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FALL 2017; VOLUME 9, ISSUE 3

Alberta Bits is the Alberta Equestrian Federation’s official member magazine. It serves the equestrian community of horses and riders of all ages, interests and involvement as Alberta’s premier resource for education, information and support. T H E A L B E RTA E Q U E S T R I A N F E D E R AT I O N H A S B E E N I N C O R P O R AT E D S I N C E 1 9 7 8 Alberta Bits magazine is mailed four times a year (Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter) to all current AEF members and is made available at the office and special events attended by the AEF. Alberta Bits is distributed throughout Alberta with news and events on behalf of recreational, sport, breeds & industry and educational sectors of the Alberta horse industry. Alberta Bits is distributed to approximately 18,000 members; 9,000 households and businesses, an exclusive list of tack and equine establishments and at events and trade shows annually.

AEF BOARD OF DIRECTORS Les Oakes 403.540.9859 lesoakes@gmail.com

PRESIDENT

Lauren Parker 403.813.1055 lmparker@shaw.ca

PRESI DENT ELECT

Tara Gamble 780.945.7516 tcgamble@xplornet.ca

PAST PRESIDENT SECRETARY

Dena Squarebriggs 403.760.0512 dmsquare04@hotmail.com

TREASURER

Sandy Bell 403.700.7880 chinookcomm@gmail.com

INDIVIDUAL

Trish Mrakawa 403.938.6398 trish@willowgrovestables.com

INDIVIDUAL

Nicolas Brown 587.988.3590 bruchev@gmail.com

INDIVIDUAL

Lewis Hand 403.722.4690 lewhand@live.ca

INDIVIDUAL

Alison Douglas 403.762.8570 thealicat@shaw.ca

INDIVIDUAL

Robert Simpson 306.641.5579 rms210@mail.usask.ca

INDIVIDUAL

Christine Axani 403.816.8979 chrisaxani@gmail.com

PA G E 0 6

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

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AEF SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS The AEF Educational Scholarships and the Bill desBarres Industry Scholarship recipients.

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T H E SO C I A L B I T

PA G E 1 2

T H E T RU T H A B O U T C O N C U S S I O N S The old adage “If you fall off, you must get right back on,” no longer applies when head injuries are involved.

PA G E 1 6

B R E E D P RO F I L E This issue we explore the majestic Arabian.

PA G E 2 2

TRAINER’S CORNER Professional trainer Tara Gamble, helps us strive for excellence in transitions.

PA G E 2 4

CLIPPING 101 A guide to the most common kinds of equine clips typically used at this time of year.

PA G E 2 6

HORSE KEEPING Easing your equine from fall to winter with proper forage and nutrition.

PA G E 2 8

WINTER 2017: November 3, 2017 SPRING 2018: January 26, 2018

ASK ABOUT INSURANCE Changes to your coverage as an AEF Member.

PA G E 2 9

CLUB & BUSINESS LISTINGS

FOR A MEDIA KIT AND/OR RATE CARD PLEASE CONTACT ALBERTABITS@ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM

PA G E 3 0

CLOSING THOUGHTS Lest We Forget. Significant archival moments in our history and we the role equines played in them.

AEF STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Sonia Dantu execdir@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 5 MEMBERSHIP

Norma Cnudde membership@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 1 MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

Ashley Miller marketing@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 6

COACHING

Erin Lundteigen coaching@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 3 COMPETITIONS

Sophie Beswick competitions@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 2 FINANCE, GENERAL INQUIRIES

Rita Bernard info@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 7

O F F I C E H O U R S : 8 : 3 0 T O 4 : 3 0 , M O N D A Y T O F R I D A Y, E X C E P T H O L I D A Y S ALBERTA BITS IS PUBLISHED BY WESTERN PERFORMANCE PUBLISHING IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE AEF

FOR EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES CONTACT: ALBERTABITS@ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM Jennifer Webster Natalie Jackman Ashley Miller • Sonia Dantu • Louisa Murch-White

MANAGING EDITOR ART DIRECTOR

PUBLICATION COMMITTEE

CONTRIBUTORS

Esteban Adrogue, Covy Moore, Tara Gamble, Kendra Roberts, Tara McKenzie Foto, Gary Millar and Todd Lemieux. ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES

Sally Bishop 403.815.1289 sallysuebishop@gmail.com ADVERTISING DEADLINES

or marketing@albertaequestrian.com. All material is copyright 2017. Ideas and opinions expressed in articles do not necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of the AEF. Alberta Bits reserves the right to accept, and/or edit material submitted for publication. The AEF makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information contained therein, but assumes no liability in cases of error or changing conditions. Any business relations or other activities undertaken as a result of the information contained in Alberta Bits, or arising therefrom, is the responsibility of the parties involved and not of the AEF. We welcome signed letters to the editor, but reserve the right to publish, edit for grammar, taste and length. For reprint information, please contact execdir@albertaequestrian.com

ALBERTA EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION

100, 251 Midpark Blvd SE Calgary, AB T2X 1S3 Toll Free: 1.877.463.6233 Phone: 403.253.4411 Fax: 403.252.5260

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THE AEF GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM ALBERTA SPORT CONNECTION

ON T HE P U B L I C AT I O N S M A I L AG R E E M E N T # 4 0 0 5 0 2 9 7 • P R I N T E D I N C A N A D A • I S S N 1 9 1 8 - 7 1 1 4 R E T U R N U N D E L I V E R A B L E M A I L TO : A L B E RTA E Q U E S T R I A N F E D E R AT I O N 1 0 0 , 2 5 1 M I D PA R K B LV D S E C A L G A RY, A B T 2 X 1 S 3

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C OV E R:

Autumn presents an idyllic setting for trail riding in Alberta. Photo by Chad Rowbotham Photography


photo © McKenzie Fotos


A M E S S AG E F RO M A E F P R E S I D E N T L E S OA K E S

President’s Message As usual, when I sit at my desk and reflect upon what has transpired over the past few months, I am overwhelmed about what has gone on in the horse world since our last edition of Alberta Bits. Weather tends to dictate many things to those of us who spend most of our time outdoors and this past summer was unusually warm and extremely dry for Alberta, which is great when hay must be cut and baled and allows for easy and pleasant backcountry trips, but brings with it the fear of wildfires. Our neighbours to the west were in either high alert or evacuation mode all summer. Recently, in the area south of Pincher Creek, AB, residents had to evacuate at a moment’s notice due to the rapid spread of fires in and around Waterton National Park. Animal rescue and relocation is not an easy task and the loss of one’s farm or acreage, and the impact this has on jobs and lifestyle, is immense. As a resource, the AEF has grown more and more involved with our members over the past number of years in becoming not only an information source but also a recovery resource for those that have been affected by floods or wildfires. The AEF is recognized by the Alberta Government as the equine organization they contact before, during and after provincial disasters have occurred. By law, all Alberta municipalities had to formulate Disaster Preparedness Plans for their residents. Until recently however, these plans focused solely on the safety of the human population, and while this will always be the primary focus of municipalities and first responders, the AEF, working in conjunction with the Alberta Government, has formulated integration of an equine plan into the overall Municipal Plan. During October, November and December, AEF Resource Teams will be working with municipalities throughout Alberta to integrate an Equine Disaster Plan into their existing Disaster Preparedness Plan. A second phase of the program will be implemented in 2018. In addition, I also urge any horse owner or facility owner to take a Disaster Preparedness Course and put together a written plan for your facility or home, as the key to staying safe in any emergency is being prepared; without a written plan, it is very hard, if not impossible, to think of everything when you are threatened with a disaster.

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While there are websites and brochures with information that is helpful in putting together your own plan, I would suggest taking one of the courses offered to the public. One such course is offered by Equi-Health Canada. In fact, as an AEF Club or facility, or as a group of AEF members, you can host the Disaster Preparedness Course (or one of the First Aid or Safe Trailering Courses) and use this event as a fund raiser for your organization. Details are available on the AEF website or you can contact me directly. From referencing one type of planning to the next is my best segue into asking for your help. The AEF Board of Directors are all volunteers and there are relatively few of us. The AEF’s major fund raiser is volunteering at one of the casinos in Calgary. This year, the casino we will be working is being held on New Year’s Eve and we are short several people. If you are interested in having a fun time and helping out the AEF, we would love to have you join us. Email Sonia Dantu execdir@albertaequestrian.com for details. We look forward to seeing you. Give your horse a hug and all the best from all of us at the AEF. AB


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SCHOLARSHIP

RECIPIENTS Congratulations to these deserving students!

The AEF Board of Directors and the Scholarship Committee are pleased to announce the 2017 AEF Educational Scholarship recipients and the Bill desBarres Industry Scholarship recipients.

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E D U C AT I O NA L

E D U C AT I O NA L

SC H OLA R S H I P R E C I PI E N T

S C H O LA R S H I P R E C I PI E N T

ALYSE

MADISEN

MOLINA

Alyse is a passionate individual who has been riding consistently for the past five years and has been riding for the Calgary Stampede Showriders for the past two years. She plans on obtaining her Equine Sciences Diploma through Olds College and then pursuing her dream of being an equine veterinarian in five years.

GROVES

Madisen has been involved in 4-H for the past five years and over this time she has completed Horsemanship Levels 1 – 7, Jumping Level 2 and a junior and young horse project. She is attending the Western Ranch and Cow Horse program at Lakeland College and then will pursue her goal of studying Animal Health Technology.


E D U C AT I O NA L

E D U C AT I O NA L

S C HOLARS HI P R E C IPIE NT

SC H OLA R S H I P R E C I PI E N T

VICTORIA

TARA

JOHNSTONE

Victoria has been active in the equine community through competitive show jumping, equine volunteer programs for disabled riding and at summer camps. She is a Spruce Meadows ambassador and has assisted with pony rides at her community Stampede breakfast for five years. She plans to complete her undergraduate degree at the University of Calgary and to become a large animal veterinarian.

Bill desBarres

SNOW

Tara got her first horse, a Welsh Pony, at the age of nine and began competing in hunter classes. She made the switch to western riding in high school with her Paint mare. Her lifelong passion for horses has driven her to pursue a career in veterinary medicine.

Bill desBarres

IND USTRY S C HOLARSH IP R E C IPIE NT

IND U ST RY S C H O LA R S H I P R E C I PI E N T

JODI

MARINA

GRAHAM

Jodi grew up on a farm where she first became involved with draft horses. Her love of draft horses led her to become a member of the Halter and Harness Heavy Horse 4-H Club and to work for various hitch show crews. Jodi has been accepted into the Animal Health Technology program at Olds College and plans on transforming her passion for horses into a successful career.

ATKINS

Marina was drawn to horses from a young age and spent her summers growing up at trail riding camps before she started working at a small animal clinic in Calgary where she found her passion for Animal Health Technology. She's currently finishing her second year at Olds College for the online Animal Health Technology Program and will be taking the Veterinary Technician National Examination in November, which will allow her to practice as a Registered Veterinary Technician. AB A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 7

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The Truth About CONCUSSIONS Unlike a broken leg, head and brain injuries can be more subtle, but also much more dangerous. Through education and awareness of concussions, riders, coaches and parents can ensure the equestrian community is taking the precautions necessary to treat concussions as seriously as they truly are. BY LOUISA MURCH WHITE

Sport is inherently risk-based, and when you add horses into the equation, whether you are jumping, sliding, or running, sport becomes even riskier. The Alberta Equestrian Federation (AEF) recommends that all riders, regardless of age, discipline or experience level, be encouraged to wear a certified riding helmet when working around and riding horses. It’s a proven fact that wearing a helmet can save a life, however, concussion can still occur and can threaten the long-term health of equestrian athletes, even while wearing a helmet. The word concussion can be a scary one, but it is our aim to shed some light on head and brain injuries. Education and knowledge is key in providing pivotal awareness so that you can learn to recognize the symptoms of concussion, as well as knowing when you are safe to return to activity following a concussion. First, what exactly is a concussion? According to Parachute, a charitable organization helping Canadians prevent predictable and preventable injuries, a concussion is concussion is a common form of head or brain injury, that can be caused by a direct, or indirect hit to the head or body. Commonly the example we hear is a naughty horse bucks its rider off, resulting in the person landing hard on their head or

neck – this would be a direct hit. However, it can also occur in less traumatic instances, as in your horse spooks and you fall off, but land on your feet. Depending on the force in which you land, the rattling of your brain inside your head may cause a concussion indirectly as well. It was once thought you had to lose consciousness for a concussion to occur; this, however, is incorrect. Most concussions actually occur without a loss of consciousness. So are concussions just for football players, and boxers? Absolutely not. The two leading causes of concussions are falls and car accidents. A fall from a horse can cause Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) which can impact cognitive function and even personality. According to Charles Owen severe brain injuries are responsible for over 60% of all equestrian related fatalities. As equestrians, it is becoming more apparent that we must be diligent and aware of the causes and symptoms of concussion. Riders, coaches and parents should educate themselves in the different physical symptoms that may appear after a rider has suffered from a concussion. The old saying used to be, “If you fall off, you get right back on,” but we now know that if you have suffered from a concussion and get back on, it could cause massive detriment to your health and future. Instead of getting right back on your

The old saying used to be, “If you fall off, you get right back on.” However, we now know that if you have suffered from a concussion and you get back on your horse immediately, it could cause massive detriment to your health and future.

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horse, or telling someone else to get back on, educate yourself in symptoms and assess yourself, and others, after a fall where concussion can occur. In this article, we will break some symptoms down into physical, cognitive and behavioural categories. Please remember, these are merely guidelines and some symptoms may not be listed. Although most signs and symptom's of concussions will show directly after an injury, there are some signs and symptom's that can take a while to show and may show hours or days after the initial incident. Another thing to note is that signs can be difficult to recognize in children, particularly young children under the age of ten who might not be able to adequately communicate how they are feeling. PHYSICAL A rider may complain of headache, pressure or neck pain, may be nauseous or vomit, have blurry or

TY POZZOBON FOUNDATION

On January 9, 2017, the rodeo community and beyond was rocked with the news that three-time Canadian Finals Rodeo qualifier and Professional Bull Riders Canadian Champion, Ty Pozzobon, had taken his own life at the tender age of 25. Pozzobon’s family and friends bravely came forward after his untimely death to share stories of their vivacious, bright and positive son and friend, but also to share the darker side of bull riding - the injuries. Pozzobon sustained his fair share of bumps and bruises in the rodeo arena, including broken bones, and more notably, several severe concussions. The Pozzobon family knew that his behaviour was not typical of the person he was, and in response to his death, his mother, Leanne Pozzobon, released a statement acknowledging that he had taken his own life, but also that they believed it was directly linked to the concussions he had suffered. The symptoms and behaviours Pozzobon had been exhibiting leading up to January, coupled with the number of concussions he had endured, pointed towards Traumatic Brain Injury. Research on concussion is still new and incomplete, however multiple studies on high concussion-risk individuals like National Football League (NFL) players has shone light on a link between sustaining multiple concussions and the risk of developing severe depression. It is only after death that doctors can look at the sufferer’s brain to show proof and evidence of the depression symptoms linked to concussion. The medical world reached out to the Pozzobon family shortly after his death and the family agreed to donate his brain to Nucleus Bio LLC in Vancouver, BC, and the University of Washington in Seattle, WA, in hopes of further enlightenment to the effects of traumatic brain injuries. Now, Pozzobon’s family and friends have created the Ty Pozzobon Foundation, functioning with a board and a mission statement to forever honour Pozzobon’s legacy through protecting and supporting the health and wellbeing of rodeo athletes inside and outside of the arena. For more information: www.typozzobon.com Photo by Covy Moore 14

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double vision, have sensitivity to light or noise, feel sluggish or groggy, may hear ringing in ears and have pain at the injury site. A coach, parent or friend, could observe that the rider has a slowed reaction time, inability to perform, may appear dazed or stunned, or have slurred speech. More physical symptoms that are observable would be loss of consciousness, poor coordination or balance, seizure, drowsiness or amnesia. COGNITIVE A rider may have issues concentrating, memory problems, and may be confused and dazed. Parents, coaches and friends could observe confusion, that the rider is easily distracted, forgets instructions, has difficulty concentrating or does not remember the activity they were participating in before the fall. BEHAVIOURAL The rider may become irritable or unusually emotional, nervous, anxious and depressed.


Sleeping patterns may be altered, being either drowsy or having difficulty falling asleep. Again, observable symptoms would be a change in mood, behaviour or personality changes; and strange or inappropriate emotions like being easily angered, laughing or crying at inappropriate times. So let’s say you are at the barn and you observe a rider fall from their horse, you know the symptoms of concussion and you believe they have suffered a brain injury. What do you do now? If you believe a rider has suffered a concussion following a fall from a horse, a blow to the head, face, neck or body, remember to remain calm. If the rider is unconscious, dial 911 immediately, follow the directions of the operator and then have someone contact either the individual's parents if they are under 18, or the individual’s emergency contact to let them know what has happened. If the rider is conscious, ensure they remain still, and do not move them while being examined. If you observe what you believe to be concussion symptoms, contact medical personnel to have them assess the situation. Riders with symptoms should not be left alone, should not drink alcohol, should not drive or be sent home by themselves. One of the most frustrating effects of concussions is that they can sideline you from school, work, and riding. Now that you’ve suffered a concussion and have taken time off you are likely itching to get back on your horse. The AEF cautions that “equestrian athletes must not begin riding again until they have fully returned to their academics or employment, have no symptoms of concussion with or without exercise and have undergone a comprehensive medical assessment that clears them to resume their normal equestrian activities.”

Riders, coaches and parents should educate themselves in the different physical symptoms that may appear after a rider has suffered from a concussion. For the best chance at a normal recovery, riders need to be honest with themselves and the medical staff they are working with. Working with a team of medical professionals to ensure that you are returning to work, or school, in the proper way is key to ensuring that you will not have residual effects of concussion. The risks associated with returning to riding too early in your recovery are very serious, a second head impact when not fully recovered from a concussion can lead to dangerous neurological implications, which can include death. Research also suggests a link between repeated brain injuries and long-term degenerative brain diseases. Finally, before getting back in the saddle, AEF also advises that, “The helmet worn at the time of injury will need to be replaced due to subtle damage to the cushioning materials as they exert their protective capacities. Even if damage is not visible, the helmet needs to be replaced.” Please remember that this article is a broad overview, but speaks on some key aspects of the importance of concussion awareness. As equestrians, we need to change the idea that you must get right back on after a fall. Although slight dizziness and confusion may seem like a “normal” symptom of a wreck with your horse, through education and awareness, we now know that this symptom, among many others, is a glaring red flag for a concussion. Protect yourself, and your future, by ensuring that you take the steps necessary to properly heal from a concussion. AB

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B R E E D P RO F I L E

The Arabian B R E E D P RO F I L E

“Few good things happen by accident, and the humanity and sensitivity of the Arabian horse is no exception. Centuries of careful breeding by the Bedouin tribes has produced a maternal and caring breed of horse that today thrives on human companionship and is indeed, the Horse Who Loves You Back.” - Mary Trowbridge,

Professional Horse Trainer and Executive Director, Arabian Professional Horseman’s Distress Fund. BY ESTEBAN ADROGUE

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B R E E D P RO F I L E

The Arabian breed originated in the Arabian Peninsula. It is said to be one of the oldest breeds in the world, with archeological findings that date more than 4,500 years ago. Scientists discovered illustrations of horses on the walls of caves that depicted a fine small muzzle, deep cheeks, pointed ears, a short back, a dished facial profile, and slender limbs; features that clearly portrayed the Arabian horse. It is believed that the first Arabian breeders were a tribe that roamed the deserts of the Middle East, named Bedouin. Back then, breeding wasn’t about performance or competition, it was vital for survival and success. Choosing only the finest specimens, breeders would focus on reproducing certain bloodlines for soundness, speed, stamina, loyalty and disposition. Arab mares were highly praised by the Bedouin. Mares carried their riders into battle with pride and courage, standing loyally by their side until the very end. Because of this, horses developed strong bonds with their riders and became

beloved members of their families and the tribe. Bonds were so close that often, Bedouin people would bring their horses inside the family tent for shelter at night and protection from theft. On a trip to Turkey made by President Ulysses Grant back in 1877, Abdul Hamid II (Turkey’s Sultan) gifted him two fantastic stallions: one was a Barb named Lindentree and the other was an Arabian named Leopard. Lindentree was kept by Grant and Leopard was given to Randolph Huntington, a famous American horse breeder. A year later, Huntington imported a desert-bred Arabian mare and bred her to Leopard, thus creating the first purebred Arabian breeding program in the United States. At the Chicago World’s Fair of 1893, Turkey presented 45 Arabian horses, including a mare and stallion named Nejdme and Obeyran, respectively. They became the first animals (No. 1 & No. 2) in the Arabian Stud Book of America (nowadays known as the Arabian Horse Association).

LEFT: The large, expressive eye and fox ears of an Arabian. ABOVE: The versatile Arabian can be observed contending in all disciplines. Everything from western pleasure, to sidesaddle, to endurance events and liberty classes. Photo by Jenn Webster

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B R E E D P RO F I L E

The Arabian Horse Association (AHA), based in Aurora, Colorado, was established in 2003 as a result of a union of the Arabian Horse Registry of America (founded in 1908) and the International Arabian Horse Association (founded in 1950).Other than bay, gray and chestnut, the Arabian horse can be roan, occasionally dominant white with sabino or rabicano patterns, or, less commonly, black. The typical height for Arabians varies from 14.1hh to 15.1hh According to the AHA, the ideal Arab should have a refined head with a slight dished face; a long, beautiful arching neck with a large, well-set windpipe, set on a clean, refined throatlatch; and a high tail carriage. This structure of the poll and throatlatch was called the mitbah by the Bedouin, allowing flexibility in the bridle and room for the windpipe. These characteristics make Arabians the easiest recognizable horse breed in the world. Its appearance must display an impressive combination of courage, energy, nobility and intelligence. There are five key elements to truly 18

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recognize a purebred Arabian; the head must be comparatively small, with a straight contour or preferably slightly concave below the eyes; a small muzzle with large nostrils that extend when in action; dark, large, round, and expressive eyes, set well apart, with a relatively short distance between the eyes and the muzzle. The jowls must be deep and wide, accompanied with a set of small, thin and well-shaped ears, with their tips curved slightly inward. Their necks should be long and arched, set on high and running all the way down into average height withers. Arabians have a short, straight back

(usually one less vertebra than other breeds), with a moderately horizontal croup, which allows them to perform the breed’s famous "floating trot.” Thus, the Arabian announces its presence to the world with its proud, graceful nature. Well-sprung ribs and a deep chest cavity allow plenty of room for lung expansion and a natural high tail carriage is a must, that when viewed from the rear, should be carried straight. Well-bred Arabians have a deep, well-angled hip and laid-back shoulder. There are variations within the breed. Depending on the discipline, some specimens have wider, more powerfully

“That alertness and sensitivity which is part of the Arabian’s genetic make-up makes them perfect partners for helping people to change and 'feel alive.'”


B R E E D P RO F I L E

ABOVE: Gary Millar and Trifon. LEFT: The purebred Arabian is a striking character. Photo by Jenn Webster

Choosing only the finest specimens, breeders would focus on reproducing certain bloodlines for soundness, speed, stamina, loyalty and disposition. muscled hindquarters that allow for intense bursts of activity, such as reining, while others have leaner, longer muscles suited for long stretches of flat work such as endurance or horse racing. Arabians usually have strong, dense bone and excellent hoof walls, which along with a superior stamina, makes the breed perfect for endurance competitions. Arabians have largely played a role in the foundation of light horse breeds. Being very versatile animals, they are used for several different disciplines: cutting, roping, reining, trail riding, western and English dressage, pleasure riding and show, racing and endurance. With a diverse set of abilities, this breed can accommodate the various needs of horse owners. Its lesser body mass combined with its energy and stamina, help it to outlast any other breed. Arabians’ genetic code is found in almost every modern breed of riding horse, used to improve other breeds by adding speed, refinement, endurance, and strong bone. Due to its presence and striking good looks the Arabian

has become one of the top ten most popular horse breeds in the world. Their legendary beauty, speed and stamina are only a part of what makes Arabians so amazing. Hereditary soundness, intelligence, good temperament mixed with their immense heart, desire to please and unique love of human companionship are some of the overlooked traits that makes Arabians such wonderful animals. The proud presence and behaviour of the Arab horse is unmistakable and their grace and beauty set them apart from other breeds. Arabians possess an array of characteristics from top to bottom, with an unequalled ability to bond with people, making them the perfect family horse. They have the ability to form extremely close, tight, loving relationships. There is something magical about the relationship between Arabians and children. With a long memory, curiosity, quick comprehension, loyal disposition and sociability, they are considered one of the most intelligent breeds in the world. At Millar Venture Arabians (MVA)

near Sherwood Park, AB, Gary Millar and his Arabian horses have an assortment of activities in which to participate and contribute to their community. There are usually one or two foals a year in the small breeding program. The Arabian stallion, Trifon, also serves as the ambassador of the Arabian Horse Reading Literacy Project. Each year, he visits between 10 and 12 schools per year as he introduces school and home-school students to an amazing reading literacy program. In this curriculum, Trifon introduces young children to horses, books, opportunities to spark the imagination and motivates them to want to read. Trifon’s calm and quiet demeanor offers students an instant and comfortable connection to the exhilarating world of horses and reading, and later, the opportunity to visit the farm and escape from the busy city life to meet many of Trifon’s friends. The Arabian Horse Reading Literacy Project is a big focus of MVA. However so is Equus Alive, the Equine Facilitated Learning group of programs at MVA, offering an ongoing series of programs and A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 7

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B R E E D P RO F I L E

workshops for business and organizations, including leadership and communication workshops, as well as specialized programs which focus on helping people deal with emotional/physical trauma, anxiety and stress issues. This spring, MVA presented its first Equus Alive Equine Specialist Facilitator certification course. It is the highly attuned disposition towards human companionship and interaction, which makes the Arabian horse so skillful at connecting with people in all the workshop and course settings. The MVA Arabians are amazing partners with their participants. Their level of sensitivity allows them to connect and respond to people. Whether it is the slightest physical movement or an emotional thought, the horses provide instant, honest and non-judgmental feedback, based on what they sense or feel. “It’s as if they hold up a mirror and say, ‘I’m responding this way because this is what I feel,’” says Millar. That

alertness and sensitivity which is part of the Arabian’s genetic make-up makes them perfect partners for helping people to change and “feel alive.” Hence the name Equus Alive. The spirit of the Arabian horse, its sensitivity and willingness to connect with people, is what makes the Equine Facilitated Learning programs at MVA so effective. Other types of breeds are more than capable of connecting with people and fulfilling a significant role, but experience at MVA suggests the Arabian horse continues to be the horse of choice because they tend to more sensitive and responding with less stimuli, which in turn gives the participants instant feedback and an opportunity to change what they did or what they thought. When the person changes, the horses change as well. With the Arabian Horse Reading Literacy Project, the horses are used as part of hands-on activities. They seem to enjoy having kids groom and stick labels on them as they identify the parts of the horse. Then, the real magic begins as the kids begin to read to the horses. With their back to the horse and holding the books up so the horse

can see the pictures and the words, kids read their books to the horses. Anyone watching would think the horse is listening to every word. Horses fully enjoy this interaction as they lower their head, chew and sigh. Often, they will sniff the reader, sparkling delight in the children’s eyes as they feel the soft breath of the horse on their ears, or a light tickle as a whisker touches the side of their face. The sensitive interaction between horses and participants offers both participants and observers with a sense of pure exhilaration. One instant, Arabian horses can display their beauty and spirit as they ‘snort and blow’ and run around freely in the pasture, but they can suddenly become still and quiet, connecting with a first responder who is working to get his confidence back, or a small child who is taking immense pleasure in reading to the beautiful animal, even though the child has perhaps never read a word in his life. The question arises: does this only happen with Arabian horses? The answer, according to Millar is, “It sure does.” At Millar Venture Arabians, horses are changing lives every day. AB

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TRAINER'S CORNER

Transitions to

Improve Lightness Strategies for excellence and smoothness in changing gaits. B Y TA R A G A M B L E

Transitions refer to some sort of change and can occur between gaits as well as within the gait themselves, meaning there can be a change in energy or a change in rhythm. In riding, upward transitions typically refer to an increase in forward movement such as going from a walk to jog / trot, and downward transitions typically refer to a decrease in energy or rhythm, such as slowing down when going from a jog / trot to a stop / halt. In my experience, riders tend to have more difficulty with downward transitions because they actually lose the forward motion in the downward shift, due to not having the horse’s hind end engaged correctly. Both upward and downward transitions require hind end engagement, and a lightening of the front end. In nature, the horse can carry up to 70% of their body weight on the forehand since they are grazing animals. When we ask the horse to go under saddle and perform more advanced movements, we begin to develop the engagement of their hind end more effectively, which will assist in creating a more responsive and lighter horse. There is a physical

development of the horse as they achieve better balance and ultimately collection, from this. I like to tell my beginner riders that the engine is in the back end of the horse and we can get some reserve energy in the tank. I also like to use a “teeter-totter” analogy about the shift in energy from the front to the back, when referring to “heavy” versus “light” ends. ACHIEVING TRANSITIONS: In order to advance your horsemanship, it’s important to prepare the horse and use consistent cues so the change is smooth. By practising simple transitions, the rider can achieve smooth cues and develop their feel to the horse and the horse will improve their responsiveness to the rider’s aids. This is working harmony. The benefits of transitions for training purposes are numerous. The physical engagement of the horse helps its mental engagement and offers variety to the horse, so the animal remains focused. Transitions also alleviate boredom and assist with horses who anticipate by keeping the equine guessing as to what will come next. Horses are very sensitive to pressure. This also applies

Jessica Ray works in harmony with "Sapphire" Photo by Natalie Jackman

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TRAINER'S CORNER to tension. I encourage the rider to prepare themselves (especially downward transitions) by taking a breath in through their nose and slowly exhaling through their mouth. This allows a moment for the rider’s brain to slow down and relaxes the core. This also translates through the horse and you can usually observe a visible relaxation. If you increase the energy in your body, your horse will respond in kind by increasing its energy. Conversely, if you decrease the energy in your body, the horse will decrease its energy. For example: while executing the posting trot on a quick moving horse, the rider should slow down the posting rhythm and the horse will respond in the same way. I like to have my riders prepare their horses through orderly and consistent use of aids. For instance, when we stop; 1) I want the rider to prepare for where they will stop; 2) I want the rider to exhale to soften their core and “melt” down in the saddle and engage leg aid, (as in squeezing a tube of toothpaste); 3) say “whoa”; and 4) use rein aids to back up the use of the seat, legs and voice. To me, the rein aid is the last and when executed correctly, these movements flow into one another, therefore creating a smooth transition. Having consistent cues helps improve response time, the horse becomes lighter, and the rider becomes smoother at giving aids. The communication just “clicks.” I always like to use a logical progression for the horse’s training level and the rider’s skill level – I want to be able to teach the duo at the level of skill in which they are. I give them lots of lead up time at the beginning and then decrease the interval they have to perform the exercise and as a result, I will see an improvement in responsiveness by both. For an example of this concept, please check out the novice exercise to your right. Ultimately, my first rule is to “use the least amount of pressure to get the job done.” Typically there is much more pressure at the beginning of the exercise and, as the horse and rider fine tune their partnership, the cues become much more invisible and the horse will become much lighter and quicker in response. Success! AB BIO: Tara Gamble has the privilege of being the Past President of the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) and of the Alberta Equestrian Federation (AEF), as well as the opportunity to represent Canada as Runner-Up Miss Rodeo Canada in 1998. She has served on the Equine Canada Board of Directors as a representative to recreation, and on the Strathcona County Economic Development and Advisory Committee as the agricultural representative. It has been an honor for Tara to receive both the CHA Clinic Instructor of the year (2006), and Volunteer of the year (2013) awards. She is a CHA Clinic Instructor, and a designated Professional Horseman with the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA) and was appointed to the AQHA Youth Activities Committee in 2012, where she is able to contribute to her vision of helping the industry work collaboratively to strengthen. Her education includes a Bachelor of Science degree in agriculture from the University of Alberta. With over 26 years of industry teaching experience and a background in both western and English, Tara has enjoyed her time helping others learn safe horsemanship practices and skills immensely. She continues to judge various horsemanship competitions, present seminars and instruct clinics. She has been fortunate to work with many equine professionals on the provincial, national and international levels which have greatly enriched her experiences.

EXERCISES USING TRAN SITIO N Sequential Transition Exercises: Begin by establishing a nice walk on the rail (works well for a group of riders). As an instructor, I remind the riders of how they are going to use their aids to ask their horse for a downward transition to a halt. Then I ask them to prepare their horse and give the cue to stop. I have them pause and reflect on how well their stop went. Then, we repeat this several times and you usually notice a huge increase in responsiveness in the horse and the rider’s ability to coordinate their cues. At this point, I may also introduce some bending and flexing exercises to mix it up (so we are not repeating same exercise). W A L K T O T R O T : Same as above when instructing. As rider’s skill level increases, I will begin to skip gaits. For instance, the halt to jog / trot, or jog / trot to halt, walk to lope / canter, lope / canter to walk, halt to lope / canter, lope / canter to halt. G A M E S F O R Y O U N G E R S T U D E N T S : Red Light / Green Light, Simon Says, and The Driving Game. The latter involves picking a famous attraction in your area and having students “ride” horses to this place. As the instructor, I establish speed limits for different gaits and I get them thinking about approaching a “stop light” etc. This game is a great way to engage young children. W A L K T O H A LT :

Variation Trot Exercise:

Have riders pick up a posting trot on one long side of the arena. When they come to the short side, switch to sitting trot or jog until the corner of the next long side. When they come to the second long side, have them extend the trot and post. Upon coming to the last short side, have them return back to sitting trot / jog. Repeat. This offers variation within the gait.

Use of markers/pattern:

I also like to use cones, barrels and obstacles in my arena. I will have the rider approach the first cone at a walk. At the first cone they must halt and pause five seconds. Then they begin to trot / jog to the second cone from a halt. At the second cone, the rider must pick up the canter / lope (as the instructor I also pick the lead they must start on and I have them identify the lead they’re on. At the third cone, they must transition to a walk or halt. This is just one example of using markers and the instructor can vary the degree of transitions, depending on the level of the rider.

Use of trot poles/logs:

Using the pattern above, I can incorporate the use of trot poles or simply have logs out for assisting with variations of rhythm within the trot or jog.

Key hole race and roll backs:

Advanced transitions to show the horse and rider’s smoothness and responsiveness throughout it all. A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 7

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With the shorter days of sunlight and the inevitable change of season, your horse's coat will likely be triggered into growth. If this doesn't quite meet eye-to-eye with your riding ambitions, it may be time to consider giving your horse some kind of a clip. Before deciding the type of clip you should use, first you must think about your horse’s living arrangements. Will you be turning horses out and bringing them in at night? Are they inside all the time? Are they turned out completely? Plus, you must factor in what sort of work load your horse will endure throughout the winter. AB

CLIPPING1 BY LOUISA MURCH WHITE

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Here are some of the most common clips you may see:

The BLANKET

The TRACE

The BIB

The blanket clip is a great alternative if you turn your horse out or keep them outside. Although the animal will still require a heavy duty winter blanket, this clip offers warmth over the back but allows the horse to cool and dry more quickly during and after a hard training session.

Two clips in one - the low or high trace clip. The coat is removed from the underside of the belly, chest and neck, but is left on the legs for protection and for more warmth; the head hair is also left on for this clip. Perfect for horses in light to medium work or for horses that predominately live outside.

The underside of the horse’s chest is clipped, and nothing else. This is a great option for a horse in light work, who also is regularly turned out. The will allow the equine to cool off faster after exercise, but he won’t require the same heavy blanketing and precautions as horses with full clips

CLIP CLIP CLIP !

In Alberta, winter nights can get extremely frigid. Full body clips are not recommended for horses that are turned out during the evening even while wearing heavy blankets.

G101

FULL BODY The HUNTER

CLIP CLIP

This clip involves clipping off all of your horse’s hair. The full clip is often used for competitive horses that are in full work or travelling to compete in warmer regions to which they might not be fully acclimatized. It ensures that the horse stays cooler during work and dries out quickly after training sessions.

The hunter clip is often used as an alternative to the full clip. It is generally used for horses in heavy to medium work and, as the name would suggest, is commonly found in the hunter jumper world. Clipped everywhere except for their legs and the saddle area, where the coat helps protect them from the saddle. A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 7

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HORSEKEEPING

Forage for Fall

The arrival of autumn signals a move for most horses off of grass onto primarily hay based diets. Knowing how, and when, to supplement your horses’ diet can ensure a comfortable and easy transition into the colder months. BY LOUISA MURCH WHITE

As many horse owners know all too well, horses can be fractious and seasonal changes in temperature can vastly affect them. With the return of crisp morning air and falling leaves, autumn signals a big dietary shift from grass pasture back to a hay-based forage diet. For some horses, they may be eating the last vestiges of hay from the previous spring, or new hay purchased that summer. Either way, a change in a horse’s diet requires attention, and often needs supplementary nutrition to balance the difference. The equine nutrition consultant for Purina Canada, Jill Dickson, states that the golden rule of equine nutrition is that, “Any changes to a horse’s diet should always be made gradually, and this includes changes in forage.” Dickson continues that a safe practice is to move horses from pasture to hay gradually, over a period of a couple weeks. “Do this by providing small and increasing amounts of hay before completely removing your horse off of the pasture. This will allow for the horse’s digestive system to adjust to the different fibre source, and also from a high moisture forage (pasture), to a low moisture forage (hay).” Due to temperature changes, some horses may be prone to drinking less water. Dehydration can quickly lead to colic which becomes the serious issue to consider when moving a horse from pasture to hay. Dickson says horse owners can proactively battle colic by adding loose plain white salt to their horses’s feed before, after and during the transition. Ensure your horse is staying hydrated by monitoring their water intake and ensuring they have access to clean, fresh water; often, a heated water source can encourage horses to 26

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drink during cold spells. Another way to check for signs of dehydration is to observe the moisture in the balls of fresh manure, and perform a skin pinch test. Hay, it seems, can be as temperamental as horses. Even if from the same supplier, hay quality can vary year to year, based on factors like weather and time of harvest. In dry growing seasons, sugar content of hays can be higher, and if cut later in the season to increase yield, proteins and digestible energy will be lower. All of these factors will affect greatly how you feed your horse. Depending on where you call home, whether it's Alberta, or if you winter somewhere warm like Arizona, you may find different hay varieties, such as grass, mixed, or legume. It is very difficult to determine the nutritional value without testing. Dickson says, “It is due to hay’s variability that it is important to have your hay tested every year in order to understand it’s nutritional value. A small decrease in digestible energy (calories) of a hay can cause large decreases in total caloric intake per day, and cause weight loss.” Dickson continues with questions proactive horse owners can ask about their hay, including: What is the protein content of the hay? What are the different fibre values? What are the sugar levels? What is the digestible energy? The answers to these questions will affect the supplemental nutritional needs of your horse. Testing your hay leads to a better understanding of what you are feeding your horses. When you hear talk of “easy-keepers” and “hard-keepers,” this often boils down to the nutritional content they are being fed. Dickson says,


HORSEKEEPING “Understanding your hay can help you make informed decisions about whether it is suitable for your horse, and what kind of feeds needs to be added to achieve balanced nutrition. A low protein hay, with a higher NDF (neutral detergent fibre) value may be suitable for the easy keeping gelding who will live off a round bale all winter and is not in work, while not being as suitable for the performance horse in training or a young, growing horse. A hay higher in sugars may be suitable for the performance horse, while being the wrong choice for the pony prone to laminitis.” Knowing your

“There are certain nutrients that hay will not provide in sufficient quantities compared to pasture, such as vitamins A, E and D...” horse’s nutritional needs, as well as having a grasp of what you are feeding when it comes to hay, will lead you down a clearer path when it comes to supplementing their diet with outside products. Kirstin Smith, one of the equine nutritional consultants behind Hoffman’s Horse Products, says that she too heavily considers the horse before recommending supplementary nutrition. “It really depends on the horse itself, are they a senior horse that has a hard time keeping on weight? Are they an active horse, or are they in a training program? Is it a pony? These are all things we keep in mind when recommending the different products you can use to supplement a horse through fall into winter.” Dickson notes that the lack of certain vitamins in hay can also play a large role with how and if you choose to supplement your horse’s forage diet. “There are certain nutrients that hay will not provide in sufficient quantities compared to pasture, such as certain vitamins, which decrease over time in stored hay, or are not present in weathered or bleached hay, such as Vitamin A and E. Vitamin D is another important nutrient that is added to feeds, and is required for horses who are stabled or do not receive lots of sunshine throughout the winter. Selenium is a mineral that is deficient in the soil in most of Alberta, and thus deficient in both pastures and hay, and will need to be supplemented.” The key to ensuring your horse has a happy and healthy transition from the warm summer months, to what can suddenly be a drastically cold fall season, truly boils down to awareness and management. When choosing supplements, ensure you are reading the feed description and choosing products that are designed for your horse’s specific needs and life stages. Being aware of the nutrient base within the hay you feed, as well as your horses’ weight and activity levels, makes it much easier for you to supplement them with any additional feed, supplements or grain throughout fall and winter. AB

CHEAT SHEET

Products to Aid in the Forage Transition FOR REGULAR HORSES:

Purina Pur-a-Yeast

A live yeast culture supplement which ensures a healthy hind-gut and improves fibre digestion.

Purina Equalizer

A balanced vitamin mineral supplement that will meet the needs of mature horses that are receiving sufficient protein from their hay. FOR HARD-KEEPERS AND SENIOR HORSES:

Hoffman’s Pro Fat Ration

A high fat supplemental ration for horses needing more body condition that is designed to be fed as a top dress with the ration you are already feeding.

Hoffman’s Senior

For senior horses needing extra energy to maintain weight, complete with all the vitamins and minerals needed for optimal mental and physical health. FOR ACTIVE HORSES:

Hoffman’s Elite

A high performance feed, with fat-based “cool” energy sources that includes yeast, vitamin E and organic selenium, among others.

Purina Optimal

A well balanced mineral supplement that contains a higher protein base, and is ideal for breeding, growing and performance horses

RIGHT: All horses are different in their nutritional needs.When transitioning from summer to fall feeds, taking an individual’s needs into consideration is key. A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 7

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BEDDING Comparison

A Brazilian BARBECUE

After discussion with our AEF members and negotiating on your behalf with our insurance program providers at Capri Insurance, we are pleased to let you know about some changes for the 2018 membership year. First and foremost, the core products that AEF members and their counterparts across Canada have relied upon for more than 20 years remain unchanged. Included with your membership are two important insurance benefits: a) Personal Liability insurance - $5,000,000: that WILL protect YOU, THE MEMBER if YOU, THE MEMBER are held legally liable for PROPERTY DAMAGE OR BODILY INJURY caused TO A THIRD PARTY. This insurance does not cover commercial use of a horse. b) $30,000 Accidental, Death and Dismemberment coverage if YOU, THE MEMBER suffer a catastrophic and permanent injury (or death) related to an incident where horses are involved. This coverage is in force 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and covers the member anywhere in the world. Please note: This coverage excludes benefits for fracture/dental injuries. As you are aware, there are many options available for purchase through your AEF membership: Members Named Perils - insurance covering death of an owned horse resulting from fire, lightning or collision/overturn of a conveyance in which a horse was being transported, attack by a dog or wild animal and more (no sickness). This insures up to a maximum of $10,000 that may be applied regardless of the number of horses owned. Losses are restricted to one claim per year. [NEW FOR 2018] This policy also includes compensation for government ordered destruction of horse. [NEW FOR 2018] Emergency Life Saving Surgery this policy covers equine Emergency Life Saving Surgery necessitated by accident or sickness, including colic surgery and fracture surgery, to a maximum limit of $2,500 for expenses incurred. ($250 deductible). Please note: This is NOT a life insurance policy; NO DEATH BENEFIT is payable under this policy. This policy is restricted to one claim per year and must be purchased by the member who is the owner of the horse(s). To purchase this optional insurance, the member must also purchase 2018 Members Named Perils. Enhanced Accidental Death & Dismemberment – In addition to your ‘included’ $30,000 Principal Sum you can purchase an additional $50,000 coverage that includes limited benefits for Fracture and Dental injuries arising from equine related activities – available to members under the age of 75. [NEW FOR 2018] Travel (out of Province/Country) – Provides $2,000,000 coverage for Medical/Hospitalization – available to members under age 75. Trips up to 90 days in duration – any number of trips per year – worldwide coverage – including participation and/or preparing for most equine related activities. This coverage must be purchased prior to leaving your Province/Territory of residence. Tack - $10,000 any one occurrence / $10,000 any one membership per policy period; $500 deductible. Weekly Accident Indemnity - Coverage is up to a maximum of $500 per week to a maximum of 26 weeks. A fully completed Application is required. The AEF continues to work with our insurance partners at Capri Insurance so that a broad range of insurance products and risk management services are designed with you in mind. Have questions about insurance? Call Capri Insurance at 1-800-670-1877. AB


MEMBER ORGANIZATIONS

as of

Sept 14th 2017

I F YO U A R E I N T E R E S T E D I N F I N D I N G O U T M O R E A B O U T O N E O F T H E S E C L U B S , O R J O I N I N G, M A K E S U R E YO U C O N TA C T T H E M !

4-H Alberta Provincial Equine Advisory Committee www.4h.ab.ca Alberta Carriage Driving Association www.albertadriving-acda.ca Alberta Donkey and Mule Club www.albertadonkeyandmule.com Alberta Dressage Association www.albertadressage.com Alberta Equestrian Vaulting Association www.vaultcanada.org/AEVA Alberta Friesian Horse Association www.afha.ca Alberta Horse Trials Association www.albertahorsetrials.com Alberta Morgan Horse Club www.albertamorganhorseclub.com Alberta Mounted Shooters www.albertamountedshooters.ca Alberta Paint Horse Club www.northernhorse.com/aphc Alberta Pony Clubs (North, Central & South Regions) canadianponyclub.org Alberta Trail Riding Association www.atra.ca Alberta Walking Horse Association www.walkinghorse.ca Alix Agricultural Society www.facebook.com/alixagsociety/info American Saddlebred Horse Association of Alberta www.saddlebredsofalberta.com Appaloosa Horse Club of Canada www.appaloosa.ca Banff Light Horse Association lbhardin@gmail.com Bashaw Light Horse Club mnmlambproduction@gmail.com Bear Valley Rescue Society www.bearvalleyab.org Bezanson Agricultural Society discoverbezanson.ca Black Diamond English Riding Club www.eversfieldequestrian.com Black Diamond Polo Club www.blackdiamondpolo.com Border Cowboys Mounted Shooters Association bordercowboysmountedshooters.com Bow Valley Riding Association bvra.wordpress.com Calgary Arabian Horse Association www.calgaryarabian.weebly.com Calgary Area Alberta Dressage Association www.ca-ada.com Calgary Regional Appaloosa Club www.calgaryappaloosa.wildapricot.org Calgary Regional Trail Riders www.calgaryregionaltrailriders.com Calgary Western Riders coreenc@shaw.ca Canadian Cowboy Mounted Shooters Association robpiasta@hotmail.com Canadian Horse Breeders Association Rocky Mountain District www.canadianhorsebreeders.com Canadian Registry of the Tennessee Walking Horse www.crtwh.ca Canadian Sport Horse Association - AB Chapter www.c-s-h-a.org Cassils Trail Blazers cweestra@live.ca Central Alberta Adult Riding Club panddjensen@hotmail.com Central Century Team Ropers Association centurycentralteamroping.com Central Peace Horse Association shelbylynn3@hotmail.com Chinook Country/Alberta Dressage Association www.albertadressage.com Cleardale Riders Club sandyrichardson@abnorth.com Clearwater Horse Club www.facebook.com/cwhcpublic/?rf=155981401093436 Cochrane Horse Trials Committee www.cochranehorsetrials.com Cooking Lake Saddle Club www.cookinglakesaddleclub.ca Cottonwood Corrals Association (Jasper) cottonwoodcorralassociation@gmail.com Coulee Winds Saddle Club kheapy@outlook.com Davisburg Pony Club donnellydigs@gmail.com Delacour Agricultural Society & Community Club www.delacourhall.ca Didsbury Agricultural Society www.didsburyagsociety.org Dunmore Equestrian Society www.dunmoreequestrian.com Edmonton Area /Alberta Dressage Association www.albertadressage.com Electric Strides Drill Team www.electricstrides.ca Endurance Riders of Alberta www.enduranceridersofalberta.com Evergreen Park (Grande Prairie Agricultural & Exhibition Society) www.evergreenpark.ca Extreme Cowboy Alberta Association www.extremecowboyracing.ca Fairview Sport Horse Society fairviewsporthorsesociety.weebly.com Family Fun Rodeo Series www.facebook.com/familyfun.rodeoseries?fref=ts Foothills Roping Group lahure@xplornet.com Foothills Therapeutic Riding Association foothillstherapeuticriding.com Fort Calgary Wheel & Runner Association bojanglesboy@platinum.ca Four: Thirteen Therapeutic Riding Association info.fourthirteentherapy@gmail.com Friends of the Eastern Slopes Association www.foesa.org Fun Country Riding Club of Strathmore www.funcountryriders.com Gladys Ridge Riding Club lisamckeage@gmail.com H.E.D.J.E. Society lundkrista@gmail.com Hastings Lake Pleasure Horse Association www.hastingslakepleasurehorseassociation.org High Country Carriage Driving Club www.highcountrycarriagedriving.org High Country Pony Club www.canadianponyclub.org High Kick Vaulters highkickvaulters@gmail.com Highridge Thundering Hooves Gymkhana Club hthgymkhana@gmail.com Hoofbeats For Hope Equine Team Society sites.google.com/site/prairiedustersmusicalrideteam Horse Industry Association of Alberta www.albertahorseindustry.ca Irricana Riding & Roping Club Association teasieo@hotmail.com Journeys Therapeutic Riding Society www.jtrs.ca Jump Alberta Society www.jumpalberta.com Lacombe Light Horse Association lacombelighthorseassociation.webs.com Lethbridge Therapeutic Riding Association www.ltra.ca Little Bits Therapeutic Riding Association www.littlebits.ca Meadow Creek Vaulting Club www.mcvc.ca Millarville Musical Ride www.millarvillemusicalride.com Miniatures in Motion Horse Club www.miniaturesinmotion.ca Mount View Special Riding Association www.mountviewriding.com Northern Trails Riding Club www.northerntrailsridingclub.org Opening Gaits Therapeutic Riding Society of Calgary www.openinggaits.ca Over the Hill Trail Riders fjhorses@syban.net Peace Area Riding For The Disabled Society www.pards.ca Peace Draft Horse Club thedrafthorseclub.com Peace Region Alberta Dressage Association www.peaceregiondressage.com Performance Standardbreds Association www.p-standardbreds.org Polocrosse Calgary www.polocrossecalgary.com Ponoka Riding & Roping Association ponokaridingandroping.com Prentice Creek Equestrian Center angie.maclean@yahoo.ca Quarter Horse Association of Alberta www.qhaa.com Rainbow Equitation Society www.rainbowequitationsociety.org Ranahan Polocrosse Club sites.google.com/site/ranahanpolocrosse Red Deer & Area Western Style Dressage Association www.albertawesternstyledressage.com Ridgeview Riding Club joanne-dunbar@outlook.com Rimbey Sleigh, Wagon & Saddle Club rimbeyswsclub@gmail.com Rocky Mountain Gymkhana Club www.rockymountaingymkhana.com Rocky Mountain Polocrosse www.facebook.com/RockyMountainPolocrosse Rundle Riders Therapeutic Riding Association www.rundleriders.com Saddle Seat Canada www.saddleseatcanada.com Shortgrass Riding Club www.shortgrassridingclub.ca Society of Tilt and Lance Cavalry www.joust.ca

South Country Team Penning Association South Peace Horse Show Association Southern Alberta Trail Riders Association Springbank Equestrian Society Springbank Pony Club Spruce View Gymkhana Club Steele's Scouts Commemorative Troop Association Stone Bridge Carriage Driving Club Strathcona All-Breed Horse Association Tennessee Walking Horse Association Of Western Canada The Calgary Hunt Club The Greater Bragg Creek Trails Association Thompson Country Pony Club Trail Riding Alberta Conference Traildusters Horse Club of Smith Tri-Country Riding Club True Grit Cowboy Mounted Shooters Association Uplift Therapeutic Riding Association Valley Riders Saddle Club Valleyview & Districts Agricultural Society Vegreville Agricultural Society Welsh Show Association Western Canadian Wagon Train Wild Rose Draft Horse Association Wildrose Mounted Shooters Will For Riding Foundation Xtreme Wild Rose Club

dunz@cciwireless.ca www.southpeacehorseclub.com www.satra.ca normaansloos@gmail.com plastiras@shaw.ca dwedmondson4@gmail.com www.steelescouts.ca www.stonebridgedrivingclub.com www.sahaalberta.com www.twhawc.com www.calgaryhuntclub.ca www.braggcreektrails.org www.thompsoncountryponyclub.org www.trailriding.ca 780-829-3628 lindagblack1@gmail.com www.truegritmountedshooters.com sturgeonlynn@gmail.com sandyrichardson@abnorth.com www.valleyviewagsociety.ca www.vegag.ca piperp13.wixsite.com/wildroseshow gsissons@hotmail.com www.wrdha.com www.wildrosemountedshooters.com willforridingfoundation.com xtremewildrose.webs.com

B U S I N E S S M E M B Ewww.aacet.ca R S Alberta Association of Complementary Equine Therapy Alberta Carriage Supply Bar T5 Beaver Dam Creek Horse Boarding Caeco Ranch Calgary Stampede Canadian Thoroughbred Capri Insurance Services Ltd Cartier Farms Equine Assisted Learning Cavallo Pulse Therapy Colchester Farm Creekside Equestrian Centre Darn That Blanket Daryle Schmidt Horse Training Centre Days Inn Medicine Hat El Caballo Ranch Equestrian Factory Outlet - Red Deer Equi-Health Canada Inc. Equine Connection Inc. Foothills Horse Transport G & B Portable Fabric Buildings Gendron Stables Glen Valley Farm Greenhawk Calgary Greenhawk Cochrane Greenhawk Grande Prairie High Country Equestrian Center Higher Trails Equine Ltd Hi-Hog Farm & Ranch Equipment Ltd Horse Canada Horse In Hand Ranch Ltd. Horse Sport Horse Trekking Adventures Just Passing Horse Transport & Bereavement Services Kaspian Equestrian Training Centre KGPHOTO Lawton & Co, LLP LIM Canada - Devoucoux Inc Martin Deerline McNiven Ranch Supply (Hansbo Sport) Millennium Equestrian Ltd. Moose Hill Ranch Outpost at Warden Rock Performance Equine Veterinary Services Persons Equine and Industrial Dust Control Polysols GGT Footing Purina Canada Rocking Star Ranch Equine Rocky Mountain Show Jumping Saddle Up Magazine Sandridge Stables Selected Bio Products Inc Spirit Winds Horse Centre Spirited Connections Counselling Spring Lake Equestrian Camp Strathcona Ventures Sunwest Equine Services Syner G Apparel & Solutions TD Equine Veterinary Group The Dressage Boutique & Equestrian Wear The Horse Store The Mane Event Equine Education & Trade Show The School of Equine Massage and Rehabilitation Therapies The Tack Collector Ltd The Visions West Studio Ulterra Equestrian Ltd. Vitality Equine Western Horse Review Westerner Park Westwood Warmbloods Whitemud Equine Learning Centre Association Willow Grove Stables Inc. Winning Strides

www.albertacarriagesupply.net www.bart5trailers.com bdchorseboarding.wixsite.com/mysite www.caecoranch.com www.calgarystampede.com www.horsecanada.com www.capri.ca/horse www.cartierfarms.ca www.cavallopulsetherapy.ca rcolchesterfarm@gmail.com www.mcvc.ca www.darnthatblanket.com www.daryleschmidt.com www.daysinnmedicinehat.ca linda.atkinson@me.com www.equestrianfactoryoutlet.com www.equihealthcanada.com www.equineconnection.ca foothillshorsetransport.com www.gandbbuildings.com 403-866-0546 glenvalleyfarm@platinum.ca jennlmcginn@yahoo.ca www.greenhawk.com www.greenhawk.com www.hcequestriancenter.com www.highertrails.ca www.hi-hog.com www.horse-canada.com www.horseinhandranch.com www.horse-canada.com www.horsetrekkingadventures.ca www.justpassinghorses.ca www.kaspianequestrian.com www.kgphoto.ca jwlawton@telus.net www.devoucoux.com www.martindeerline.com www.hansbosport.com www.millenniumequestrian.com www.moosehillranch.com www.outpostatwardenrock.com www.performanceequinevet.net www.personscs.com polysols.com www.equipurina.ca www.rockingstarranch.ca www.rmsj.ca www.saddleup.ca www.sandridgestables.ca www.horseherbs.com www.spiritwindshorsecentre.com www.spiritedconnections.ca byron.bue@gmail.com www.strathconaventures.com www.sunwestequine.com www.synergyapparel.ca www.tdequinevet.com www.dressageboutique.com www.facebook.com/theHorseStore www.maneeventexpo.com www.equinerehab.ca www.thetackcollector.ca smithpr1@telus.net www.ulterraranches.com www.vitalityequine.com www.westernhorsereview.com westernerpark.ca www.westwoodwarmbloods.com www.welca.ca www.willowgrovestables.com www.winningstrides.com

AO LB FA 0 1S 7 B E S U R E TO S U P P O RT O U R B U S I N E S S M E M B E R S ! T H O S E L I S T E D I N B L U E P ROV I D E D I S C UE NRT T S AT B OI T A SE F| M EL MLB E2 R V I S I T O U R L I S T O F S TA B L E S A N D FAC I L I T I E S AT O U R W E B S I T E !

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CLOSING THOUGHTS

Lest We Forget Thank-you to Todd Lemieux, Warbird Pilot and Board of Directors, Bomber Command Museum of Canada - Nanton, Alberta, for sending this archive info to Alberta Bits.

Canada, part of the British Commonwealth, joined the war against Nazi Germany in 1939. The United States did not declare war on Germany until after the attack on Pearl Harbour in 1941. Prior to 1941, flying US aircraft into Canada in support of the war effort would have been considered an act of war, so an ingenious idea was hatched. Aircraft would be flown to the border crossings at Sweet Grass, Montana and Emerson, North Dakota where they would be pulled inches across the border by horse team into Canada and then flown to air training bases. In doing so a "conduit of bombers and fighters" was created to help provide aircraft to the Royal Canadian Air Force.

Dateline - France 1944: A Canadian Hawker Typhoon pilot befriends a local French horse. Typhoons (seen in the background) operated out of austere airbases in France, brought the punch to the Nazis with heavy ground attack. Horses were considered strategic assets and the Germans would either kill or release them from the local farms as they retreated. It was common for RCAF squadrons, often staffed with pilots from the western Canadian prairies, to adopt and take care of the loose horses. They then became unofficial squadron mascots. During these turbulent and violent times, the horses provided companionship and reminders of a peaceful life back home.

30

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Alberta Bits - Fall 2017  

The Official Magazine of the Alberta Equestrian Federation

Alberta Bits - Fall 2017  

The Official Magazine of the Alberta Equestrian Federation