health and wellness since 1950

57 Years...

86 Years...

Motor SuPPLy Co.

KIBBLE EquIPMENt

www.churchoffset printing.com

64 Years...

87 Years...

74 Years...

Get bigger graphics

“We’re the uys” insurance g

512 E. 7th St Albert Lea

Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 29

63 Years... Gordonsville, Minn. Phone 448-3302 Serving You For 63 Years Business started in 1950

83 Years... Built-Rite Mfg., Inc.

HoLLAnDALe • 507-889-4311 ALBeRt LeA • 507-373-5500 www.producestatebank.com Member FDIC

Since 1926

69 Years...

Albert leA Steel, Inc. 1126 S. Broadway Albert Lea

373-5315 63 Years... ProvIDING truCKING SErvICES

BECKEr HI-WAy FrAtE 2401 Becker Drive Albert Lea Phone 373-8513

Since 1950

55 Years... Trades & Labor Federal Credit Union owned by our Members Focused on Service

best comPanies

People Helping People Since 1958

1606 e MAin st, Albert leA 507-373-6446

www.tradesandlabor.com

610 S. Broadway • 377-1863

John Doppelhammer Bob Weiser

2046 Sorensen rd. P. o. Box 246 Albert Lea, MN 373-6122

MANuFACturING MACHINE SHoP CNC CoNtrACt MACHINING

265-3235 Conger, MN

In business since 1929

69 Years...

Ag Power Enterprises

Serving South Central Minnesota with John Deere Ag & Consumer Equipment Belle Plaine, Hollandale, owatonna

Since 1944

the alternative for your financial needs

Protecting you since 1956 with only the

84 Years...

60 Years..

Since 1930

66 Years... company

an

507 W. Front St. & 902 East Main Albert Lea, MN 56007

507-377-2102 Since 1947 www.almco.com

60 Years...

2013

Albert Lea • Austin Mason City www.stadheimjewelers.com

Christian Communities of Care

"Known For Fine Diamonds" Since 1953

55 Years...

Clarks Grove -Waseca veterinary Clinic L.L.P.

thomas Lang, D.v.M. Dennis Nelson, D.v.M. Michael Bjorklund, D.v.M. Jennifer Bauer, D.v.M. P.o. Box 30 • 28088 770th Ave. Clarks Grove, MN 56016 (507) 256-7237 Fax: (507) 256-7611

thomas Metzdorff, D.v.M. Scott Lang, D.v.M. Carey Prigge, D.v.M 1400 State Street South Waseca, MN 56093 (507) 835-1700 Fax: (507) 835-1980

Small & Large Animal Services


Page 30 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

52 Years... South Central Mn Youth For ChriSt

“The Rock” 373-1015

www.scmyfc.org

47 Years... Architects & Civil Engineers 907 SYKES STREET Albert Lea 507-373-0689 Since 1966

40 Years...

51 Years... ST. John'S luTheran home &

knuTSon place

901 Luther Place, Albert Lea www.stjohnsofalbertlea.org 373-8226 In business since 1962

46 Years... • traVel • Vacations • embroiDery & aDVertising • specialty coffee

130 West clark albert lea, mn 373-2473

In Business Since 1967

40 Years...

LICENSED ELECTRICAL SERVICE & MAINTENANCE

1900 Sorensen Rd. Albert Lea Now serving 4 locations Albert Lea • Rochester Owatonna • Mason City

In business since 1973

37 Years...

R&S Racing

507-437-7440

36 Years... 377-3174 or 383-5773

505 Pilot Street Albert Lea, Rick Mummert 507-373-5907 MN PERFORMANCE PARTS rick.mummert@ & MACHINE gmail.com In business since www.ronholtanrealty.com February, 1976 Award winning engines since 1976 1025 South Broadway

45 Years...

PEDERSON INDUSTRIAL SALES 601 West College 507-373-1316

Stocking Distributor of Nationally known brand items for the Industrial Trade Since 1963

42 Years...

Hill, Larson, Walth & Benda CPA’s

COMPANIES

All types of illuminated & non-illuminated signs

INTERSTATE MoToR TRuCKS, INC.

50 Years...

377-8904 709 Wilson St. Albert Lea, MN Selling Insurance Since 1968

39 Years...

1655 W Main St Skyline Plaza Albert Lea, MN

377-1333

In business since March 1971

39 Years...

Albert leA tAx Service

www.altaxservice.com 2110 Y. H. Hanson Ave. 502 S. Broadway The Best in Salads 507-377-1625 and Mashed Potatoes

Since December 1973 www.mrsgerrys.com

36 Years...

In business since December, 1974

35 Years...

General Contractor

• Commercial • Industrial/Manufacturing • Retail/Service

507-373-6645 Albert Lea, MN 56007

ESTABLISHED IN 1977

48 Years... Next to Wok n Roll Buffet

2340 Hendrickson Rd. Albert Lea • 373-0946

Professional Tax Service Since 1965

41 Years...

Senior Court 915 Maplehill Drive Albert Lea, MN 507-373-5391

Providing elderly housing since 1971

In Albert Lea Since June, 1978

V ogt D

istributing

3004 Lake Chapeau Dr. Albert Lea, MN

373-0327

Since Feb. 1, 1965

41 Years... an

company

505 W. Front St

Albert Lea, MN 56007 507-377-8910 Since 1972 www.lou-rich.com

47 Years... LLC

A part of Albert Lea since 1966

41 Years...

KEITH'S AUTO BODY SHOP

Complete Refinishing Insurance Estimates Foreign & Domestic

377-1501

920 S. Washington Albert Lea, MN Since May 1972

39 Years...

1201 Garfield Ave., Albert Lea (507) 373-2311 • www.thornecrest.net Since 1974 EOE

34 Years... • Seamless Siding & Gutters • Roofing • Windows • Leaf Protection Systems

505 East Main Albert Lea, MN • 373-0636

48 Years...

603 S. 1st Ave. Albert Lea 373-3435

www.HomeSolutionsMidwest.com

Lic. # BC001552

34 Years... Committed to the quality of life & services for people with disabilities since 1979.

32 1/2 Years...

ING Financial Partners 510 W. Richway Dr. Albert Lea, MN 507-373-2786 800-944-8540 Arnold W. Mulso LUTCF

In business since Nov. 1, 1980


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 31

32 Years...

TIRE & SERVICE 1353 SE Broadway

373-6469 Since 1982

32 Years... Com-Tec Mobile Radio 101 1st Ave SW Glenville, Mn

448-3717 Since 1981

28 1/2 Years... 28 Years...

WESTRUM TRUCK & Body InC. new & Used Grain Trailers, Used Semi Tractors

1907 E. Main, Albert Lea 373-4218

www.westrumtruck.com

“ALL YOUR FAMILY PROTECTION UNDER ONE ROOF”

Cliff Wuerflein 377-2290 1907 E. Main St. Albert Lea Since 1985

24 Years... 507-377-8838 1-800-274-8858

77917 209th St, Albert Lea Since March 1989

www.protrucking.net

24 Years... R&R TRUCK REPAIR

31 Years...

Senior Tower 905 Maplehill Drive Albert Lea, MN 507-373-6622

Providing elderly housing since 1981

28 Years...

E OTOR & M EARING B SERVICE LECTRIC

BALdoR

Motors and drives

On Call 24 Hours

377-8848

In Business Since March 1989

LOCAL LOCKER/FARM TO TABLE Tues. Buy 2 pc Chicken Dinner Thurs. Steak & Shrimp or Steak & Lobster Tail & Get 2 pc Chicken Dinner FREE Dine in or carry out Fri. Prime Rib or All You Can Eat Fish Fry Wed. Walleye Dinner Sat. Prime Rib or BBQ Ribs

Where family & friends meet for great food & good times! Steve & Jodi Dittrich Catering & Off-Site Liquor License Available Tues.-Fri. 3:30 pm to Close, Sat. 11am Lunch to Close

507-256-4501 • Downtown Geneva www.georgesofgeneva.com

Since Sept. 3, 1982

27 Years... rick Furniture Downtown Albert Lea • 507-373-2514

227 S. Broadway

30 Years... 29 Years...

Nice People, Nice Store

nancy VanderWaerdt, LUTCF, FSS Providing Insurance and Financial Services 377-0227 505 Bridge, Albert Lea www.nancyvw.net Since November 1982

27 Years...

373-1000

World Headquarters at

826-3666

Pro Manufacturing Inc.

373-5570 • 377-0091

77917 209th St, Albert Lea

www.promfg.net Since March 1996

®

201 E. Clark St. Albert Lea 507-377-9344 Since Jan. 1, 1984

24 Years...

China 805 East Main

THE MOST UNIQUE DINING EXPERIENCE IN SOUTHERN MINNESOTA

373-2804

1313 Southview Lane Albert Lea Since 1986

Luncheon hours: Mon-Sun 11am-3pm

Dinner hours:

Sun-Thurs: 3pm-9pm Fri & Sat: 3pm-10pm

377-8888 & 377-2035 Locally Owned Since Dec. 1989 Dine-In & Carry Out

www.chinarestaurantal.com

23 1/2 Years... 21 Years...

In Business Since November 1989

R&R MInI SToRAGE

Jan Jerdee RESTAURANT

Albert Lea, Minnesota

200 Main St. Manchester

29 Years...

2409 Myers Road

373-2514

1401 West 9th Street

17 Years... WE ARE ALL ABOUT 17 Years... AWESOME FOOD!

373-1401

CALL 377-0032

Tractor Manuals & Parts Larry Rognes, Owner Visit our 2401 Myers Road Albert Lea, Minn.

31 Years of Alamco... 22 Years of Weyerhauser 22 Years of RILCO 75 YEARS OF LAMINATION

311 W. MAIn ALBERT LEA Since 1992

19 Years...

Convenient Insurance Service PRoPERTy And LIABILITy UMBRELLA KEy EMPLoyEE LIFE FUndInG BUy/SELL AGREEMEnTS IRA'S GRoUP HEALTH

Call Today

Po Box 328 owatonna, Mn 55060 (507) 455-5299 • (800) 533-0472 Lic#: 20416372 sljohnson@fedins.com The FEdERATEd Insurance Companies Home office: 121 E. Park Sq. owatonna, Mn 55060 (507) 455-5200 • www.federatedinsurance.com

15 1/2 Years... 15 Years...

¢ents

Bookkeeping

“SUPER SToRE To yoUR dooR”An FREE ESTIMATES • FREE INSTALLATION

507-373-8535

Toll Free 877-3738535 dESIGn CEnTER 310 1st Ave S. ALBERT LEA, Mn Since Sept. 1, 1997

STACEy L. joHnSon

Bookkeeping services & customized Quickbooks training Advanced Certified Quickbooks Pro Advisor Laurie Sistek 415 E. William St, Albert Lea

507-552-1263

laurie@bookkeepingcents.com

15 Years... Come see us for all your industrial and construction supplies!

1103 Sykes St. Albert Lea 377-7026 Since 1998

Larry and Barb Rognes

R&R

Albert Lea, Mn 56007 (507)-377-8073 96 Total Units Since 1984

24 Years...

InTERSTATE MoLdInG & MFG

Custom Plastic Injection Molding Injection Molds Rapid Prototyping 2220 Myers Rd Albert Lea, Mn

(507) 377-3800 Since nov. 1989

18 Years...

Commercial Casework & Cabinetry Lake Mills, IA

Find us on and win prizes! 4,000+ likes and counting!


Page 32 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

14 Years...

14 Years... We serve complimentary full hot breakfast daily. FREE Wi-Fi & Triple sheeted pillow top beds

Assisting you with all your real estate needs in Freeborn County!

Scott’S OFFiCE PrOduCtS Office Supplies Office Furniture 373-8316

Your local office supply dealer

FREE DELIVERY

10 1/2 Years... 9 1/2 Years... y’s

Properties

M-W 7:30-5, Th by appt.

auroradental.net

8 Years...

www.remax.com

9 Years...

9 1/2 Years...

Dry Cleaning

Steven K. Bland, DDS

412 E. William, Albert Lea, MN Office: 377-2752

Cell: 383-1300 dawn.realtor@ me.com

1617 SE Broadway

507-373-5350

507-377-2752 RE/MAX 

Mar

• Formals and Wedding dresses

373-MARY (6279)

2218 E. Main St

377-3000

13 Years... 448-2752 Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm Sat. 10-2pm 120 E Main St, Glenville Soy Candles, Soaps & Lotions,

VISIT "THE BOUTIQUE!"

Since Oct. '97

9 Years...

In Touch DoIng More

373-6337 Hubbard Agency Located in Nelson’s

Locally owned by Jesse & Mary Zamora M-F 7-6; Sat 8-12 Since Aug 2, 2004

8 Years...

Edward S. Hubbard

Skyline Plaza Albert Lea 507-373-1688

6 Years...

Marketplace

The only Albert Lea owned pharmacy

2 Years...

Helping Hands Home Care of MN 507-993-7500 2306 E. Main Albert Lea

507-373-6471 www.abvialbertlea.com

11 Years...

Greg Moen, Realtor®

Dawn (Freeman) Swalve, Realtor®

507-373-4000 821 E. Plaza St. • Albert Lea, MN Julie Sternhagen, General Manager www.bestwestern.com

11 Years...

14 Years...

www.helpingcareforyou.com

To always attain the highest quality of care that you need and deserve.

2751 E. Main 373-3200 www.loves.com

Dr. Rachel Nolander-Poppel 1206 W Front St, Albert Lea, MN 507-373-5968 www.AdvancedFamilyDentalAL.com

Call a marketing professional today! Renee Citsay • 507-379-3430 Clay Culbertson • 507-379-9851 Angie Eggum • 507-379-3429 Michele Beyer • 507-379-3428 Susan Price • 507-379-9852

Properties Greg Moen, Broker/Owner Steve Honsey, Josh Harmdierks, Kisti Skarr, Lynn Kelley, Emelie Paulson, Jim Paulson, Heather Allen, Jay Waltman

412 E. William St, Albert Lea 377-2752 • www.remax.com

9 Years...

505 W. Front St Albert Lea, MN www.innovance.com Parent company of Lou-rich & Almco Since 2004

FIND THE RECIPE FOR

Lasagna Rolls

e of

all Issu

in the F


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 33

Albert Lea 2010 census: 18,016 Median age: 44 Households: 7,774 Housing units: 8,410 Square miles: 14.68 City Hall address: 515 Clark St. City Hall phone: 377-4300 Railroads: Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern (Canadian Pacific), Union Pacific Highways: Interstate 90, Interstate 35, U.S. Highway 65, U.S. Highway 69, Minnesota Highway 13 Schools: Riverland Community College, Albert Lea High School, Southwest Middle School, Hawthorne Elementary School, Halverson Elementary School, Lakeview Elementary School, Sibley Elementary School, St. Theodore Catholic School, Brookside Education Center, The Children’s Center, United Preschool

Bricelyn 2010 census: 365 Median age: 47.9 Households: 168 Housing units: 197 Square miles: 0.3 City Hall address: 309 N. Main St. City Hall phone: 653-4369 Railroads: Union Pacific Highways: Minnesota Highway 253 Schools: none; is in United South Central School District

Alden 2010 census: 661 Median age: 39.9 Households: 268 Housing units: 292 Square miles: 1.0 City Hall address: 174 N. Broadway St. City Hall phone: 874-3620 Railroads: Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern (Canadian Pacific) Highways: Interstate 90, Minnesota Highway 109 Schools: Alden-Conger Elementary and Secondary Schools

Conger 2010 census: 146 Median age: 32.7 Households: 62 Housing units: 69 Square miles: 0.1 City hall address: 51 School St. City hall phone: 265-3435. Railroads: none Highways: none Schools: none; is in AldenConger School District

Clarks Grove 2010 census: 706 Median age: 38.1 Households: 295 Housing units: 312 Square miles: 0.4 City Hall address: 101 N. Independence Ave. City Hall phone: 256-4106 Railroads: Union Pacific Highways: Interstate 35, Minnesota Highway 251 Schools: none; is in Albert Lea School District

Ellendale 2010 census: 691 Median age: 39.6 Households: 296

Neighbors by the numbers Housing units: 317 Square miles: 0.9 City Hall address: 505 Second St. City Hall phone: 684-2681 Railroads: Union Pacific Highways: Interstate 35, Minnesota Highway 30 Schools: NRHEG Elementary School Emmons 2010 census: 391 Median age: 43.4 Households: 174 Housing units: 190 Square miles: 0.8 City hall address: 219 Main St. City hall phone: 297-5707 Railroads: none Highways: U.S. Highway 69 Schools: none; is in Glenville-Emmons School District Freeborn 2010 census: 297 Median age: 38.9 Households: 120 Housing units: 130 Square miles: 0.2 City hall address: 402 Park St. City hall phone: 863-2204 Railroads: none Highways: none Schools: none; is in United South Central School District Geneva 2010 census: 555 Median age: 38.3 Households: 220 Housing units: 228 Square miles: 0.4 City Hall address: 403 Fourth St.

City Hall phone: 256-4192 Railroads: none Highways: Interstate 35 Schools: none; is in NRHEG School District

Highways: Minnesota Highway 251 Schools: Hollandale Christian School; is in Albert Lea School District

Railroads: Union Pacific Highways: U.S. Highway 69, County Highway 105 Schools: Lake Mills Community School

Glenville 2010 census: 643 Median age: 44.2 Households: 278 Housing units: 290 Square miles: 2.2 City Hall address: 221 W. Main St. City Hall phone: 448-3916 Railroads: Union Pacific and Cedar River Highways: U.S. Highway 65 Schools: Glenville-Emmons High School, GlenvilleEmmons Elementary School

Hartland 2010 census: 315 Median age: 36.8 Households: 140 Housing units: 148 Square miles: 0.3 City hall address: 407 Broadway St. City hall phone: 845-2469 Railroads: Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern (Canadian Pacific), Union Pacific Highways: Minnesota Highway 13 Schools: none; is in NRHEG School District

Manchester 2010 census: 57 Median age: 36.8 Households: 26 Housing units: 30 Square miles: 0.1 City hall address: 70830 255th St. City hall phone: 826-3483 Railroads: Union Pacific Highways: Minnesota Highway 13 Schools: none; is in Albert Lea School District

Hayward 2010 census: 250 Median age: 44.5 Households: 114 Housing units: 123 Square miles: 0.6 City hall address: 107 County Road 26 City hall phone: 373-1222 Railroads: Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern (Canadian Pacific) Highways: Interstate 90 Schools: none; is in Albert Lea School District Hollandale 2010 census: 303 Median age: 38.3 Households: 128 Housing units: 146 Square miles: 0.4 City hall address: 110 Park Ave. W. City hall phone: 889-4001 Railroads: none

Kiester 2010 census: 501 Median age: 47.8 Households: 246 Housing units: 281 Square miles: 0.4 City hall address: 116 N. Main St. City hall phone: 294-3161 Railroads: Union Pacific Highways: Minnesota Highway 22 Schools: none; is in United South Central School District Lake Mills 2010 census: 2,100 Median age: 45.3 Households: 944 Housing units: 1,055 Square miles: 2.6 City Hall address: 105 W. Main St., Lake Mills, IA 50450 City Hall phone: 641-5923251

New Richland 2010 census: 1,203 Median age: 43.8 Households: 487 Housing units: 531 Square miles: 0.6 City Hall address: 203 N. Broadway Ave., PO Box 57, New Richland, 56072 City Hall phone: 465-3514 Railroads: Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern (Canadian Pacific) Highways: Minnesota Highway 13, Minnesota Highway 30 Schools: NRHEG Secondary School Northwood 2010 census: 1,989 Median age: 44.2 Households: 885 Housing units: 1,004 Square miles: 3.8 City Hall address: 627 Central Ave.

City Hall phone: 641-3241075 Railroads: Union Pacific Highways: U.S. Highway 65, County Highway 105 Schools: NorthwoodKensett Elementary School, Northwood-Kensett Junior/ Senior High School Twin Lakes 2010 census: 151 Median age: 49.5 Households: 76 Housing units: 85 Square miles: 0.51 City Hall address: 101 W. Main St. City Hall phone: 852-2155 Railroads: none Highways: U.S. Highway 69 Schools: none; is in Albert Lea School District

Wells 2010 census: 2,343 Median age: 45.3 Households: 1,013 Housing units: 1,133 Square miles: 1.4 City hall address: 125 S. Broadway Ave. City hall phone: 553-6371 Railroads: Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern (Canadian Pacific) Highways: Minnesota Highway 22, Minnesota Highway 109 Schools: United South Central High School, United South Central Middle School, United South Central Elementary School, St. Casimir Catholic School, Covenant Life School

INTRODUCTORY OFFER

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For only $20, book a 20 minute mini stress-reduction session You will learn the benefits of acupuncture, achieve REAL results without a ton of needles and see how easy acupuncture treatment is and transform stress and anxiety, within minutes!

Call today! 507-369-4654 216 E. Main St., Albert Lea healingfocusllc@gmail.com

we’re your energy superhighway…

right next door

ITC Midwest is pleased to be a member of the Albert Lea business community. From our warehouse and office facility on Highway 46, our 25 employees and contractors are working to create a strong electric grid for the region. Since acquiring the region’s electric transmission system in December 2007, ITC Midwest has been investing to improve electric reliability and accommodate the growing needs of electricity users. We’re also giving customers broader access to generating sources, including the clean wind energy developments under construction in Minnesota and Iowa. Our efforts contribute to the growth of Albert Lea and the region. We’re pleased to be your energy superhighway, right next door. ITC MIDWEST 1.877.482.4829 www.itctransco.com


Page 34 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

On the road again

A photographic look at Ulland Bros. road construction By Brandi Hagen

Larry Berg from Ulland Brothers Inc. paves the end of driveway off of Highway 69.

Ignacio Marroquin from Ulland Brothers Inc. levels out piles of asphalt during the first week of September.

A tack is sprayed out over the end of a driveway to coat the surface of a driveway on Highway 69 before another lift of asphalt is laid.

Larry Berg operates a paver during a road construction project that stretches from Highway 13 south to the Iowa border. Jeff Stene and Craig Schleusner are pictured running the screws to lay the asphalt.

Ignacio Marroquin helps get the endgate of a truck closed after it dumped a load of asphalt into a paver.


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 35

Asphalt is transferred from a dump truck into a paving machine during the first week in September for a road construction project on Highway 69.

Glenville

Member FDIC

Citizens State Bank

Plumbing

300 West Main Glenville, MN 56036 (507) 448-3981

448-2902

Glenville, MN We’re Radio Doctors

Send us your tired two-ways

101 1st Ave. SW Glenville, MN 56036

507-448-3717 800-795-1255

Sprinkler Systems Core Aeration • Broadleaf Weed Control Liquid Fertilizing • Crabgrass Control

FREE Analysis & Estimate

507-373-2217

SALES ACCESSORIES SERVICE

Share our passion.

ROYAL SPORTS 105 W. Main, Clarks Grove, MN 56016 (507) 256-7596

www.royalsports.us

Serving You With Quality Hardware Since 1903

• Interior & Exterior Paints • Plumbing & Electrical • Farm Supplies • Full line of Air Compressors • Snow Blowers • Mowers & Tillers

Clarks Grove Hardware

Clarks Grove • 256-7249


Page 36 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Helping leads to store ownership Opportunity knocked for Thompson family

By Tim Engstrom Michelle Thompson never intended to get into the liquor business. It all started when she gave her aunt a helping hand. Her uncle, Rick Farris, bought the Liquor Depot in 2003 from Doug and Mary Evans. Farris died in 2006 and his wife suddenly had to run a liquor store and needed help. Thompson ended up managing the store’s affairs for four years before she bought it in November 2011. Her aunt was considering selling it to a New Prague beverage company, and the more she and her husband talked about it, the more they liked the idea of buying it to keep it locally owned. “I never would have imagined I owned a liquor store,” she said. “But it’s a cool gig after all.” Most Albert Leans know the Liquor Depot is, as the name implies, a liquor store in a former train depot. The tracks for the Canadian Pacific Railway subsidiary Dakota, Minnesota & Eastern Railroad go by. The official name of the store is MT Liquor Depot, but advertisements have called it Michelle’s Liquor Depot, and the name has stuck. “It has a ring to it,” she said. Since buying the place, she has had it painted, added shelves, added more wine and craft beers. She added a lottery machine and few other add-ons, more impulse-buy items at the cashier counter. “We are constantly putting out something new,” she said. Thompson said she now has double the amount of wine at the store. She said the only beers the Liquor Depot used to carry were domestics, stuff such as Busch Light. Now she works on having the latest craft beers and said some new ones are Mankato Brewery, Lucid Brewing and Third Street Brewhouse, which makes the popular Three Way Pale Ale. She said she is quick to respond to customer requests for the store to carry an item, and she said she has built up a solid, loyal customer base. They often point her in the right direction, she said.

“I like the selection here,” said customer Charles Yates, “and Michelle is a nice person.” Thompson credited her distribution representatives for being helpful, too, whether it is getting the fad liquors or decorations for the walls, they come through, she said. One decoration a customer provided was a redneck wind chime over the hallway to the cooler entrance. It is made of Coors Light cans on strings. Thompson said the Coors Light distributor is tall and hits his head on it. Thompson said she needs the assistance with what to carry because she doesn’t drink beer or wine. She prefers Bud Light Lime-A-Rita, the malt liquor version of a margarita, or Twisted Tea, a hard iced tea that aims to taste like real ice tea. She also likes the line of Smirnoff Ice malt beverages. Customers walk up to the counter and see themselves on the security camera. Thompson said it is just there for peace of mind and said there was no incident that prompted the camera. Thompson, who decline to state her age, is a graduate of the Albert Lea High School class of 1992. She took classes at Riverland and met her husband when she was 22. Her husband is Troy Thompson, the owner of Troy Thompson Insurance. They have a son, Cody, 24, and a Holly, 17. Holly is a senior at Albert Lea High and returns to figure skating this winter after skipping it last season because of a knee injury. She has skated since preschool. They own two Arabian horses, one quarter horse and an appendix horse. The family is active at the Freeborn County Fair. Some Albert Lea residents recall when Michelle Thompson worked parttime for six years at the Estee Lauder makeup counter at Herberger’s in Albert Lea. She spent several years as a stay-at-home mother, too. Thompson said the employees at the store are family, except one, who has been at the Liquor Depot for so long he is like family.

Tim Engstrom

Michelle Thompson greets customers at the counter of Michelle’s Liquor Depot underneath a Coors Light neon sign she likes. The counter offers impulse-buy items, such as lottery tickets or the latest fad drink.


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 37

Yee haw!

Family of Dahl Farm Supply opens Western wear store By Kelli Lageson An idea a long time in the making has finally become a reality. Holly Dahl, owner of Dahl Farm Supply with husband, Chris, had long thought about owning a Western clothing store. And now that her daughters, Jade and Jessa Wipplinger, are older, it seemed like the perfect time. “We wanted to do something as a family,” Holly said. Holly and Chris farm north of Albert Lea and have owned Dahl Farm Supply since 2004. Dahl Farm Supply sells seed, ag chemicals, fertilizer, Eduraplas poly tanks, Traeger smoker grills and seed tenders, among other items. The Dahls were named the Albert Lea-Freeborn County Chamber of Commerce Farm Family of the Year in 2009. The family is hoping the clothing store can be something they can all work together on. Holly plans to do the accounting and ordering, and Jade and Jessa will work at the store and start to learn the accounting and business side as they go. “It’s something the girls can work at,” Holly said. Holly and Chris also have a son, Weston, and everyone has been pitching in building the new store. The shop, Country Soule Boot & Western Store, opened earlier this month in Northbridge Mall. The Dahls own horses, and both Jade and Jessa have long been interested in trail riding. They were also members of the Sunset Saddle Club. And they all love the fashion that goes along with riding and caring for horses. “I like the fashion boots, they’re fun and blingy,” Jessa said. Jade’s favorite item? She has a hard time choosing but likes the fashion jeans. “I love it all,” Jade said. Continued on Page 38

Kelli Lageson

Holly Dahl, middle, poses with her daughters, Jessa Wipplinger, left, and Jade Wipplinger, right. The three women will operate Country Soule Boot & Western Market in the Northbridge Mall.

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And there’s a lot of merchandise to choose from at the store. The family wanted to be able to offer clothing for men and women and for all ages. They carry popular Western wear brands like Ariat, Cinch, Wrangler and Rock & Roll Cowgirl, among others. There are work clothes, and then there’s fashion. To go along with the fashionable items, they also sell purses, jewelry, wallets, belts and belt buckles. And it doesn’t just stop at clothing. The store will also sell horse tack and other accessories like hay bags, horse boots and saddle pads. There will also be a whole wall of cowboy hats, and a few other styles of hats, as well as a full wall of cowboy boots for all ages. Boot prices range from $65 to $250, and for children’s boots, $40 to $70. “We will try to have a variety,” Holly said. And the family is open to suggestions. They stocked the store with a variety of options of clothing and accessories, but they’re looking forward to hearing what customers like and Along with clothing for men and women, Country Soule Boot & Western Market has accessories and home decor items for sale.

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Merchandise is shown at Country Soule Boot & Western Market. don’t like. But they don’t doubt the popularity of Western-style clothing. “It’s been fun to see the style in the Western world change,” Holly said. “It’s getting to be something everybody wears.” Holly said they hope the store will grow, and they had lots of curious folks asking about the store before it opened. She said Northbridge Mall was more than helpful, and allowed them to renovate the store somewhat so that it could have its three dressing rooms more easily noticeable. The store will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays and from noon to 4 p.m. on Sundays. The store’s phone number is 552-1425. Its website is www.countrysoulebootwesternmarket.com.

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Horse tack and other accessories are for sale at a new western store in Northbridge Mall.

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Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 39

How to decipher the Affordable Care Act for small businesses It is almost here! In a little more than a month Dean L. that oft-cursed AffordSwanson able Care Act — aka Obamacare — starts to Ask roll out in Minnesota. SCORE Will it absolutely wreck small businesses? Will it help small businesses? We are hearing and reading all kinds of messages about this topic and I have avoided adding more print to this flurry of speculation, but I have decided to yield to many requests especially those that have sincerely asked if there is anything helpful in the act for small businesses. I will rely on information that I got from Ari Matusiak, director of private sector engagement for the program. The response starts out by stating: “Small businesses are the backbone of our economy, and for the 28 million small employers across the country, healthcare is a major concern. The Affordable Care Act provides benefits and opportunities to small businesses that will help increase access to affordable coverage options.” Here are five key ways the Affordable Care Act can benefit small employers and their workers: 1. SHOP marketplaces: Currently, small businesses face premiums that are on average 18 percent higher

About SCORE You can contact the office by email at info@score-rochester.org or by phone at 507-288-8103. The office hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday. Contact SCORE in Rochester to make an appointment for a faceto-face counseling session or other questions. The volunteer counselors of SCORE are ready and willing to help make a success out of every small business with which they work. Business counseling is free and you may return as many times as needed — the best business bargain available. We will connect you with a mentor who has successfully navigated the world of business. The Rochester chapter office address is: SCORE c/o Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce 220 South Broadway, Suite 100 Rochester, MN 55904

than large businesses. On Oct. 1, the new Small Business Health Insurance Options Program (SHOP) marketplaces will be open for businesses, and small employers in every state will be able to shop for health coverage on a competitive marketplace, that brings unprecedented transparency to the market and gives small businesses the same purchasing clout as big businesses. 2. Reducing administrative complexity: SHOP Marketplaces include web portals that provide standardized, easy-to-understand information that will make comparing and purchasing coverage easier, and will simplify the administrative challenges that businesses often face when offering plans. Visit www.HealthCare.gov to learn more about the SHOP marketplace and to get ready for open enrollment. 3. New tax credits: The small business tax credit helps small businesses afford the cost of healthcare coverage for their employees, and is already helping qualifying small businesses offset the cost of insurance by up to 35 percent. In 2014, this tax credit goes up to 50 percent and is available to qualified small businesses who obtain coverage through the SHOP Marketplace. 4. Improved risk pooling: The new SHOP Marketplaces will allow small groups to pool risks and reduce administrative complexity, thereby increasing their purchasing power and reducing costs for small businesses that want to provide coverage to their workers. Business can enroll starting on Oct. 1 through their brokers, or directly through the SHOP Marketplace. 5. Workplace wellness: The Affordable Care Act creates new incentives to promote workplace wellness programs and encourages employers to take more opportunities to support

healthier workplaces. Effective for plan years after Jan. 1, 2014, final rules allow the maximum reward to employers using a health-contingent wellness program to increase from 20 percent to 30 percent of the cost of health coverage, and the maximum reward for programs designed to prevent or reduce tobacco use will be as much as 50 percent. To help provide small business owners with the resources and information they need, the Obama Administration recently launched Businesss.USA.gov/healthcare, a one-shop where employers of all sizes can go for customizable information about how the law impacts them, based on the size, location and future plans for offering coverage. And the Department of Health and Human Services launched a call center specifically to serve the needs of small businesses interested in the SHOP marketplace. This call center (800-706-7893) is a new resource to help business owners get information to make the right decision for their bottom line and their employees. It’s open Monday to Friday from

9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with representatives available to help in English and Spanish. The Small Business Administration has also teamed up with Small Business Majority to offer a weekly webinar series designed to educate small business owners about what the health care law means for them. Dean L. Swanson is a volunteer SCORE mentor and district director for SCORE Minnesota.

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Page 40 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

The diner that could

It might be small, but customers are loyal

By Brandi Hagen

Brandi Hagen

Diana Newman stands behind the counter at her restaurant, Diana’s Diner. Newman has been running the restaurant since 2007.

This little eatery has had many names since it opened in the 1930s, but most recently, Diana’s Diner, named after it’s owner, Diana Newman, serves about 40 to 50 people each day. Newman, 38, was born and raised in Albert Lea, and after working at the Elbow Room for eight years doing multiple jobs, she was fortunate to open her very own diner. The building at 522 S. Broadway in Albert Lea sparked Newman’s interest. “A friend of mine and I had always seen this place just sitting here,” she said. So Newman and her friend found out who owned the building and inquired about it. At first, the owners of the building, Randy and Nancy Delger, turned down Newman’s idea to buy the restaurant on contract. “They must have asked around about me because later they called and said, ‘Yeah, we’ll do it,’” Newman said. Museum & Library open year round. October-April Tues-Fri 10am-4pm May-September Tues-Fri 10am-5pm

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On May 1, 2007, Newman opened Diana’s Diner serving popular items like hot beef commercials, patty melts, biscuits and gravy and omelets, among other breakfast and lunch options. Newman said initially really all she had to do to open was buy groceries and clean the restaurant; everything else she needed was already in the building. And, even now, Newman has no plans to change the interior of the building, she likes how it is set up. One thing she would like to do, though, is to paint the exterior someday. Similar in size to the Elbow Room, Diana’s Diner has four booths, eight stools at the counter and two tables. Newman runs the show doing everything from serving and cooking to cleaning and doing the paperwork with help from just one other employee, Tina Shay. Shay and Newman had worked together in a restaurant setting before and Newman thought it would be a good fit. “She’s very dependable,” Newman said. Because Newman knew how difficult it was to know if the diner would be busy or slow at any given time or on any given day, she knew she needed someone who had a similar background as herself. “We’ve learned we can make it through little rushes, and there are times we go solo,” Newman said. “That’s why it’s nice to have someone who has done this.” Newman said even when there is a rush, most of the customers can see there is a small staff working and they are understanding and patient. Some of Newman’s regular customers even get up to fill their own coffee cup. “If they’re OK with that, I’m OK with that, too,” Newman said. “You just try and make it homey.” Newman said what makes her good

Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 41

Diana’s Diner is at 522 S. Broadway in Albert Lea.

Diana’s Diner Address: 522 S. Broadway, Albert Lea Hours: 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday, 6 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Saturday Payment: Cash or check, no credit cards

at what she does is her personality. She is generally happy and likes to joke around and visit with her customers. She said she meets a lot of different people throughout the week and they aren’t all local people either. Newman said people traveling have found Diana’s Diner because they searched for diners on their GPS and her restaurant showed up. “There are people that now stop every time they come through here,” Newman said. “It’s nice to hear them say, ‘we’ll be back.’” As Newman’s role changed from an employee to an employer, the differences she has experienced have been that she doesn’t get a paycheck, she runs errands and she keeps track of

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the monthly log. Still, six years later, she enjoys what she does. “There’s really no disadvantages other than you don’t really know what you’re going to have for an income,” Newman said. “But, doing it for so long, you learn real quick how to budget.” As a mom of three children, Tyler, 20, Taylor, 16, and Trinity, 12, and a grandma to her almost 1-year-old grandson, Brody, Newman stays busy both at work and at home. “Very seldom do my boyfriend and I take it easy,” Newman said. Looking back to when Newman first started Diana’s Diner, she said she never really worried about the business being successful or not. From the time she and her friend inquired about the restaurant to the time she opened, there was maybe a month’s time. “I think because it happened so quick, I just thought, you have to do this,” Newman said. Now, she just hopes to keep seeing a steady stream of customers walk through the door.

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Page 42 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Theater adds a 2nd screen, now waits for 3D projector By Michelle Haacke

Tim Engstrom

Women purchase tickets at the Mills Theater in early September. The marquee highlights movies on two screens now.

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LAKE MILLS — Adding a second screen to the Mills Theater was just the first act. The second act, 3D, is still to come. “It’s coming anytime now, we’re just waiting on the installer,” said Scott Helgeson, board chairman for Lake Mills Entertainment. “Hopefully in the next month or so it’ll be up and running.” The Mills Theater opened its second screen in July. “We showed a lot of kid movies over the summer, and the theater’s doing really well,” said Helgeson. Both screens in the Mills Theater currently show what are considered second-run movies, which means these films have been out in theaters across the nation for three to four weeks. Helgeson said they are working to get some first-run movies into the new theater, as well, which will run for two weeks at a time. “Some of the theaters in our smaller surrounding communities like Osage and Clear Lake show a firstrun movie each quarter, and they’ve been successful, so we’re looking to do the same,” he said. Like the original theater, which opened in 2008 and seats 200, the new screen is also digital. Construction began on the new 90seat venue in March 2012. According to Helgeson, funding came from local donations, the Lake Mills Foundation and the Hanson Foundation in Forest City, Iowa. Donations also helped update the theater’s marquee to a digital sign in 2011.

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Helgeson and Mark Alphs, another member of the Lake Mills Entertainment board, along with other community members also put in many man-hours on the construction, which included building the stadium seating, installing the curtains, putting in doorways and more. The second screen was built next door to the existing theater on West Main Street, in a building that was also owned by the nonprofit. They simply knocked out some doorways and renovated the space. “We’re using the same lobby and concessions, and there’s not much more labor, so we figured we could do this without a lot more cost,” said Helgeson. The ultimate goal was to provide more local entertainment to the people of the community, and so far, it seems to be working. “Five years ago you never saw a lot of people out an about,” said Helgeson. “Now there’s more for people to do right here in Lake Mills.” The Mills Theater shows movies each day of the week at 7 and 7:30 p.m., with matinees at 3 and 3:30 p.m. on Sundays and late shows on Saturdays. Before the theater reopened in 2008, it closed in 2001. Lake Mills Entertainment formed as part of an effort to keep the theater a key part of the city’s downtown. The original theater’s building was constructed in 1936 in the art deco style popular at the time. Despite changes to the building, the marquee remains is reminiscent of the days when seeing a movie costs a quarter.

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Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 43

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Chuck Karl, the owner and general manager of Karl’s Carquest, sits in his office. Karl is originally from Worthington, but he has raised his family in Albert Lea.

Parts of the story Carquest is proud to be local

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Page 44 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Continued from Page 43

Chad and his daughter, Lex. Jim’s wife, Pat, and Janet work with their husbands as bookkeepers for their respective stores. Karl will turn 60 in October, and he’s been around cars since he was a boy. His father owned a car dealership, sold it and bought a small auto parts store in Worthington, he said. Karl worked as an auto mechanic in high school, but he decided to work in the family business instead of pursuing a career as an auto technician. “I just decided that wasn’t my cup,” he said. “One year to the day after they bought the business, I joined,” Karl said. Now, Karl and his brother have taken over, since their parents are out of the business. Along with owning, managing and acting as a salesman at Carquest, Karl makes time for hobbies. Along with completing projects around his yard and house, he spends his time golfing, floating on his pontoon boat and traveling. “We’ll go just about anywhere,” Karl said. A few travel destinations Karl mentioned were Mexico, the Ozark

Micah Bader

The Carquest francise in Albert Lea is owned by Chuck Karl and his brother, Jim.

Mountains and Okoboji, Iowa. Karl is also active in the community. He’s the fire chief of the Albert Lea Township Fire Department, the full-time backup to the city. He’s been with the department for the duration of his residence in Albert Lea, he said. In addition, Karl is an active member at United Methodist Church and the Daybreakers Kiwanis Club, where he was president and will be treasurer next year.

The stretch of Main Street east of Garfield Avenue, an area Karl referred to as part-row alley, features several auto parts stores. However, Karl said his store is different than the rest. “One of the biggest things about our store is that we’re the only locally owned parts store in town anymore,” he said. “There’s one store that’s not a complete parts store that’s locally owned, but the rest are

owned by corporate.” Carquest not only carries parts for cars, its shelves also hold motorcycle, boat, tractor and semi-truck parts. “We’ve got a little bit of everything,” he said. “The Carquest chain has a complete line of parts, so we have a lot to offer.” For racing and demolition derby enthusiasts, Karl said he has a special deal. “We don’t sponsor any cars, but when drivers put our logo on their car, we’ll sell them parts at a discounted price,” he said. Despite his roots in the automotive business, Karl’s garage doesn’t feature any classic cars. “I haven’t gotten into collecting them. I guess what I’m doing is more like collecting a business and keeping the bills paid,” Karl said with a laugh. Part of the store’s success has been a low turnover of workers. “My favorite part of owning the store is servicing the customers and working with my employees,” Karl said. “I’ve got good people here. If you don’t have good employees, you don’t have a good business, and I feel like I’ve got the best employees in town for auto parts.”


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 45

Sarah Stultz

A Ventura Foods employee removes containers of Smart Balance from a line in early September. New machinery at the Albert Lea plant allows the company to package two containers of the product together vertically with a cardboard sleeve.

Upgrades equal growth

Ventura Foods invests in package shape, good for shelf space

By Sarah Stultz

Albert Lea’s Ventura Foods is seeing growth after $3 million in equipment upgrades and a new customer contract. The upgrades allow Ventura — which locally manufactures 350 million pounds of shortenings, oils and margarines a year — to fill square containers of margarine instead of traditional round ones.

The new product shape was initially made for the company’s customer Smart Balance and will maximize shelf space, said Nicholas Beyer, controller at the company. Other companies will be able to utilize the equipment at the start of the year. A separate piece of machinery also allows the company to package two containers of margarine together vertically — instead of horizontally — with a cardboard sleeve.

He credited Ventura employees for getting the new equipment up and running. He said many were working six to seven days a week when the upgrades were happening earlier this year. “It was a huge undertaking, and our employees were huge in making that successful,” Beyer said. Aside from the new equipment, the company has landed a new contract that calls for an additional 25 mil-

lion pounds of production a year. He declined to release the name of the customer. With all the changes, he estimated there will be between 20 to 25 additional full-time employees, bringing the total number of employees to between 210 and 215. He said the company leases some cold storage space from some nearby

Continued on Page 47


Page 46 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

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Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 47

Sarah Stultz

An employee with Ventura foods lines up the square containers to be fed into a new machine at the plant.

Continued from Page 45 buildings but is studying the feasibility of an addition for refrigerated storage at its own plant. The last time Ventura had an addition was in 2004. The company’s website states the Albert Lea location is “one of the largest, most advanced processing plants for margarines, shortenings and oils in the U.S.” It makes shortenings, oils, margarines, butter blends, salad oils, liquid butter alternatives, pan and grill oils, pan coatings, flavored sprays and bases for stocks, soup, gravies and rubs for the food service industry. In retail, it produces Smart Balance

spreads and a private label. The Albert Lea location began in the mid-1960s as Miami Margarine and became Ventura in 1996 after a merger between Wilsey Foods and Holsum Foods, Beyer said. The products manufactured there are sent to grocery and other retail stores, to restaurants and the food service industry, and to industrial customers such as baking conglomerates. Ventura, which has 10 other locations outside of Albert Lea, has plants in California, Oregon, Texas, Missouri, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Louisiana, Alabama and Pennsylvania. Its headquarters is in Brea, Calif.


Page 48 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

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Minnesota’s economy is on the move

Minnesota is often Katie called one of the “best kept secrets” in the coun- Clark Sieben try, and it’s no mystery as to why. In addition to State affordable living, topView notch health care and pristine lakes and forests, the state boasts a highly educated workforce and low unemployment rate. As we move beyond the Great Recession, the state is experiencing faster economic growth than many of our neighboring Midwestern states and, in many ways, the nation. Don’t take my word for it. Ask the businesses that have been expanding their operations and adding jobs this year. In the last six months alone, 80 Minnesota companies have announced expansion plans, creating 2,800 new jobs in the state. The list includes Emerson Process Management, which is spending $70 million on an expansion that will bring up to 500 manufacturing jobs to Minnesota. Another manufacturer, tractor and farm equipment maker AGCO, is investing $42 million to expand its facility right here in the southwestern Minnesota community of Jackson, adding 75 jobs to bring total employment at the site to 1,200. Not only are companies expanding existing operations here, but the state is on the short list for major relocations. Recent examples include California-based photo giant Shutterfly Inc., which announced plans in August to open a 217,000-square-foot office and manufacturing complex that will create about 329 jobs in Shakopee. Earlier this summer, trucking and storage company Valley Cartage announced that it was relocating from Wisconsin to Lake Elmo, creating 50 new jobs along with the existing jobs it was moving across the border. Earlier this summer DEED asked 230 businesses across the state if they anticipate their sales revenue to grow or remain stable in the coming year. Seventy-seven percent said yes — up from 70 percent last year. This confidence in the economy often translates into new jobs, and we’re seeing growth across many sectors. The state added 4,300 jobs in July, bringing total job growth in the state to 71,500 in the past year,

a growth rate of 2.6 percent that easily surpasses the national rate of 1.7 percent. Minnesota is adding jobs at one of the fastest paces we’ve experienced in 20 years. Meanwhile, our unemployment rate of 5.2 percent is at a five-year low, ranking among the best in the country. Job vacancy numbers offer another sign of employer confidence and a recovering economy. Last week, DEED released a survey that showed job vacancies in the state were at their highest level in 12 years. Employers reported 72,570 openings for jobs – up 15.3 percent from the same period a year ago. The state’s strong workforce is tone of the key reasons we’re attracting new companies to the state. Minnesotans, ingrained with a strong Midwestern work ethic, are recognized for their high productivity, motivation and low absenteeism. Ninety-two percent of Minnesotans have a high school diploma or higher, ranking second nationwide, while more than 32 percent have earned bachelor’s degrees or higher, ranking 11th in the U.S. Adding to the evidence of our surging economy, the U.S. Commerce Department’s Bureau of Economic Analysis said Minnesota had one of the fastest-growing economies in the country last year, tying California for fifth place in growth of gross domestic product. Our diverse economy, including 19 Fortune 500 companies in health care, financial services, retail, food production and other industries, helped us weather the recession better than many other states. It all adds up to an economy that is humming along, thanks to a strong workforce, healthy mix of companies, favorable business climate and policies that support economic growth. It seems Minnesota is not going to be a “best kept secret” for much longer. The word is out that Minnesota is a great place for companies to thrive and grow. Katie Clark Sieben is the commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development.


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 49

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Page 50 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

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Innovation is key to growing the economy of Minnesota

Jobs and the state’s economic infrastructure William remain the focus as Minnesota businesses — Blazar all Minnesotans, for that matter — face the chalBusiness lenges of competing in View an evolving global economy. As policy-makers prepare for the 2014 Legislature, the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce also is focused on policies that promote both the development and growth of our state’s economy. Minnesota cannot stand still; every successful economy in the world is changing. Our job is to help policy-makers identify and adopt policies that create an economic infrastructure that encourages and advances innovation. With that, change and growth will follow. We all need to evolve together, whether living in Warroad or Worthington, Moorhead or Minnetonka. Urban and rural Minnesota must walk in sync if Minnesota businesses are to keep pace with their peers. And we perform best when we find and use new ways of linking our varied communities, each with distinct resources. Bottom line, working together our metro areas and rural communities give us more opportunity than if we consider them separately. We don’t get to determine how our economy will change. More so than ever, that’s a function of the national and world economies. Our challenge is to have the infrastructure that allows creative Minnesota businesspeople to take advantage of these changes and grow their businesses here. Understanding and facilitating economic change is a long-term and neverending process. We’ll succeed only if we concentrate on improving the overall business climate for the benefit of all sizes and types of businesses rather than picking winners and losers by providing company-specific incentives. So what elements of our economic infrastructure are key to taking advantage of current world economic change? Competitiveness: State policy-makers must replace the “tax/no tax” debate with a serious conversation about competitiveness. More importantly, identify the kinds of spending that

represent strategic investments that will help the economy change and grow. And then, focus on those investments. Workforce: Businesses across many industry sectors still struggle to find qualified workers. Changing demographics demand that we implement important reforms including teacher effectiveness and testing programs that help to prepare our students to enter an increasingly competitive workforce. Environmental permitting: Businesses are not seeking relaxed regulations; they just seek certainty around time and cost. Continue to streamline the environmental review and permitting process by removing unnecessary and duplicative regulations. Transportation: Businesses supported major funding increases in 2008, but there’s little evidence that we’re getting the outcomes, especially with respect to efficiency, that were promised. We need to rethink the idea of trading promises for money — not just when it comes to our transportation systems, but probably other public services as well. Energy: Electric rates, once a competitive advantage for Minnesota companies, are now a real risk to attracting and keeping businesses here. We must work to slow the cycle of rate increases. Health care: MNsure has changed the dynamics of employee health insurance, especially among smaller companies. We must engage in and monitor the development of the state’s health insurance exchange so it provides understandable information on the quality of care and the cost of health insurance products without placing additional costs or mandates on small-business customers. Making headway on these fronts — and developing and growing the state’s economy — requires a new mind-set among our elected officials. We must get beyond the outmoded strategy of raising taxes to improve services. And, at the same time, we need to realize that simply cutting spending won’t produce the public service outcomes that are necessary Continued on Page 52


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 51

Chamber of Commerce looks for the long-term solutions

By the strictest definition, a Chamber of ComRandy merce is an association Kehr of business, industrial and professional firms Chamber and interested individuView als working together to enrich the economic well being of its community — to preserve the business system, to promote business growth and development. It is the community’s department of progress. Yet, it is much more than that. Your Albert Lea-Freeborn County Chamber of Commerce is a voluntary association of business and professional men and women who have joined together to work for the solution of their mutual business and community problems. Chamber members often look beyond the short-term solutions and work to plan far into the future. We do this by active involvement of our membership in our various committees. These committees do much of the work of the chamber and are our best connections to the community. The Chamber Ambassadors: They have the opportunity to share in welcoming many new businesses to our community. They also share several events with existing members. There are anniversaries, new locations, and grand openings and reopenings, to name a few. Business/education partnership: They bring business operators and educators together to develop a program that enhances the education of our youth and aids in the development of a qualified workforce for the future. They recognize all aspects of education from early childhood through lifelong learning opportunities. They currently are actively involved in the youth apprenticeship program with Albert Lea High School. Agriculture committee: Their purpose is to increase awareness of how the agriculture industry impacts the business community, and to educate/ assist our youth in the understanding of the importance of the agriculture industry. They partner with the University of Minnesota Extension Service to name the Freeborn County Farm Family of the year and sponsor the annual Third Grade Farm Tours. Chamber Foundation: While a

separate entity from the chamber itself, this nonprofit group serves as a fiscal agent for many local organizations. Current examples include the American Legion, the cottage fund

and others. Governmental affairs: They are a proactive voice for the business community on governmental affairs issues. The committee facilitates communication between government and the business community and keeps the business community informed of vital issues. They make recommendations to the board of directors on policy issues. They also inform the public through candidate forums and various legislative forums. They also develop legislative priorities for our chamber and advocate for these priorities with local and state officials. Green committee: This committee is committed to developing programs that enable our business, large and small, to become more energy efficient and reduce their carbon footprint through reuse and recycling. Seminars are offered as well as green office manuals. Worksite wellness committee: This is the committee that is committed to changing the workplace in Freeborn County through the implementation of wellness programs, healthy food choices and tobacco use reduction practices. It is composed of many of our major employers and their goal is to share best practices and, in essence, to “do the work” for the smaller employers that may not have the time or resources to research and develop these programs. The committee believes that a healthier workforce is a more productive workforce. They share their message with the community by participating in community events that promote healthy behaviors. Our members participate in these committees in order to improve your community’s economy and quality of life, while always keeping these broad objectives in mind: • Helping business prosper and grow. • Increasing job opportunities in Freeborn County. Continued on Page 52

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Page 52 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

LOVERINK DRAINAGE Rural • Residential * Individual sewer systems • Sewer maintenance & repair • City sewer and water installation • Basement & site preparation • Waterways, filter intakes & tiling (trenched or plowed) • Field pumps, cement & box culverts • Ponds, ditch cleaning, wetland restoration • Excavation • Demolition and boring

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Farmer John Linder of Wells stands in his shop where he and his family constructs spiral staircases. Julie Seedorf

Continued from Page 19 Usually if it is new construction, the contractors wait to add the roof so the staircase, which is made out of steel, can be lowered into the building. A second business has been born out of Linder Enterprises, and it is a sandblasting business. It was started to use with their staircases and exContinued from Page 51 • Encouraging an orderly expansion and development of all segments of the community. • Contributing to the overall economic stability of the community. • Enhancing the quality of life for all citizens of Freeborn County. The Albert Lea-Freeborn County Chamber of Commerce, while working to promote and develop Continued from Page 50 to develop and grow our economy. Both strategies have been tried by recent administrations, and both

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panded when other companies in the area needed work done for them. When asked what he would rather be doing, farming or working in Linder Enterprises, John stated “Linder Enterprises. It is more fun.” He summed it up nicely. “It is satisfying working with my family. We know what we are good at, and we stick to it.” a healthy and positive business climate, continues to promote the quality of life found here. Through the sponsoring of numerous community programs, we strive to give back to the community which so generously supports our local businesses. Randy Kehr is the executive director of the Albert Lea-Freeborn County Chamber of Commerce. have failed. Redesigning services to deliver better value is the best strategy with promise for both short-term and long-term success. Though we’ve poked at the edges, we’ve not stayed the course with a serious effort. It’s not easy; it requires creativity as well as political backbone. Minnesotans can do their collective part by giving policy-makers the license to promote change that capitalizes on today’s evolving economy. It’s essential if Minnesota is to remain a player in the global marketplace. William Blazar is senior vice president of public affairs and business development at the Minnesota Chamber of Commerce: www. mnchamber.com.


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 53

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS Accentra Credit Union....................................... 48 Addies...................................................................6 Advantage Auto Glass......................................... 16 Adventure RV Centre.........................................56 Ag Power.............................................................47 Alamco................................................................12 Albert Lea Area Schools..................................... 41 Albert Lea Community Theater..........................54 Albert Lea Electric..............................................10 Albert Lea Public Warehouse.............................43 Albert Lea Seedhouse........................................ 44 Albert Lea Steel...................................................43 Albert Lea Taxi...................................................41 ALEDA...........................................................cover ALFC Chamber..............................................cover Allen’s Tow & Travel...........................................43 Alliance Benefit Group....................................... 16 Almco..................................................................37 Antiques of the Midwest.......................................6 ARO Accounting................................................ 46 B & D Metal Works............................................. 17 Bayview Funeral Home...................................... 14 Becker Auto........................................................43 Blue Earth Chamber of Commerce.................... 41 Bonnerup Funeral Home.................................. 38 Bookkeeping Cents............................................ 40 Brick Furniture...................................................19 Cedar River Complex......................................... 49 Certified Travel...................................................14 Cheers Liquor Store........................................... 46 Church Offset...................................................... 21 Citizens State Bank.............................................35 Clarks Grove Hardware......................................35 Collins Auto Repair..............................................7 Com Tec..............................................................35 Conger Catering..................................................52 Conger Meat Market........................................... 19 Country Soul....................................................... 21 Countryside RV Service..................................... 50 Crescendo Exquisite Food and Fine Wine...........6 Curt’s Pharmacy................................................ 46 CVB-Albert Lea..............................................cover Dahl Farm Supply...............................................39 Dave Syverson Auto Center................................. 8 Dave’s Auto Service............................................42 Diamond Joe.......................................................56 Doors and Floors................................................43 Doug’s Sandblasting.......................................... 50 Dr. Lundstrom......................................................4

Etc. Tanning...................................................... 46 Exact Manufacturing..........................................37 Falkstone............................................................18 Farmers Mutual.................................................. 17 Farmers State Bank..............................................3 Flaherty’s Hi-Tech Motorwerks......................... 12 Freeborn Construction..................................cover Freeborn County................................................. 15 Freeborn County Historical Society.................. 40 Freeborn Lumber...............................................54 Freeborn Pride Builders.................................... 40 Geno’s Plumbing...................................................5 Glenville Plumbing.............................................35 Good Earth Village............................................. 41 Good Samaritan Society of Albert Lea.............. 40 Green Lea Golf Course........................................ 19 Hanna Plumbing and Heating...........................24 Hanson Tire..........................................................2 Hart Brothers......................................................25 Healing Focus.....................................................33 Heart of the Artichoke..........................................6 Heartland Security............................................. 14 Hi Yield...............................................................12 Hillcrest Cemetary............................................. 40 Home Federal.....................................................55 Injection Technology............................................7 Innovance...........................................................37 Interstate Packaging......................................cover ISC Financial Advisors...................................... 46 ITC Midwest.......................................................33 Jan Jerdee Blue Cross Blue Shield..................... 16 Jensales............................................................... 17 Jensen Heating, A/C & Plumbing......................25 Jim & Dudes.......................................................10 Kibble Equipment.............................................. 48 KIMT..............................................................cover King Maintenance..............................................18 Lake Mills School................................................42 Larson Contracting........................................cover Larson Manufacturing........................................ 21 Larson Manufacturing........................................42 Lembke Construction.........................................18 Liquor Depot...................................................... 38 Lou-Rich.............................................................37 Loverink Drainage..............................................52 M & S Outdoor Equipment................................. 51 Making an Impact Business Guide............ 28 - 32 Manchester Hartland Telephone....................... 17 Manpower.......................................................... 50

Minnesota Abstract............................................52 Minnesota Corregated Box................................. 12 Morreim Drainage Inc........................................ 17 Mrs. Gerry’s Salads.............................................18 Nancy’s Café.........................................................6 New To You...........................................................6 Northbridge Mall...........................................cover Northwood Lumber..............................................7 Northwood True Value.........................................7 Oak Park Place.................................................... 11 Panels Plus..........................................................37 Pantheon Computer Systems.............................24 Paragon Bank...................................................... 17 Parkview Care Center......................................... 17 Plymouth Shoe Store............................................6 Prairie Senior Cottages..................................cover Produce State Bank............................................39 Produce State Bank............................................18 Reinertsons Embroidery......................................6 ReMax - Emelie Paulson....................................43 Riverland Community College......................cover Rofshus Precision Machine Inc.......................... 41 Royal Lawn.........................................................35 Royal Sports........................................................35 Sanderson Auto..................................................56 Schipp’s Pro Power Wash.....................................9 Scotts Office Supply..............................................7 Security Bank...................................................... 11 Select Foods........................................................55 Shell Rock River Watershed.................................2 South Central Pet Care....................................... 14 Southside Custom.............................................. 50 St. John’s Lutheran Home................................ 20 State Bank of Clarks Grove............................cover The Art Center......................................................6 Thorne Crest......................................................... 1 TNT Used Appliances...........................................6 Total Glass & Lock..............................................25 Trades & Labor...................................................16 Trading Post.......................................................14 Troy Thompson..................................................43 Ulland Brothers.................................................. 51 VanWilgen Farms...............................................39 Ventura Foods...............................................cover Village Cooperative...............................................5 Walmart............................................................. 38 Wells Federal Bank.............................................47 Wells Insurance Agency..................................... 17 Zumbro River Brands...........................................7


Page 54 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

Albert Lea Community Theatre 49th Season 2013-2014

14

2013-20

X THE FOE ON TH Y A FAIRW

Ludw ig by Ken son Written y r Matt d by Ro 0, Directe ctober 1 ances O , 18, 19 m r o rf e P 17 3M, 16, 7 11, 12, 1 st 26 & 2 u g u A s s e Audition k ta y wa

air on the F s romp The Fox s on a hilariou from t ce u n o ie g d ru au ulls the uff y denizens which p e st th th a club. e undern rivate countr y ities, of a p ken iden theta is m ith verFilled w g doors, and o ans, slammin anitc shenanig medy top rom usly paces co ers’ th rio it’s a fu s the Marx Bro dcap a all that rec A charming m fe, and classics. re about love, li w ith... adverntu rnal love affair te man’s e golf.

ER OCTOB

14

2013-20

E LEND M R A TENO

Ludw ig by Ken ey Written ve Kinn d by Ste te c e ir 3, D ay 1, 2, ances M m r o rf e P , 10 4M, 8, 9 6 rch 5 & e a M s Auditioisntoric night at thny,

One a h Opera Compa d o Clevelan amous tenor Tit tello. world-f perform in O s, hap is to Morelli a series of misdose Through ives a double the Tito rece ilizers, causing ve u of tranq anager to belieff a house m and setting o k ic ad he is de action of slapst he T chain re ken identity. y is ta ed is and m all com nces , screwb ie madcap ed to leave aud r. te n ra laughte h gua it w ed teary-ey

MAY

2013-2014

GUYS ON ICE

Book & lyrics by Fred Alley Music by James Kaplan Directed by Jerry Girton Performances Frebruar y 13, 14, 15, 16M, 19, 20, 21, 22 Auditions December 16 & 17 Guys on Ice tells the story of two ice-fishing buddies from Northern Wisconsin who talk and sing about life, love and the one that got away. Join us in celebrating De Wishing Hole, Ode to a Snowmobile Suit, Fish de Miracle Food and De One Dat Got Away!

FEBRUA RY

2013-201

4

ANNIE, THE MUSICA L

Written by Thom as Directed by Gordy Meehan Handelan Perform d ances Ju ly 17, 18 19, 20M, , 23, 24, 2 5, 26 Audition s May 20 & 21 Annie te

lls who ends the stor y of a little up or Depressio in the lap of luxury phan Warbucks. n-era billionaire O with children at Unlike most of th liver e other Miss Hanni age, spunky gan’s are still al Annie believes herorphanto claim heive and will one day parents offers to ad r. So when Mr. Warreturn powerful mobt her, she asks th bucks find her re an in America to hee most he agrees. al mom & dad instea lp her the attent Warbuck’s reward d, and to kidnap ion of conartists, whocauses A plot classic fa nnie. But don’t ending for mily musical has afret ; this Annie, Dad happy the whold dy Warbucks and gang.

JULY

Marion Ross Performing Arts Center 147 N. Broadway • Albert Lea • 377-4371

24/7 Call Center 1-877-730-3144 • Box Office Open Thursdays 4-6pm www.actonbroadway.com


Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013 • IMPACT • Page 55

2410 YH Hanson Avenue • Albert Lea, MN 56007 • (507) 379-9269


Page 56 • IMPACT • Albert Lea Tribune • Friday, September 27, 2013

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The Albert Lea-Freeborn County Chamber of Commerce's mission is to "Promote and develop a healthy and positive business climate to improve the quality of life in the Albert Lea-Freeborn County area." The Chamber of Commerce is the one organization that merges all phases of our local economy from the smallest employer to the largest. Always striving to enhance the business environment, we work with local and state government to create a climate conducive to growth. Look for the Chamber of Commerce membership sticker at our member businesses.

... the Land Between The Lakes! Albert Lea Convention & Visitors Bureau 102 W. Clark St. • Albert Lea, MN 56007

Northbridge Mall, Albert Lea, MN 56007

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Northbridge Mall Businesses • Albert Lea/Freeborn County Chamber of Commerce • Anytime Fitness • Bliss Bridal and Formal Wear • Bob's Buttons & Farm Toys • Book World • Certified Travel • Cinema 7 Theatre • Clearance Isle • Conger Meat Market • Copper Kitchen • Country Soule • Dunham's Sports • Edward Jones - Andrew Irvine • Electric Beach • Fat Daddy's Leather

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Impact 2013