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Post Colic

Recovery

Common Equine

Traits of a

Dental Errors Great Coach

P U B L I C AT I O N S MA I L AG R E EME N T # 4 0 0 5 0 2 9 7

SUMMER 2018

From the battlefield to Dressage arena

versatile

the

Friesian Connecting Traditional Styles

Working Equitation

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SUMMER 2018; VOLUME 10, ISSUE 2 Alberta Bits is the Alberta Equestrian Federation’s official member magazine. It serves the equestrian community of horses and riders of all ages, interests and involvement as Alberta’s premier resource for education, information and support. THE ALBERTA EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION HAS BEEN INCORPORATED SINCE 1978 Alberta Bits magazine is mailed four times a year (Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter) to all current AEF members and is made available at the office and special events attended by the AEF. Alberta Bits is distributed throughout Alberta with news and events on behalf of recreational, sport, breeds & industry and educational sectors of the Alberta horse industry. Alberta Bits is distributed to approximately 18,000 members; 9,000 households and businesses, an exclusive list of tack and equine establishments and at events and trade shows annually.

aef board of directors PRESIDENT PRESIDENT ELECT PAST PRESIDENT SECRETARY TREASURER INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL

Lauren Parker 403.813.1055 lmparker@shaw.ca Sandy Bell 403.700.7880 windhorseretreat@gmail.com Les Oakes 403.540.9859 lesoakes@gmail.com Dena Squarebriggs 403.760.0512 dmsquare04@hotmail.com Sandy Bell 403.700.7880 windhorseretreat@gmail.com Trish Mrakawa 403.938.6398 trish@willowgrovestables.com Nicolas Brown 587.988.3590 bruchev@gmail.com Alison Douglas 403.762.8570 thealicat@shaw.ca Tara Gamble 780.945.7516 tara@tghorsemanship.com Jason Edworthy 403.651.5678 jedworthy@spring-bank.ca Tiara Chambers 780.897.7446 royaltequestrian@gmail.com Janine Leroux 403.968.3311 j_zuk@hotmail.com Melonie Myszczyszyn 403.932.1108 meloniemysz@cciwireless.ca Brenda Spanier 403.932.2936 brendaspanier@gmail.com Becky Taylor 403.507.9935 beckyt.aht.oc@gmail.com Robert Simpson 780.628.2356 rms210@mail.usask.ca

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FALL 2018: September 7, 2018 WINTER 2018: November 3, 2018 FOR A MEDIA KIT AND/OR RATE CARD PLEASE CONTACT ALBERTABITS@ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM or marketing@albertaequestrian.com. All material is copyright 2018. Ideas and opinions expressed in articles do not necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of the AEF. Alberta Bits reserves the right to accept, and/or edit material submitted for publication. The AEF makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information contained therein, but assumes no liability in cases of error or changing conditions. Any business relations or other activities undertaken as a result of the information contained in Alberta Bits, or arising therefrom, is the responsibility of the parties involved and not of the AEF. We welcome signed letters to the editor, but reserve the right to publish, edit for grammar, taste and length. For reprint information, please contact execdir@albertaequestrian.com

6 PRESIDENT ’S MESSAGE 6 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S MESSAG E 8 TH E SOCIAL BIT 10 BITS & PIECES Introducing the AEF Provincial Award Recipients; Bursary Awards

Recipients; Pump Up Your Levels winners; and the new AEF Board of Directors.

FOR YO UR HORSE’S 12 CARING DENTAL NEEDS

Dr. Brittany Wise helps with advice for recognizing dental

disease in equine.

following surgery.

14 COLIC SYMPTOMS & POST EPISODE CARE Understanding different types of colic and what to expect

16 BREED PROFILE The multi-talented Friesian Horse.

20 SPEARING TH E BULL The growing allure of Working Equitation. 24 TRAINER’S CORNER How to coach riding students to great success. 28 AS K ABOUT INSURANCE Understanding personal liability coverage. 29 CLUB & BUSINESS LISTINGS 30 CLOSIN G THOUGHTS Celebrating the AEF’s big 40th anniversary! Post Colic

RECOVERY

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Common Equine

Traits of a

DENTAL ERRORS GREAT COACH

SUMMER 2018

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Message from President, Lauren Parker Hello Alberta! I’m excited to address you for the first time as the new President of the AEF. The next three years are going to be a wonderful journey for us as an organization and I hope you will put your faith and confidence in me to help facilitate making the AEF even better than we could have imagined. As this is my first report, there are only a few things I would like to touch on. First, thank you to those who put their name forth for election to the AEF Board. The candidate profiles were exemplary and I know it was not an easy decision for many to choose only six. To those who were elected, we look forward to fostering a strong culture to grow the membership. To those who were not elected, there is place for everyone in the AEF and we hope to see you on the board in the future. The AEF hosted its annual Stride With Us, AGM and Gala on Saturday March 24. This was the first time AEF hosted a gala type evening and there was enjoyment had by all. The AGM drew in a record number of attendees and we were extremely proud to honor our first ever Provincial Award recipients. During the evening gala, guests dined on an incredible meal while enjoying presentations from the clinical signs of colic, to how to handle the business of horse insurance and developing a personal

plan for defining success. There was a vast number of items at the silent auction and thanks to those who donated and bid; the AEF raised $2,500 to put towards the purchase of an Emergency Livestock Handling Equipment Trailer that can be utilized in emergency situations. Thank-you to all those who attended and welcomed in what is sure to be a great year ahead. After attending the 2018 Equestrian Canada Convention during the first week in April, it was proven to be a successful undertaking. Various meetings were attended and we saw progress made between the Provinces/Territories of Equestrian Canada. I look forward to the new relationships and contacts that were fostered out of this event. Going forward, please feel free to reach out to myself or any board members at any time. We would be pleased to attend meetings or events to share updates on the AEF and hear your input on how we can foster a stronger equine community with you. We are here to serve you, our devoted membership. Until next time, happy trails! AB

Message from Executive Director, Sonia Dantu The summer is that time of year we all look forward to, whether it is heading to the back country, enjoying non-competitive recreational activities, pleasure driving, artistic or cultural exercises with equine companions, competing at shows or simply enjoying long, warm summer days. Wrapping up 2017, the AEF annual report was presented to the membership electronically and at the Annual General Meeting held in Conjunction with Stride with Us on March 24, 2018. Thanks to those who took the time to attend and support the organization in its 40th year. The AEF would not exist without our members and we are truly grateful for your support. We encourage members to view the 2017 annual report highlights at the AEF website and see where your membership dollars were hard at work. Core Grant Funding – Over the past four years, AEF was notified about changes forthcoming to the Alberta Provincial Sport Organization (PSO) core funding and accountability framework from Alberta Sport Connection (ASC). In 2018, a new three-year funding cycle was announced and all PSO’s funded by ASC (80+ sports in Alberta). All PSO’s were assessed against annual reporting requirements on membership, finance, capacity and programming including long-term athlete development, coaching and under-represented populations; each PSO was placed in one of three tiers. AEF is extremely pleased to report that out of 18 PSO’s in Tier 1, ten (10) received an increased in funding and AEF was in the top four (4) for the highest amount received. AEF was commended by ASC for achieving the required accountability objectives over the years. ASC funding 6

ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

accounts for 8% of overall AEF revenue. Agreement with Equestrian Canada – A new Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was signed with Equestrian Canada (EC) in April. For the first time in many years, this agreement represents collaboration with EC and the PTSO’s in Canada. The PTSO’s presented a Business Case to the new EC Board of Directors in January 2018, this was met with full support. As a result, the membership across Canada will see improvements to National programs in three core areas; National Coaching Certification Program, Athlete Pathway Development (including rider levels, grassroots programs and officials program) and to improve PTSO and EC administrative efficiencies to benefit the membership. AEF Committees – With six new board members and many of those with different interests, backgrounds, values, viewpoints and abilities, the AEF membership will benefit from the work of these individuals on committees. It is difficult for the six AEF employees to cover all areas of expertise and all areas in the province. Committees are among the most important functioning forces of an organization. Committees represent, involve, and serve members, as well as provide an important training ground for future leaders of an organization. Because its summer and the memories are just waiting to happen. Enjoy. AB


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BITS & PIECES

PROVINCIAL AWARD RECIPIENTS

Back row, left to right: Rupert May, EC Vice President; Jill Barron, Barron Barn; Victoria Forbs, Dallyn Shields, Les Oakes, Fenella Murphy, Jean Smith, Amanda Penner, Patty Carley, Gabriel Klotz, EC 2017 Community Coach of the Year; Sandra Donnelly, EC 2017 Competitive Coach of the Year. Bottom Row, left to right: Lauren Parker, AEF President

The 2017 AEF Provincial Award recipients and two EC 2017 Coach Award recipients received their

awards at the 3rd annual Stride with Us on March 24, 2018 at the Executive Royal Hotel in Leduc, AB.

We are extremely proud of these deserving recipients who were nominated by their peers: Victoria Forbes – Outstanding Instructor/Coach of the Year. Fenella Murphy – Sportsmanship Excellence Award. Dallyn Shields – Outstanding Athlete/Rider of the Year. Jean Smith – Outstanding Volunteer of the Year. Patty Carley – Outstanding Contributor of the Year. Barron Barn – Outstanding Stable/Facility of the Year. Amanda Penner – Above and Beyond Excellence Award. The AEF is pleased to offer Annual Provincial Awards recognizing deserving members throughout our industry sectors and in the Alberta equine community. The 2018 Provincial Nominations will be open September 1, 2018 and close on December 31, 2018. Thank you to everyone who took the time to nominate deserving Alberta equine enthusiasts.

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BITS & PIECES

BURSARY AWARDS RECIPIENTS Sonja Burton English Rider Bursary Taylor Stock, Calgary AB Taylor considers herself very fortunate to have grown up with horses and has never looked back. As a child, she was always found in the stables and not much has changed. The thrill of eventing and the discipline of dressage have proven to be her great loves though what she values most is the quiet understanding between herself and her horses. Riding has been a huge part of her life and has led to many adventures and, she, has no doubt, will lead to many more. A love of horses has taken Taylor all over North America and to Europe. Now back in Canada, she continues to pursue her passion in this industry and share her experiences with others. Currently, Taylor has achieved her competition coaching certification and is employed as a coach. She also maintains a few training horses. She finds great fulfillment in helping riders and their horses understand each other as they reach closer to their goals. Taylor has a thirst for knowledge and improvement in her own riding. This bursary will go towards her professional development in providing opportunities for her to attend clinics and lectures that the AEF provides. Taylor states, “By improving myself I can pass my knowledge on to others and help the Alberta equestrian community grow. I am fortunate to be part of an equestrian community that is supportive of upcoming riders, amateur and professional. As a young rider becoming professional, I have greatly appreciated the support of AEF and found the Equestrian Canada Rider Levels program and the Coaching program very instrumental to my career.”

Charlene Baker Western Rider Bursary Piera Zemlak, Calgary AB Piera, a passionate and driven horsewoman, is a grade 12 student at Robert Thirsk High School. She has had a passion for horses ever since she was a young girl and enjoys everything related to equines. She has been lucky enough to be able to experience a variety of events such as the show circuit, gymkhanas, riding trails in the mountains, and hitching teams. Piera has also completed the Equine Technician program through Olds College and is currently a member of the Calgary Stampede Showriders; a youth program that performs across southern Alberta and tours to the US. Piera plans to utilize the Charlene Baker Western Rider bursary to help her complete her Western Instructor certificate whilst pursuing an engineering degree at the University of Calgary. In future, she plans to assist beginner riders to improve their horsemanship and explore the unbreakable connections and gentleness that horses have to offer. Piera states, “For future equestrians to succeed, I think it is crucial to advertise the learning opportu10

ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

Taylor Stock, Sonja Burton English Rider Bursary Recipient

Piera Zemlak, Charlene Baker Western Rider Bursary Recipient

nities, such as the rider program that AEF offers, and where to find the resources to succeed. As a member of the AEF, I’ve benefited, as they have provided me with ample opportunities to further my education in the equine industry and make connections with other like-minded individuals. The Western Learn to Ride program has benefitted me significantly as a rider by enforcing attention to detail, and gentle and subtle actions for a smooth and confident ride. Most importantly, my awareness of safety standards and understanding how to better care for my horses has been heightened significantly. Training with a certified coach has given me the learning experience of a lifetime and has shown me that every ride is furthering the training on my young horse.”

Pump Up Your Levels RECIPIENT WINNERS Instructor/Coach Lynda Tennessen, Edmonton AB Lynda Tennessen is a certified English riding instructor at Whitemud Equine Learning Centre (WELCA) in Edmonton, AB. She had her very first horse at WELCA in 1979. Since then she has ridden at several show barns, teaching and has done some showing as well. She has owned six other horses since then and two are still actively working in the Lesson program at WELCA. One is 26 years of age and the other is 36 years of age. She can’t help but want to share their great personalities to help teach the students in the recreational community based programs that WELCA provides. Lynda really enjoys the atmosphere at WELCA and the sense of belonging it gives to its users from the lesson programs to the field trips, to the Equine Assisted Therapy sessions, NAIT, Clinics and inclusive volunteer programs. Lynda feels that athlete development could be advanced in Alberta by the continued use of the rider level pro-


BITS & PIECES

grams. There are five certified instructors/coaches at WELCA, including Lynda, all who have a common interest through the rider level programming. Lynda states, “I am always thankful of the amazing way that the Equestrian Canada Rider Levels help us in setting up our riding classes and they help set up a progressive scheduled for increased learning in all aspects of riding and loving and caring for a horse. It also gives our students strong clear goals on what they would like to achieve in their riding classes.” Lynda plans to use this funding as financial aid for some of her students, to purchase books for the EC Rider Levels program. She also plans to use the funding for other educational materials such as DVD’s and/or a course for herself so that she could pass on further learning to her students. In closing Lynda shares, “I am very happy to be a part of the Alberta Equestrian Federation and am most thankful of the constant support we receive from them in the process of the Rider Levels and other matters that come up with running of a facility with so many students. I will continue to further my education in the industry by attending the amazing courses provided from or through the AEF.”

Takoda

an attached six stall barn with washroom facilities and wash bay for the horses. It is owned and operated by Wendy Martin, EC/NCCP certified Western Competition Coach, and her husband and family. Takoda Ranch’s lesson program consists mainly of riders hauling in with their own horses. It is well maintained which means that it requires gravel for the trailers to park without getting stuck and hoses to water the arena, because good footing is a must. There is always tack, stable supplies, and first aid kits available. This funding will be put to good use by starting with hoses, sprinklers (a way to keep the wash bay from freezing up in winter), more heat tape and of course, there is always a need for more sand. Wendy Martin, owner of Takoda Ranch, states, “The Learn to Ride Program has really benefited me both as a Coach and a facility. It provides structure and progression and I keep the criteria posted on the barn wall so students have a better understanding of where they are at and what to work towards. As a Coach, I love that the AEF has always been right there to answer any questions and make sure that we are all on the same page. They strive to keep the standards high and I for sure plan to use and help promote this program for years to come.” Takoda Ranch’s riders and coaches are always striving to learn more within the equine industry.

Stable/Facility Ranch, Drayton Valley AB

Takoda Ranch is centrally located, with easy access and offers an unheated 70’ x 172’ indoor riding arena. It also has

NEW AEF BOARD OF DIRECTORS Thank you to all AEF members, guests, award recipients and guest speakers who attended the AEF AGM, Stride with Us and AEF’s First Annual Awards Banquet in Leduc, AB. The event was very well attended and enjoyed by all. We are pleased to announce the AEF Board of Directors that will be serving the membership: Lauren Parker, President; Sandy Bell, President Elect and Treasurer; Les Oakes, Past President; Dena Squarebriggs, Secretary; and the following individual members: Nicolas Brown, Alison

Douglas, Trish Mrakawa, Tara Gamble, Jason Edworthy, Tiara Chambers, Janine Leroux, Melonie Myszczyszyn, Brenda Spanier and Becky Taylor. A special thank you to past AEF Board members, Lew Hand and Robert Simpson for their support, volunteerism and dedication over the years. AEF would also like to thank all nominees that put their name forward. A total of ten nominations were submitted for six positions on the Board. ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

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Caring for Your Horse’s

DENTAL Needs All horses – even those considered to have a “good mouth” – need regular equine dental care from a veterinarian, for the early identification of potential problems. B y J enn Webster

In response to constantly changing food sources, climates and due to evolution, horses have tough, continuously erupting teeth. Consequently, this has required veterinarians to have a comprehensive understanding of equine dental anatomy and their knowledge on the subject must continually improve. Dental care for horses is essential to their performance, feed utilization and overall well-being. Equine teeth erupt continuously at 2-3mm per year throughout a horse’s life and because of this continuous eruption, any teeth which are out of alignment with opposing teeth will develop overgrowths. Proper care performed by a licensed veterinarian leads to improved equine health and welfare. Although every equine is different and every dental case has varying circumstances, we asked Dr. Brittany Wise, DVM of Wise Equine Veterinary Services in Crossfield, AB, for some general advice on recognizing dental disease in the horse. 12

ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

Q

WHAT ARE THE MOST COMMON EQUINE DENTAL “MISTAKES” YOU SEE HORSE OWNERS MAKE?

Dr. Wise – Not doing routine dental exams/maintenance, or waiting until the horse displays a problem eating. Lastly, underestimating the effect that proper dentistry can have on performance.

Q

DEFINE A TYPICAL ROUTINE DENTAL EXAM.

Dr. Wise – This would first involve sedation for the safety of the horse and examiner and to allow thorough examination. Next we perform an external exam and palpation of the skull including the chewing muscles, jaw, and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Next it’s visualization and palpation of all teeth and soft tissues (the gums, tongue and cheek). I use a dental mirror and sometimes a pick to assess the chewing surfaces of the teeth. We must evaluate how well the horse’s teeth are contacting each other when the jaw is moved side to side. Lastly, it’s the length and shape of the horse’s incisors.


Q

HOW OFTEN SHOULD A HORSE RECEIVE DENTAL CARE?

Dr. Wise – In most cases I recommend annual examinations. Between the ages of two and four we recommend twice-a-year exams due to the shedding of caps and the potential problems that can arise. In certain cases (severe wave, missing teeth, periodontal disease, misplaced teeth, etc.) the horse may also need an exam every six months. Geriatric horses (late teens or into their twenties) will sometimes need to be done more often because they start to have teeth expire and may have mobile teeth which need to be extracted. In cases where a horse is not being ridden, doesa lot of grazing and has well aligned teeth – sometimes they can go two years between floats. However, I still recommend an annual dental exam for these horses to ensure there are no issues to address. For performance animals, I recommend annual dentistry.

SIGNS INDICATING YOUR HORSE MAY HAVE A DENTAL PROBLEM:

• Training issues, especially with the bit. • Head tossing. • Dropping food while chewing. • Head tilted while eating. • Excessive bit mouthing. • Colic. • Undigested grain in manure. • Weight loss. • Bad breath or nasal discharge.

EQUINE DENTAL ANATOMY There are several dental tissues that make up the anatomy of a horse’s mouth. These include: • Enamel—The hardest body tissue. When the equine tooth erupts its complete enamel content is laid down and wears progressively throughout a horse’s lifetime. • Cementum—The softest of the calcified dental tissues, which covers the tooth’s root and holds the tooth in place by anchoring it to the periodontal ligaments. • Dentin—As the main tooth structure, this living calcified tissue without blood supply supports tooth enamel. In the equine tooth, enamel and cementum wear away, leaving dentin unprotected on the occlusal surface. • Pulp—Tooth pulp is soft, sensitive, and vascular and contains the blood vessels necessary to deliver nutrients to the dentin-building odontoblasts that give horses’ teeth sensation. • Periodontal tissue—These tissues (including the gingiva and periodontal ligament), alveolar bone (socket), and cementum attach the teeth to the jawbones and allow for flexibility and tooth eruption.

Proper care performed by a licensed veterinarian leads to improved equine health and welfare.

Dr. Brittany Wise helps us with some advice for recognizing dental disease in horses.


H o r s e keep i n g

Colic Symptoms & Post Episode Care One of the most frustrating and mystifying diseases of horse ownership include the dreaded symptoms of colic and post-care after an episode. Alberta Bits breaks down some of the different types of colic, and what you can expect if your horse requires surgical intervention. B y Lo u isa Murc h White

Colic – it’s a term most horse owners know all too well, but what exactly is colic and how do we care for our horses after an episode? According to the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS), colic is a general term that refers to abdominal pain in the horse. In the equine industry, the word colic seems frustratingly prevalent, and this is due to its nondiscriminatory nature. It can affect horses of all ages and breeds and can vary from a mild case that resolves itself, all the way to a serious case that will require surgical intervention. On either end of the spectrum, consulting your veterinarian as soon as you observe any signs or symptoms of a colic episode is always in the horse owner’s best interest. According to the ACVS, signs of a colic episode vary widely. “Signs of pain may appear as mild symptoms such as looking at the flank, lifting the upper lip, no interest in eating and kicking the hind legs up towards the abdomen. However, often severe symptoms can be noted in horses such as repeatedly laying down and getting up and violently rolling up onto their backs or throwing themselves down on the ground.” Horse owners may also observe pawing, depression, inappetence, stretching out, dog sitting, sweating, increased 14

ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

heart rate, less than normal to no manure production, or even diarrhea. The wide variety of symptoms makes colic episodes more difficult to pin-point right away and signs often depend on the personality of the individual horse. There are various types of colic, again ranging from mild to severe. One common cause of colic is an impaction colic. This type of colic occurs when a dense mass of food becomes impacted in the large intestine of the horse. This is often caused by dehydration and causes constipation. An impaction can generally be treated easily, usually through fluids, pain relief and laxatives, although some cases do require surgical intervention. Another common colic episode that is generally easily treated is caused by gas and is known as spasmodic colic. Gas will build in the abdomen due to excess fermentation or a decreased ability to move gas throughout the body. This causes the intestine to stretch and can be painful for the horse. More serious colics include those caused by equine parasites, such as tapeworms, strongyles and roundworms. Lastly, displacement or “twisted gut” is often the most serious colic cause that veterinarians will have to deal with. A twisted gut occurs when part of the intestine has shifted places in the


HORS E K E E P IN G Opposite Page: Colic episodes that go surgical are scary, there’s no doubt. Still, the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) states that surgical success rates have improved dramatically over the years due to early referral and prompt surgical intervention.

Right: Caring for colic survivors, especially those requiring surgery is no easy task. However, with proper care it is possible to help our horse transition back to their previous lives. Jenn Webster

abdomen and begins to twist, causing a torsion that blocks the horse’s blood supply. A displacement requires immediate veterinary attention and often, without surgery, horses will die. Once you have determined your horse is experiencing symptoms of a colic episode, your veterinarian will ask several questions such as if your horse has recently traveled, if you have changed their routine or feed schedule, if they are on any medications and if they regularly experience colic symptoms. From there, they will perform a physical examination which typically includes a rectal examination and blood work and may include an ultrasound examination of the abdomen, a gastroscopy to evaluate for ulcers and passing a nasogastric tube to check for accumulation of fluid in the stomach. Colic can be handled in two ways, medical and surgical. Medical treatment will generally consist of Banamine or sedation, laxatives administered directly into the stomach via a nasogastric tube and then re-hydration with oral or IV fluids. These three medical interventions will generally clear up a mild case of colic, however, if the horse remains uncomfortable and in pain, your veterinarian may opt for a surgical approach. Perhaps even scarier than the word colic for most horse owners, is the term surgery. As discussed, there are a multitude of variations of colic, however if your horse has a large impaction that will not pass, a foreign body blocking the small colon, a twist of the large colon or a strangulation of the small intestine by a fatty tumour, surgery will most likely be required. Survival rates for many types of colic-related surgeries are high and the ACVS states that surgical success rates have improved dramatically over the years due to early referral and prompt surgical intervention. Equine surgery almost always begins with the veterinary staff clipping the hair around your horses’ abdomen and administering intravenous fluids. From there your horse will be anesthetized and a large endotracheal tube will be placed in their windpipe to keep the airway open during anesthesia. Hobbles will be placed on their lower legs and they will be hooked to a hoist and trolley to lift him onto a surgery table. Each colic surgery is different, the surgeon will make an incision on the lowest part of your horses’ abdomen and then will explore the area to discover the root cause of the problem. Often large amounts of the intestine must be pulled out of the abdomen and emptied or repositioned to discover where the problem is coming from. Once diagnosed, the surgeon will then plan out the treatment. This could include repositioning displaced intestine, removing damaged intestine or clearing the intestine of blockage. The care required post surgery is often the most laborious and difficult part of a colic. This is when horse owners must take extra care and be sure that their horses’ are healing properly. For horses that require severe surgery, most veterinarians will recommend the animal stays at the hospital for a lengthy period of time – they will require monitoring as well as large

amounts of intravenous fluids and medications as they heal. For horses struggling to heal, complications can include abdominal infection, laminitis, colic recurrence and incision problems. The most common problems veterinarians see are the effects of endotoxaemia, which is toxins released by the damaged gut, continued abdominal pain or when the intestine becomes paralyzed, known as ileus. However, horses recovering at a healthy rate will likely be discharged from the hospital at five to seven days post operation. It is recommended that once home, horses be put on stall rest for six to eight weeks and hand-walked several times per day. It is an arduous process but stall confinement is a necessity because if a horse is turned out and starts to run and play, the weight of the intestines and organs could rupture the surgical incision. The six to eight weeks of stall rest is generally the appropriate time for a horse to slowly heal and have the incision strengthen over time. Veterinarians will recommend specific treatment instructions depending on the cause of colic and prognosis post-surgery. Horse owners may be required to administer medication, change their horses’ feed program and feed schedule and will require regular veterinary visits before they can go back to their normal day-to-day lives. When faced with any type of colic situation, it is always best to call your veterinarian immediately and allow them to plan a strategy to get your horses back to feeling their best. AB ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

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The

Friesian

From story book tales to modern times, the Friesian Horse went from the horses of royalty and knights, to competing in exhilarating combined driving competitions and high-level dressage performances, amongst other activities. B y Lo uisa Murc h White

Often when horse lovers envision the regal Friesian Horse they picture a princess on a gorgeous fairy tale black horse with a long, flowing mane. Truth be told, when it comes to the historic breed, that image isn’t far from the truth. The Friesian breed originated in the province of Friesland 16

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in the northern Netherlands. There are records of the breed that go as far back as the fourth century where there are mentions of Friesian troops who rode their own horses, the Friesian Horse to battle. In the 11th century, illustrations appeared of the early ancestors to the Friesian horse and often depicted

knights riding horses, the most famous example being William the Conqueror. During the 16th and 17th centuries, there was less demand for a true heavy war horse as weaponry and armoury were becoming lighter. At this time, the Netherlands were briefly linked with Spain and Andalusian horses were


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Horse Above: Marita and Nita Floryn compete in the fast-paced sport of combined driving with their Friesian horses. Flynn Photography

crossbred with Friesians to produce a lighter horse more suitable to work as carriage horses. This gave the Friesian Horse higher knee action, a relatively small head and an arching neck. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the breed remained popular as harness horses as well as the preferred horse for upperclass farmers. The 20th century beckoned in the era of mechanization. Farmers no longer needed the Friesian for farm

work, they found them too luxurious and there was a move away from the breed which almost led to its extinction. However, in 1879 Friesian farmers and landowners gathered to found the first studbook society, Het Friesch Paard. These calculated moves from early breeders of the Friesian Horse certainly saved the breed and now there are over 70,000 registered Friesians across the world. In modern times, Friesian horses

began appearing on the international driving scene which fuelled a strong revival for the breed and in 1974, the first importations of the breed were made to North America. The studbook society is now known as The Royal Friesian Horse Studbook, the Koninklijke Vereniging “Het Friesch Paarden - Stamboek” (KFPS) and promotes the interests of the Friesian horse in the broadest sense of the word. The KFPS has 10,000+ members, and half are located outside of the Netherlands. The registration of horses in other countries is done by the KFPS in Holland through local associations affiliated with the KFPS. Friesian Horses in both the Netherlands and other countries are inspected according to KFPS standards by society-trained members. Inspections are known as “keuring.” Inspections begin with the Foal Book and are for young horses and horses not yet accepted into the Studbook. Beginning at age three, inspections begin for geldings and mares to meet the Studbook requirements. During these inspections, horses are judged on conformation and their movement at the walk, the trot and sometimes at liberty. The selection of stallions consists of more phases. In the first phase the stallions (age three and older) are approved based on their own merit during the inspection. The second phase is the Central Testing, where the collected information and assessment is used to decide whether a stallion will be entered into the studbook register. In the third phase, the approved stallion is tested on his offspring and then it is decided if that stallion is approved permanently. Worldwide, KFPS has many affiliate associations and in North America, the KFPS and Friesian Horse owners are represented by the Friesian Horse Association of North America (FHANA). FHANA is the only official organizer of Friesian Horse inspection (keuring) events which are hosted by local FHANA chapters. KFPS certified judges from Holland travel to North ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

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America to officiate these events and judge horses. FHANA also administers studbook registration, transfer of ownership and brings together Friesian horse owners for sales and breeding. One of the larger local chapters of FHANA is the Alberta Friesian Horse Association (AFHA) which represents Alberta, North-East British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, the Northwest Territories and the Yukon. AFHA hosts the keurings with KFPS judges from the Netherlands, organizes club events, trail rides, driving and riding clinics with well-known national and international clinicians. AFHA also has a musical ride group that trains and performs in Alberta and participates in a variety of parades and events, such as the Mane Event and Calgary Stampede with their beautiful Friesians. AFHA Secretary and Treasurer, Annie Muilwijk, owns Muilwijk Friesians, alongside her husband Kees. The team breed, train and show Friesian horses, and became hooked on the breed while living in their original home country of Holland. “We emigrated to Canada 12 years ago from 18

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Holland where we had a dairy farm. Riding horses was more of a hobby for me, but when I started to learn how to drive, I was totally hooked,” says Muilwijk. Their original Friesian mare came with them to Canada where she had her first foal, and the Muilwijk’s connected with Wim and Nita Floryn of Gull Lake Farm, who breed and show Friesians. “At the time, Gull Lake Farm had around 15 to 20 Friesian horses that they used in parades, carriage horses for weddings, took on trail rides, really everything. We began going with them to these events, and got more involved, from there we started breeding as well and currently we have 15 Friesians from youngsters to show horses and breeding mares.” Muilwijk credits the Friesian Horse for their easy to train and kind personalities. “They are very friendly and honest horses. I love them for how they show, they always look so majestic. They are also really easy to work with, and that is definitely one of their best characteristics. Another factor is that they can be driven and ridden, we have begun to see many Frisians showing in

higher dressage classes. You can use them for many, many things.” As the breed and fanbase has grown, so have the activities you see Friesian’s involved in. Friesians are commonly seen on the fast-paced combined driving courses, one of the fastest growing equestrian sports in North America. Muilwijk adds, “Friesians are great trail horses. One member of our club, Kenton Miller of Kaspian Equestrian participates in dressage with his horses, but he also has a Friesian that is a fantastic working equitation horse and he shows in those classes as well.” Other members are active in the dressage show ring and they achieve high points with their Friesians. AFHA is an active club that organizes many events for their members and has been handed the reins to host the 35th anniversary celebration of the Friesian Horse Association of North America which is being hosted at the Calnash Ag Event Centre in Ponoka, Alberta, July 15-17, 2019. Muilwijk calls this an honour for both the club and its members, that AFHA was chosen to host this prestigious event. For spectators, Muilwijk says that there will


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be something for everyone to see. “We will have shows and events throughout the day of July 16th, there will be dressage and driving demonstrations and competitions. We have invited clinicians from Holland who will discuss driving and we will invite the audience to come and try driving if they never have before.� The final exciting aspect of the celebration will be the recreation of a traditional Friesian demonstration, the quadrille. For the event, eight of AFHA’s members with their pairs of horses will form a drill team with carriages, an exciting and exhilarating demonstration to watch. The traditional quadrille is famous in Holland, comprised of eight “sjees� (two-wheeled carriages), drawn by Friesians, driven by gentlemen accompanied by a lady, both dressed in traditional costumes like those worn in the 1850’s. Complex patterns are driven which shows the drivers’ trust in

the obedience of their horses. Muilwijk says, “It’s truly beautiful and we want to recreate it, and do it justice.� She adds that AFHA is really looking forward to the celebration, “We have a great group of people organizing the celebration and it’s going to be great.� AB

Opposite Page: Friesian horses are popular for parades due to their quiet demeanour and stunning presence under harness. Mark Muilwijk

Above: The Alberta Friesian Horse Association facilitates many events and activities for lovers of the Friesian breed, including their own musical ride which performs at the Calgary Stampede and other events abroad. Kees Muilwijk

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Spearing the Bull The emerging sport of Working Equitation. B y Cyndi Rowat

An intoxicating sport is developing on Canada’s equestrian scene. One that lures the perfectionist with its clarity of detail and yet, handily satisfies the adrenaline junkie. While its roots emanate from Iberian traditions, equestrians from all disciplines are discovering this multi-faceted sport where the thrill is in the skill and thankfully, the only bull encountered will be a silhouetted one. Working Equitation (WE) is the invention of European cattlemen where tradition, culture and horses entwine. Portuguese and Spanish cattlemen working their herds with a garrocha – a long, lance-like pole; their Iberian horses’ cat-like agility maneuvering themselves out of the way of the horned, temperamental cattle of the Spanish steppes. The sport offers an arena in which to showcase the mastery of these essential fieldwork skills, demanding versatility and consistency through four

phases of competition including cattle work, two phases of obstacle work and a dressage phase. In each phase the emphasis is on harmony, fluidity and horsemanship. Since being introduced to the world in 1996 by its four founding countries; France, Spain, Italy and Portugal, the sport has enraptured riders across Europe, North America and Australasia.

“I love that it is a diverse sport and that it challenges you,” says the trainer, coach and mother of three from Duck Lake, SK. “It heavily focuses on quality horsemanship.” “This is a very welcoming multidisciplinary and multi-breed sport,” attests Jungman, “It is so diverse. I’ve seen Thoroughbreds, Andalusians, Arabs, Canadians, Morgans…everything.” The sport offers a rare opportunity for riders to be as successful in their western saddles, cowboy hats and chaps as those in their English breeches and tack and all in the same arena. With the layout of seven levels plus a children’s level, there is a suitable level for everyone to start and most importantly, somewhere to grow. From the Introductory Level, Novice A & B, Intermediate A & B, Advanced to Masters, each level brings increasingly more complex skills. You will need a horse at least four years of age

“I love that it is a diverse sport and that it challenges you.”

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~ Kim Jungman Kim Jungman, president of Working Equitation Canada (WECan) was originally captivated by the sport watching a YouTube video of Pedro Torres, multiple European and World Champion. “It had everything in it that I would love to do,” she recalls.


Opposite Page: Competing at the Fiesta of the Spanish Horse in California in 2017, Jill Barron pilots ‘Xander’ in the Advanced division. The pair captured Reserve Champion for owner, Robin Bond. LKurtz Photography

to be able to compete at the Novice level. The Introductory (Level 1) is elementary by design, making it inviting for new riders and new or young horses. Level 1 requires walk and rising or sitting trot and has no speed trial. Conversely, at Intermediate A (Level 4), requirements include sitting trot and simple changes through the walk. In levels up through Intermediate B (Level 5) the phases may be ridden with one or two hands after which, reins must be in one hand. This may not be an issue for many western riders but for many English riders, it may be one of the challenges in moving up the levels. At the highest levels; Advanced and Masters (an international level), all phases are ridden with one hand, riders are required to sit the trot and all canter transitions are executed with flying lead changes. To be a sanctioned competition, the Dressage, Ease of Handling and Speed phases are required. The Cattle Handling phase is included when venues with suitable cattle facilities are able to provide a team competition. WE’s blueprint is unique and while there are similarities with existing disciplines it is important to consider the sport from a fresh perspective. “We know that word ‘dressage’ scares people,” chuckles Jungman. “Both English and western. But it is a working dressage, it is not about the big movements you often see in modern dressage.” The dressage component encourages the athletic development of the horse with the goal of executing appropriate level movements in a working atmosphere. Each of the movements required in the dressage phase at each level tie in with that of the level of skill required in the Ease of Handling (EOH) phase. In the EOH, an obstacle course pattern is designed to replicate what a working cattleman may encounter in the field. Competitors navigate 8 to 15 obstacles depending on their level. Each obstacle has a numerical score with marks awarded for transitions/navigation, gait, impulsion, submission, rider and presentation. Navigated well, the phase should be smooth,

International Working Equitation Time Line 1996 Working equitation is a newcomer in

equestrian sport. The first European Championships were hosted in Italy in 1996 with representation from Italy, Portugal, Spain and France. Today, the World Association of Working Equitation (WAWE) is represented by sixteen countries.

1996

European Championship

2002

2002 The first World Championships were hosted in Portugal in 2002 and have been contested every four years since.

2005 Until 2005 the four core countries com-

peted for the European Championships. WAWE is formed

2003

1st World Championship

2004 2005 2006

Australia joins WAWE

2007

2006 The first Junior results were recorded in 2006 with the European Championships hosting the first Junior/Young Riders Championship in 2015.

2015 In 2015 the first World Cup was hosted in Tatui, Brazil. Eight countries participated with Brazilian breeders providing the horse power.

2018 The next World Championships are to be hosted

2008 2009 2010

May 2018 in Munich, Germany.

2011

USA organizations formed

Confederation for Working Equitation

2012 2013 2014 2015 We United is Created Merge of WEIAUSA Working Equitation International Association USA and USFWE United States Federation of Working Equitation.

ridden with accuracy and should exhibit the ease of handling of the horse in, on and around the obstacles. The speed round may carry some trepidation unless you are an adrenaline junkie or race-horse incarnate. The objective is to navigate the 10 to 12 obstacles in the correct order with no errors, as quickly and efficiently as possible. Imagine the painful 30-second penalty assessed for not correctly securing the gate! Time penalties and bonuses are as-

WE Can is formed

2016 2017

Working Equitation Judge

sessed to the rider’s elapsed time. While the obstacle rounds may resemble cowboy challenge or trail classes, this sport features clear expectations on 19 set obstacles. This allows riders to work on correct execution and build confidence. It is important for riders to familiarize themselves with the required gait for both EOH and speed rounds as performing an incorrect gait between or on obstacles is also penalized. The obstacles for the EOH and Speed ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

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Left: Kendra Martland of Cochrane, AB, spearing the ring on her Spanish Norman “Montague” at the WE United Championships, OR in 2017. Michael T Photography Right: Jill Barron of Turner Valley, AB, and her Quarter Horse mare “Steveo” captured the Intermediate A Open Division at the Haras Cup in Magnolia, TX – Oct. 2017. Kellee Campbel Photo

as a trainer – I love competition. To go toe-to-toe with the big trainers, to be in the winner’s circle with them was a proud moment.” Barron is the owner/operator of the Barron Barn and recipient of the 2017 AEF Outstanding facility of the Year award. Enjoying success as a coach, trainer and competitor, Barron continues to raise the bar on her skills. “I find when you go out to compete in a big international setting like that – it’s inspiring. I just want to get that much better.” admits Barron. Now a sought-after clinician across North America, Barron is excited about the sport’s continued development. rounds include bridges, gates, side passing poles, backing through obstacles and the obstacle of infamy – the spearing of a ring on the bull – for which competitors who manage to wield their 12-foot garrocha pole through the 6” ring, are rewarded with 10 precious seconds off their time. While the cattle trial is not a required element until the Advanced levels, it adds an exciting element to the sport. This is a timed team trial, similar to cattle penning, where each team member is required to sort and cut a pre-selected cow from the herd and then, as a team, herd it to a designated pen while avoiding course errors. Without the cattle phase, the sport is easily accessible and can be hosted in more venues. WE truly is its own entity. No Bull. And in the hands of the masters of the sport, it is living equestrian art.

Albertan Cowgirl International Success

While WE may not yet be on the tip of the tongues of many equestrians, Canadian athletes are making an impact in the competitive arena. Alberta horse trainer and WE clinician and judge Jill Barron of Turner Valley, AB has leaped into this sport with both spurred boots. Barron is a newly minted champion, winning the Intermediate ‘A’ Open divi22

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sion on her Quarter Horse mare at the Haras Cup in Magnolia, Texas this past October. The Haras Cup being one of the most prestigious events on the continent. Her efforts in 2017 earned her top five rankings with the Confederation of WE USA including Regional International Championships in both Open Level 4 (Intermediate A) and Level 6 (Advanced) divisions. Inaugurated into the sport in 2015 at the urging of client Jacquie McArthur of Okotoks, AB, her WE debut came on the back of McArthur’s Australian Stock Horse in Katy, TX. In early 2017, Barron captured a Reserve Championship at the Fiesta of the Spanish Horse in Burbank, CA riding in the Advanced division for owner Robin Bond. For Barron – the Haras Cup win was the defining moment. As a coach, with success for her clients; Jacquie McArthur winning the Amateur division and Shannon Jaycock of Calgary, AB capturing third as well as a competitor winning on her own horse. Her mount, ‘Steveo’, an experienced team roping and breakawayroping horse but a rookie in the sport of working equitation, rose to the challenge under Barron’s expert guidance. “It was incredible. It was the affirmation that we could compete on a big stage. The best in the nation were there,” says Barron at a loss for words. “For me

Spearing Success – Connection is Key

As one of ten directors on the Working Equitation Canada board (WECan), Barron has been passionate about the sport’s upbringing. Barron recently became Canada’s first licensed working equitation ‘r’ judge with the Confederation for WE. Credentials which allow her to judge B-rated competitions (the first show level above schooling shows) from children to intermediate levels. She is also a technical delegate and International Director for the Confederation for WE USA board. The components of this sport offer a feast for the meticulous rider and Barron shares her strategies from her various perspectives for achieving success in this sport of accuracy and precision. “The key components are rhythm, relaxation, connection, impulsion, straightness and collection,” emphasizes Barron. “Working on your horse’s frame and body control. If you have that, you can do anything.” This concept is emphasized in the scoring as competitors have the potential to earn an additional point on every mark simply by improving their horse’s acceptance of contact and quality of engagement. With this solid foundation to work with, Barron zeros in on the details.


The rider in the dressage and the EOH should be attentive to the nuances of their transitions and be attentive to the symmetry of their circles and serpentines so they have proper flexion and are equal in size and shape and have a consistent rhythm.

Barron’s Top Tips: 1. Train your horse to be a confident partner and leader. Let it do the thinking. Riders are there to prepare and facilitate but the horse must be able to do it on its own. 2. Trust in the process. Take the time to learn the maneuvers essential for success. Find an instructor to help. The success is in the details, as with any sport. 3. Don’t cut corners. Have a diligent training program and put in the work. Training a horse in general takes a lot of dedication and time. Enjoy the process and be realistic about where you are at and what you need to work on. “Connection, engagement and symmetry. That’s how you score well,” says Barron succinctly.

Canadian Objective: Accessibility – Quality Horsemanship

WE is an accessible, fun sport for every breed of horse and discipline of riding. It is easy to get involved due to the dedication of advocates like Barron and Jungman. “Preserving the value of quality horsemanship,” that was Jungman’s main objective when she set out to form WECan in 2015 – the organization that promotes, organizes and facilitates the

sport in Canada. In the two years since, WECan has grown to represent 10 regions including the Northern territories and the Maritimes. Alberta clearly dominates the national landscape and BC and Saskatchewan are showing a strong, growing contingency. In 2017, Alberta hosted the first B-rated show at the Canadian National Andalusian and Lusitano Horse Show in Red Deer after hosting non-rated shows the previous two years. “This year there are a larger number of schooling shows planned, 3 B-rated shows scheduled in Alberta and the first B-rated show in Saskatchewan.” “WECan is focused on growth,” affirms Jungman. “We are working with

YouTube Mashup:

Pedro Torres and Oxidado: An undisputed star in the sport, Pedro Torres has many videos to inspire you: www.youtube.com/watch?v=5895K-Xjupk

Equestrian Canada (EC) to become an accredited sport. We are looking to be as visible as possible.” WECan and their supporters are ensuring there are plenty of opportunities for WECan enthusiasts throughout Canada to get involved. The thrill is in the skill – the sport appeals to technical riders focused on horsemanship with an appetite for an adrenaline rush and a lot of fun. WE will challenge your foundation, stretch your perceived limits and you’ll meet really great people. Ride Inspired. WECan’s website posts links to regional Facebook pages and websites: http://workingequitationcanada.com/regionallinks/ AB

Aim High. Watching Masters in the sport can be inspiring. Here’s a list of our favourites.

Eduardo Almeida and Santos: www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxT4HvYGupY Keep it Real –

Keep it Real – Novice Speed Test, this video includes narration. www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSZqkwYYs2I ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

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trainer’s corner

coaching for Success

A great coach who can inspire, mentor and train a rider and horse is sometimes hard to find. The Equestrian Canada instructor/coaching program is making it easier for equestrians to seek out professional coaches across our nation. B y Lo uisa Murc h White

Tiara Chambers of Royal T Equestrian in Grand Prairie, AB, sits on the Board of Directors for the AEF and is also a Coach Developer with Equestrian Canada (EC). Chambers’ focus is in three day eventing, but her passion for coaching riders transcends past the English saddle to western-focused riders, and beginner equestrians as well. The EC instructor/coaching program was developed in partnership with the National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP), the Coach24

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ing Association of Canada (CAC) and Sport Canada. The EC instructor/coaching program is the only Canadian equestrian instructor/ coach certifying program recognized internationally by the CAC and the Canadian Olympic Committee. The goals and objectives of the program include offering an acceptable standard of developing coaches and to provide a structure where coaches can enter and progress as they improve their expertise. The program aims to improve the level of performance and competence


trainer’s corner

Opposite Page: A good coach will be aware of a rider’s goals, be a big advocate for safety and will always act professionally. Jenn Webster

Below: Great instructors repeatedly show characteristics that make positive effects on their students.

of Canadian equestrian coaches, as well as their students. dteigen, the Coaching Coordinator for the AEF, has been Achieving and maintaining certification as an EC coach amazing at supporting new coaches coming in, those wanttestifies to the instructor’s professionalism and competence ing to advance and coaches in the program itself. The EC as a teacher in equestrianism. Candidates are evaluated at and AEF work very closely together to facilitate the growth of these individuals.” the highest national standard and must provide evidence of Chambers’ role is to advocate riding ability, a cleared police check, and educate about the curriculum, first aid/CPR certification, adher“Through the program I offer the ence to the EC code of ethics and rider level workshops so that people conduct, as well as complete profescan get started into the program, as sional development as set forth by well as workshops and lessons to offer the CAC. mentorship to new coaches,” she says. As a Coach Developer within the “At these workshops coaches can EC program, Chambers certifies come in, practice different aspects coaches, is involved in the evolutions of the program such as emergency and advocates for the program itself. ~Tiara Chambers preparedness or lesson planning, and Chambers is passionate about the program that is bringing a higher level of professionalism then we will work with them on delivery of the topic and to coaches across Canada. “The thing I love most about different teaching techniques. We want everyone to bring a the program is that it’s been built over time by key people creative twist to their coaching style, we want them to make in our industry who worked alongside the CAC to develop it their own but keep the structure of the program as well.” As a coach herself, and through the role of Coach Developer the program. As I was going through the program myself, I mentored with Trish Mrakawa of Willow Grove Stables who with the EC and Director with the AEF, Chambers has some challenged me to pursue my Coach Developer status. The fantastic insight on what makes a great coach. “I always tell program has been growing by leaps and bounds. Erin Lun- people to find somebody that is interested in what you are

The thing I love most about the program is that it’s been built over time by key people in our industry who worked alongside the CAC to develop the program.

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t tr r aa ii n n ee r r ’’ ss c co or rn n ee r r doing with your horse and wants to help you accomplish your personal goals. I advise people: to do their research, look for someone who is in the right area for what your level is, as well as your horse’s level.” Once you have someone in mind, Chambers offers a check-list of attributes to look for. “Number one for me is that they need to advocate for safety. Make sure that their facility is a safe environment. Do they have first-aid and do they know how to use it? Make sure your coach has the safety and first-aid equipment close by and that they have the safety measures in place – like an emergency ~Tiara preparedness plan, in case of an accident or emergency.” From there, equestrians should be aware of their personal goals and if their new coach will be able to help them achieve them. Chambers says, “Too often in the industry I hear that we don’t have that many certified coaches who have gone through the pathways to ensure they have the background, knowledge and safety awareness in place to be top coaches. When choosing a coach, ask yourself, ‘Are these people investing in their own knowledge? Are they taking clinics, continuing their education and researching new information for both horse and rider?’”

With her own students Chambers likes to focus on short term goals, which she calls smart goals. “I like to help make my riders achieve short term goals for both themselves and their horses. That way they can easily check goals off the list and feel they are achieving more and more.” In that same vein of thought, Chambers advises that coaches should be flexible. “I challenge all of our instructors to be flexible, a rider may come in and what the lesson plan is for the day may not be best suited for the horse and rider that day. Riders have to learn how to ride the horse they have that day and flexibility is a Chambers key aspect of that.” Coaches must also be tuned-in to their students. “When choosing the right coach for you, make sure they are invested in you as a person. Coaches should take the time to know who you are so they can respect and honour you as a rider. Maybe you are having a terrible day and are very tired – a coach should be able to pick up on that, know when to push you and know when to back off and support you.” Check the AEF website for a list of Certified Coaches in your area. Professionalism is another paramount characteristic of a great coach, in Chambers’ mind.

I always tell people to find somebody that is interested in what you are doing with your horse and wants to help you accomplish your personal goals.

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trainer’s corner Opposite Page: A good coach will be aware of a rider’s goals, be a big advocate for safety and will always act professionally. Jenn Webster

Below: As a coach herself, and a Coach Developer with Equestrian Canada, Tiara Chambers has developed a strict set of guidelines for what she believes makes a great coach in the horse industry.

“Coaches should value your time, and vice-versa. Both rider and coach should be on time and prepared for the lesson. Professionalism is such a big thing for me, I tell all my coaches to dress for the job that you want. I show up in my breeches to every lesson, I am ready to ride, even if I never ride. A great coach also watches their language, they keep everything professional and polished.” Finally, a coach puts their rider and their growth, first. “A coach will inspire you and will help you succeed, even if that means leaving them to go ride with a more advanced coach who can help you achieve even higher goals. In our sport, people come and go as they advance and grow their skill set. I advocate to my riders to grow as far as they can and when they are ready, I can introduce them to clinicians and coaches who they can continue their career with. Just because you are riding with someone now doesn’t mean that, that is who you will be riding with for the rest of your life. As a rider, ask the questions, do your research and make sure what your coach is telling you is true.” AB

CERTIFIED BECOME AN EQUINE CANADA

INSTRUCTOR/COACH

DESIGNED

FOR

EQUESTRIAN

LIFE

CERTIFICATION IS AVAILABLE IN THE FOLLOWING DISCIPLINES:

E N GLISH, WES TERN , SA D D L E SE AT & D RIV IN G All Equine Canada coaching programs are nationally recognized programs developed by discipline-specific coaching committees comprised of the best equine professionals around. They allow for growth, development and training opportunities amongst those involved – and eventually certification in one of either two streams: instruction (teaching those who enjoy their horses outside the competitive ring; ideal for those who teach beginner riders, riding schools or day camps) or coaching (for those individuals who work with students who compete).

F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N C O N TA C T

coaching@albertaequestrian.com OR VISIT THE AEF WEBSITE ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM

McNiven Ranch Supply Ltd, official North American supplier of HANSBO SPORT, proud sponsor of the AEF Live Outside the Box program

ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

27


a s k a b o u t i n s u r a n ce

Understanding Personal Liability Coverage

306.525.7345

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Question: Does it matter how many horses I have, or what I do with them? Answer: The policy covers your non-commercial activities with any number of horses owned or non-owned; it provides protection regardless of where the horses are – world wide. Question: What is the difference between “commercial” use and “personal” use? Answer: If there is compensation or trade in kind being provided for the use of the horse, it may be deemed commercial use. For example, using the horse to give someone else riding instruction or pony rides for a fee, or short term rental of the horse to someone else, are a few examples of typically excluded activities. There are exceptions to the above and we encourage you to ask the CapriCMW team if you are unsure if the use of your horse will be covered. Question: How much coverage does the program provide? Answer: The policy provides $5,000,000 coverage. The coverage you have is not shared with any other member. There is no aggregate limit on the policy, so in theory , if we had 1,000 claims under the program in a single term, there would be 1000 x $5,000,000 coverage provided. (Let’s not EVER have that kind of year – okay?) Question: Does the policy cover me when I compete at a horse show and why does the show manager care if I have insurance? Answer: The insurance provided to you as a member of AEF Version 1.1 | October 2017 definitely protects you when you attend at a horse show or clinic etc. (any number of events, anywhere in the world). The show manager / sanctioning authority / host commonly requires that all participants have personal liability insurance in place as a means to defer and share risk. In as much as we insure several hundred horse shows and equine events each year across Canada, we know and support this simple risk management strategy. Because the AEF policy is so well known, most hosts now mandate that membership be in place. In summary, everyone who rides, drives or enjoys horses as part of their lifestyle should be a member and take advantage of the insurance provided through membership in AEF. At CapriCMW, we are constantly working on improvements to the membership program. If you have questions, suggestions or comments, please contact us. Have a safe and enjoyable summer. © thgirypoc egami DICS .devreser sthgir llA .ecnaillAEDI © thgirypoC .dohtem 7G eht yb metsys gnigami KYMC yna etarbilac ot desu eb nac mrof sihT ® .ecnaillAEDI fo kramedart deretsiger a si 7G .ecnaillAEDI fo noissimrep nettirw tuohtiw detibihorp trap ro elohw ni noitacilpuD .SEPN

As the risk management partner for the AEF and its members, our team at CapriCMW gets asked many questions about the insurance we deliver to the diverse equine community in Alberta. I know I can speak on behalf of my colleagues to say that the best part of our day is when we are answering those inquiries to help unravel the confusion surrounding insurance for our thousands of equine industry clients. Of the many products and services we provide, it is the personal liability coverage that remains the most discussed, and in the minds of many, represents the most important component of our program. The following represents frequently asked questions and I hope that this information, along with information we have posted on the AEF website, is useful. If this article leads you to ask more questions of us, PLEASE do so. We are at your service! Question: Does this policy cover me as the member or the horses I own? Answer: As a member in good standing of the AEF, YOU THE MEMBER are covered for liability that could be imposed upon you if a horse you own, lease, borrow or use causes bodily injury or property damage and you are held to be legally responsible.

Mention Promo Code PW1 and get 5% OFF your first print order! New customers only.

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ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018

Micheal (Mike) King, CAIB, R.I.B.

Mike King is a partner at CapriCMW Insurance and the program lead for the PTSO programs across Canada. For more information, please call the Agri-department at CapriCMW Insurance, 1-800-670-1877 or agri@capri.ca


membe r o r g a n i z a t i o n s a s o f M a y 7 , 2 0 1 8 if you are interested in finding out more about one of these clubs, or joining, make sure you contact them Alberta Carriage Driving Association (ACDA)......................................... www.albertadriving-acda.ca Alberta Central Region Pony Club ......................................................... panddjensen@hotmail.com Alberta Dressage Association................................................................. www.albertadressage.com Alberta Equestrian Vaulting Association.................................................www.vaultcanada.org/AEVA Alberta Friesian Horse Association.............................................................................. www.afha.ca Alberta Horse Trials Association............................................................ www.albertahorsetrials.com Alberta Morgan Horse Club ....................................................... www.albertamorganhorseclub.com Alberta Mounted Shooters............................................................www.albertamountedshooters.ca Alberta South Region Pony Club............................................................www.canadianponyclub.org Alberta Trail Riding Association...................................................................................www.atra.ca Alberta Walking Horse Association................................................................. www.walkinghorse.ca Alix Agricultural Society........................................................................ alixagsociety@outlook.com American Saddlebred Horse Association of Alberta...........................www.saddlebredsofalberta.com Banff Light Horse Association.......................................................................... ruthann7@telus.net Bear Valley Rescue Society...........................................................................www.bearvalleyab.org Bezanson Agricultural Society.........................................................................discoverbezanson.ca Black Diamond Polo Club................................................................... www.blackdiamondpolo.com Border Cowboys Mounted Shooters Association...................... bordercowboysmountedshooters.com Bow Valley Riding Association......................................................................... bvra.wordpress.com Calgary Arabian Horse Association................................................ www.calgaryarabian.weebly.com Calgary Area Alberta Dressage Association.......................................................... www.ca-ada.com Calgary Regional Appaloosa Club (1997)...............................www.calgaryappaloosa.wildapricot.org Calgary Regional Trail Riders......................................................www.calgaryregionaltrailriders.com Calgary Western Riders..................................................................................... coreenc@shaw.ca Canadian Cowboy Mounted Shooters Association........................www.canadianmountedshooters.ca Canadian Horse Breeders Association Rocky Mountain District...... www.canadianhorsebreeders.com Canadian Registry of the Tennessee Walking Horse................................................... www.crtwh.ca Canadian Sport Horse Association - AB Chapter.................................................... www.c-s-h-a.org Cassils Trail Blazers............................................................................................ cweestra@live.ca Central Alberta Adult Riding Club .......................................................... panddjensen@hotmail.com Central Century Team Ropers Association......................................... centurycentralteamroping.com Central Peace Horse Association............................................................................... cpha@live.ca Chinook Chapter (ACDA)...................................................................... www.albertadriving-acda.ca Chinook Country/Alberta Dressage Association..................................... douglorraine87@gmail.com Cleardale Riders Club .................................................................... sandyrichardson@abnorth.com Clearwater Horse Club.............................. www.facebook.com/cwhcpublic/?rf=155981401093436 Cooking Lake Saddle Club.............................................................. www.cookinglakesaddleclub.ca Cottonwood Corrals Association (Jasper)...........................cottonwoodcorralassociation@gmail.com Coulee Winds Saddle Club............................................................................ kheapy@outlook.com Davisburg Pony Club .............................................................................. donnellydigs@gmail.com Delacour Agricultural Society & Community Club..............................................www.delacourhall.ca Delacour Pony Club ..........................................................................cherianderson99@gmail.com Didsbury Agricultural Society................................................................ www.didsburyagsociety.org Dunmore Equestrian Society............................................................. www.dunmoreequestrian.com Edmonton Area /Alberta Dressage Association..........................................................www.eaada.ca Endurance Riders of Alberta......................................................www.enduranceridersofalberta.com Extreme Cowboy Alberta Association.................................................www.extremecowboyracing.ca Fairview Sport Horse Society..........................................www.fairviewsporthorsesociety.weebly.com Family Fun Rodeo Series.....................................www.facebook.com/familyfun.rodeoseries?fref=ts Foothills Therapeutic Riding Association.....................................www.foothillstherapeuticriding.com Four: Thirteen Therapeutic Riding Association........................... info.fourthirteentherapy@gmail.com Friends of the Eastern Slopes Association................................................................ www.foesa.org Fun Country Riding Club of Strathmore...................................................www.funcountryriders.com H.E.D.J.E. Society....................................................................................... lundkrista@gmail.com Hastings Lake Pleasure Horse Association................www.hastingslakepleasurehorseassociation.org High Country Carriage Driving Club.......................................... www.highcountrycarriagedriving.org High Country Pony Club........................................................................www.canadianponyclub.org High Kick Vaulters..............................................................................highkickvaulters@gmail.com Highridge Thundering Hooves Gymkhana Club ........................................hthgymkhana@gmail.com Hoofbeats For Hope Equine Team Society..........sites.google.com/site/prairiedustersmusicalrideteam Journeys Therapeutic Riding Society ........................................................................... www.jtrs.ca Jump Alberta Society.................................................................................. www.jumpalberta.com Lacombe Light Horse Association.......................................lacombelighthorseassociation.webs.com Lethbridge Therapeutic Riding Association...................................................................tony@ltra.ca Little Bits Therapeutic Riding Association............................................................... www.littlebits.ca Meadow Creek Vaulting Club....................................................................................www.mcvc.ca Millarville Musical Ride................................................................... www.millarvillemusicalride.com Miniatures in Motion Horse Club...........................................................www.miniaturesinmotion.ca Mount View Special Riding Association...................................................www.mountviewriding.com Northern Trails Riding Club .........................................................www.northerntrailsridingclub.com Opening Gaits Therapeutic Riding Society of Calgary ......................................www.openinggaits.ca Over the Hill Trail Riders .................................................................................. fjhorses@syban.net Peace Area Riding For The Disabled Society............................................................. www.pards.ca Peace Draft Horse Club............................................................................... thedrafthorseclub.com Peace Region Alberta Dressage Association.................................... www.peaceregiondressage.com Performance Standardbreds Association..................................................www.p-standardbreds.org Polocrosse Calgary.............................................................................www.polocrossecalgary.com Ponoka Riding & Roping Association.................................................... ponokaridingandroping.com Quarter Horse Association of Alberta...................................................................... www.qhaa.com Ranahan Polocrosse Club................................................. sites.google.com/site/ranahanpolocrosse Ridgeview Riding Club................................................................... ridgeviewridingclub@gmail.com Rimbey Sleigh, Wagon & Saddle Club....................................................rimbeyswsclub@gmail.com Rocky Mountain Gymkhana Club...............................................www.rockymountaingymkhana.com Rundle Riders Therapeutic Riding Association............................................... www.rundleriders.com Saddle Seat Canada........................................................................... www.saddleseatcanada.com Shortgrass Riding Club.......................................................................www.shortgrassridingclub.ca Society of Tilt and Lance Cavalry................................................................................www.joust.ca South Country Team Penning Association..................................................................www.sctpa.ca South Peace Horse Show Association............................................. www.southpeacehorseclub.com Southern Alberta Trail Riders Association................................................................... www.satra.ca Southern Century Team Roping Association ....................................... southcenturyteamroping.com Springbank Equestrian Society............................................................... normaansloos@gmail.com Springbank Pony Club...........................................................................................c3inc@shaw.ca

Spruce View Gymkhana Club............................................................dwedmondson4@gmail.com Steele’s Scouts Commemorative Troop Association.......................................www.steelescouts.ca Stone Bridge Carriage Driving Club............................................www.stonebridgedrivingclub.com Strathcona All-Breed Horse Association...................................................... www.sahaalberta.com Tennessee Walking Horse Association Of Western Canada.................................www.twhawc.com The Greater Bragg Creek Trails Association............................................www.braggcreektrails.org Trail Riding Alberta Conference........................................................................ www.trailriding.ca Traildusters Horse Club of Smith .........................................................................780-829-3628 Tri-Country Riding Club............................................................................... schenk88@telus.net Uplift Therapeutic Riding Association..................................................... sturgeonlynn@gmail.com Valleyview & Districts Agricultural Society...........................................www.valleyviewagsociety.ca Vegreville Agricultural Society............................................................................... www.vegag.ca Welsh Show Association........................................................ piperp13.wixsite.com/wildroseshow Western Canadian Wagon Train.................................................................gsissons@hotmail.com Western Dressage Association of Southern Alberta............. www.albertawesternstyledressage.com Wild Rose Draft Horse Association..........................................................dbsteph@telusplanet.net Wildrose Mounted Shooters.................................................. www.wildrosemountedshooters.com Will For Riding Foundation..................................................................willforridingfoundation.com Xtreme Wild Rose Club........................................................................ xtremewildrose.webs.com

b u s i n e s s membe r s Alberta Association of Complementary Equine Therapy........................................www.aacet.ca Banff Trail Riders.....................................................................................www.horseback.com Boehringer Ingelheim Canada Ltd...........................................www.boehringer-ingelheim.ca/en Calgary Stampede......................................................................... www.calgarystampede.com CapriCMW Insurance ......................................................................... www.capri.ca/horse Carpino Production & Design........................................................... palmocarpino@gmail.com Cartier Farms Equine Assisted Learning.................................................... www.cartierfarms.ca Cavallo Pulse Therapy.................................................................. www.cavallopulsetherapy.ca Colchester Farm..........................................................................rcolchesterfarm@gmail.com Creekside Equestrian Centre.............................................................................. www.mcvc.ca Equestrian Factory Outlet - Red Deer.................................... www.equestrianfactoryoutlet.com Equi-Health Canada Inc......................................................... www.equihealthcanada.com Equine Connection Inc.............................................................. www.equineconnection.ca Equus Physio................................................................................. www.equusphysio.com Evergreen Park (Grande Prairie Agricultural & Exhibition Society).............www.evergreenpark.ca Foothills Horse Transport....................................................... www.foothillshorsetransport.com Glen Valley Farm..................................................................................www.glenvalleyfarm.ca Greenhawk Cochrane.............................................................................www.greenhawk.com Guiding Spirit Learning Solutions.........................................www.guidingspiritlearning.solutions High Country Equestrian Center.................................................. www.hcequestriancenter.com Higher Trails Equine Ltd...................................................................... www.highertrails.ca Hi-Hog Farm & Ranch Equipment Ltd.............................................................www.hi-hog.com Horizon Equestrian Centre............................................................ www.horizonequestrian.com Horse In Hand Ranch Ltd..............................................................www.horseinhandranch.com Just Passing Horse Transport & Bereavement Services......................www.justpassinghorses.ca Kaspian Equestrian Training Centre.............................................. www.kaspianequestrian.com Katy Whitt Photography.......................................................................www.katywhitt.com Lawton & Co, LLP.....................................................................................jwlawton@telus.net Mane Equestrian Athletics....................................... maneequestrianathletics@gmail.com Martin Deerline........................................................................... www.martindeerline.com McNiven Ranch Supply (Hansbo Sport).................................................. www.hansbosport.com Millennium Equestrian Ltd.......................................................www.millenniumequestrian.com Moose Hill Ranch.............................................................................www.moosehillranch.com New View Stables........................................................................... www.newviewstables.com Olds College ............................................................................................www.oldscollege.ca Persons Equine and Industrial Dust Control............................................... www.personscs.com PFERA Inc..................................................................................................... www.pfera.ca Purina Canada........................................................................................www.equipurina.ca Rocking Star Ranch Equine....................................................... www.rockingstarranch.ca Rock’N Horse Ranch Arena & Stables................................................ www.rocknhorseranch.ca Saddle Up Magazine....................................................................................www.saddleup.ca Saltaire Equestrian Haus............................................................... www.saltaireequestrian.com Silverado Horse Centre............................................................ info@silveradohorsecenter.com Spirit Winds Ranch................................................................www.spiritwindshorsecentre.com Spring Lake Equestrian Camp.................................................. www.springlakecampground.ca Stampede Saddle Solutions inc.................................www.stampedesaddlesolutions.com Strathcona Ventures............................................................www.strathconaventures.com Syner G Apparel & Solutions......................................................... www.synergyapparel.ca TD Equine Veterinary Group................................................................... www.tdequinevet.com The Dressage Boutique & Equestrian Wear....................................www.dressageboutique.com The Horse Store..................................................................www.facebook.com/theHorseStore The Mane Event Equine Education & Trade Show..............................www.maneeventexpo.com The School of Equine Massage and Rehabilitation Therapies......................www.equinerehab.ca The Tack Collector Ltd........................................................................ www.thetackcollector.ca The Visions West Studio............................................................................smithpr1@telus.net Ulterra Equestrian Ltd................................................................. www.ulterraranches.com Vitality Equine............................................................................... www.vitalityequine.com Western Horse Review..............................................................www.westernhorsereview.com Westwood Warmbloods......................................................... www.westwoodwarmbloods.com Wheatland Equestrian....................................................................... hdmaskell@hotmail.com Whitemud Equine Learning Centre Association...................................................www.welca.ca Willow Grove Stables Inc.....................................................www.willowgrovestables.com Winning Strides................................................................................www.winningstrides.com

BE SURE TO SUPPORT OUR BUSINEsS MEMBERS! THOSE LISTED IN BLUE PROVIDE discounts TO AEF MeMBERS. VISIT OUR LIST OF STABLES AND facilities AT OUR WeBSITE!

29


c l o s i n g t h o ug h t s

Celebrating the Big 4-0! Photo submissions from members to help us celebrate this milestone anniversary. vi si t albe r t ae que s t rian. c o m t o su bmi t a pho t o. Sandra Donnelly and Belshazzar running cross country at Mustang Powder Horse Trials May 2017. Photo by Jessica Kerschbaumer

This is my old guy Toby. Last summer he lost his long last companion Reese so now he spend his time with the girls. And sometimes it’s still exciting. Photo submitted by Baudina Slikker

Miniature horse Riot and owner Sherry Wilson McEwen in Country Pleasure Driving class, Olds, Alberta. Jennifer Smart and Aloan receive coaching from Alberta High Performance Eventing Team Coach Leahona Rowland. Rebecca Farm 2017. Photo by Jessica Kerschbaumer.

My favorite place. Photo submitted by Patti Wobick

30

ALBERTA BITS I SUMMER 2018


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Don’t give parasites a free ride.

Choose EQVALAN® GOLD to kill more worms than any other equine dewormer. 1

EQVALAN® GOLD is: • BROAD SPECTRUM – treats 63 parasites2 • SAFE – approved for foals as young as 2 months of age 2 • CONVENIENT – one tube treats up to 600 kg (1320 lbs)2

1

Based on registered label claims for individual species and adult/immature stages of equine parasite control products in Canada.

2

EQVALAN® Gold Canadian product label.

EQVALAN® is a registered trademark of Merial (a member of the Boehringer Ingelheim group of companies), used under license. ©2017 Merial Canada Inc. (a member of the Boehringer Ingelheim group of companies). All rights reserved. EVLG-17-8109-AD (E) XCE283123.

Abbits summerissue2018  

Featuring the Versatile Friesian from the battlefield to dressage arena. Connecting traditional styles with Working Equitation

Abbits summerissue2018  

Featuring the Versatile Friesian from the battlefield to dressage arena. Connecting traditional styles with Working Equitation