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WINTER 2017; VOLUME 9, ISSUE 4

Alberta Bits is the Alberta Equestrian Federation’s official member magazine. It serves the equestrian community of horses and riders of all ages, interests and involvement as Alberta’s premier resource for education, information and support. T H E A L B E RTA E Q U E S T R I A N F E D E R AT I O N H A S B E E N I N C O R P O R AT E D S I N C E 1 9 7 8 Alberta Bits magazine is mailed four times a year (Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter) to all current AEF members and is made available at the office and special events attended by the AEF. Alberta Bits is distributed throughout Alberta with news and events on behalf of recreational, sport, breeds & industry and educational sectors of the Alberta horse industry. Alberta Bits is distributed to approximately 18,000 members; 9,000 households and businesses, an exclusive list of tack and equine establishments and at events and trade shows annually.

AEF BOARD OF DIRECTORS Les Oakes 403.540.9859 lesoakes@gmail.com

PRESIDENT

Lauren Parker 403.813.1055 lmparker@shaw.ca

PRESI DENT ELECT

Tara Gamble 780.945.7516 tara@tghorsemanship.com

PAST PRESIDENT SECRETARY

Dena Squarebriggs 403.760.0512 dmsquare04@hotmail.com

TREASURER

Sandy Bell 403.700.7880 chinookcomm@gmail.com

INDIVIDUAL

Trish Mrakawa 403.938.6398 trish@willowgrovestables.com

INDIVIDUAL

Nicolas Brown 587.988.3590 bruchev@gmail.com

INDIVIDUAL

Lewis Hand 403.722.4690 lewhand@live.ca

INDIVIDUAL

Alison Douglas 403.762.8570 thealicat@shaw.ca

INDIVIDUAL

Robert Simpson 306.641.5579 rms210@mail.usask.ca

INDIVIDUAL

Christine Axani 403.816.8979 chrisaxani@gmail.com

AEF STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Sonia Dantu execdir@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 5 MEMBERSHIP

Norma Cnudde membership@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 1 MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

Ashley Miller marketing@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 6

COACHING

Erin Lundteigen coaching@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 3

PA G E 0 6

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

PA G E 0 8

L I V E O U T S I D E T H E B OX W I N N E R S The winners of the program that awards time away from the television and computer screens, and more time with horses!

PA G E 1 1

T H E SO C I A L B I T

PA G E 1 2

WINTER CARE TIPS Advice for safe riding and keeping your horse comfortable during the most challenging season in a Canadian calendar year.

PA G E 1 4

B R E E D P RO F I L E Love for Longears: the often misunderstood Mule.

PA G E 1 8

CHRISTMAS GIFT GUIDE Perfect holiday gifts for every equestrian on your list.

PA G E 2 2

S N O W S P O RT Getting started in Canada’s newest winter obsession – Skijoring.

PA G E 2 6

HORSE KEEPING ARE YOU PREPARED? Here’s why getting caught in the “evacuation order” process of an emergency isn’t the time to make plans to save your animals or your farm.

PA G E 2 8

ASK ABOUT INSURANCE Understanding the AEF travel policy.

PA G E 2 9

CLUB & BUSINESS LISTINGS

PA G E 3 0

CLOSING THOUGHTS In 2018, the Alberta Equestrian Federation will celebrate its 40th anniversary. As such, we’re inviting members to share their archives with us!

COMPETITIONS

Sophie Beswick competitions@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 2 FINANCE, GENERAL INQUIRIES

Rita Bernard info@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 7

O F F I C E H O U R S : 8 : 3 0 T O 4 : 3 0 , M O N D A Y T O F R I D A Y, E X C E P T H O L I D A Y S ALBERTA BITS IS PUBLISHED BY WESTERN PERFORMANCE PUBLISHING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE AEF

FOR EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES CONTACT: ALBERTABITS@ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM

THE OFFICE WILL BE CLOSED DECEMBER 22 AND REOPEN JANUARY 3, 2018 Jennifer Webster Natalie Jackman Ashley Miller • Sonia Dantu • Louisa Murch-White

MANAGING EDITOR ART DIRECTOR

PUBLICATION COMMITTEE

CONTRIBUTORS

Sally Aungier, Miles Lacorte, Elli Meinert Monique Noble, Marlene Quiring, and Louisa Murch White. ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES

Sally Bishop 403.815.1289 sallysuebishop@gmail.com ADVERTISING DEADLINES

SPRING 2018: January 26, 2018 SUMMER 2018: April 27, 2018 FALL 2018: September 7, 2018 FOR A MEDIA KIT AND/OR RATE CARD PLEASE CONTACT ALBERTABITS@ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM

or marketing@albertaequestrian.com. All material is copyright 2017. Ideas and opinions expressed in articles do not necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of the AEF. Alberta Bits reserves the right to accept, and/or edit material submitted for publication. The AEF makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information contained therein, but assumes no liability in cases of error or changing conditions. Any business relations or other activities undertaken as a result of the information contained in Alberta Bits, or arising therefrom, is the responsibility of the parties involved and not of the AEF. We welcome signed letters to the editor, but reserve the right to publish, edit for grammar, taste and length. For reprint information, please contact execdir@albertaequestrian.com

ALBERTA EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION

100, 251 Midpark Blvd SE Calgary, AB T2X 1S3 Toll Free: 1.877.463.6233 Phone: 403.253.4411 Fax: 403.252.5260

albertaequestrian.com

THE AEF GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM ALBERTA SPORT CONNECTION

P U B L I C AT I O N S M A I L AG R E E M E N T # 4 0 0 5 0 2 9 7 • P R I N T E D I N C A N A D A • I S S N 1 9 1 8 - 7 1 1 4 R E T U R N U N D E L I V E R A B L E M A I L TO : A L B E RTA E Q U E S T R I A N F E D E R AT I O N 1 0 0 , 2 5 1 M I D PA R K B LV D S E C A L G A RY, A B T 2 X 1 S 3

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AlbErTA EquEsTrIAn FEdErATIon 100, 251, Midpark Blvd, Calgary (Alberta) T2X 1S3 Phone: 403-253-4411/Toll Free: 1-877-463-6233 coaching@albertaequestrian.com www.albertaequestrian.com


A M E S S AG E F RO M A E F P R E S I D E N T L E S OA K E S

President’s Message With the natural disasters that have been happening over the past few years in Alberta, emergency preparedness is most likely on everyone’s mind; however, plans may not be in place. As the AEF has been involved with many of these disasters, it became very apparent that emergency preparedness support for the equine industry in Alberta is critical. Over the past few months, the AEF has been working on creating the Alberta Equine Industry Emergency Preparedness Plan and Municipal Guidelines and Templates. This project was made possible by grant funding through Growing Forward. The Plan provides an overview of how emergencies are managed in Alberta, preparedness tools and resources as well as roles, responsibilities and protocols. The Plan is intended to be used for emergency preparedness training and as a reference guide by the AEF staff and members of the Equine Industry Emergency Resource Team. The team is comprised of 17 equine industry representatives from across the province. Team members will be assisting municipalities with incorporating equine into their existing Community Emergency Management Plans and assist in the event of an emergency that involves equine. The Guidelines and Templates are intended for use by municipalities, First Nations and Metis Settlements to incorporate equine into their existing Community Emergency Management Plans. November 21, 2017 marked the last of the 10 Municipality Emergency Preparedness workshops delivered by the AEF. The goal of these workshops was to provide an overview of the equine industry in Alberta and assist municipal bodies and personnel to assure that equine are included in their respective emergency management plans. All rural municipalities, First Nations and Metis communities were invited to attend a workshop(s) of their choice. The agenda included equine emergency factors – animal handling, behavior, rescue and recovery. Workshop attendees included emergency response leaders, representatives from municipal governing bodies and field personnel as well as members of the AEF Equine Industry Emergency Resource Team. AEF is hopeful that funding may be available in the New Year to continue with this project for the next phase, which would include further training for individuals. For more information on how to put your own plan in place, contact the AEF office or your municipality office and ask where and how you can take a one-day course so that you are better prepared to handle an emergency in your area. As we come to the end 2017, the AEF staff and Board of Directors are well underway preparing for the next Stride

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A L B E RT A B I T S | W I N T E R 2 0 1 7

With Us in conjunction with the AGM on March 24, 2018 in Nisku, AB. To have increased member participation and to celebrate the upcoming 40th Anniversary of the AEF, we are planning a special event. This event will offer the opportunity to increase your knowledge, participate in a silent auction to help raise funds for an Emergency Livestock Handling Equipment Trailer (in-line with our goals to support equine emergency preparedness) and to celebrate together with the recipients of the first ever AEF annual awards, nominated by the AEF membership. We hope that by creating an event that offers educational and networking opportunities, our members will come out to meet the staff and the Board; and pass on ideas of what you, the membership, want to see as we proceed through 2018 and beyond. One of the areas that the AEF has worked hard to achieve over the past few years is to become an organization that is able to financially support projects that ultimately benefit the equine community. Over the past two years, the AEF has not only increased funding to support development of trails, but the AEF has also increased scholarship dollars to those seeking to further their education in pursuit of a career in the equine industry and has given back to many individual and club members to support their educational efforts for development. As we are quickly approaching another Christmas season, I personally would like to thank each of our AEF members for everything you do for the Alberta equine world and to wish you and your family a very Merry Christmas and all the best in the year to come. AB


2 0 1 7

A E F

HAVE A SEAT...

M E M B E R S H I P S

EXPIRE ON DECEMBER 31, 2017

ON THE AEF BOARD

INDIVIDUAL/FAMILY/BUSINESS/CLUB/STABLE/FACILITY

TIME TO RENEW!

Here is your chance to grow personally and professionally, to develop skills, gain unique experience and make lasting connections with a team of other passionate and motivated professionals as an AEF Board of Director. AEF staff, a dedicated and hard-working group, competently manage the day-to-day operations, enabling the board to focus on matters of strategic importance and to improve programs and services to our ever-growing membership base. Become part of our team.

NOMINATION FORMS ARE DUE

FEBRUARY 7, 2018 THERE ARE 4 DIRECTOR POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR A 3-YEAR TERM.

NOTICE of the AEF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

For more information, please contact Sonia Dantu, execdir@albertaequestrian.com or visit our website to download a nomination form.

M A RC H 2 4 , 2 0 1 8

Erin

FO F C. C LO F I C IN 2 2 SE E W CL – D I LL US JA BE I V N. E. 2

Sonia

AE

Rita

Norma

E

Sophie

TH

Ashley

The AEF is built on the strong foundation of our members and volunteers. We are extremely proud of our equine community and thank you for your continued support. We look forward to serving you in 2018.

DE

May your Neighs be Merry & Bright

A L B E RT A B I T S | W I N T E R 2 0 1 7

7


We are really excited to announce that our Alberta Buckaroos logged a total of

9,193 HOURS OF HORSE TIME

12,457 HOURS

OF OUTDOOR ACTIVITY TIME

17,442

HEALTHY SERVINGS OF FRUITS & VEGETABLES CONSUMED

Everything is more fun when it’s real! Dust off those boots, get outside and have some fun with a horse. You could win some great prizes for doing just that! We want youth to spend less time in front of the TV and computer and spend more time outside being active. Less screen time and more horse time = great prizes! It’s that easy! This creative program has stirred up a lot of interest and enthusiasm over the years. AEF members from all over Alberta aged 7-15 years-old are leaving the TV and computer behind and getting out and spending more time with their horse! Not surprisingly we receive a lot of support from the parents too! Youth members keep track of how they are spending their time either with their horse and for outside activities, as well as how many healthy servings they are eating each day between April 1st and September 30 of each year to win great prizes. We also have a ton of cool draws for prizes throughout this time! You don’t even have to own a horse to participate! If you are 7-15 years-old and want to Live Outside the Box, contact us today! FIRST PLACE PRIZE

Pro Sport Video Camera (with helmet mount) SECOND PLACE PRIZE

Digital Camera

THIRD PLACE PRIZE

between April 1 – September 31st

Special thank you goes to McNiven Ranch Supply Ltd. official North American Supplier of Hansbo Sport – proud sponsor of the AEF Live Outside the Box program! Thank you for providing prizes for our monthly draws!

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNERS OF THE

2017 MONTHLY DRAWS FOR THEIR VERY OWN HANSBO HS IC HALTER

April – Teigan Tkachuk May – Jessy Maurice June – Hailey Lewicki July – Ayden Stephens August – Halle Crotty September – Amy Minken

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Fitness Tracker

FIRST PLACE WINNER H I GHE ST

N UM B E R

O F

Horse Time Hours

Nessa Ingram

AGE: 15 Nessa started talking riding lessons at age six. She got her first horse after four years of riding. Prairie Rose is an 11-year-old Welsh Cob Section D. This year they were travelling all over Alberta attending clinics, eventing competitions, and camps. Nessa joined Pony Club four years ago. Pony Club has given her the opportunity to explore many disciplines. Eventing is Nessa’s passion! Prairie Rose and her are

thriller seekers and love cross country. Every spare moment that Nessa has she spends it with Prairie Rose. She is one of a kind and they are best friends!


CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL OF OUR WINNERS AND THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSOR

McNIVEN RANCH SUPPLY LTD. OFFICIAL NORTH AMERICAN SUPPLIER OF HANSBO SPORT age of nine. Her 4-H project horse is Vienna, she is a 17-year-old Arabian mare. She is spicy, hot and full of energy but she is also a loyal companion and has taught Emmeline so much! Horses are her passion. When she is older she would like to own a ranch, teach riding lessons, be a horse trainer and be an equine chiropractor. She hopes to be involved with horses for the rest of her life!

FIRST PLACE WINNER HIGHEST

NUM B ER

O F

Outdoor Activity Hours

Aimee Deveaux

AGE: 11 Aimee lives in Calgary with her parents, her older sister, her younger sister and her little brother. Her favourite thing to do is ride horses. Aimee has been riding since she was six. She currently rides a fun chestnut mare named Cheyenne and they have learned a lot together. Aimee enjoys dressage, jumping, cross country, trail riding, showing and pony club. When shes’s not riding she enjoys helping out at the barn or other outside activities such as biking, skiing and tennis. She also enjoys playing volleyball, traveling, camping and photography.

FIRST PLACE WINNER HIGHEST

NUM B ER

O F

Healthy Servings Consumed

Emmeline Lansdell

AGE: 15 Emmeline has belonged to the Looma Lights Light horse 4-H club since the

SECOND PLACE WINNER H I GHE ST

N UM B E R

O F

Horse Time Hours

Tiana Winkler

AGE: 12 Tiana Winkler has been riding since she was seven-years-old. She’s an Albertan eventer, and has successfully competed at the pre-training level. Her horse is Cee Dee Frosty’s Faro, a Canadian Warmblood mare. Faro and Tiana were the pre-training champions this year. They like to trick people with their age as Tiana is only 12 and Faro is 17! Tiana is looking forward to competing at training level next year with Faro, as well as entry with her new addition, Diva!

with are Kavalia, Jake, Phlynnigan, Telli, Joepy, AJ, Louis and Sully. Every day after school and on the weekend Trinity likes to do lots of things. On Tuesdays and Saturdays she does vaulting. On Fridays and Sundays she rides many horses and on Mondays and Thursdays Trinity does cross-training for vaulting (yoga, work outs, stretches). Her favourite activity with the horses is vaulting. She also like to ride outside, do dressage, some jumping, longeing and groom her horses.

SECOND PLACE WINNER H I G H E ST

N UM B E R

O F

Healthy Servings Consumed

Rayla McKinnon

AGE: 12 Riding first became Rayla’s passion at the age of four. She got her first horse when she was eight-years-old, and now has her very own horse. Firefly is a 12-year-old red roan APHA and is a finished reiner. Over the years Rayla has trained hard in many different disciplines including, trail riding, jumping... [CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE]

SECOND PLACE WINNER H I GHE ST

N UM B E R

O F

Outdoor Activity Hours

Trinity Van der Sluijs

AGE: 11 Trinity lives on a dairy farm, where they have lots of cows and horses. The horses that she loves to ride and vault A L B E RT A B I T S | W I N T E R 2 0 1 7

9


[CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9]

THIRD PLACE WINNER

...vaulting, reining and endurance. Recently she has been doing really well in dressage and jumping. She has only been jumping at home for six months and now jumps up to 2” high. Rayla would love to be a vet when she gets older, as she loves the outdoors, doing horse chores and even just spending time in the field with her horses. Rayla states, “Thank you so much to the LOTB program for setting this up, it is absolutely amazing!”

H I G H E ST

H I GH E ST

N UM B E R

O F

Outdoor Activity Hours

Madeline Watkins

HIGHEST

NUM B ER

O F

Horse Time Hours

Taiga Thorsteinsson

AGE: 15 Taiga is a proud participant of the Live Outside the Box program. Taiga is from Stettler, AB and rides western. She participated in lots of activities outdoors this year including boating, swimming, hiking, running and horseback riding.

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O F

Calla van Beurden

THIRD PLACE WINNER

THIRD PLACE WINNER

N UM B E R

Healthy Servings Consumed

AGE: 9 Maddie Watkins is lucky enough to be born into a farm family. She is the fifth generation on the Watkins family farm, located in Red Deer Lake, Alberta. She has ridden since before she could walk, and her third word was “horse.” She lives horses in every part of her life, every day contains a horse and she would not have it any other way. She has had four wonderful horses in her life up to this point. Her first mount, Freckles, was given to Maddie by her Grandma Betty, before she was born. She moved then to Chocolate Joe, a wonderful Quarter Horse, found by her Auntie Michelle. Next she loved a ranch horse named Danny that she stole from her Father, and now rides a jumper pony named Prince. Surrounded by horse professionals, Maddie is blessed to be guided towards safe, fun, and wellrounded horsey life filled with love and knowledge of these majestic animals.

AGE: 9 Calla van Beurden is nine-years-old and in grade four. She loves taking riding lessons, going to horse camp and her favourite part about riding is cantering! Calla loves going out to where she boards their horses and playing with all the animals. Her favourite pony is the pony she leases named Cindy-Lu, but she also loves taking care of her Mom and Aunt’s horses Ricky and Stogie. Calla really enjoys grooming and glittering ponies and horses. Cindy has a really cute heart shaped spot on her hindquarters that she love to decorate with glitter! AB


Get featured by tagging the AEF on Facebook or Instagram (@alberta_equestrian) and using the hashtag #AlbertaEquestrianFederation on your posts!

The SOCIAL BIT

A L B E RT A B I T S | W I N T E R 2 0 1 7

11


STAY WARM (YOU AND YOUR HORSE) The minus degree

temperatures may not mean much until you factor in the wind chill. When riding in the winter that cold, raw wind can have negative effects on your horse’s lungs, so use good judgment when taking your horse outdoors, and try to stay out of the wind as much as possible. You can layer your winter clothes, but keep in mind – you do have to get on the horse, and you don’t want to limit your movement so that you can’t ride effectively. Choose winter boots that have some kind of heel, and a smaller foot that will easily slide in and out of a stirrup.

WARM THE BIT AND OTHER EQUIPMENT There are varying

WINTER HORSE CARE

TIPS

Winter presents unique challenges for the horse and rider. With sound horse care consideration, it is possible to maintain exercise regimes and training, and bring an equine comfortably through this tricky time of year. B Y A L B E RTA B I T S W R I T E R S

Winter can be a challenging time of year when it comes to riding horses, but it’s not impossible. With careful planning and knowledge, you can ride safely and enjoyably throughout the winter months. Here are a few tips to help you and your horse make the most of your riding, be it for pleasure or becoming fit for spring competitions. 12

A L B E RT A B I T S | W I N T E R 2 0 1 7

opinions on this subject but if putting our tongues on cold metal is similar to what a horse feels when a cold bit is put inside its mouth, it’s easy to imagine how the horse feels. A heated tack room is ideal, but if you don’t have one, at least keep your bridle and saddle pad in a warm area. If your saddle pad is warm and sweaty when you remove it from the horse’s back after riding, put it somewhere where it can dry. If not allowed to dry properly, this can create the opportunity for bacteria to grow on the underside. FOOTING It is imperative that you find somewhere to ride where your horse has good footing. Try to avoid ice at all costs and stay off frozen gravel roads, where the ground can be like cement. Also, avoid riding in hard crusted snow which can cut your horse’s legs and make the bulbs of the heels very tender. If such areas cannot be avoided, use leg protection on your equine to protect those lower leg areas. The best place to ride is a snow-packed trail, where there is no hazard of slipping and there is some snow to minimize concussion. BAREFOOT OR SHOES? There are pros and cons to both options. If you are unable to avoid icy areas, shoes with borium or caulks might be a good option. It depends where and how much you are riding; your farrier’s advice will be your most valuable tool in this case. A major problem with shoes is that they allow the snow to pack in the cup of the hoof and your horse ends up with big balls of snow stuck to his hooves. This will also happen with a horse that is barefoot, but it may not be as much of a problem. Some riders swear by “snow pads” – rubber pads that can be put on by your farrier and help force the snow out of the horse’s foot.

FITTING UP FOR COMPETITION OR RIDING FOR PLEASURE Whether you are riding for pleasure, or in

preparation for spring competition, it is important to treat your horse like the special athlete he is. If you are only riding


sporadically throughout the winter, go easy on your horse, as he won’t be in shape for miles of hard riding. If you are conditioning your horse, start slow and progress accordingly. Factor in the activity level of your horse prior to the training program. How many months did he have off? Was he stabled or in a pasture? What kind of feeding program has he been on? How much hair does he have? It only takes a bit of exertion to get a horse sweating when it’s really cold, and this is something you should try to avoid in the winter. A wet, long haired horse can take an awful long time to sufficiently dry, but you should not put him back outside in the winter elements until he is completely dry. COOLING AND DRYING YOUR HORSE It’s always necessary to get a horse cooled down properly before turning him out, but in the cold months, it is absolutely imperative. If you have a warm barn, you can leave your horse inside until he’s dry but if you have a cold barn you may need to find other ways to help your horse cool down and dry in a timely manner. Grooming with a curry comb in a circular motion lifts the hair and allows it to dry a little quicker than if it is all laying flat. A cattle blower/vacuum is a good tool, as you can “blow dry� your horse’s hair. The noise of the machine could be a limiting factor, but most horses eventually relax. After grooming, put a woolen blanket or cooler on your horse to wick away the moisture. If your horse wears a blanket, the outdoor blanket must fit well. The belly straps must be snug to keep the blanket in place and to avoid the possibility of the horse getting a foot or leg caught. A hood provides more protection, keeping the neck covered as well. Using a blanket and hood will encourage shedding in the spring and the horse’s hair will stay slick and shiny during the winter months. CLIPPING Body clipping is an option but only if you are prepared to keep your horse in a warm indoor environment until the weather warms up, unless you have a heavyduty blanket with a hood for your horse to wear outdoors. Certainly, the cooling off period for a clipped horse will be much shorter than a long-haired one. If your horse will still be kept outside, it is not recommended to clip the fetlock/pastern hairs. Horses need that hair to protect their legs from the crusty snow and to keep their legs warm. With some preparedness and consideration, winter riding can be most enjoyable, for yourself as well as your mount. AB

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B R E E D P RO F I L E

B R E E D P RO F I L E

Love for LONGEARS Understanding why Mules are more.

BY JENN WEBSTER • PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARLENE QUIRING

ABOVE: Five-year-old Kate having a Mule moment with 22-year-old Daisy, her mount at the Alberta Donkey and Mule Club Longears Show. RIGHT TOP: Katherine Cook of Camrose, AB, and her mule Dixie competing against horses in a jumping competition. RIGHT: Baby mules typically have very sweet dispositions.

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Mules may be one of the most misunderstood equine breeds of the world. To produce the hybrid equine called a mule, a breeder must mate a male donkey (jack) and a female horse (mare). The opposite cross, using a male horse (stallion) and a female donkey (jennet), is called a hinny. Although the mule and hinny hybrids have the same sexual characteristics and drive as their parents, they are sterile due to an

uneven number of chromosomes – 63. However, male mules must be castrated the same as horses and although it's rare, there are a few documented cases around the world where a female mule has actually given birth to another live mule. “You always hear a lot of old wives’ tales about mules,” says Marlene Quiring of Ponoka, AB. “One of the most common is that Mules are stubborn - ‘Be careful! They will kick


B R E E D P RO F I L E or bite you…’ It’s simply not true for a Mule to come out of the blue and do that. And Mules aren’t stubborn. They are very protective. They think a little more than a horse does. They assess a situation much more than a horse does,” she explains. Quiring has been a longtime member of the Alberta Donkey and Mule Club and has raised Mules for 15 years. Being so involved with the association has allowed her to show in and be part of the annual fun show they host each year. Quiring is also one of the driving forces behind the production of educational seminars for Donkey and Mule enthusiasts and each year, they are excited to bring up clinician Jerry Tindell – one of North America’s top horse and mule trainers. “Jerry has helped a lot of people who have gotten in over their heads. He has a great understanding of human nature to help their Mules. Or to help people with whatever their breed of choice is,” Quiring says. The Alberta Donkey and Mule Club was established in 1989 by a dedicated group of Albertans, passionate about their animals. The club was formed not only to positively promote the love of Mules and Donkeys, but also to promote them as useful animals. “Unlike horses, whose instinct is generally to flee, a Donkey’s instinct is to shut down,” Quiring explains. “Donkeys are from a desert ancestry, where they weren't always able to flee. So they will turn and fight instead, simply because they can’t run away from a problem. A Mule has the combination of horse and donkey instincts.”

Quiring states that with the best of both the horse and donkey coming together in one animal, a mule obtains more of a “stand and assess” attitude, rather than a “run off” temperament. “It’s what makes them really good for pleasure driving and trail riding, etc. They really have a selfpreservation attitude. They don't want to get themselves hurt. Because of this, they don’t create as many vet bills

for their owners either,” she laughs. “To me their personality is more like that of a dog. Baby mules especially! They tend to like people right away. But if their people don't understand the way they think, that can cause Mules to go in a different direction. Many people get into Mules without any knowledge of equine behaviour and that’s when everyone gets into trouble.” Quiring states that although Mules can be a bit more challenging, they are also more rewarding overall. Mules come in all sizes, from the small miniature, to the giant draft Mules. The smallest mules come from miniature jacks and miniature horse mares. The draft Mules come from mammoth jacks and large draft mares. Saddle mules are typically bred from Quarter Horse, Thoroughbred, and other pleasure riding type mares, in combination with standard and large standard-sized jacks. Hinnys come in all the same sizes, but as E.C. Porter states in A Breeder’s Notebook, “It is simply the very low conception rate of the jennet (even to a jack), which makes the breeding of hinnys much less sure and not at all profitable, compared to the breeding of Mules.” [CONTINUED ON PAGE 16] A L B E RT A B I T S | W I N T E R 2 0 1 7

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B R E E D P RO F I L E [CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15]

Mules today are used for packing, pleasure riding, driving, racing, jumping and a sport specific to their breed, called “coon” hunting. As Mules can do anything a horse can do, (and in many cases, sometimes better), Mules can jump as high as their withers from a standing position. Coon hunting is the practice of using Mules for the hunting of racoons - a concept that developed into a competition. Due to the difference in their muscling, Mules can jump higher than horses from a complete standstill. The idea for the competition began many years ago with raccoon hunters riding Mules deep in the southern woods of the United States. During the hunt, there were often fences in the way of the chase. The riders would dismount and throw a blanket or jacket over the top wire, making it visible to the Mule. Standing on the opposite side, the rider urged the Mule to jump from a standstill, thus avoiding a

long walk to the nearest gate. Because of their strength and surefootedness, Mules are also being used more and more by cross-country and endurance riders as good, dependable mounts. You might even catch them practising in the disciplines of fox hunting, dressage, combined driving, cow work and all sorts of other recreational uses. “I myself, prefer to ride Mules over horses anytime, I like how Mules work off my legs and can be expertly taught how to neck rein. We go packing into the woods, we even tend to ride the Mules and pack the horses anymore!” Quiring chuckles. “I just prefer a Mule because of the way their mind works. Generally speaking they’re also an easier ride. They have a nice motion and a gait they get from the Donkey. They are very sure-footed and because of the way their eyes are set on their heads, they can actually see where their back feet are going. That’s why in the famous Grand Canyon rides, you’ll only ever see

“Mules aren’t stubborn. They are very protective. They think a little more than a horse does.”

the guides using Mules. Mules are the reliable ones, they're not going to step over the edge because that’s where their self-preservation comes in.” Quiring says that Mules additionally benefit from their great senses of humour. “I find them entertaining! They’ll test you but it’s almost like a fun game. They have more personality.” “There’s a common quote out there that ‘Mules are very much like a horse – but more so.’ You have to think about that for a bit,” she chuckles. AB

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LEFT: Cam Fleury of High River, AB, competes in mounted shooting on his mule Lacey. HERE: Coon Jumping class. Mules and donkeys have the ability to jump from a standstill, similar to a deer.

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A L B E RTA B I T S ’ C H R I S T M A S G I F T G U I D E

THE PERFECT

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Serape is on-trend and these cute, yet functional, shoes will be a definite hit under the tree. PRICE: $179.99 FIND IT AT: www.lammles.com

Horze Desiree Women’s Full Seat Breeches

Twisted X Serape Fringe Driving Moccasins

Boss Mare Hoodie

Sassy, yet funny? We love this hoodie, and we bet the boss of your house will too. PRICE: $69.95 FIND IT AT: www.tonicequestrian.com

Snoozies

An excellent accessory for eggnog drinking beside the Christmas tree. Snoozes are sherpa-lined knit slipper socks. PRICE: $17.95 FIND IT AT: www.lammles.com 18

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The perfect amount of comfort, wrapped in a stylish check print. PRICE: $89.95 FIND IT AT: www.horsestore.com

These stylish full seat breeches are in a new colour, Port Royale, and include a number of technical features including a silicone pattern on the full seat with a check design for a touch of style. PRICE: $178.95 FIND IT AT: www.horsestore.com


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Horze Equestrian Toque

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Kitchen Conversion Charts

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Back On Track Long Sleeve

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FOR HIM:

Twisted X Driving Moccasins

These driving moccasins featuring a rubber sole, and easy slip-on design. The perfect gift for your on-the-go rancher. PRICE: $189.99 FIND IT AT: www.lammles.com

For more great gift ideas, visit the Alberta Equestrian Federation’s newsfeed at

Snoozies

albertaequestrian.com

Keep his toes warm and toasty this holiday season with these great slipper socks. PRICE: $19.95 FIND IT AT: www.lammles.com

Rodeo Tuff T-Shirt

This slim-fit, vintage-inspired tee, is comfy, and casual. PRICE: $26.00 FIND IT AT: www.bart5trailers.com

Don’t Turn Your Back In The Barn

This is the humorous account of the people and animals who Canadian veterinarian, Dr. David Perrin, met in the early stages of his practice. PRICE: $13.95 FIND IT AT: www.amazon.ca


A L B E RTA B I T S ’ C H R I S T M A S G I F T G U I D E

3 Horses Tempered Glass Cutting Board This glass cutting board fits wonderfully in any equestrian home. PRICE: $15.99 FIND IT AT: www.greenhawk.com

Roper Maple Leaf Cowboy Boots

Wear your patriotism loud and proud with the new Canadian Collection from Roper. PRICE: $289.95 FIND IT AT: www.lammles.com

FOR THE LITTLE EQUESTRIAN: Glow In The Dark Unicorn Puzzle Set by Mudpuppy Not only is it unicorn-themed, but it’s also glow in the dark! What’s better than that? PRICE: $14.95 www.indigo.ca

Horse Club Advent Calendar by Schleich

Perfect for the horse lover in your home leading up to Christmas. This advent calendar comes with delightful figurines and lots of accessories. PRICE: $39.95 FIND IT AT: www.lammles.com

Farm World Advent Calendar by Schieich

Do you have a little farmer in your house? Then the Farm World advent calendar is for them, with figurines of all their favourite barn yard friends to play with. PRICE: $39.95 FIND IT AT: www.lammles.com

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Pony Power Socks

Super cute socks for your little pony-clubber. PRICE: $7.95 FIND IT AT: www.horsestore.com

Breyer Traditional Dually Truck and Trailer

You might not want to give them any big ideas, but this dually truck and trailer set is just too adorable to pass up. PRICE: $92.95 for truck $92.95 for trailer FIND IT AT: www.horsestore.com

John Deere Farm Power Tractor with Trailer Your little helpers will learn as they play, driving and hauling around the yard and barn. PRICE: $378.00 FIND IT AT: www.walmart.ca

Les Amis Donkey

A plush and cuddly donkey that is sure to be a favourite around the house. PRICE: $31.99 FIND IT AT: www.greenhawk.com

FOR YOUR HORSE:

Natural For Life’s Equine Box Set

These essential oils are made for both horse and rider. This box set includes oil for calming, protection, and healing. PRICE: $215.00 FIND IT AT: www.tonicequestrian.com


Equicrown Horse Compression Bandages

Medical-grade compression wraps to fit your horse’s leg perfect, every application. PRICE: $299.95 FIND IT AT: www.strathconaventures.com

Shedrow Westbury 600D High Neck Turnout

Have a horse in the barn that needs to be bundled up in the cold weather? This high neck turnout is perfect for that. PRICE: $129.99 FIND IT AT:

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Bio Gel Bio Wash

A unique compound of all-natural organic herbs and minerals that is proven to speed the healing of wounds, reduce inflammation and scarring and kill bacteria. PRICE: Prices vary per size of product FIND IT AT: www.energyequine.ca

INFUSED CERAMIC AND MAGNETIC TURNOUT BLANKET

Triple E Nylon Pink Bosal

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Back On Track Mesh Sheet

Everyone’s favourite Welltex product now comes in a variety of fun colours. Never get your horses’ sheets mixed up again! PRICE: $269.00 FIND IT AT: www.botcanada.com

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HERE: A soft cotton rope is best even for experienced skijorers; soft ropes are much more forgiving and far less slippery than yacht rope or traditional lariats. Any colour other than white is best as it makes the rope easier to see in snowy conditions. RIGHT: Protective gear for your horse is important as hard packed snow can be quite sharp.

SNOWSPORT Skijor Canada’s Skijordue is a must do.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MONIQUE NOBLE

What started as a private event with an entry fee of a block of cheese, is now a growing national competition. Skijor Canada’s premier event Skijordue is back again this year and will be held, weather permitting, on February 3, 2018 at the Calgary Polo Club. If last year’s event with almost 700 attendees was any indication, it will be the must do event of the season. Skijordue 2018 is expected to be larger than 2017 and plans for an epic day of skijoring events, demonstrations and races followed by a bumping après skijor party are well in hand. Cheese fondue is the epicurean epicentre of this event and with ski and equine excitement all around, Skijodue promises to be the not-be-missed extreme sporting event of the year. While the original fondue idea was based on an après ski tradition Skijor Canada founders Sam Mitchell and her husband Graham adopted over seven years of wintering in Switzerland, she enthuses that, “The cheese gave us such a weird opportunity to be cheesy and to not take it too seriously… we want to have fun, and keep it affordable (sadly cheese is no longer the preferred currency). We want to create a unique event that welcomes all sorts of people and the cheese aspect just seems to give us license to do some ridiculous stuff.” Sam, an Alberta College of Art and Design (ACAD) graduate in textiles and design, loves any excuse to break 22

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out a costume, and the abundance of fur, fringe and neon spandex at last year’s event is a testament that the competitors and spectators of skijor are eager to join in on the fun. When winter arrives, most equestrian folk are settling in for a slower pace or no pace at all, but skijorers across Canada are gearing up in slick fashion for cool weather and hot extreme-sport skijor racing. As the sport grows in popularity, more and more people are joining the community. With this in mind, we asked Sam Mitchell to walk us through all the aspects of getting started in the sport. Sam, who was also a race marshal last year advises that, “The last thing you want to do is pull out a fat, fuzzy horse and run it flat out.” For this competitive sport, the ideal (and most fun) way to start skijoring is with an experienced rider mounted on a fit ranch or rope broke horse. An experienced slider (on skis, a snowboard, or a toboggan) is also an asset. The horse must be accustomed to a rope and able to neck rein as Skijor Canada rules specify that the rider must guide the horse with one hand while holding the rope with the other. If your skier is inexperienced, ensure your horse is experienced or vice versa. Pairing a green slider with a green horse is a fast way to face washes and frustration. Green riders are encouraged to spend some time learning to handle a rope on their horse before towing anything.


TO GET STARTED YOU WILL NEED: • Two people with adventurous spirits and a sense of humour. • A fit, broke horse accustomed to both ropes and neck reining. • A western saddle with a horn that can be used for dallying a rope. • Roping (joined) reins as they are easier to handle than split reins.

Preparing your horse for winter sports is slightly different from other seasonal riding but not so much as to be prohibitive. If you are expecting a big day of sport, ensure your horse is well fed and watered before exercise. Therapeutic products may help to warm up your horse’s muscles before, in between and after exercise. In the winter, they are very helpful for both humans and horses. Always take care to warm your horse up properly, and cool him down, ensuring he’s completely dry before you turn him out. When first introducing your horse to skijoring, it is best to do so in an enclosed field and in small steps, rewarding your horse with reassurance and rest as he learns. 1. Introduce the horse to your board or skis, let the horse smell and touch them and then put the equipment on the ground and move it around – without a slider – so the horse can get used to the movement and sound. When the horse is comfortable, your slider can get on their ride. 2. Ensure your horse is comfortable with your slider on their ride while they are unattached. The slider should jump, move and fall to get your horse used to their movements. Once the horse is comfortable, it is time to attempt your first skijor! 3. Communication between rider and slider before you start is important as it’s near impossible to converse once you start. Discuss your route and plan your speeds together. If you encounter a problem mid-run, the swiftest save is for either party to simply to let go of the rope. 4. To start, the slider should hold the rope with one hand, about three feet from the end, anchoring the tail of the rope in their other hand at the corresponding hip. Passing the tail of the rope behind their bum is a good way to help ease the pull on their arms at slow speeds. They should begin with their front arm bent, and allow it to extend as they start moving, to avoid getting jerked forward. Safety in mind, the rope should never be tied around the slider. Once your slider has become used to the pull [CONTINUED ON PAGE 24]

• A breast collar that will help the saddle stay in place and redistribute some of the pressure created by pulling at speed. • While some horses fare well barefoot, if the conditions are particularly icy, you can shoe horses with borium or corks for extra traction. Sharp shoeing is an option but is not encouraged for horses that are turned out in groups. Shod horses should also be equipped with snow pads to help prevent snow from balling up in their hooves. • Sport boots and bell boots for your horse – all four legs should be protected. Wraps are not recommended. • A strong, soft, round cotton rope free of knots and in good repair, approximately 30 feet long. • Older downhill skis or a snow board – they may get a bit banged up. Whether you use skis or a board is strictly preference. (If you are an experienced boarder, stick with your snowboard; for a complete beginner, skis are easier to start on.) Toboggans (although they are not used in skijor competition,) are a great introductory option for green sliders/horses. • Sliders should wear a helmet – you will fall. • Goggles and face protection for the slider are key – you will get snow in your face. • Gloves for both the slider and rider are highly recommended as you are handling rope and, it’s winter. For the rest of your gear, you can go traditional and functional or have some fun Euro-trash-mashing bright spandex with fur, shearling and fringe-tastic cowboy chic items to create your own skijor style.

Check out www.skijorcanada.com for competition schedules, rules and for help planning your own skijor event! A L B E RT A B I T S | W I N T E R 2 0 1 7

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LEARN TO RIDE ENGLISH OR WESTERN THROUGH THE NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED EQUESTRIAN CANADA PROGRAMS WITH AN EXPERIENCED AND CERTIFIED EQUESTRIAN CANADA INSTRUCTOR OR COACH ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT

coaching@albertaequestrian.com or phone 403-253-4411, ext 3

ABOVE: As your team gains confidence, you can pick up speed and start going up and down small hills. A slider should never get ahead of their rider/horse team, so steep hills are discouraged. If you do get in front of your rider/horse team, let go of the rope immediately!

START RIDING TODAY

Ensuring your horse’s comfort with the slider is not only a vital component for safety but also for success. Ritz, a 10 year old gelding trained by Rempel Performance Horses, was very relaxed throughout his introduction to skijoring, which is not a surprise, as he used to be a Calgary Stampede pick-up horse. and movement of the rope, they can hold it in front of them or wherever is most comfortable. If the slider falls, they should always let go of the rope. 5. When your slider is ready, you can dally the rope around the horn. There are four key points to this; thumbs up, counter clockwise if you are right-handed; clockwise if you are left-handed. Always keep the rope over your leg, and always turn your horse toward your rope so the rope cannot go behind your back. 6. Before cueing your horse, check to see that your slider is ready and when you get the nod, start slow. Let your horse get used to the person attached to them and let that person get used to the movement. It is the rider’s job to guide the horse and the slider’s job to guide themselves so they stay on the rider’s rope side. The slider must take great caution to avoid sliding into the horse or fellow skijorers. The rider should make turns gentle and wide to help the horse – the slider should stay to the outside of the turn on the rope side, to keep the rope taught and to get the most out of the centrifugal force of the movement. Skijor Canada discourages tying ropes to riders, sliders or saddles so that in the event of an issue everyone can be disconnected by letting go of the rope on either end. Team safety should be foremost in everyone’s mind. Once everyone is comfortable, you can go outside of your enclosed area and start practicing your skills over hills, around corners and even - if you’re brave enough - jumps. Happy Skijoring! AB [CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23]

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BECOME AN EQUESTRIAN CANADA

CERTIFIED I N S T R U C T O R / C O A C H CERTIFICATION

IS

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coaching@albertaequestrian.com

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HORSEKEEPING

Are You

Prepared? Getting caught in the “evacuation order” process of an emergency isn’t the time to make plans to save your animals or your farm. Here are some true life accounts of Canadian equine owners and how they faced their worst fire nightmares. BY JENN WEBSTER

“On the first day, we had an advisory from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to evacuate our horses. That was Monday,” tells Pat Erelis of Fort McMurray, AB. “So some of us took horses out of the Clearwater Horse Club and went to Ricards Landing. We slept overnight with horses in the trailer and the next day, some of us decided to go south while others went to the north. But on Tuesday, I went back to the city and that’s when the fire really started to spread. I was at work when a girl came by and said a voluntary evacuation was taking place. I got in my car to get gas and it was chaos. Gridlock traffic everywhere. Normally, it takes 10 minutes to get to my horses but that day, it took four hours.” Erelis’ story is just one of many that emerged from the wildfires of Fort McMurray, AB, in May of 2016. Erelis is a reining enthusiast and like many of the horse owners in the area, she kept her three steeds at the Clearwater Horse Club. Out of 31 barns, 29 of them burnt down at the not-for-profit organization, which has been in existence since 1969. Each member at the club has their own paddock, looked after by their respective individual members of the association. The property boasted an indoor and outdoor arena, a hay shed and various equipment to keep it running. However, it was discovered that nearly everything burnt to the ground when occupants were finally allowed back into Fort McMurray in June. 26

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“At the time, we knew that all of the horses got out,” says Erelis. “Unfortunately, a bunch of the people who went north had to let their horses loose because fire set in quickly and unexpectedly in that area as well. The police told them, ‘You can’t go back and get your animals because it has become too dangerous.’ So on their own, many of the horses discovered areas where there were no trees. Later on, a bunch of them were found grazing in school yards.” Lac La Hache, BC, resident Elli Meinert, experienced a similar situation during the summer of 2017. Little did she know that when the province of British Columbia was about to experience one of its worst wildfire seasons in history, Meinert’s home was about to become a highly sought after evacuation zone. “I remember that on July 6, I got my first Facebook message,” said Meinert. “It read, ‘Can I bring my herd over?’” she relayed. In addition to her own animals, Meinert ended up with eight extra horses in her care that afternoon. Meinert owns and operates Easygo Ranch, an equine facility bordering a lake, in northern BC. As the events of the summer unfolded, the raging wildfires quickly sparked in several locations in close proximity to the ranch. “On July 7, I was by myself and all of a sudden there were water bombers flying right over the house. I phoned my hubby and asked him to come home. On Friday, I hauled horses for someone who was put on Order. And

then while I was trying to load horses for someone else – we were put on Alert. I shoved the last horse I could fit in the trailer and went back home. Then the news started coming in. The 108 (a big settlement of houses nearby) were also put on Order.” To be on “Alert” means officials in the province have advised residents to be ready, in case they must leave. You can leave but you can’t come back. Highways were only open to whatever evacuation route officials deemed safe to travel at the time. To be on “Evacuation Order” means you have to leave. “At that point, we weren’t just trying to look after our horses or other peoples’ horses – we were making beds for people. My Step-Dad, my neighbours – where else did they have to go? You can’t go to a hotel with two Jack Russells and cats and stuff,” Meinert stated. “So we got really efficient with the dog shuffle (because not all the animals got along). We took in a few extra people and more animals.” On July 7, Meinert admits they all thought about leaving because the closest fire was too close for comfort. “I had trailers lined up, but soon we realized we couldn’t leave because they closed the highway.” After that, another 15 horses arrived so Easygo’s tally came in at 35. “Some of the owners were stuck on the other side of road blocks. There was an orphan from the SPCA that came. We were looking after them all, full time,” she said.


HORSEKEEPING LEFT: A view of the smoke and fires near Easygo Ranch in Lac La Hache, BC, this past summer. One of the ranch’s equine residents stands in a paddock while a water bomber flies overhead. Photo by Elli Meinert HERE: A barn fire drill, as part of TLAER training, www.tlaer.org Photo by Sally Aungier BELOW: Each year, many Canadian horse owners are faced with the threat of emergency situations, whether they are natural or accidental disasters

The human residents of Easygo Ranch were also stuck on a six kilometre travel radius during those days. They were permitted to move around in the radius, but no farther. “We could go to our gas station corner store, which was good but they quickly ran out of supplies. We were all put on rations: one loaf of bread and one jug of milk per household. It was stupid. “After chores each day we would all meet up in front of the barn to decide who was cooking dinner that night. One night we had just finished and the power went out. I just wanted a shower… We spent this whole time prepping in case

the fire did come to the ranch. We tried to make the place as fireproof as we could. But that night it was distressing. We’d look to the south west and you could see a plume of smoke from the 100 Mile House fire. To the north west there was another huge fire from the Chilcotin. And in the north east there was the fire from Williams Lake. We were all just standing there and discussing what we were going to do and then all this smoke started drifting in from across the lake.” “I really wasn’t going to leave unless we could take all the horses,” she explained. “We could only take 12 horses and there were clearly more than that.”

Thankfully Easygo Ranch already had great fire suppression systems in place before summer started. These included a dry well located close to the barn, the lake that could be pumped out of, and an indoor arena with amazing water hoses and generators for power. Even so, the group at Easygo Ranch knew that if a fire did come to their doorstep, they would not be able to force it back. Luckily, during those days in July, the fires gave them quite a scare but didn’t progress to the point of destruction for the ranch. As July turned to August and finally September, a bit of relief was sighed when officials finally announced the fire situation was under control. Everyone who was housed at Easygo Ranch during the summer fared well. Still, it’s not a situation Meinert ever wants to endure again. “Honestly, I hope to never see something like that in my lifetime again. It never needs to happen again,” she states. Meinert and Erelis’ experiences were slightly different but the gravity of their situations were equally severe. Each year, many Canadian horse owners are faced with the threat of emergency situations, whether they are natural or accidental disasters. Either way, when you are an equine owner, it pays to be prepared. People with animals should have an evacuation plan in place for their animals prior to ever being faced with an emergency. In any emergency, the safety of people is the priority of first responders. Only when a situation is deemed safe, can rescue operations for animals begin to take place. Equine owners are ultimately responsible for safeguarding their animals. It’s up to us to plan ahead. Emergency preparedness is important to each of us individually and to our communities. Start preparing now; check future issues of Alberta Bits for tips and resources. AB

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ASK ABOUT INSURANCE

TRAVEL POLICIES

As the weather becomes colder, many members start to plan their winter escape to warmer destinations. For our clients, that trip may also include travelling with their horses. This product was initially created due to inquiries and concerns over the limitations often found in standard every day travel insurance. In response, we designed a customized out-of-province plan for the membership. B

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The basic features of this product are similar to other plans: • Emergency unexpected medical expense reimbursement/coverage; • Availability of coverage anywhere in the world; • 24-hour claims assistance.

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With all of these features, it is no surprise that many members are acquiring this coverage. There are 10 important points to remember: 1. The coverage will not reimburse for treatment of preexisting medical conditions; 2. The coverage does not “stack” with other plans; 3. The 90-day period begins on the date you leave the province; 4. You cannot start coverage if you are already out of province; 5. The insurer recommends that for smaller expenses, you pay the bill and seek reimbursement when you get home; 6. There is no deductible on this plan; 7. The policy does not cover injuries arising from rough stock rodeo or pari-mutuel racing activities; 8. Claims assistance is available 24/7; 9. If you turn 75 years of age during the term, coverage ceases at 12:01 am on your birthday; 10. Coverage is available to individual members in good standing with the AEF. 001

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The travel policy covers: • Trips up to 90 days in duration; • Unlimited number of trips during the term; • Covers (but is not limited to) injuries sustained while riding, competing, and interacting with horses (rough stock rodeo and pari-mutuel racing is excluded); • Covers members who have not yet reached the age of 75 (was 65 in 2017); • $2,000,000 limit of coverage.

In closing, this insurance policy, like all of the programs we administer, was designed by horse people – for horse people. Insurance for horses – and their people – it is what we do. Questions? Comments? Call us anytime toll free 1-800-6701877 and ask for the equine department. Michael (Mike) King, CAIB, R.I.B.

Mike King is a partner at Capri Insurance and the program lead for the PTSO programs across Canada. For more information, please call the Agri-department at Capri Insurance,1-800-670-1877 or agri@capri.ca


MEMBER ORGANIZATIONS

as of

Nov. 14th 2017

I F YO U A R E I N T E R E S T E D I N F I N D I N G O U T M O R E A B O U T O N E O F T H E S E C L U B S , O R J O I N I N G, M A K E S U R E YO U C O N TA C T T H E M !

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Society lundkrista@gmail.com Hastings Lake Pleasure Horse Association www.hastingslakepleasurehorseassociation.org High Country Carriage Driving Club www.highcountrycarriagedriving.org High Country Pony Club www.canadianponyclub.org High Kick Vaulters highkickvaulters@gmail.com Highridge Thundering Hooves Gymkhana Club hthgymkhana@gmail.com Hoofbeats For Hope Equine Team Society www.sites.google.com/site/prairiedustersmusicalrideteam Horse Industry Association of Alberta www.albertahorseindustry.ca Irricana Riding & Roping Club Association teasieo@hotmail.com Journeys Therapeutic Riding Society www.jtrs.ca Jump Alberta Society www.jumpalberta.com Lacombe Light Horse Association lacombelighthorseassociation.webs.com Lethbridge Therapeutic Riding Association www.ltra.ca Little Bits Therapeutic Riding Association www.littlebits.ca Meadow Creek Vaulting Club www.mcvc.ca Millarville Musical Ride www.millarvillemusicalride.com Miniatures in Motion Horse Club www.miniaturesinmotion.ca Mount View Special Riding Association www.mountviewriding.com Northern Trails Riding Club www.northerntrailsridingclub.org Opening Gaits Therapeutic Riding Society of Calgary www.openinggaits.ca Over the Hill Trail Riders fjhorses@syban.net Peace Area Riding For The Disabled Society www.pards.ca Peace Draft Horse Club thedrafthorseclub.com Peace Region Alberta Dressage Association www.peaceregiondressage.com Performance Standardbreds Association www.p-standardbreds.org Polocrosse Calgary www.polocrossecalgary.com Ponoka Riding & Roping Association ponokaridingandroping.com Prentice Creek Equestrian Center angie.maclean@yahoo.ca Quarter Horse Association of Alberta www.qhaa.com Rainbow Equitation Society www.rainbowequitationsociety.org Ranahan Polocrosse Club ranahanpolocrosse@gmail.com Red Deer & Area Western Style Dressage Association www.albertawesternstyledressage.com Ridgeview Riding Club joanne-dunbar@outlook.com Rimbey Sleigh, Wagon & Saddle Club rimbeyswsclub@gmail.com Rocky Mountain Gymkhana Club www.rockymountaingymkhana.com Rocky Mountain Polocrosse www.facebook.com/RockyMountainPolocrosse Rundle Riders Therapeutic Riding Association www.rundleriders.com Saddle Seat Canada www.saddleseatcanada.com Shortgrass Riding Club www.shortgrassridingclub.ca Society of Tilt and Lance Cavalry www.joust.ca South Country Team Penning Association sctpa.entries@gmail.com

South Peace Horse Show Association Southern Alberta Trail Riders Association Springbank Equestrian Society Springbank Pony Club Spruce View Gymkhana Club Steele's Scouts Commemorative Troop Association Stone Bridge Carriage Driving Club Strathcona All-Breed Horse Association Tennessee Walking Horse Association Of Western Canada The Calgary Hunt Club The Greater Bragg Creek Trails Association Thompson Country Pony Club Trail Riding Alberta Conference Traildusters Horse Club of Smith Tri-Country Riding Club True Grit Cowboy Mounted Shooters Association Uplift Therapeutic Riding Association Valley Riders Saddle Club Valleyview & Districts Agricultural Society Vegreville Agricultural Society Welsh Show Association Western Canadian Wagon Train Wild Rose Draft Horse Association Wildrose Mounted Shooters Will For Riding Foundation Xtreme Wild Rose Club

www.southpeacehorseclub.com www.satra.ca normaansloos@gmail.com plastiras@shaw.ca dwedmondson4@gmail.com www.steelescouts.ca www.stonebridgedrivingclub.com www.sahaalberta.com www.twhawc.com www.calgaryhuntclub.ca www.braggcreektrails.org www.thompsoncountryponyclub.org www.trailriding.ca 780-829-3628 lindagblack1@gmail.com www.truegritmountedshooters.com sturgeonlynn@gmail.com sandyrichardson@abnorth.com www.valleyviewagsociety.ca www.vegag.ca piperp13.wixsite.com/wildroseshow gsissons@hotmail.com www.wrdha.com www.wildrosemountedshooters.com willforridingfoundation.com xtremewildrose.webs.com

BUSINESSMEMBERS Alberta Association of Complementary Equine Therapy Alberta Carriage Supply Bar T5 Beaver Dam Creek Horse Boarding Caeco Ranch Calgary Stampede Canadian Thoroughbred Capri Insurance Services Ltd Carpino Production & Design Cartier Farms Equine Assisted Learning Cavallo Pulse Therapy Colchester Farm Creekside Equestrian Centre Darn That Blanket Daryle Schmidt Horse Training Centre Days Inn Medicine Hat El Caballo Ranch Equestrian Factory Outlet - Red Deer Equi-Health Canada Inc. Equine Connection Inc. Foothills Horse Transport G & B Portable Fabric Buildings Gendron Stables Glen Valley Farm Greenhawk Calgary Greenhawk Cochrane Greenhawk Grande Prairie High Country Equestrian Center Higher Trails Equine Ltd Hi-Hog Farm & Ranch Equipment Ltd Horse Canada Horse In Hand Ranch Ltd. Horse Sport Horse Trekking Adventures Just Passing Horse Transport & Bereavement Services Kaspian Equestrian Training Centre KGPHOTO Lawton & Co, LLP LIM Canada - Devoucoux Inc Martin Deerline McNiven Ranch Supply (Hansbo Sport) Millennium Equestrian Ltd. Moose Hill Ranch Outpost at Warden Rock Performance Equine Veterinary Services Persons Equine and Industrial Dust Control Polysols GGT Footing Purina Canada Rocking Star Ranch Equine Rocky Mountain Show Jumping Saddle Up Magazine Sandridge Stables Selected Bio Products Inc Spirit Winds Horse Centre Spirited Connections Counselling Spring Lake Equestrian Camp Strathcona Ventures Sunwest Equine Services Syner G Apparel & Solutions TD Equine Veterinary Group The Dressage Boutique & Equestrian Wear The Horse Store The Mane Event Equine Education & Trade Show The School of Equine Massage and Rehabilitation Therapies The Tack Collector Ltd The Visions West Studio Ulterra Equestrian Ltd. Vitality Equine Western Horse Review Westerner Park Westwood Warmbloods Whitemud Equine Learning Centre Association Willow Grove Stables Inc. Winning Strides

www.aacet.ca www.albertacarriagesupply.net www.bart5trailers.com bdchorseboarding.wixsite.com/mysite www.caecoranch.com www.calgarystampede.com www.horsecanada.com www.capri.ca/horse palmocarpino@gmail.com www.cartierfarms.ca www.cavallopulsetherapy.ca rcolchesterfarm@gmail.com www.mcvc.ca www.darnthatblanket.com www.daryleschmidt.com www.daysinnmedicinehat.ca linda.atkinson@me.com www.equestrianfactoryoutlet.com www.equihealthcanada.com www.equineconnection.ca foothillshorsetransport.com www.gandbbuildings.com 403-866-0546 glenvalleyfarm@platinum.ca jennlmcginn@yahoo.ca www.greenhawk.com www.greenhawk.com www.hcequestriancenter.com www.highertrails.ca www.hi-hog.com www.horse-canada.com www.horseinhandranch.com www.horse-canada.com www.horsetrekkingadventures.ca www.justpassinghorses.ca www.kaspianequestrian.com www.kgphoto.ca jwlawton@telus.net www.devoucoux.com www.martindeerline.com www.hansbosport.com www.millenniumequestrian.com www.moosehillranch.com www.outpostatwardenrock.com www.performanceequinevet.net www.personscs.com polysols.com www.equipurina.ca www.rockingstarranch.ca www.rmsj.ca www.saddleup.ca www.sandridgestables.ca www.horseherbs.com www.spiritwindshorsecentre.com www.spiritedconnections.ca byron.bue@gmail.com www.strathconaventures.com www.sunwestequine.com www.synergyapparel.ca www.tdequinevet.com www.dressageboutique.com www.facebook.com/theHorseStore www.maneeventexpo.com www.equinerehab.ca www.thetackcollector.ca smithpr1@telus.net www.ulterraranches.com www.vitalityequine.com www.westernhorsereview.com westernerpark.ca www.westwoodwarmbloods.com www.welca.ca www.willowgrovestables.com www.winningstrides.com

A ILSBCEORT A TBS I T WFI N 0 1S 7 B E S U R E TO S U P P O RT O U R B U S I N E S S M E M B E R S ! T H O S E L I S T E D I N B L U E P ROV I D E D UN TS O |A E MT EE MRB E2 R V I S I T O U R L I S T O F S TA B L E S A N D FAC I L I T I E S AT O U R W E B S I T E !

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CLOSING THOUGHTS

Celebrating the Big 4-0! HELP US COMMEMORATE OUR 40TH ANNIVERSARY IN 2018

The Alberta Equestrian Federation is celebrating our 40th anniversary in 2018 and we want to celebrate our members! Help the AEF commemorate this banner year by submitting your equine photos for our special 40th anniversary issue of Alberta Bits! Visit albertaequestrian.com to submit a photo.

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Photo courtesy of Ingrid Schulz

Peace and Joy of the Season. —The Board and staff of the AEF.

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photo © McKenzie Fotos

Alberta Bits - Winter 2017  

The Official Magazine of the Alberta Equestrian Federation

Alberta Bits - Winter 2017  

The Official Magazine of the Alberta Equestrian Federation