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Equine Nutrition

Basics

Recognizing

High Risk Foals

AEF Celebrates

the Big 4-0

SPRING 2018

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SPRING 2018; VOLUME 10, ISSUE 1 Alberta Bits is the Alberta Equestrian Federation’s official member magazine. It serves the equestrian community of horses and riders of all ages, interests and involvement as Alberta’s premier resource for education, information and support. THE ALBERTA EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION HAS BEEN INCORPORATED SINCE 1978 Alberta Bits magazine is mailed four times a year (Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter) to all current AEF members and is made available at the office and special events attended by the AEF. Alberta Bits is distributed throughout Alberta with news and events on behalf of recreational, sport, breeds & industry and educational sectors of the Alberta horse industry. Alberta Bits is distributed to approximately 18,000 members; 9,000 households and businesses, an exclusive list of tack and equine establishments and at events and trade shows annually.

aef board of directors

PRESIDENT Les Oakes 403.540.9859 lesoakes@gmail.com

Lauren Parker 403.813.1055 lmparker@shaw.ca

PRESIDENT ELECT

PAST PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

TREASURER Sandy Bell 403.700.7880 chinookcomm@gmail.com

Tara Gamble 780.945.7516 tara@tghorsemanship.com Dena Squarebriggs 403.760.0512 dmsquare04@hotmail.com

INDIVIDUAL Trish Mrakawa 403.938.6398 trish@willowgrovestables.com

INDIVIDUAL Nicolas Brown 587.988.3590 bruchev@gmail.com

INDIVIDUAL Lewis Hand 403.722.4690 lewhand@live.ca

INDIVIDUAL Alison Douglas 403.762.8570 thealicat@shaw.ca

INDIVIDUAL Robert Simpson 780-628-2356 rms210@mail.usask.ca

INDIVIDUAL Christine Axani 403.816.8979 chrisaxani@gmail.com

aef STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Sonia Dantu execdir@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 5 MEMBERSHIP

Norma Cnudde membership@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 1 MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

Ashley Miller marketing@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 6

COACHING

Erin Lundteigen coaching@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 3 COMPETITIONS

Sophie Beswick competitions@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 2 FINANCE, GENERAL INQUIRIES

Rita Bernard info@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 7

OFFICE HOURS: 8:30AM TO 4:30PM, MONDAY TO FRIDAY, EXCEPT HOLIDAYS ALBERTA BITS IS PUBLISHED BY WESTERN PERFORMANCE PUBLISHING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE AEF

FOR EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES CONTACT: ALBERTABITS@ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer Webster ART DIRECTOR Kendra Roberts PUBLICATION COMMITTEE

Ashley Miller • Sonia Dantu • Louisa Murch White CONTRIBUTORS

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SUMMER 2018: April 27, 2018 FALL 2018: September 7, 2018 WINTER 2018: November 3, 2018 FOR A MEDIA KIT AND/OR RATE CARD PLEASE CONTACT ALBERTABITS@ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM or marketing@albertaequestrian.com. All material is copyright 2018. Ideas and opinions expressed in articles do not necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of the AEF. Alberta Bits reserves the right to accept, and/or edit material submitted for publication. The AEF makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information contained therein, but assumes no liability in cases of error or changing conditions. Any business relations or other activities undertaken as a result of the information contained in Alberta Bits, or arising therefrom, is the responsibility of the parties involved and not of the AEF. We welcome signed letters to the editor, but reserve the right to publish, edit for grammar, taste and length. For reprint information, please contact execdir@albertaequestrian.com

6 PRESIDEN T’S MESSAGE 8 TH E SOCIAL BIT 10 SUPPLEMEN TI N G FOR TH E BIG 4 Nutritional considerations for hoof health, joint supplement additives, digestive aid and calming anxiety in the horse. 12 IDEN TI FYIN G H IG H RISK FOALS Understanding critical symptoms of neonatal disease. 14 BREED PROFILE The large heart of the Miniature Horse. 18 IMMUN IZATIO N IN SIDER Vaccines can keep your horse safe from severe and even life

threatening diseases, in a way no other medicine or health modality can offer.

winter suggestions for ground work training.

21 TRAIN ER’S CORN ER Equestrian Canada-certified trainer Samantha Humphreys offers some

26 H ORSEKEEP IN G Ease the aches and chill of cold weather with these equine therapeutic

options.

28 ASK ABOUT IN SURAN CE Detailing more AEF members-only benefits. 29 CLUB & BUSIN ESS LISTIN GS 30 CLOSIN G TH OUGH TS Celebrating the AEF’s big 40th anniversary!

ALBERT A EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION

100, 251 Midpark Blvd SE Calgary, AB T2X 1S3 Toll Free: 1.877.463.6233 Phone: 403.253.4411 Fax: 403.252.5260

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President’s Message

As we ease into spring, the memory of doing chores in minus 30 degree Celsius weather is still there but it is starting to fade. It seemed that no part of Alberta was spared from the frigid weather this year. During the majority of December, I talked to somebody each day who was having frozen waterer issues or hydrants that had frozen. It makes life so easy when we don’t have to battle the elements. When the weather is as cold as it was, it means that most of us don’t get to do what we enjoy the most – riding. Hopefully, now that the days are longer and the thermometer is registering warmer temperatures, all of us can start spending more time with our good buddies. Thank you to all the volunteers and Board members who helped with our two-day Casino in December. Casinos are our major fundraiser and without the generous gift of volunteer time, this event would not have been possible. As we move into a new membership year, I would like to remind everyone about our referral program. This program enables you to earn a free membership by referring new people to join the AEF. For more information on this program, contact us at 1-877-463-6233 or info@albertaequestrian.com On March 24th, the AEF staff and Board will be in Leduc

for Stride With Us, in conjunction with the AEF AGM, an exciting day of equine education, business development, and fun. Bring your family and friends and join us for an exciting day. This is a very special year as it marks the 40th Anniversary of the AEF and we hope you will come and celebrate with us! This is my outgoing message to you as President, as I will hand over the reins in the President’s role at the AEF AGM in March. I would like to thank all the members who I have had the pleasure to meet over these past five years. It has been a privilege to represent the AEF in the role of President; I have many fond memories and have formed new friendships throughout the province. I will continue to work with Alberta’s municipalities to integrate their Municipality Disaster Preparedness plans to include an equine component. Have a great 2018 and hopefully, I will meet up with you on a trail this summer. All the best. AB

A M E SSAG E F R O M A E F E X E C U TIV E DI R E C TO R SO N IA DA N T U

Executive Director’s Message

The start of a new calendar year seems like an obvious time to talk about new beginnings and to look back on the past year’s achievements. The AEF continues to focus on goals that lead operations as guided by the federation’s strategic plan. In February of 2017, the Board of Directors reviewed, updated and approved the strategic plan. While goals remain similar to those of past years, they are important and critical for growth. By continuing to focus, we hope that you were able to see and feel some changes. Enhancing Member Value – Our priority is and continues to be about creating and ensuring value for our members and growing membership. In addition to offering many benefits included in your membership; insurance, funding, opportunity to earn a free membership, discounts and savings, Alberta Bits magazine and more, the AEF cost of your membership remains unchanged since 2013. Increasing Educational Opportunities – A new partnership with Equine Guelph across Canada enables members to self-educate and obtain certification at a discounted rate online. Short courses available consist of Gut Health & Colic Prevention, Sickness Prevention in Horses, Horse Behavior & Safety (both adult and youth courses) and Horse Care & Welfare. If you have not taken the opportunity to visit the portal, we encourage you to do so at our website under Equine Welfare. Preparing the Industry for Emergencies – Over the past few months, the AEF created the Alberta Equine Industry 6

ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018

Emergency Preparedness Plan, Municipal Guidelines and Templates. This project was made possible by funding through the Alberta Government’s Growing Forward. The plan provides an overview of how emergencies are managed in Alberta, preparedness tools and resources, as well as roles, responsibilities and protocols. November 21, 2017 marked the last of 10 Municipal Emergency Preparedness workshops delivered by the AEF. The goal of the workshops was to provide an overview of the equine industry in Alberta and assist municipal bodies and personnel to assure that equines are included in their respective emergency management plans. For 2018, AEF is planning to host several Equine Emergency Preparedness courses for individuals as part of our commitment in helping the industry be prepared. Many of you provided input to a short survey in January, which will help guide the strategic direction for the AEF. We thank you for taking the time to share your responses and hope you will see the changes as we do our best to work toward building a stronger equine community in Alberta. With thanks to the membership for your ongoing support, the Board for volunteering their time and the staff that are so dedicated. AB


TIME TO RENEW! A E F

I P S E R S H M E M B

CEMBER EXPIRED DE

31, 2017

SI N ES S • FA M ILY • BU IN D IV ID U A L STA BL E • FA C ILTY • C LU B •

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RENEW YOUR MEMBERSHIP TODAY! ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018

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Get featured by tagging the AEF on Facebook or Instagram (@alberta_equestrian) and using the hashtag #AlbertaEquestrianFederation on your posts!

The SOCIAL BIT

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Supplementing for the

Big 4

Considerations for nutritional additives when on the hunt for hoof helpers, joint health, digestive aid and calming supplements. B y J enn Webster

Doing what’s best for your equine companion sometimes means incorporating additional feed supplements into their diet. Supplements should help horses by providing something in their diet that they are regularly missing or in need of, in greater quantities. Hoof health, increased digestive efficiency, joint health and calming supplements for a horse demeanour without impeding performance are four of the most common reasons horse owners would reach for additional equine nutrition. The most important concept to consider when choosing a supplement for your horse is to ensure you are first choosing ingredients that can actually benefit the problem you are targeting with a nutritional additive. If not, supplementation with ill-equipped ingredients wouldn’t be money spent wisely. Secondly, pick a product and a name that you recognize. Next it’s important to feed the product according to its label. Always ensure you are supplementing wisely as providing too much (of even a good thing!) can be dangerous. All vitamins and minerals should be consumed in balance and when in doubt, check with your veterinarian for advice. 10

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1 HOOF CARE HELP

Brittle walls, shelly souls, or horses that are prone to abscesses may be good candidates for hoof care nutrition. There are a medley of justifications for daily equine hoof supplements. When searching for one, verify that a product you are interested in contains sources of zinc, methionine, copper, cobalt, lysine, fatty acids and biotin. Lysine and methionine are essential amino acids that are the building blocks of protein. The hoof horn is made up of keratin protein structures and if the horse’s diet isn’t providing him with appropriate amounts of lysine, the hoof horn may be affected. Zinc is a mineral that is used in the repair and reproduction of epithelial cells in the hoof wall. It is also important to keratin protein synthesis, for cementing the cells of the hoof together. Biotin, which is a very common ingredient in hoof supplements, helps the cells of the hoof stick together. As an extra bonus, it also can improve a horse’s coat condition.


2 KEEP CALM & RIDE ON

Products that promote calming and focus benefits for horses are extremely popular. Primary ingredients of supplements in this category include such things as valerian, vitamin B1, chamomile, magnesium and / or L-Tryptophan. Some people believe that valerian has sedative qualities which relax the nervous system. Chamomile is heralded for soothing and relaxing effects and Tryptophan is the amino acid precursor for serotonin – a neurotransmitter involved in sedation, the inhibition of aggression, fear and stress. On the herbal side of the discussion, black cohosh and raspberry leaf is thought to help with drastic hormonal shifts in mares. The key to finding the right product for your horse is to determine whether or not a product is truly needed and won’t simply “mask” the symptoms of a bigger issue. Then, if you feel a product is required to offer relief from anxiety and to help aid cognitive therapy, carefully read the label of any supplements you are considering. Use of calming agents in competition horses that might undergo drug testing could test positive as some governing sport associations do not allow the use of valerian or other calmatives.

3 SUPPLEMENTING FOR SOUNDNESS

4 DIGESTIVE AID

A large portion of horse owners feed their horses “joint supplements” prophylactically to either help prevent arthritis in a horse’s athletic prime, or to prevent further damage to a joint. Joint health products often include ingredients such as glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, and methylsulfonylmethane (also known as MSM), Avocado/ Soybean Unsaponifiables (also known as ASU), or high molecular weight hyaluronic acid. Currently, there is more scientific research to show that injections work better in a “preventable” fashion to aid equine joints, however oral products are often used as secondary treatments. When shopping for an oral joint supplement, always go to a reputable source and reputable product as not all companies and their respective products meet their label claims.

Digestive problems can affect a number of horses. Often these include performance animals, who may suffer from colic or gastric ulcers. Decreased digestive efficiency can also affect older animals with such conditions as Cushing’s disease, insulin resistance or changes to their metabolism. Digestive supplements commonly contain prebiotics and probiotics. Prebiotics are substances that support the hindgut’s bacteria population and often include oligosaccharides and yeast products. Probitoics stimulate the growth of positive gut microflora and can help horses improve their digestion, negotiate stress and fight pathogenic organisms. Typically, they contain only one, or a few, of the thousands of species of microbes normally present in the horse’s gut. Other ingredients common to digestive supplements for horses include antioxidants, herbs, fruit pectin, lecithin and sea buckthorn berries and pulp. ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018

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Identifying High Risk Foals Understanding a few, critical symptoms of neonatal disease. B y J e n n W e b s t e r • photos By Nata lie Jac kma n

The long-awaited arrival of a newborn is an incredibly joyous occasion. However if the foal isn’t born healthy, your delight may quickly give way to distress. In some instances, time is of the essence and veterinarian support may make the difference in a foal’s survival. Here are a few abnormal circumstances, highlighting some key symptoms to watch for.

TIME LINE Following birth, your foal should stand within one hour. The foal should nurse from the mare within two hours. The mare should lose her placenta within three hours of birth. Anything longer than that is considered a “retained placenta” and may require veterinarian intervention. If you are concerned about the amount of colostrum your foal consumed, have a vet take a blood sample within 12-24 hours of birth to check its IgG levels. This ensures the foal received enough colostrum and immune support to fulfill its needs for life.

SIGNS OF NEONATAL DISEASE There are some predisposing factors that can lead to neonatal disease. The most significant of which includes the failure of passive transfer of maternal antibodies (colostrum) to the foal. However, other predisposing factors include foaling dystocia, prematurity, failure to provide the mare with good hygienic surroundings during foaling, failure to provide the mare with proper nutrition throughout gestation, and failure to disinfect the foal’s naval stump properly. Healthy foals are a joy to observe and conversely, sick foals often display very telltale signs that something is wrong. However, it’s not always cut-and-dried that an underlying issue is occurring. Abnormal symptoms include a weak or tired foal, a foal that doesn’t want to nurse vigorously, or a foal that has a lot of dried milk on its face (indicating the mare has milk, but the baby isn’t getting it). Furthermore, signs of neonatal infection include; red or purple spots on the gums and white sclera of the eyes; swelling of the joints or legs; and, in the event of the foal not getting 12

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enough oxygen before birth, during delivery or after birth, you might witness what is referred to as “Dummy Foal Syndrome” (Neonatal Maladjustment). This is demonstrated by a foal that may wander, may not nurse, has a head tilt, stumbling gait, trouble urinating, or has abnormal whinnying sounds. Healthy babies should be curious, able to stand and move around, be willing to nurse and be interested in interacting with its dam. If not, contact your veterinarian.

PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE Although Mother Nature sometimes has other plans in mind, there are some preventative maintenance things you can do to ensure the health of your broodmare and her foal. These include: • Maintaing a clean environment for both. • Vaccinating the broodmare. • Reducing the possibility for the ingestion of bacteria by the foal, via the udder to the intestinal tract. Also reducing the possibility for a naval infection by bedding the foaling stall with straw as opposed to sawdust, lessens the chance for foal septicemia. • Care for the foal’s naval stump appropriately by applying a topical antiseptic such as Betadine shortly after the placenta has separated. • Ensure the foal receives an adequate supply of colostrum.


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B ree d pr o f i l e

The

Miniature Horse Little in stature, mighty in spirit. B y Lo uisa Murc h White

Above: The aim of Miniature breeders is to achieve the same aesthetic of a full-sized horse but in miniature. Kendra Gale/The Big Book of Miniature Horses

opposite page Top: Mini mare and foal. Kendra Gale/The Big Book of Miniature Horses opposite page bottom: Miniature horse shows offer in hand classes, alongside driving classes. Laura Sparrow

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Miniature Horses have been recorded in history for hundreds of years, originally seen as the pets of royalty and circus performers. However, our modern, North American Miniature Horses began when the Appalachian coal mines became mechanized and sold off all of their pit ponies. Some

enterprising breeders collected all the smallest and began programs to produce the smallest possible horse from there. The addition of new bloodlines, and the creation of the registries helped towards the development of today’s Miniature Horse, which is truly a horse in miniature.


B ree d pr o f i l e

Kendra Gale, Cochrane, Alberta, is the force behind Miniature Horsemanship, where she offers training, clinics and online programs tailored to those wanting to work with Miniature horses. Gale, whose education is in Equine Science and is an Equestrian Canada certified driving instructor, completed her first book, The Big Book of Miniature Horses, in 2016. Gale is a third-generation miniature lover, descending from Circle J Miniature Horses which features show horses, parade horses, combined driving horses and treasured friends. “My Grandparents brought our first three home in 1981, and at that time there were already a couple of well established breeders here in Alberta, with stock imported from the United States, Europe and Argentina.” So what makes a Miniature Horse a specific breed? Gale says, “A Miniature horse is a height breed. The American Miniature Horse Association registers horses up to 34”, the American Miniature Horse Registry up to 38”. Ideally, if you took a photo of a Miniature Horse without anything for perspective, you shouldn’t be able to tell that it is a Miniature Horse rather than a full sized horse – or at least, that is what breeders strive for!” As far as health concerns go, Miniature Horses, like many breeds

of small horses and ponies, can be “easy keepers” and prone to metabolic issues. Gale says, “They are also one of only a few breeds that are at risk of producing dwarfism, and breeders need to be educated to try and prevent this – genetic testing is now available to help make informed breeding choices.” Gale continues that Miniature Horses can also be more likely to deal with stifle issues, and are at risk for hyperlipidemia – a process where, under stress, the horse’s fat stores are dumped into the bloodstream, causing damage to internal organs. This risk can be reduced by maintaining them at a healthy weight, and calling the vet immediately if they ever go off their feed. A marker of the Miniature Horse’s personality is their kind demeanour. Making new friends is what Miniature Horses do best. Like all horses, they seem to have a great deal of empathy, in tune with those around them and able to

sense who needs them. They also tend to be pretty fearless, which, coupled with their size, makes them willing and able to deal with strange things like wheelchairs and elevators. This fearlessness and willingness makes them excellent therapy horses, and many Miniatures are used as therapy and companion horses for the sick, or elderly. Miniature Horses are characterized by their smart, inquisitive nature, and love to be a part of whatever you’re doing. Gale jokes that is, “…whether it’s helpfully stealing fencing tools or supervising manure removal. They love to have a job and learn new things readily, so you do have to watch you don’t inadvertently teach them something you’d rather they didn’t know.” Gale also credits the Miniature Horses for being smart and athletic. “They make excellent driving horses – the fastest growing division in the fast growing sport of Combined Driving is ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018

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B ree d pr o f i l e

the VSE (Very Small Equine) division. In addition to driving, Miniature Horses tend to be very good at jumping, and Hunter and Jumper classes are popular at Miniature Horse shows. Halter obstacle, or in hand trail, as well as Horse Agility, allow Miniature Horses to show off both their physical abilities and their intelligence. And many people simply enjoy showing them in the halter division, where they are groomed and shown similar to Arabians, with lots of expression.” Elsie Overgaard, Rocky Mountain House, Alberta, is a long-time breeder and supporter of the Miniature Horse breed. “I’ve been involved with horses all my life, but as I got older the bigger horses were beginning to be too much for me to handle. We started raising

Miniature Horses in 1982 and it became a passion for me because I just love the breed so much.” The passion Overgaard had translated into her introducing Miniature Horse halter classes in the David Thompson Days All Breed Horse Show in 1989. In 1996 the success of the classes translated into the Miniature breed having their own day and from there it grew into its own successful show, Miniatures in Motion which is now held at Spur West Event Centre in Rocky Mountain House, Alberta. The success of the show brought Miniature owners together, and in 2011 the Miniatures In Motion Horse Club became a registered society. The association’s goal is to promote the Miniature Horse breed and to share in

“Many Miniatures are used as therapy and companion horses for the sick, or elderly.”

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the enjoyment of these small equines in all aspects of the sport. The show itself has classes for everyone to enjoy, including driving, showmanship, halter, in-hand jumping, barrels, poles and trail, a costume class and fun games for owners and their Miniatures to enjoy. Reflecting on the last 23 years of the successful show, Overgaard says, “Driving is getting to be very popular with the younger generation and the older people as well. Driving is a fantastic learning tool for younger people because a Miniature is much easier to handle than say, a full Belgian Draft. Then, as you get older, the Miniature is also easier to handle, and you still get the enjoyment of competing.” Overgaard herself is often too busy organizing to show, but says her grandchildren, and greatgrandchildren, have taken over the reins, so to speak. “I cheat, they get to show my horses


B ree d pr o f i l e

now! But I like the driving and jumping personally, I like to go out there and have fun. We encourage the young people to be a good sport and have fun with their Miniatures. We have awards for sportsmanship, and those go to the competitors that are always smiling, always good sports, no matter if they win or lose.” For those looking to get into the Miniature Horse breed, Overgaard offers some sage advice. “I encourage buyers to make sure the Miniature is papered, otherwise they can’t be sure what they are getting. I tell people to get information about the person they are buying the horse from, make sure they are reputable and lastly, make sure the horse is sound.” Overgaard notes that often she hears people say disparaging remarks about the Miniature temperament that are simply untrue. “They say they are mean and miserable, they compare

DESIGNED

FOR

them to Shetland ponies, but they are nothing like that. I find they have a temperament of a large and happy puppy dog. They are eager to learn and please, and that’s why they make such a great learning tool for children. Children can work with them, and then go on to train large horses in the future

EQUESTRIAN

with the knowledge they received from training Miniatures.” AB Opposite Page: Miniature Horses are renown for their ability to be therapy horses. Kendra Gale/The Big Book of Miniature Horses

Above: Driving is becoming a popular pastime with both young and old Miniature owners. Kendra Gale/The Big Book of Miniature Horses

LIFE

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IMMUNIZATION INSIDER Vaccines place a protective barrier between your animals and disease. S to ry an d Photos By Jenn Webster

Often in the case of equine diseases, the only protection you can provide for your animals is prevention. Immunizations can keep your horse safe from severe, and even life-threatening, diseases in a way no other medicine or health modality can offer. There is no one-size-fits-all protocol on the topic of equine vaccinations and in actuality, vaccine programs should be

tailored to suit an individual animal or individual facility. Vaccinations are critical to protecting equines from such diseases as Eastern encephalomyelitis, Western encephalomyelitis, tetanus, influenza, equine herpesvirus and West Nile virus. Check with your local veterinarian to learn which ailments are concerns in your area

to ensure your horse will receive proper vaccinations – both core and risk-based. Immunizations are a vital part of proper equine ownership. All horses require a vaccination protocol of some sort. Your veterinarian can assist you in a regime and schedule that works for your herd. Here are some other considerations to keep in mind when preparing

Core Vaccination Recommendations TETANUS

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Tetanus is caused by toxin-producing bacteria present in the intestinal tract of many animals and found in abundance in the soil where horses live. Spores can enter the body through wounds, cuts or the umbilical cords of newborn foals. It’s not contagious between horses but tetanus poses a constant threat to horses and humans. More than 80% of affected horses with tetanus will die. In previously unvaccinated ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018

horses, a tetanus vaccine should be administered in two doses four to six weeks apart.Vaccinate annually after the initial series. Boosters may also be required for horses that incur an injury or undergo surgery, or for mares and foals if advised by your veterinarian.

EASTERN / WESTERN ENCEPHALITIS Commonly known as “sleeping sickness,” this disease is caused by the Western Equine Encepha-

lomyelitis (WEE) virus or the Eastern Equine Encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus. The Venezuelan variety (VEE) has been observed in some southern states and specific parts of the world. The disease is often transmitted via mosquitos, after the insects have received the virus from birds and rodents. The symptoms vary but all forms of the disease result in the degeneration of the brain. Approximately 50% of horses infected with WEE die and the death

rate of those infected with EEE or VEE is 70-90%. In previously unvaccinated horses, administer two doses four to six weeks apart. Revaccinate prior to the onset of the next vector (mosquito) season and annually thereafter.

EQUINE INFLUENZA One of the most common respiratory diseases of horses, this virus is highly contagious. Influenza is treatable but it’s expensive to deal with, results in downtime and discomfort


Opposite Page: Check with your local veterinarian to learn which ailments are concerns in your area to ensure your horse will receive proper vaccinations – both core and risk-based. Right: No vaccine is 100% effective. In some situations, immunization may decrease the severity of disease but not prevent it completely.

an immunization program that works for your individual needs. • No vaccine is 100% effective. In some situations, immunization may decrease the severity of disease but not prevent it completely. This can be due to several things including differences in the virulence of some diseases. Additionally, vaccine companies must compromise between effectiveness and adverse reactions. Owners don’t want side effects to be too severe hence vaccines may be diluted in an effort to provide the best protection with the least amount of side effects. • The use of your horses determines another vaccination variable. Competition horses will require different immunization protocols than broodmares would, for instance. Vaccines must be stored properly (at the correct temperature), administered properly and given in the proper dosage. To ensure they are safe and effective, vaccines need to be properly handled. Veterinarians are properly trained to know all these considerations. • Traffic on your farm and the contact your horses have with others is another big factor. Do you have show horses that travel frequently to other regions for competitions? Are broodmares shipped in constantly for breeding? Do you have what is considered a closed herd or are new horses frequently introduced to your property? and can also cause an owner a lot of indirect financial loss. Influenza viruses change constantly in an effort to bypass the horse’s immune system. Equines on high traffic farms or those who travel a lot may need regular immunization against the disease – check with your veterinarian to see if vaccination can work for your horse.

RHINOPNEUMONITIS There are two different viruses; equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) and equine herpesvirus type 4 (EHV-4) that cause two

More traffic puts your herd at higher risk, therefore your herd may require a more complex immunization strategy. In a closed herd situation, horses can still be affected by illness even if they don’t leave the farm. Infectious diseases can be transmitted by insects, wildlife and people in some cases. • Vaccination involves the injection of bacteria or viruses that are inactivated or modified to avoid causing actual diseases. Two or more doses are usually required to initiate an adequate immune response. When a horse receives a complete vaccine procedure, the protective antibodies in the horse’s blood protect it from invasive or specific diseases. Over time however, the antibodies decline and the horse requires a booster shot at regular intervals. Just as in humans, flu strains of horses can change too. Therefore, over time vaccines must change as well, to adapt. Vaccines are designed to stimulate an immune response however, not all horses will respond the same. Side effects or ad-

different diseases in the horse, known as rhinopneumonitis. Both cause respiratory tract problems however, EHV-1 can also cause abortion, foal death and paralysis. Rhinopneumonitis is spread by aerosol and direct contact with secretions, medical tools or drinking water. Immune protection is short-lived therefore, pregnant mares must be vaccinated at the fifth, seventh and ninth months of pregnancy.

WEST NILE VIRUS West Nile virus (WNV) is the

verse reactions are typically rare, but they can happen. Veterinarians are properly trained to manage adverse effects. • Many combination vaccines are available to eliminate the number of injections a horse must endure and to tailor options for individualized protection. • If you have competition horses, you’ll want to check the rules and regulations of your events to ensure your horse’s medical record meets the show requirements. For biosecurity reasons, many precautions are taken for Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI) events, for example. Vaccination against equine influenza of all horses competing at FEI events is prescribed in the FEI Veterinary Regulations. Additional vaccinations against the risk of other equine infectious diseases may be necessary, depending on the region the event is held. It is therefore recommended to verify which vaccinations are required to protect your horse within the specific geographical region. AB

leading cause of arbovirus encephalitis in horses and humans in the United States. Horses represent 96.9% of all reported nonhuman mammalian cases of WNV disease. The virus is transmitted via mosquitoes. The case fatality rate for horses exhibiting clinical signs of WNV infection is approximately 33% therefore, vaccination for WNV is recommended as a core vaccine and is an essential standard of care for all horses in North America. In previously unvaccinated horses, an initial shot should be given,

followed by another dose four to six weeks later. After that horses should be vaccinated annually prior to mosquito season.

OTHER DISEASE CONCERNS: These diseases may not be considered “core risks” for vaccination purposes however, your veterinarian can advise you if they are a concern in your area. Strangles Rabies Botulism Equine Viral Arteritis Potomac Horse Fever

ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018

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t r a i ner ’ s c o rner

Ground Training for the Greater Good A question-and-answer conversation with Dreamscape Horsemanship and Equestrian Canada-certified Western Instructor Samantha Humphreys, about ground training. B y S ama ntha Humphreys

For most horse owners, winter is a down time. Whether you show during the summer, or just ride for fun, more times than not, the horse gets the majority of its time off during the winter. It’s cold, it’s slippery, and not everyone has access to an indoor arena to ride in. Even if you do ride most of the winter, indoors or out, most horses still come into spring a little fresher than normal.

Groundwork is fantastic for getting some of those “spring jitters” out of the horse without having to be on the horse and possibly dealing with less than ideal behaviour. Weather also plays a huge role. As snow melts, things get mucky and slippery. Good footing is often compromised for those of us who do not have an indoor arena. Though we cannot always ride, we can still work with our horses. ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018

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t r a i ner ’ s c o rner Ground training is a great warm-up that goes above and beyond from simply longing your horse to take the freshness out of them. You can do ground work with the horse already tacked up plus, I prefer ground training as a warm up because it gets the horse more in tune to its rider while still getting the horse moving. Afterwards they are less frisky before a spring ride. You can let your horse run around acting silly on a longe line, or you can put his or her mind to work at the same time. Ground training is also fantastic when you are limited on time and do not want to get your horse too sweaty, as most ground training exercises do not require a horse to jog or lope lap after lap.

Q. Ground training is great for people with limited equipment. But what do you need to keep things safe? I am a big advocator of groundwork. I deal with a lot of excuses on why someone hasn’t done ground training with their horse. In my opinion, most ground training exercises can be done with limited facilities and limited equipment. By this, I mean you don’t have to have an indoor arena, or a round pen. People often partner a round pen with groundwork and then just skip the groundwork if a round pen is not available. That doesn’t have to be the case. Most horse owners, outside of trainers or those who compete have respectably limited equipment. You don’t need a “stick and string” or a rope halter to do groundwork. Contrary to most groundwork videos you find online, the same exercises can be done with different equipment. Do you have a halter and a lead rope? Perfect. In place of a stick and string, you can use a longe whip, dressage whip, the end of your lead rope or even just a plastic grocery bag in your hand. But safety is still the most important aspect of anything you do with your horse. So how do we keep winter/spring groundwork safe? First, ensure the halter you are using is well fitted to your horse. Whether it is a leather, nylon, nylon with breakaway piece or a rope halter, make sure it fits. If you are not sure on the proper fit, ask! There are many trainers and coaches out there to help you, don’t be afraid. I would rather have someone ask a million questions than get hurt! Your lead rope should be in good repair also, length isn’t overly important for most groundwork tasks, though a bit of length (12 foot) is usually my preference. It gives you more room to move. If the lead rope has a snap, it should be sturdy and not cracked or broken. If the rope is frayed or chewed, that compromises the strength of the lead and therefore has a higher likelihood of breaking. Well-fitted equipment in good repair keeps you and your horse safe. The next biggest safety concern this time of year is footing. If you have an indoor arena, this is not as big of an issue. However if you are stuck outside, follow this simple checklist: Find the safest footing possible, ie. avoid ice build-up, super uneven ground or areas of slippery mud. I know how hard it is in the spring to avoid ice, as during the day it’s warm enough to melt and overnight is still cold enough to freeze, so everything turns into an ice rink. 22

ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018

It has been proven that horses trained regularly with sessions of groundwork in addition to their normal riding routine are more relaxed and willing to work for their riders.

In the event you cannot avoid icy or muddy areas, stick to exercises more geared towards desensitizing or controlled movements. Do not longe the horse across ice or slippery mud where they could slip and fall, or where you could slip and fall. There are a large number of ground training exercises that do not require the horse to move, and most of the ones that do require movement can be tweaked to avoid anything faster than a slow jog. I avoid loping, whether on the ground or under saddle if the footing is questionable, as there are so many other things you can do that don’t compromise safety.

Q. Desensitization. What is it? And can you please outline some exercises for us? Most ground training can be divided into two categories. There are exercises that get your horse to move their feet whichever way you are asking for (sideways, forward, back) and then the desensitization exercises. Desensitization exercises are some of my favourite. Desensitizing is simply introducing a stimulus that a horse may think is scary and get them used to it so it is no longer scary. Sometimes desensitization exercises combine exercises from the other category if we happen to be working on something like getting the horse to cross an obstacle such as a bridge, tarp or even a puddle. Chances are, you have already done an exercise like this to some degree without even realizing it. Now of course, there is no way we can cover every single exercise in this article, so here are a couple of my favourites. Stick and String Exercises Again, you do not need a “stick and string” to do these exercises. Although that is my tool of choice, you can use a second lead rope or a longe whip instead. If are using an extra lead rope, ensure you are not using the snap end, as that can hurt your horse.


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To start, stand facing your horse’s shoulder at a 45-degree angle, with a bit of space between you and your horse. This is the “safe” zone. From this position, the horse cannot kick you with its hind legs, strike you with its front legs, and should your horse go to pull back or bolt if they get nervous, you won’t be in the way. If you are on the left, hold the lead rope in your left hand, vice versa on the right side. Hold the longe whip, or stick and string, or spare lead rope in your other hand. The first step is to swing your arm in a circle so that the string or rope hits the ground beside your horse, circles through the air and back to the ground. This desensitizes the horse to both movement and sounds (the smacking sound the rope or string will make on the ground). Though the goal of this exercise is for your horse to stand still and relax while you are moving the string, it is common for horses to get a little nervous and move around. If they start moving around, you do not want to stop the swinging. Keep your horse’s head flexed a bit towards you and quietly follow them and keep swinging your rope or string until they stand still. Taking it away now only teaches them that if they make a fuss, or move away, that the “scary” thing also goes away. That might not seem too bad to start with if they only take one or two steps. But horses build on baby steps, both good and bad. What starts off as a couple steps to move away may soon grow to be a bolt under saddle, and that is opposite of what you are trying to accomplish with desensitizing exercises. Once they stand still, or if they stood still the whole time, stop swinging the rope and pet your horse to reassure them. They will learn that standing still or relaxing is the fastest way to make a “scary” thing disappear. Do this step on both

sides of your horse. This is probably the most important rule of desensitization and ensuring you are correctly training your horse. The same rule applies to every desensitization exercise you do, regardless of the tool/stimulus being used. The next step in this exercise is to then start flicking the rope or string all over the horse’s body. Neck, shoulders, back, hip, and around their legs etc. This desensitizes your horse to something moving and eventually, touching them. Use the same mandate as the first step if the horse begins to move around. If they happen to stomp their foot or even kick out as you swing it around their legs, keep going until they no longer do that. Do this from each side. Just because they accept it on their left side, does not mean the horse will accept it on their right. More times than not, a horse always has one side that is stiffer or more reactive than the other. You might have to spend a bit more time on this side. Throughout these exercises, always ensure you are standing in the “safe” zone we discussed earlier. I usually keep building on these exercises until the horse can stand calmly, without flinching or spooking while I do these exercises. Ultimately, as a trainer, my goal is for them to stand with me, lead rope on the ground (ground tied) as I swing the stick and string all around and cause a fuss. That is how you know you have done a good job. I do not recommend letting go of your lead rope if you are in a large area, or around other horses/riders, as that becomes a safety concern should a horse spook or bolt. The final step for this exercise is what I like to call the “Helicopter.” Take your rope or stick and string, and swing it above the horse’s head, neck, back and hip as you would if you were swinging a rope to rope a cow. Again, same as always for desensitization exercises, if the horse begins to move around, continue until they stand still. As always, do from both sides of your horse. You can repeat all these steps with a plastic grocery bag too by simply tying the bag to the end of your longe whip, stick or spare lead rope. That will add a higher level of difficulty to your exercise, above and beyond the plain stick and string. I cut the bottom off the plastic grocery bags for two reasons; 1) It keeps them from filling up with air as you go through the steps, making it harder to flick the bag around and; 2) this way there is nothing the horse can get tangled in, in the event they happen to spook or step on the bag at all. The fantastic part about the stick and string exercises, is the horse can really be adapted to any type of stimulus, whether it is the stick and string, a plastic bag, a piece of tarp, or a flag. Use common sense. Do not purposely put you or your horse in danger for the sake of desensitizing. This is also a great example of an exercise that can be used on a horse regardless of the animal’s age. Weanlings, yearlings and un-started horses, as well as older, broke horses can benefit from these exercises.

Desensitize on both sides. Just because they accept it on their left side, does not mean the horse will accept it on their right.

Safe zone for stick and string exercises.

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Flapping the stirrups increases your horse’s level of desensitization.

Start with the rope or the string on your longe whip or a stick and string, and build on it from there, adding the plastic bag, then the tarp and so forth. Each stage will build on the one before.

Flapping, Flapping Stirrups Surprisingly, there are a lot of broke horses out there that cannot handle this exercise right away. Though most commonly used for young horses just learning how to be saddled, flapping the stirrups is a great exercise for horses full of spring jitters. For this exercise you do need your horse saddled, English or western, it really makes no difference. The same rules apply: should your horse start moving or spooking/shying, keep the exercise as controlled as possible by putting a bit of pressure on your lead rope to keep your horse moving, then release the stimulus and reward the horse with some rubs on the face or neck. This exercise puts you in a closer position to your horse. If you are starting on the left, have the lead rope in your left hand, your right hand is going to grab your stirrup. You want to stand at a 45-degree angle towards your horse, but this time, about where your stirrup hangs. Keep yourself out of range of a kick or strike, and step back if your horse spooks or tries to bolt away. If you are starting on the left, pick up your stirrup with your right hand. You are going to swing your stirrup side to side and flap it up and down. English saddles stirrups leathers are not going to be very noisy in this motion and will be able to move easily. Because of the stirrup fender on a western saddle, they do not move as readily, so just do what your saddle allows. Fenders also make more noise, so during the flapping up and down, there will be more noise to desensitize the horse. You can start with gentle movements, but as your horse progresses, you should be able to be rather dramatic 24

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and still have your horse stand still. Test your horse. Swing the stirrup side to side, flap it, flip it right up on top of the seat of your saddle and let it fall back down and bump the horse’s side. Make sure you do this on both sides. The purpose of this exercise is to test your horse’s level of desensitization. Or if flapping the stirrups seems to be a problem area for your horse, it will further desensitize him or her. Do not be fooled: even broke horses can have issues with flapping stirrups. It is common for a horse to spook (or even the rider, by accident), as the horse jumps sideways, loses balance and for a stirrup to flap or swing. There is nothing worse than a secondary stimulus causing trouble, whether it be another spook, or worse, a bolt or buck. It is much easier to take the time to desensitize a horse than it is to try and hold back a runaway mount. Horses coming in from a winter off or a winter of less consistent riding are often a bit more reactive or spooky as they get back into the normal routine. It is the perfect time to repeat these exercises if you have done them before, or to introduce these exercises.

Q. What are the benefits of ground training?

Ground training can have several benefits that most people overlook. First off, it is an excellent way to help you and your horse gain some confidence in working together. You learn to direct the horse’s feet and the horse learns to follow your cues. For the same reason, the bond between you and your horse will become stronger. Your horse will be more confident in you as the leader, have more respect for your personal space, and gain more trust in you. When used as a warm up, just like longing, it will be pretty easy to notice if your horse is a little off or sore. The desensitization exercises help quiet your horse and make him more tolerant of scary things.


t r a i ner ’ s c o rner This doesn’t mean you have to desensitize to every possible stimulus, there is no way we can do that, but the horse will learn over time how to react to something different. How many times do you drive up the road and see plastic bags stuck to someone’s barbed wire fence? You never know what you might run into on a trail, so preparing your horse at home is the best plan. Introduce enough odd or scary things to your horse so they learn to relax and accept it, even if you run into something you haven’t desensitized them to at home. It has been proven that horses trained regularly with sessions of groundwork in addition to their normal riding routine are more relaxed and willing to work for their riders.

There are a lot of things you can introduce to a young horse before they are even under saddle that comes from ground training, and a lot of concepts introduced on the ground make it easier for the horse to understand once you are on their back. Whether it is a young horse, or an older, well broke horse. Obstacle ground work is some of my favourite to do, as the combinations of exercises are unlimited. There are quite a few issues riders come across under saddle that can very easily, and relatively quickly, be corrected with ground training. There are many different exercises that can help improve your horse’s response, training and overall behaviour. Never under estimate the power of groundwork! AB

BIO Samantha Humphreys & Dreamscape Horsemanship Dreamscape Horsemanship was founded in mid-2014. Humphreys is certified through Equestrian Canada as a Western Instructor. What started off as a couple lessons for her has turned into a lifelong passion. She grew up in Ontario showing Quarter Horses, winning numerous high points in both western and English and when she found out that Olds College in Olds, AB, had a horse training and coaching program, she packed up and moved west. Three years after graduating, she has contended in a few colt starting challenges, with more on the way. In June 2017, she purchased her own facility, Wolf Hollow Ranch, located 20 minutes south of Sylvan Lake, AB, and has been working hard at expanding the facilities and growing business. Humphreys has mentored with other trainers and coaches to build up her skills and plans to continue learning in the field.

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COMPLeMENTARY THERAPIES Utilizing combinations of treatment regimens for improving a horse’s optimal performance. B y Jenn Webster

The use of complementary medicine continues to increase in the horse industry. Whatever your discipline, the pursuit of achieving your horse’s optimal performance and best quality of life often make adjunctive therapies good options. While there are a myriad of therapies that fall within this broad term, the modalities that complement routine veterinary care are best. Meaning they are an adjunct to, not a replacement for, conventional veterinary 26

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medicine. With that in mind, here are two progressive therapeutic modalities making real advancements in horse health. PULSED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD THERAPY Mimicking the earth’s own magnetic field, pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF) offers a new modality to an equine owner’s tool kit for maintaining


h o r s e k eep i n g

“PEMF therapy enhances a bodies natural ability to heal itself. It can reduce pain and improve the quality of life and performance by allowing a body to function as it was designed to do!”

a horse’s wellbeing. By producing a performance by allowing a body to safe electromagnetic pulse, PEMF function as it was designed to do!” says energizes the cells of the body and Gibb. stimulates a natural healing process. PEMF magnetic waves travel up to 16 The modality is very non-invasive inches and can be used all over the body. as it utilizes a soft, flexible rubber EquiPulse is an easily adjustable device coil placed gently on the horse to and as such, this ability to adjust the send a wide, magnetic field deep intensity provides a gentle but optimal ~Keely Gibb into the cellular level of the body. level of power to a specific area. It As the pulsing magnetic field pulses on, the cell membrane can benefit the horse with increased joint flexibility, energy, is gently pulled by the magnetic field. As a result, cells in the performance and cellular metabolism. It can also be used to area are able to release waste, toxins and inflammation and address ailments such as hoof abscesses, sweeney shoulder, tendon injuries and joint pain. receive oxygen and nutrients. Horses typically enjoy their PEMF sessions and can often Cavallo Pulse Therapy is an alternative and holistic health service owned and operated by authorized Equipulse be seen licking their lips or yawning during a treatment. PEMF can be used on a regular basis for maintenance, to practitioner, Keely Gibb in Calgary, AB. “PEMF therapy enhances a body’s natural ability to heal keep the horse’s body healthy and pain free, in addition to itself. It can reduce pain and improve the quality of life and aiding in the healing of injuries. Opposite Page: PEMF can be used on a regular basis for maintenance to keep the body healthy and pain free as well as helping injuries heal.

this page: Infused Magnetic Therapy increases oxygenation to the horse’s muscles, causing tense muscles to relax.

INFUSED CERAMIC/MAGNETIC TECHNOLOGY The Hansbo Sport ICM series combines many years of expertise in equestrian products with innovative healing technology. This technology targets vulnerable areas of the horse that are sensitive during and after hard work. While focused on rehabilitation, Hansbo’s latest product line is also designed for optimal fit, function and style. Hansbo Sport ICM wraps, rugs, boots, saddle pads and harnesses work by generating their own heat, giving the horse a greater feeling of well being and by helping to prevent injuries. It is well known that heat accelerates healing in joint disorders. Heat has long been used to treat rheumatoid arthritis as well as muscle aches and injuries, and problems in tendons and ligaments. Clinical studies have recently shown that ceramic material placed against the skin activates infrared

waves from body heat in specific areas to aid in healing. Infrared waves accelerate blood circulation in the body. When this happens, heat-sensitive nerves are activated, which reduces muscle tension and stimulates the body to emit endorphins. As the processes interact, the effect of the infrared waves reaches deeper into the horse’s body and can also have a positive effect on inflammation. The use of ceramic fabrics can increase blood flow by up to 80 percent and reduce muscle spasms. Increased blood circulation speeds up healing in skin and muscle, as well as bones. Hansbo Sport offers their technology in everything from sweat wraps, to fleece rugs. The products’ unique characteristics ensure the horse feels comfortable both on the road and in the stable after riding. AB ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018

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a s k a b o u t i n s ur a nce

MEMBERS ONLY BENEFITS The AEF and “CapriCMW” have been working collaboratively in service to the horse community in Alberta for some time.

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Over the years, the products and services offered to members have changed dramatically – all in response to a changing landscape in the horse industry and evolving risk assessment practices we have been able to employ as specialists in this field of work.

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If you would like more information about Equi-Care or any of the insurance options that you, the member, has exclusive access to as a member of the AEF – please let any of our specialized team of licensed insurance professionals know.

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Mike King is a partner at CapriCMW Insurance and the program lead for the PTSO programs across Canada. For more information, please call the Agri-department at CapriCMW Insurance, 1-800-670-1877 or agri@capri.ca


member o r g a n i z a t i o n s if you are interested in finding out more about one of these clubs, or joining, make sure you contact them:

Alberta Carriage Driving Association................................................. www.albertadriving-acda.ca Alberta Dressage Association............................................................. www.albertadressage.com Alberta Equestrian Vaulting Association.............................................www.vaultcanada.org/AEVA Alberta Friesian Horse Association.......................................................................... www.afha.ca Alberta Horse Trials Association........................................................ www.albertahorsetrials.com Alberta Mounted Shooters........................................................www.albertamountedshooters.ca Alberta South Region Pony Club........................................................www.canadianponyclub.org Alberta Trail Riding Association...............................................................................www.atra.ca Alberta Walking Horse Association............................................................. www.walkinghorse.ca Alix Agricultural Society.................................................................... alixagsociety@outlook.com American Saddlebred Horse Association of Alberta.......................www.saddlebredsofalberta.com Banff Light Horse Association......................................................................ruthann7@telus.net Bear Valley Rescue Society.......................................................................www.bearvalleyab.org Black Diamond Polo Club............................................................... www.blackdiamondpolo.com Calgary Arabian Horse Association............................................ www.calgaryarabian.weebly.com Calgary Area Alberta Dressage Association...................................................... www.ca-ada.com Calgary Regional Appaloosa Club (1997)...........................www.calgaryappaloosa.wildapricot.org Calgary Regional Trail Riders................................................. www.calgaryregionaltrailriders.com Calgary Western Riders................................................................................. coreenc@shaw.ca Canadian Cowboy Mounted Shooters Association....................www.canadianmountedshooters.ca Canadian Horse Breeders Association Rocky Mountain District...www.canadianhorsebreeders.com Canadian Registry of the Tennessee Walking Horse............................................... www.crtwh.ca Canadian Sport Horse Association - AB Chapter................................................ www.c-s-h-a.org Cassils Trail Blazers........................................................................................ cweestra@live.ca Chinook Country/Alberta Dressage Association................................. douglorraine87@gmail.com Clearwater Horse Club.......................... www.facebook.com/cwhcpublic/?rf=155981401093436 Cooking Lake Saddle Club.......................................................... www.cookinglakesaddleclub.ca Cottonwood Corrals Association (Jasper).......................cottonwoodcorralassociation@gmail.com Coulee Winds Saddle Club........................................................................ kheapy@outlook.com Delacour Agricultural Society & Community Club..........................................www.delacourhall.ca Didsbury Agricultural Society............................................................ www.didsburyagsociety.org Dunmore Equestrian Society......................................................... www.dunmoreequestrian.com Edmonton Area /Alberta Dressage Association......................................................www.eaada.ca Endurance Riders of Alberta..................................................www.enduranceridersofalberta.com Extreme Cowboy Alberta Association............................................ www.extremecowboyracing.ca Fairview Sport Horse Society......................................www.fairviewsporthorsesociety.weebly.com Family Fun Rodeo Series.................................www.facebook.com/familyfun.rodeoseries?fref=ts Foothills Therapeutic Riding Association.................................www.foothillstherapeuticriding.com Four: Thirteen Therapeutic Riding Association....................... info.fourthirteentherapy@gmail.com Friends of the Eastern Slopes Association............................................................ www.foesa.org Fun Country Riding Club of Strathmore...............................................www.funcountryriders.com H.E.D.J.E. Society................................................................................... lundkrista@gmail.com Hastings Lake Pleasure Horse Association............www.hastingslakepleasurehorseassociation.org High Country Carriage Driving Club...................................... www.highcountrycarriagedriving.org High Country Pony Club....................................................................www.canadianponyclub.org High Kick Vaulters..........................................................................highkickvaulters@gmail.com Hoofbeats For Hope Equine Team Society..... sites.google.com/site/prairiedustersmusicalrideteam Jump Alberta Society.............................................................................. www.jumpalberta.com Lacombe Light Horse Association...................................lacombelighthorseassociation.webs.com Lethbridge Therapeutic Riding Association...............................................................tony@ltra.ca Little Bits Therapeutic Riding Association........................................................... www.littlebits.ca Meadow Creek Vaulting Club................................................................................www.mcvc.ca Millarville Musical Ride............................................................... www.millarvillemusicalride.com Miniatures in Motion Horse Club...................................................... www.miniaturesinmotion.ca Mount View Special Riding Association...............................................www.mountviewriding.com Peace Area Riding For The Disabled Society......................................................... www.pards.ca Peace Draft Horse Club........................................................................... thedrafthorseclub.com Peace Region Alberta Dressage Association................................ www.peaceregiondressage.com Polocrosse Calgary........................................................................ www.polocrossecalgary.com Ponoka Riding & Roping Association................................................ ponokaridingandroping.com Quarter Horse Association of Alberta.................................................................. www.qhaa.com Ridgeview Riding Club............................................................... ridgeviewridingclub@gmail.com Rimbey Sleigh, Wagon & Saddle Club................................................rimbeyswsclub@gmail.com Rundle Riders Therapeutic Riding Association........................................... www.rundleriders.com Shortgrass Riding Club...................................................................www.shortgrassridingclub.ca South Country Team Penning Association..............................................................www.sctpa.ca South Peace Horse Show Association......................................... www.southpeacehorseclub.com Southern Alberta Trail Riders Association............................................................... www.satra.ca Springbank Equestrian Society...........................................................normaansloos@gmail.com Springbank Pony Club.......................................................................................c3inc@shaw.ca Spruce View Gymkhana Club.......................................................... dwedmondson4@gmail.com

Steele’s Scouts Commemorative Troop Association...................................www.steelescouts.ca Stone Bridge Carriage Driving Club........................................www.stonebridgedrivingclub.com Strathcona All-Breed Horse Association.................................................. www.sahaalberta.com Tennessee Walking Horse Association Of Western Canada.............................www.twhawc.com The Greater Bragg Creek Trails Association........................................www.braggcreektrails.org Trail Riding Alberta Conference.................................................................... www.trailriding.ca Tri-Country Riding Club........................................................................... schenk88@telus.net Uplift Therapeutic Riding Association................................................. sturgeonlynn@gmail.com Valleyview & Districts Agricultural Society.......................................www.valleyviewagsociety.ca Western Canadian Wagon Train.............................................................gsissons@hotmail.com Western Dressage Association of Southern Alberta......... www.albertawesternstyledressage.com Wild Rose Draft Horse Association......................................................dbsteph@telusplanet.net Wildrose Mounted Shooters.............................................. www.wildrosemountedshooters.com Will For Riding Foundation..............................................................willforridingfoundation.com Xtreme Wild Rose Club.................................................................... xtremewildrose.webs.com

b u s i n e s s member s Alberta Association of Complementary Equine Therapy.................................. www.aacet.ca Banff Trail Riders............................................................................... www.horseback.com CapriCMW Insurance ....................................................................www.capri.ca/horse Carpino Production & Design......................................................palmocarpino@gmail.com Creekside Equestrian Centre.........................................................................www.mcvc.ca Equestrian Factory Outlet - Red Deer...............................www.equestrianfactoryoutlet.com Equi-Health Canada Inc................................................... www.equihealthcanada.com Equine Connection Inc.........................................................www.equineconnection.ca Equus Physio............................................................................www.equusphysio.com Evergreen Park (Grande Prairie Agricultural & Exhibition Society)....... www.evergreenpark.ca Foothills Horse Transport..................................................www.foothillshorsetransport.com Glen Valley Farm............................................................................ www.glenvalleyfarm.ca Greenhawk Cochrane....................................................................... www.greenhawk.com High Country Equestrian Center.............................................www.hcequestriancenter.com Higher Trails Equine Ltd.................................................................www.highertrails.ca Hi-Hog Farm & Ranch Equipment Ltd....................................................... www.hi-hog.com Horizon Equestrian Centre...................................................... www.horizonequestrian.com Horse In Hand Ranch Ltd........................................................ www.horseinhandranch.com Just Passing Horse Transport & Bereavement Services................ www.justpassinghorses.ca Kaspian Equestrian Training Centre.........................................www.kaspianequestrian.com Katy Whitt Photography................................................................. www.katywhitt.com Lawton & Co, LLP............................................................................... jwlawton@telus.net Mane Equestrian Athletics................................. maneequestrianathletics@gmail.com Martin Deerline......................................................................www.martindeerline.com McNiven Ranch Supply (Hansbo Sport)............................................ www.hansbosport.com Millennium Equestrian Ltd................................................. www.millenniumequestrian.com Moose Hill Ranch....................................................................... www.moosehillranch.com New View Stables..................................................................... www.newviewstables.com Persons Equine and Industrial Dust Control..........................................www.personscs.com PFERA Inc................................................................................................www.pfera.ca Rocking Star Ranch Equine..................................................www.rockingstarranch.ca Rock’N Horse Ranch Arena & Stables...........................................www.rocknhorseranch.ca Saddle Up Magazine.............................................................................. www.saddleup.ca Silverado Horse Centre.......................................................info@silveradohorsecenter.com Spirit Winds Ranch.......................................................... www.spiritwindshorsecentre.com Spring Lake Equestrian Camp.............................................www.springlakecampground.ca Stampede Saddle Solutions inc........................... www.stampedesaddlesolutions.com Strathcona Ventures...................................................... www.strathconaventures.com TD Equine Veterinary Group............................................................. www.tdequinevet.com The Mane Event Equine Education & Trade Show........................ www.maneeventexpo.com The School of Equine Massage and Rehabilitation Therapies................ www.equinerehab.ca The Visions West Studio...................................................................... smithpr1@telus.net Ulterra Equestrian Ltd............................................................www.ulterraranches.com Vitality Equine..........................................................................www.vitalityequine.com Western Horse Review........................................................ www.westernhorsereview.com Westwood Warmbloods....................................................www.westwoodwarmbloods.com Wheatland Equestrian..................................................................hdmaskell@hotmail.com Whitemud Equine Learning Centre Association.............................................www.welca.ca Willow Grove Stables Inc............................................... www.willowgrovestables.com Winning Strides.......................................................................... www.winningstrides.com

BE SURE TO SUPPORT OUR BUSINEsS MEMBERS! THOSE LISTED IN BLUE PROVIDE discounts TO AEF MeMBERS. VISIT OUR LIST OF STABLES AND facilities AT OUR WeBSITE!

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closing thoughts

Celebrating the Big 4-0! Photo submissions from members to help us celebrate this milestone anniversary. vi si t albe r t ae que s t rian. c o m t o su bmi t a pho t o.

Jordyn and her horse Rainbow are the best of friends.

Off track Thoroughbred Like A Girl galloping on cross country at Alhambra Stables. Photo by Kris Waldo.

1st Marathon. Samantha Pritchard and King’s Landing warming up for dressage at Mustang Powder Horse Trials May 2017. Photo by Jessica Kerschbaumer.

You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours. Moxee & Videy in Killam, AB.

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ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018


S I L E N T AU C T I O N

|

B A N Q U E T

|

A G M

CELEBRATING

40

Silent Auction Over $9,000 in products/services with proceeds going towards an Emergency Livestock Handling Equipment Trailer – First ever annual Provincial Awards recognizing outstanding AEF members – Dinner Presentations: Dr. Chris Berezowski of Moore Equine Veterinary Centre on Colic Prevention and Treatment – Mike King of CapriCMW on Emergency Life Saving Surgery – Inspiration by Richard Monette of Inner Warrior Consulting

March 24, 2018 E xecutive Royal H otel and Conference Centre, Leduc, Alber ta Registration Deadline: February 28, 2018 ALBERTA EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION 403.253.4411 ext. 6 | marketing@albertaequestrian.com ALBERTA BITS I SPRING 2018

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115,000 SQUARE FEET OF

APRIL 27 - 29, 2018

EVERYTHING

RED DEER, AB

250+ TRADE SHOW VENDORS

WITH OVER

SHOPPING.

W E S T E R N E R PA R K

FROM BITS TO BOOTS

AND TACK

TO TRAILERS. Advance Tickets Advance Tickets are on sale for the 12th Annual event. Order your tickets online and SAVE $$$! Tickets are available at the door also.

(844) 578-7518

Clinicians

Trainers Challenge

Over 100 hours of Clinics & Demos by: Jeff Campf - Jumping Diane Creech - Dressage Mike Beer - Team Roping Heidi McLaughlin - Horsemanship Glenn Stewart - Horsemanship Martin Black - Horsemanship Andy Marcoux - Driving

The crowd pleasing Trainers Challenge returns to see 3 top trainers try their hand at breaking 3 horses from Ace of Clubs Quarter Horse. Alex Alves - Alberta Jason Irwin - Ontario Kade Mills - Alberta

www.maneeventexpo.com

Abbits spring2018  

The Love of Miniature Horses Issue and much more!

Abbits spring2018  

The Love of Miniature Horses Issue and much more!