Page 1

P U B L I C AT I O N S M A I L AG R E E M E N T # 4 0 0 5 0 2 9 7


For your peace of mind… Capri insures you, your horses, your business, your property

Complete insurance protection for the equine community Capri is the industry leader when it comes

farm or ranch and offers business liability for

to insuring horses and their people.

coaches, trainers, equine business operators, veterinarians and more.

We have a long-standing partnership with the Alberta Equestrian Federation. We

Capri Insurance Services Ltd. is the official

automatically provide all AEF members

insurance provider to the Alberta Equestrian

with $5,000,000 personal liability

Federation and its members.

insurance and $30,000 A.D. & D. coverage that covers you, the member, 24/7 anywhere in the world. Additional services are available through our dedicated agriculture/equine department providing expertise to protect horses, your

Equine Department

100-1500 Hardy Place, Kelowna BC V1Y 8H2 Email: agriculture@capri.ca

www.capri.ca

1-800-670-1877


FALL 2015; VOLUME 7, ISSUE 3

Alberta Bits is the Alberta Equestrian Federation’s official member magazine. It serves the entire equestrian community of horses and riders of all ages, interests and involvement, as the Voice of Equine Alberta. T H E A L B E RTA E Q U E S T R I A N F E D E R AT I O N H A S B E E N I N C O R P O R AT E D S I N C E 1 9 7 8 Alberta Bits magazine is mailed four times a year (Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter) to all current AEF members and is made available at the office and special events attended by the AEF. Alberta Bits is distributed throughout Alberta with news and events on behalf of recreational, sport, breeds & industry and educational sectors of the Alberta horse industry. Alberta Bits is distributed to approximately 17,500 members; 9,000 households and businesses, an exclusive list of tack and equine establishments and at events and trade shows annually.

AEF BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT PRESI DENT ELECT PAST PRESIDENT SECRETARY TREASURER INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL INDIVIDUAL

Les Oakes 403.540.9859 les.oakes@gmail.com Lewis Hand 403.722.4690 lewhand@live.ca Tara Gamble 780.945.7516 tcgamble@xplornet.ca Lauren Parker 403.813.1055 lmparker@shaw.ca Barb Easthom 403.801.4111 beasthom@rubydale.com Trish Mrakawa 403.938.6398 trish@willowgrovestables.com Jay Mills 403.637.2410 jay.mills@albertaequestrian.com Nicolas Brown 780.454.5001 bruchev@gmail.com Dena Squarebriggs 403.760.0512 dmsquare04@hotmail.com Alison Douglas 403.762.8570 thealicat@shaw.ca Don Scott 780.895.7660 ddlscott@shaw.ca Jessi Chrapko 403.627.5696 jdc@platinum.ca Robert Simpson 780.619.7779 rmsimps1@ualberta.ca Darcee Gundlock 403.308.7500 djg2@cciwireless.ca

PA G E 0 6

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

PA G E 0 8

AEF SCHOLARSHIP AWA R D W I N N E R S

PA G E 0 9

NOTES & COMMENTS Our newest column! We want to hear from you.

PA G E 1 0

W I L D RO S E T R A I L R I D E R E C A P A recap of the fourth annual AEF Wild Rose Trail Ride fundraiser at the Red Lodge Guest Ranch in Bowden, AB.

PA G E 1 2

C L U B P RO F I L E S The Alberta Equestrian Vaulting Association takes their dynamic organization to new heights; and here’s why the Alberta Horse Trials Association is poised to take three-day eventing higher in our province.

PA G E 1 4

W I L D RO S E S H O W C O M P E T I T I O N Andalusians and Lusitanos were on display at the Canadian National Show and Fiesta in Olds, AB.

PA G E 1 5

O U T S TA N D I N G VO L U N T E E R Lisa Robertson is a proud mom, a dedicated competitor and a driven hunter-jumper volunteer.

PA G E 1 6

B R E E D P RO F I L E In our newest editorial feature, we turn the spotlight on the Morgan Horse.

PA G E 2 0

S TA B L E P RO F I L E Whispers Equine Learning Ltd. teaches leadership and basic life skills with the assistance of equines.

PA G E 2 2

H E A LT H H OW- TO Dr. Dennis Rach shows us a important horse husbandry skill: finding a digital pulse.

PA G E 2 4

HORSEKEEPING With fall in the air, use our comprehensive check-list to get your horses and your barn ready for winter.

PA G E 2 6

ASK THE INSURANCE GUY Clinics, Commercial General Liability and coverage.

PA G E 2 7

W H Y YO U S H O U L D T R A I N W I T H A C E RT I F I E D I N S T RU C T O R / C OA C H

AEF STAFF EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Sonia Dantu execdir@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 5

COACHING COORDINATOR

Erin Lundteigen coaching@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 3

MEMBERSHIP COORDINATOR

COMPETITIONS COORDINATOR

MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

FINANCE, GENERAL INQUIRIES

Norma Cnudde membership@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 1 Ashley Miller marketing@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 6

Sophie Beaufils competitions@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 2 Rita Bernard info@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 7

RECREATION & INDUSTRY COORDINATOR

Vanessa Morriss recreation@albertaequestrian.com 403.253.4411 ext 4

O F F I C E H O U R S : 8 : 3 0 T O 4 : 3 0 P M , M O N D A Y T O F R I D A Y, E X C E P T H O L I D A Y S A L B E R TA B I T S I S P U B L I S H E D B Y W E S T E R N H O R S E R E V I E W I N PA R T N E R S H I P W I T H T H E A E F

FOR EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES CONTACT: ALBERTABITS@ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM Jennifer Webster ART DIRECTOR Natalie Jackman PUBLICATION COMMITTEE Ashley Miller, Sonia Dantu CONTRIBUTORS American Morgan Horse Association, Maria Balch, Marion P. Cox, Daniel Kaiser, Piper Whelan, Howard Schatzberg Photography, Susan Stromberg Photography, Treasured Times Imagery, Bridget Baskin, and Shauna Wells Photography. MANAGING EDITOR

ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES

Sally Bishop 403.815.1289 sallysuebishop@gmail.com Laura Mills 403.461.8964 laura@westernhorsereview.com 2015 ADVERTISING DEADLINES

Winter 2015: Nov 17 FOR A MEDIA KIT AND/OR RATE CARD PLEASE CONTACT ALBERTABITS@ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM

or marketing@albertaequestrian.com. All material is copyright 2015. Ideas and opinions expressed in articles do not necessarily reflect the ideas or opinions of the AEF. Alberta Bits reserves the right to accept, and/or edit material submitted for publication. The AEF makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the information contained therein, but assumes no liability in cases of error or changing conditions. Any business relations or other activities undertaken as a result of the information contained in Alberta Bits, or arising there from, is the responsibility of the parties involved and not of the AEF. We welcome signed letters to the editor, but reserve the right to publish, edit for grammar, taste and length. For reprint information, please contact execdir@albertaequestrian.com

ALBERTA EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION

100, 251 Midpark Blvd SE Calgary, AB T2X 1S3 Toll Free: 1.877.463.6233 Phone: 403.253.4411 Fax: 403.252.5260

albertaequestrian.com

THE AEF GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM ALBERTA SPORT CONNECTION P U B L I C AT I O N S M A I L AG R E E M E N T # 4 0 0 5 0 2 9 7 • P R I N T E D I N C A N A D A • I S S N 1 9 1 8 - 7 1 1 4 R E T U R N U N D E L I V E R A B L E M A I L TO : A L B E RTA E Q U E S T R I A N F E D E R AT I O N 1 0 0 , 2 5 1 M I D PA R K B LV D S E C A L G A RY, A B T 2 X 1 S 3

4

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

PA G E 2 9

CLUB & BUSINESS LISTINGS PA G E 3 0

MEMBER PICK Kim Cox is both a dressage coach and judge – and an invaluable asset to the horse community.

ON THE

COVER:

AHTA members of all ages participate in three day eventing competitions across Alberta. Photo by Shauna Wells Photography


A M E S S AG E F RO M A E F P R E S I D E N T L E S OA K E S

President’s Message As usual, weather has dominated the conversation across Alberta this past summer. Drought, grasshoppers, forest fires, too much rain in certain parts of the province, even high temperature warnings have all been the topic of discussion this summer. The impact that it will have on the equine world in Alberta will be significant. Feed costs this year are expected to be higher than ever, which is never good. Over the summer months, the number of calls from concerned citizens to the AFAC hotline about horse welfare issues increased. It’s almost imminent that more will be expected as the industry will be faced with increased activity based on how expensive feed will be this year. As we move into fall, the days get shorter and often cooler in Alberta; it’s time to start thinking about preparation for the ever changing weather. Fall / winter preparation such as stocking up on feed and bedding, walking your fence line to ensure it’s safe and secure, checking horses’ winter blankets, spiffing up the barn, replacing mats, hoses, rubber buckets (even light bulbs if needed), perhaps investing in a storage cabinet to keep winter supplies, warm gloves, and ice melt will help you be prepared. Fall is a good time to provide updates to our membership on what’s been happening over the busy, enjoyable summer months and what’s coming up for our renewal year. (I did not want to mention New Year...) Equine Canada (EC) proposed By-laws and Articles of Continuance in August. Members are currently involved in the voting process and, by the time you read this, both will have been voted on at the EC Special meeting being held during the Canadian Interprovincial Equestrian Championships (CIEC) on September 26, 2015 in Ottawa. The proposed By-laws and Articles were the result of extensive consultation and collaboration with EC’s partners and stakeholder groups, including Provincial/Territorial Equestrian Sport Organizations (P/TSOs), Sport, and Industry councils. By working together, the EC Board, EC Governance Committee and the By-laws Taskforce (including representatives from the core groups of provinces, sport, and industry) created proposed By-laws that meet the requirements of the Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act (CNCA), but also represented a framework that all parties believe should allow EC to be repositioned as a leading equestrian and equine federation premised on the core values of respect, diversity, inclusivity, service, excellence, and volunteerism. P/TSOs received approximately 90% of what had been requested in the proposed By-laws and the AEF board voted to support the By-laws in principle, while at the same time recognizing that there is still work to be done on policy and any future service agreements. We hope to be able to share updates with our members in the near future. Team Alberta! Through a rigorous selection process and 6

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

hard work, junior and senior athletes along with their coaches will have represented Alberta at the CIEC September 25 – 27, 2015, at Wesley Clover Parks, Ottawa, in the disciplines of dressage, jumping and reining. Team Alberta Dressage junior members are Natalie Russell and Shae-Lynn Airth; senior members are Nicole Ostapek and Becky Farrell. Dressage coach is Lorraine Hill, from Lethbridge. Team Alberta Jumping junior members are Jada Wagner and Jade Fowler; senior team members are Hunter Nesbitt and Sarah Stewart. The jumping coach and Team Alberta Chef D’Equipe is Trish Mrakawa, from DeWinton. Team Alberta Reining junior members are Alexandra Hibberd and Maxine Whiteside; senior team members are Sarah Hibberd and Krystal Hansen. The reining coach is Christa Turel, from Olds. We are extremely proud of all our Team Alberta members that worked so hard over the past few months to secure a spot on Team Alberta. The AEF also extends sincere gratitude to those sponsors who have helped to support this team and make this event possible for them to attend. We look forward to reporting on Team Alberta at the CIEC in our winter issue. As the AEF was fortunate enough to have a new recreation staff join us this year, staff and board members have been kept very busy this summer attending meetings of the Kananaskis Trail Advisory Group and Bighorn Backcountry Standing Committee; participating in workshops such as the Technical Large Animal Emergency Rescue (TLAER); volunteering at events such as National Horse Day and the Calgary Stampede; joining in festivities such as Trails Fest at the Canmore Nordic Centre and the Grand Opening of West Bragg Creek All Season Trail. Many of these meetings and events have allowed the AEF to broaden our reach and audience. This fall, the AEF is embarking on a few initiatives to assist us in further reaching our business and strategic plans goals; we hope you will jump in the saddle and join us. On October 1, 2015, the AEF will be hosting a first ever Equine Industry Collaborative Meeting. This will be a gathering of industry partners to share best practices, discuss surrounding matters affecting the equine industry and how


industry can work together to plan for the future. We will keep the membership abreast of the planning and projects that come from this gathering of professionals. This fall will also see the AEF on the road sharing the first series of Regional Presentations throughout the province. In a casual setting, these events will provide an opportunity for all equine enthusiasts to learn more about the AEF; who we are, what we do, what we have to offer, etc. This is an ideal opportunity for questions to be answered, concerns to be voiced and friendly discussions to be had; Capri Insurance will be joining us. Presentations are scheduled for 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm, beginning on October 15th in Lethbridge at the Lethbridge Sport Council; October 16th in Leduc at Amberlea Meadows; and October 17th in Grande Prairie at Peace Area Riding for the Disabled Society (PARDS). Read inside this issue on how you can help bring non-members and we WILL REWARD YOU! We look forward to meeting you there! This year, we want to give ALL our members the opportunity to get your 2017 membership absolutely FREE and help us grow our herd! In the past, you have been able to refer brand new members and receive $5 off your membership to a total of $15. Now there is NO LIMIT! We’ve noticed this year that some members have gone above and beyond with referrals, so why limit them? No reason at all. This option will be available to individual, family, club and business members starting January 1, 2016! There are also some new incentives this year for coaches and Wild Rose competitions, be sure to read this issue back to front so you don’t miss out! Many other incentives and opportunities for our members are being planned for the 2016 year. We look forward to sharing all of those with you in the next several issues of Alberta Bits. As always, we encourage members to reach out and share your stories, questions, concerns and kudos with us. Please contact any of the board members or staff at any time. Our stall doors are always open and we look forward to having you renew your membership and continue to serve you in the year to come! Wishing you a Fall without falls. AB

Come JUMP with US! www.jumpalberta.com jumpalberta@gmail.com

PUT THE

POWER of PRINT

TO WORK IN YOUR MARKETING PROGRAM! Reach the audience of the Alberta Equestrian Federation – the largest equine association in Alberta. FOR ADVERTISING ENQUIRIES PLEASE CONTACT:

albertabits@albertaequestrian.com MEMBERSHIP ADVERTISING GARNERS YOU A 30% DISCOUNT

Contact the AEF today! marketing@albertaequestrian.com

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

7


AEF SCHOLARSHIP

RECIPIENTS THE AEF BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND THE SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE 2015 SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS.

Congratulations to these bright students!

LAURA A. CRAIG

Laura Craig is 36-years-old and considers Calgary home. She has been riding since she was eight-years-old and initially focused on hunter / jumper and equitation before transitioning into purely jumpers. Her current horse, Ganesh, is an eightyear-old Canadian Sport Horse, with whom she competes in the 1.20m jumpers. Laura has a BSc in Psychology, a MSc in Neurological Science and a PhD in Neuroscience. She worked in medical research for several years before deciding to follow a childhood dream and go back to school to become a veterinarian. She has just finished her first year at University of Calgary in the Faculty of Veterinary medicine program and is looking forward to completing her degree (in 2018) and starting a new career as an equine practitioner. When she’s not riding nor studying, Laura enjoys spending time hiking, camping and skiing in the Rocky Mountains.

CAYLEY PELZER

Cayley Pelzer graduated high school in June of 2015. She likes to reflect upon the last 12 years and recognize how this time has developed her into the unique person she is now. She would like to thank her parents, 4H leaders and mentors, school staff and of course, her animals. Cayley has been involved with the 4H program for nine years, along with Pony Club, of which she has been a member since she was four-years-old (that’s 14 years). Those times have shaped her as a person and have given Cayley opportunities to showcase all her hard work by showing horses, sheep and cattle. She has grown up showing horses all her life, from lead line and walk trot classes at open shows to being in the hunter/jumper ring at Rocky Mountain Show Jumping. With having many personal bests, show ring successes and finding diamonds in the rough for horses that turned into super stars; horses taught Cayley to work through the hard patches. She has had multiple horses that have lead her to high-point awards and have helped her achieve many goals over the years. In the last couple years she has not shown as much as she did in the past, choosing instead to focus on her high school studies and showing Black Angus cattle. However, she always jumps at the chance to get back in the saddle again. She will continue to pursue her equine passion in the future by enrolling in Agri-business in post-secondary studies.

CASSIDY BARNERT

Cassidy Barnert is a 19-year-old from Okotoks, AB. She has been involved with horses all her life and has been both a 4H and Pony Club member. Now, she is an 11year platinum award winning member in the Millarville Mutts and Mustangs 4-H Club. She has hosted clinics, competed in shows, cowboy-up challenges, and often enjoys a relaxing trail ride. She has performed with the Millarville musical ride and recently has taken up the sport of polocrosse. One of her greatest accomplishments has been training a young rescue horse. During the summer, she works as a farmhand and is learning about quality hay production. Currently, Barnert is a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology major at the University of Calgary who plans on becoming a chiropractor for both horse and rider. Her goal is to understand the biomechanics of horse and rider to improve the performance, regardless of discipline. AB 8

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5


ABOVE: This picture was submitted by Connie King and taken from a ride in her Lethbridge, AB area. BELOW: Robert Fisher of Belle Plaine, Saskatchewan, and his horse “Willie” spent some time enjoying the beautiful Canadian summer, in harness.

NOTES & COMMENTS HAVE SOME GREAT NEWS OR PHOTOS TO SHARE?

Do you love spending time with your horses? Do you love reading Alberta Bits magazine? Drop us a comment. Or send us a picture of yourself, your kids, or your friends enjoying some quality time with your equine companions to marketing@albertaequestrian.com and we’ll publish it in the next issue of the official magazine of the Alberta Equestrian Federation! LEFT: QUALITY TIME. Christina Lush and her equine pal, hanging out at a horse show. RIGHT: "My kids and I (with our equine friends) going for a ride in our hay field. This was taken before my daughter headed back to college and my son, back to school." Submitted by Debbie Ganser

TIME TO RENEW YOUR 2016 AEF MEMBERSHIP Your current 2015 AEF Membership expires on December 31, 2015. MEMBERSHIPS CAN BE RENEWED ONLINE, BY MAIL, EMAIL OR BY FAXING YOUR MEMBERSHIP FORM TO OUR OFFICE. The AEF staff is available to assist you as well! Be sure to inform the AEF if there have been any changes to your email, mailing address or other information.

YOUR MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS KEEP GROWING EACH YEAR! ALL MEMBERS NOW HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO GET THEIR BASIC MEMBERSHIP FOR FREE IN 2017!

• Automatic $5,000,000 personal liability and $30,000 AD&D insurance coverage; • Optional insurances available for purchase, including enhanced AD&D coverage to include fracture and dental benefits, Tack Coverage, Members Named Perils coverage for your horses, Weekly Accident Indemnity, Out of Province/Country Travel; • Receive your 2017 basic membership absolutely FREE! Refer brand new members to the AEF and receive $5.00 off per referral! Simply have the new member mention your name and AEF Number when joining (referrals do not carry forward); • Member Discounts are made available exclusively to AEF members from many of our Business Members; • Alberta Bits member magazine four times per year (emailed or mailed); • Free listings and posting in AEF online forums and classifieds; • Opportunity to apply for scholarships and funding assistance; • Access to participate in clinics and educational workshops; • A wide range of programs for recreational and competitive riders and drivers of all ages; • Live Outside the Box (youth program for active living); • Ride & Drive Program (great rewards); • Trail Supporter - supports the efforts of Alberta trail builders with the development, maintenance and improvement of horse friendly trails, campsites and staging areas throughout the province; • Access to resource information on everything from where to take lessons to where to go trail riding; • Online store – great items from Rider Level Manuals, Trail Manuals/Guides, Equestrian Books, educational DVD’s, Clothing, Muck Boots™, EquineLUX™ saddle pads, Signs and much more;

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

9


SEPTEMBER 5, 2015

WILD ROSE

TRAIL RIDE RECAP

The fourth annual AEF Wild Rose Trail Ride fundraiser took place on September 5, 2015 at the Red Lodge Guest Ranch in Bowden, AB. Despite the poor weather forecast and rain in surrounding areas, participants were able to enjoy a lovely ride, rain free. Event participants started off the day enjoying a delicious buffet brunch, prepared by George’s Kitchen and Catering, followed by a two or three-hour ride through the beautiful countryside. The AEF team would like to extend a warm thank you to all of the participants who supported this year’s event and to those who arrived to take part in the ride, despite the forecast for rain. We would also like to thank all of our hard working volunteers and staff for making this day a huge success. A 10

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

special thank you to our gracious venue host, Wendy and Dale Bradshaw of Red Lodge Guest Ranch, our event partner, Capri Insurance, and our Refreshment sponsor, Foothills Horse Transport. The AEF Partnered with Capri Insurance to offer this year’s fundraising initiative for three therapeutic riding groups. The beneficiaries of the 2015 Wild Rose Trail Ride were: Little Bits Therapeutic Riding Association, Peace Area Riding for the Disabled Society, and Prentice Creek Equestrian Centre. Thanks to the generosity of so many in the equine community, the AEF was able to raise the largest amount to date, $1,300 for each of the three beneficiary associations, that work hard assisting mentally, physically and/or emotionally disabled individuals enjoy the calming and healing power of horses. AB


The world’s richest source of new leading Omega 7 We all want our pets and livestock, big or small, to be as healthy and happy as possible. Allow the natural goodness of SeaBuck 7 with 190+ bio-active nutrients and new leading omega 7 help your animal companions reach the pinnacle of good health.

BENEFITS ARE: • Full of natural anti-oxidants • Organic whole-fruit product, readily digested and absorbed • CertiďŹ cate of analysis containing no foreign substances • Helps keep horse in peak condition • Helps support A HEALTHY DIGESTIVE FUNCTION • Reduces oxidative stress • Helps maintain normal disposition and alertness • Supports a healthy immune system

Professional Edge Equine

www.professionaledgeequine.com • 519-652-2789

ď‚˜

ď‚™

ď‚˜

HOG HITH

FARM & RANCH EQUIPMENT Ltd

E OU AN TSTANDING B R

1974

ď‚™

D

2015

♌

Outstanding Equine Equipment

Superior Footing & Mud Control EcoRasterÂŽ

Stalls

Portable Corrals

Round Pens

1-800-661-7002

đ&#x;? đ&#x;?

www.hi-hog.com

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

11


C LU B P RO F I L E

A L B E RT A E Q U E S T R I A N VA U L T I N G A S S O C I A T I O N

Leaps and Bounds For the dynamic equestrian vaulters in this organization, their sport is a balancing act – literally. BY PIPER WHELAN

Imagine performing a choreographed gymnasticsinspired routine to music while wearing a colourful costume. Now imagine doing this on the back of a horse cantering on a longe line. This is what the members of the Alberta Equestrian Vaulting Association (AEVA) work towards, both competitively and recreationally. Now with four clubs under their designation, the AEVA was established in 2004. “At that point in time, equestrian vaulting was not even really known in Alberta, and therefore there was no association nor groups in place to organize any event, nor have any rules or bylaws to then hold any competitions,” says Carolyn Latimer, treasurer and promotional committee member of the AEVA. Latimer is a certified equestrian vaulting coach, and her daughter, Heather, is a member of the Meadow Creek Vaulting Club in Olds, Alberta. “The goal of our association is to promote the sport of equestrian vaulting in the province of Alberta, and hold a minimum of two, ideally, organized competitions that are sanctioned by Equine Canada every year,” she explains. The AEVA currently has 80 members, their highest yet. Individual and family memberships are available, and members must also be part of the Alberta Equestrian Federation. All ages are welcome; children can begin vaulting in AEVA-sanctioned clubs at the age of six. A horse is longed while a vaulter uses a saddle with various grips, called a vaulting surcingle, to help them perform their exercises. The performance can feature an individual, a pair or a squad of six. Vaulters perform at either a walk, trot or canter, the latter of which is used at all international vaulting competitions. A vaulting competition consists of two parts: compulsories and freestyles. Compulsories are set exercises to be performed by each vaulter, increasing in difficulty the higher the level. The freestyle section is comprised of choreographed routines, judged on the performance’s artistic elements and safelyexecuted moves. “You will see handstands and cartwheels and somersaults on the back of the horse,” Latimer explains. “You will see them do some jumps and land on the horse’s 12

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

back. They will do a variety of strength exercises, like a press or a front support – almost like a push-up or a plank. Another example would be flexibility, and that can be done with splits or what we call a needle – a standing split.” It’s not necessary to have gymnastics or dance training to become a vaulter, says Latimer, though it is an advantage when starting out. A bomb-proof horse is the key to a vaulter’s success. “It doesn’t matter what breed it is. It probably doesn’t matter how tall the horse is or how big it is, to start with,” she says. “But the horse really needs to be quiet and accepting of a lot of action around them, and be tolerant of a lot of movement on their back and neck.” Aspiring vaulting coaches can turn to the AEVA in obtaining their coaching certification, which is a requirement in registering a club with the association. They will bring in a specialist from British Columbia to run a two and a half-day certification course and to help the individual start their own club. The AEVA hosted the Canadian National Vaulting Competition in August in Rimbey, AB. They host this event every other year. They also held their second provincial competition of the year in October at Ponoka, AB. For more information on the AEVA or the sport of vaulting, visit vaultcanada.org/AEVA. AB LEFT: Heather Latimer, then 15, performs an individual freestyle routine on “Jake” at the 2014 Canadian National Vaulting Competition in Langley, BC. Photo by Marion P. Cox BELOW: Jeanine and Angelique Van der Sluijs, coaches of the Meadow Creek Vaulting Club in Olds, AB, perform a pas de deux (pair) routine at the 2014 World Equestrian Games in France. Photo by Daniel Kaiser


C LU B P RO F I L E If you’ve always wanted to give three-day eventing a try, the Alberta Horse Trials Association (AHTA) is the place to begin. Established in 1970, the AHTA is a non-profit organization created to promote and support three-day eventing in Alberta. “I think the sport itself is what makes it really unique,” says Kristine Haut, president of the AHTA. “It’s not just one thing that you have to excel at,” she continues, pointing out the cross country, show jumping and dressage components. “There’s three different disciplines that you have to school and train in, and I think that really makes it unique in that we’re really having versatile riders and versatile horses.” Currently, the association has 488 members, 161 of which are juniors. The AHTA holds six sanctioned events throughout the year: summer and fall shows at Alhambra Stables in Red Deer, AB; the Beaumont Horse Trials in Beaumont, AB; the Thompson Country Horse Trials in Rocky Mountain House, AB; the Cochrane Horse Trials in Cochrane, AB; and the South Peace Horse Trials in Grande Prairie, AB. Not only does the AHTA board oversee membership and sanction events, it also takes care of communications, “... on behalf of the association as well as on behalf of the organizers – who actually put on the events in the province,” she says. Another function is to help fund these events, as the equipment needed to run a show, like jumps and cross country courses, can be pricey. “We have a casino that we run every two years, so we work with Alberta Liquor and Gaming for that and they provide us with funding, so the board of directors distributes that, and a big part of that goes to our equipment.”

ABOVE: Riding through a cross-country water obstacle. Photo courtesy of Shauna Wells Photography BELOW LEFT & RIGHT: Photos by Susan Stromberg Photography

ALBERTA HORSE TRIALS ASSOCIATION

Off to the Trials Three-day eventing is on the rise in Alberta and this organization wants to take it even higher. BY PIPER WHELAN

The Association also gives out a wide range of member awards at their annual banquet in October. Another facet of the AHTA is its High Performance (HP) program. “We are very proud of (this) program as it helps to support and develop our top riders,” Haut explains. “We provide financial assistance to those travelling to out-ofprovince competitions as well. Last year, one of our Alberta HP riders, David Ziegler, won individual gold at the (North American Junior and Young Rider Championships). This year, another one of our HP riders, Shelby Brost, won an individual bronze, so we are obviously very proud of each of them.” In the next year, Haut hopes the AHTA will continue to increase its membership. “This year we’ve had record numbers at our events, and we’re at, I think, almost a record membership level. The sport is continuing to grow, which is fantastic,” she says. “We always like to offer clinics with the best clinicians we can find, and so

always expanding our pool of clinicians is important to us, and bringing clinics at a very subsidized price. (At) one of our clinics, you can ride in it for $150, and that one weekend can get you three or four lessons, which I think is pretty unheard of these days in equine sport, so it’s really great that we can do that.” If you’d like to find out more about three-day eventing, visit the AHTA website at www.albertahorsetrials.com. New riders are encouraged to check out their new mentorship program, where they can contact current members on the list who are willing to assist them in getting started in the sport. AB

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

13


W I L D RO S E S H O W C O M P E T I T I O N

ABOVE (CLOCKWISE): Klaus Schurmann competes in the English classes at this annual event. Riders competed aboard these beautiful breeds in a variety of classes (equitation to pleasure to halter) during this three-day national show.

2 0 1 5 C A N A D I A N N AT I O N A L

Andalusian & Lusitano Show and Fiesta The prairies play host to an event celebrating the history and culture tied to a talented, eye-catching breed. BY PIPER WHELAN

PH OTO S by MARY WOOD, TREASURED TIM ES IMAGERY

For one weekend in August, one of the most beautiful and graceful equine breeds was on display in Olds, Alberta. The 2015 Canadian National Andalusian & Lusitano Show and Fiesta took over the Olds Regional Exhibition Grounds on Aug. 21-13. This event is hosted annually by the Pacific Association of the Andalusian & Lusitano Horse (PAALH), an organization dedicated to promoting the Andalusian and Lusitano through competitions, as well as informing the public on the breed’s history and the rich equestrian heritage of Spain and Portugal, where it originates. This year’s edition featured a range of classes for purebred and part-bred Andalusian and Lusitano horses, and also offered a number of classes open to all breeds. Classes ranged from a full slate of English and western hack classes, to halter and in-hand classes on Friday and Saturday, and finished with a full day of dressage on Sunday. Many of the classes were well attended, and three of the most popular classes; Best Movement, Sport Horse in Hand and Working Equitation, all had a whopping 17 entries. With over 75 horses 14

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

attending the show, the classes were very competitive and exciting to watch. The event opened to a stormy Friday, with unrelenting rain and low temperatures. The next two days, however, looked brighter, and echoed the mood found at the grounds during this show. “There were a few challenges in adapting to a new show facility, but the staff at Olds Exhibition Park worked diligently with us to address any problems and helped ensure the show was a success,” a press release issued by the PAALH stated. “The show was very well attended and enjoyed by horses, handlers and spectators alike.” One of the highlights of this annual event is their “Fiesta of the Royal Horse,” which took place on Saturday night. The Fiesta celebrates the skill and splendor of the breed and featured a variety of equine performers travelling from afar to demonstrate their craft for the audience. For two and a half hours, skilled riders and horses performed for a captivated audience, accompanied by a Mariachi band. Included in the Fiesta lineup were performances in Spanish Garrocha and Doma Vaquera, a musical Kur Freestyle, mounted shooting, liberty demonstrations and much more. The Fiesta also included the judging of the Supreme Purebred and PartBred Halter classes, adjudicated by United States National judge Richard Petty. Another component of this annual tradition is the live auction of a donated horse, and this year’s edition had two part-bred colts on the auction block. The first colt was donated by Dori Appleton of Carbonear Stables in Tofield, AB, and the second donated by Paul and Shannon Desrosiers of Sleepy Hollow Ranch, also of Tofield. Also auctioned off at this time were a selection of equine art from Jolene Aarbo, Shannon Ford and Stephanie Travers, while a silent auction proved successful throughout the night. AB BELOW: Teala Caton won High Point Rider on Alta Bonita at the show.


O U T S TA N D I N G VO L U N T E E R

Lisa Robertson (seen here on Precipitation, owned by Joyce Ender) loves the discipline of hunter-jumper, but loves dedicating her time to help youth discover the sport even more. Photo by Maria Balch

A passion for youth involvement in equine sport drives this

Barn Mom’s Efforts BY PIPER WHELAN

Like many proud barn moms, Lisa Robertson remembers her own horse-focused childhood fondly. “I rode from the time I was six on and showed to a relatively high level,” she explains. “After university, I purchased a couple of horses again and rode as an amateur until I started a family.” Now living with her family in Chestermere, Alberta, Robertson’s equine activities are more focused on her eight-year-old daughter, who rides at Riqueza Riding Academy, a hunter-jumper barn in Calgary. The mother of two, who is the associate director of sponsorship and events at the University of Calgary’s Olympic Oval, was more than happy to lend a hand when Riqueza hosted their Rising Star and BRAVE Show on July 25-26, 2015. The BRAVE series is comprised of seven shows throughout the year held at three facilities, created to introduce new riders and young horses to the world of hunter-jumper competition. Robertson and the other volunteers tackled many chores to prepare for this event and ensure it ran smoothly. Prior to the show, they repainted fences, mowed grass, cleaned up the facility and set up the courses. Robertson proved invaluable on show day, helping out wherever she could, and even taking on the role of unofficial photographer throughout the event. Giving her time to youth equestrian events is very significant to Robertson. “I love the sport,” she says enthusiastically. “It truly is my passion and I know the value it can bring to the lives of children and teens… I absolutely love the sport and I love the horses, so I know even if I didn’t have a child competing, I’d still be involved. “Supporting grassroots shows and this type of show is important. I think that the sport has limitations, in terms of where you can go in the sport, based on your socioeconomic standing within society,” she continues. “It’s not an inexpensive sport, and these are wonderful shows that not only expose people to the sport but also provide an affordable way to be in the sport.” AB

THE AEF VOLUNTEER RECOGNITION PROGRAM

IS A FEATURE OF SANCTIONING AS A WILD ROSE COMPETITION

Volunteers, selected by competition organizers, receive recognition and a $50 VISA/MC gift card. A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

15


B R E E D P RO F I L E

The Morgan Horse Versatile and hardworking, this breed is a favourite of many Alberta equestrians. BY PIPER WHELAN

The story of the Morgan horse’s origin is one horse lovers know well: Justin Morgan of Vermont buys a horse foaled in 1789 and names him Figure. The stallion becomes legendary for his ability to outperform other horses, whether pacing or pulling, and

ABOVE: A successful hunter pleasure Morgan. Photo by Howard Schatzberg Photography RIGHT: Albertans involved in every kind of equine discipline are finding success on the Morgan horse, from dressage and eventing to ranch work and recreational riding. This is due to their stamina and agility, as well as their physical characteristics. According to the Alberta Club’s website, “a short broad head, small sharp ears, a long laid-back shoulder, deep body and straight, clean-boned legs make the Morgan the choice of both casual rider and the earnest professional.” Photo by Dave & Andy OPPOSITE PAGE: Photo courtesy of the American Morgan Horse Association 16

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

that legacy passes on to his get and, subsequently, down many generations. According to the American Morgan Horse Association, “...No other American breed can trace its pedigree back as far as the Morgan horse can to the same foundation horse.”

The Morgan horse’s history in Alberta is not nearly as old, but features the traits that made Figure and his offspring famous behind both the plow and carriage. The first Morgan came to Alberta in the late 1880s with the early settlers migrating from the mid-western United States. At this time, a good horse for hard labour on homesteads was crucial for those trying their luck on the prairies. “The first record of registered Morgans was of two stallions, which were brought to the Cypress Hills ranching country in the 1920s to cross on the range mares,” the Alberta Morgan Horse Club’s website reads. Today, the Alberta Morgan Horse Club promotes the breed and reaches out to all who ride Morgans, as it has for almost 50 years. “I know there are some assumptions or preconceived notions that the Horse Club is really


only for those who are involved in the horse shows,” says David Gillen, Club president. “It’s intended for everyone who enjoys doing horse activities with the Morgan horse.” At the moment, the club doesn’t have the numbers it did in years past, given a decreased number of local breeders and less money to be made in the horse industry. However, Gillen has hope for a resurgence in the coming years, thanks to the versatility of the breed and the growing popularity of new disciplines suited to its traits. “Morgans do compete successfully in virtually all events,” says Gillen,

and Kentucky. They’re also exploring industry, but those horses are also bred new events with a wider scope, such as here as well, so we’re contributing to a “series of ultimate cowboy challengethe breed.” type clinics,” says Gillen. Other events Sonja Lorenson, a trainer who runs include trail rides, breed demonstrations Cold Creek at Leduc, AB, is one of and sponsoring and assisting with events these successful Albertans. “In the past like endurance rides. 15 years or so, we’ve taken horses that Currently, there are a number of are Canadian bred, trained and owned local riders and horses who have done to about 13 or 14 Grand National extremely well at the Grand National & and World Championships, so we’ve World Championship Morgan Horse been very lucky to have some really Show, held each October in Oklahoma excellent horses to show,” she explains. City, Oklahoma. This success on an Last year, she trained the horses that international level, Gillen explains, her teenaged daughter, Aidan, won the represents the quality of the breed Reserve World Championship Youth in Canada and, more specifically, in Hunter Pleasure and the Reserve Alberta, as well as World Championship 14-15 Year Old “...No other American breed can trace its a dedication to the Hunter Pleasure aboard. pedigree back as far as the Morgan horse breed. “We have had Lorenson – who has shown Morgans some very successful since 1979 and competed in a variety can to the same foundation horse.” individuals, horses of disciplines – finds the breed is a who rode Morgans in both dressage and trainers from here,” he says. delight to work with. “I think the most and team penning. “They really are an “When they come home with a world amazing thing about Morgans is their excellent choice for a lot of disciplines championship, it’s validating that character and their personality,” she because they’re up-headed and have a Alberta is on the map and on the right says, noting how easy they are to train... natural up-hill build. So any discipline, track, and a contributor to not only the [ C O N T I N U E D O N PAGE 18] like dressage or the up-and-coming western dressage, where you really care BREED TRAITS Albertans involved in every kind of equine discipline are finding that the horse can shift its weight back success on the Morgan horse, from dressage and eventing to ranch work and and engage its hind quarters – it’s a recreational riding. This is due to their stamina and agility, as well as their physical really great candidate for that.” characteristics. According to the Alberta Club’s website, “a short broad head, small The abilities of the breed were sharp ears, a long laid-back shoulder, deep body and straight, clean-boned legs make exhibited during the club’s annual the Morgan the choice of both casual rider and the earnest professional.” Labour Day weekend show, held this year on September 4-6 at Ponoka, Due to its distinctive trot, the Morgan is known for its prowess as a carriage horse, AB, to a good turnout. “We had a which made the breed an ideal choice in centuries past. At that time, horse owners lot of classes with some pretty good needed both strong, productive farm horses and quick harness horses, and the competition in them, and a lot of Morgan horse fit the bill perfectly. More recently, combined driving competitors at the classes that had a fair number of horses FEI-level have found the breed to be an excellent choice for their discipline. in them,” says Gillen, noting that some “The soundness of our horses is really significant,” says David Gillen, president of the competitors travelled all the way from Alberta Club. “Our horses do compete regularly into their twenties and even at the British Columbia for the show. National Oklahoma City level into their twenties and have no issues with soundness… “The highlight of our show was (a) Even our show horses, they could pull a plow all day if we needed them to.” trainers’ equitation challenge, and we had 13 trainers in the ring competing,” he explains. These competitors rode in a variety of seats, and rode Morgans as well as other breeds. Youth involvement in the breed is a key component of the Alberta Morgan Horse Show. The Youth Challenge consists of equitation, judging and oral presentation competitions designed to develop and showcase the skills of junior exhibitors. Their participation is crucial to the club, says Gillen, who explains that they’re currently working to revitalize their youth program, which had featured a summer camp in years past. Morgan enthusiasts can participate in a number of activities through the club. One club mandate is bringing in top clinicians for sessions; last year they held clinics with trainers from Illinois A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

17


[CONTINUED FROM PAG E 1 7 ]

“The other thing that I really like about these horses is that I’ve had virtually no serious illness, serious injuries that are genetic … In addition to that I love the way they carry themselves naturally and the way that they move naturally, which is very animated.” What does the future hold for the Morgan horse in Alberta? According to Gillen, and judging by the wide variety of disciplines in which the breed excels, there’s much to be excited about. This is Photo courtesy of the American Morgan Horse Association

especially the case when it comes to an emerging discipline that’s creating a buzz throughout the horse industry. “Probably somewhere we’re going to see more Morgans is in the western or cowboy dressage,” he predicts. “The Morgan is such a useful horse in that discipline because it’s very easy for them to do it because of their natural build. But I think that discipline, in all breeds, is exploding positively, and I think we’re going to see a big draw of Morgans to that.” Lorenson, too, sees opportunities to

entice more people to the breed, such as combining shows with other breeds. “I think that combining some of these breeds and showcasing more than one can actually bring more new people into each one of our breeds, because it’s a bigger show, it draws more attention, and … we’re getting some interest as people see what some other breeds are capable of doing, even in combining the shows,” she explains. “They’re a horse that because they’re so versatile, there’s definitely room for many different interests.” AB

MORGAN HORSE MEMBERSHIP DETAILS Members of the Alberta Morgan Horse Club are listed in the annual Alberta Morgan Horse Directory, which is circulated at a variety of events across Canada and the United States. They’re also eligible for national awards, presented at a gala each spring, and provincial awards, given out at a fall event. A family membership is $40 per year, individual membership is $30 and a youth membership is $20.00 For more details: www.albertamorganhorseclub.com Nationally, the breed is represented by the Canadian Morgan Horse Association, with its office in Port Perry, Ontario. In addition to the Canadian registry and breed promotion, it offers an award system for trail rides and other activities, a high point program for the show circuit, a historical committee and a junior member program, and hosts a yearly convention. An annual membership is $55; a youth membership is $27.50, or $11 if you have one senior member in your immediate family. For more details: www.morganhorse.ca

18

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5


WILD ROSE

SHOW INCENTIVES Sanction your Horse Show/Competition with the Alberta Equestrian Federation! BENEFITS

Effective Risk Management Certified Officials Competition / Event Promotion & Advertising Alberta Bits Magazine Promotion Incentives for your entrants and volunteers (Win Your Entry & Volunteer Recognition) Competition Certificate Approval to sell AEF Temporary Memberships Use of Rules Affordable FOUR EASY STEPS

Complete the Wild Rose Event Application Submit Certificate of Insurance Submit Guest Card Application or use AEF-Carded Judge Submit Prize List N E W I N C E N T I V E S AVA I L A B L E F O R 2 0 1 6 PAY IT BACK - WILD ROSE OFFICIALS FUNDING The AEF is introducing a new funding program that will help provide financial support to Wild Rose show organizers. Organizers will have the opportunity to apply for funding every year to help offset some of the costs associated with officials' fees to hold a competition. Applications will be accepted in November and will be based on certain criteria, including total officials’ fees incurred during the past year. WILD ROSE MEMBER REFERRAL For every five (5) BRAND new members that join the AEF due to the show organizer’s efforts, the AEF will provide a $25 voucher redeemable on their next Wild Rose Show sanctioning application. Vouchers have no cash value but also do not expire! Referrals may be accumulated over several events and used the following year.

Programs:  Travel & Education

Bursary deadline October 31, 2015

 In Province Travel

Bursary deadline November 15, 2015

Upcoming Events:  The Royal West October

22-31, 2015

 Jump Alberta Symposium November 20-24, 2015 Featured Clinicians Archie Cox—Hunter & Equitation riders Buddy Brown—Jumpers  Casino Fundraiser,

Deerfoot Inn and Casino January 7,8 2016 Earn Volunteer Credits $10 per hour VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!!

 Year End Awards Gala Deerfoot Inn & Casino January 9, 2016  Annual General Meeting January 18-24.2016 date TBD www.jumpalberta.ca jumpalberta@gmail.com A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

19


S TA B L E P RO F I I L E

Whispers Equine Learning Ltd. Ground work and a horse’s natural instincts create meaningful learning opportunities at this equine facility. BY PIPER WHELAN

Winston Churchill once said, “There’s something about the outside of a horse that’s good for the inside of a man.” Shana Nicholls knows this for a fact; it’s the driving force behind her business. Nicholls is the owner and program coordinator of Whispers Equine Learning Ltd. (WELL) at Sylvan Lake, Alberta. WELL is certified by the Cartier Equine Learning Centre’s Building Block Certified Equine Assisted Learning Program, and is run out of Nicholls’ boarding facility, Chilly Beach Farms. “The focus is to teach the skills of communication and human relations u s i n g h o r s e s a s t h e t e a ch e r s, ” says Nicholls. WELL offers youth programming that teaches leadership 20

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

and basic life skills through equine assisted learning (EAL), as well as programs for anti-bullying, special needs clients and at-risk behaviour in youth and adults. She also facilitates corporate programming for employee and team development. “The keys to success with this type of program is that it’s experiential learning, it’s self-driven and it’s objective-based,” she explains, adding that the horse’s natural instincts acts as a barometer for a person’s mood and behaviour, creating the opportunity for growth and development. Nicholls, who rode competitively for many years, wanted to find greater fulfillment in her work with horses. “A very smart person just asked me to think of the things that make me want


to get out of bed in the morning and to thread those things together to find out my purpose in life,” she recalls. “The only time I ever wanted to get out of bed is when I’d have a horse show, and the other thing was I’ve always really enjoyed helping people.” Putting those together, she turned to EAL and got her certification as a facilitator. “My heart is definitely with the youth and the atrisk behaviours.” Nicholls has six horses that she uses in WELL’s programs, including a retired thoroughbred and a few Quarter horses. “I’ve got a mare, my personal mare that I bred, and she was a Grand Prix jumper line, but she’s got such a unique personality that she’s fantastic for EAL, so I’ve used her in this,” she says. WELL became an AEF member through Nicholls’ insurance with Capri Insurance, and has found her membership acts as some extra advertising for the business. “The information that they send is quite valuable. I’ve looked at it as something that would have been a little bit better when I was competing, but I find that it’s a good resource for everything I’m doing.” Now in its second year, Nicholls continues to promote what WELL can do. “It’s such an innovative and unique form of learning that I really have to be talking to a lot of people, so networking is really my goal,” she explains. She’s had youth centres, school boards and mental health awareness groups visit her facility recently. “There’s simply no better way to develop a leader until you hand them a horse. So I really try to create the awareness for people to realize this is an excellent skill-building program.” “Because the horse doesn’t speak and doesn’t judge, it really changes the learning environment,” she continues. “I don’t tell (the participants) anything – I facilitate and get them to think. The horse tells them everything, every time. It’s so outstanding what the horse can do for us when we use them in their natural state as our barometer.” AB

HAVE YOU RENEWED YOUR AEF

MEMBERSHIP? 2015 Memberships expires December 31st, 2015

Don’t miss out on all the benefits (see page 9 of this issue for a full list)

“Because the horse doesn’t speak and doesn’t judge, it really changes the learning environment....”

OPPOSITE PAGE TOP: WELL's youth program helps children build confidence by taking the lead. OPPOSITE PAGE BOTTOM: Many of Nicholls’ clients had never been around horses before starting the program. ABOVE: People of all ages can learn something about themselves by working with horses. BELOW: Participants work on trust and leadership skills by leading horses through trail courses, blindfolded. Photos by Shana Nicholls

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

21


H E A LT H H OW-TO

HOW TO FIND A

DIGITAL PULSE Story & Photos by JENN WEBSTER

There are many reasons why a veterinarian or horse owner would want to check a horse’s pulse or heart rate. Obviously, these reasons include checking for illness in the animal, however, a pulse can also be used to determine if a horse is improving from illness or injury or for pre-purchase exams. There are several places on the body where a person can take a horse’s pulse and one of the most frequently checked is the digital pulse. Once you are familiar with the feel of a normal digital pulse, understanding what a “bounding” digital pulse feels like is an excellent horse husbandry skill to possess. An increased digital pulse means that the heart is pumping arterial blood into the enclosed hoof capsule, which has increased pressure and resistance to the flow of blood through the foot. This happens due to inflammation in the bone and soft tissue (ligaments, digital cushion, etc.) of the hoof capsule. An increased digital pulse is often a telltale sign of laminitis. While all horses have a digital pulse, sometimes it can be difficult to find as it is taken on the posterior (palmar) digital artery on the pastern between the coronary band and fetlock. In this article, Dr. Dennis Rach of Moore Equine Center near Balzac, Alberta explains step-by-step how to locate the digital pulse.

#1 LOCATE THE FLEXOR TENDON

The tough fibrous tissues that can be found at the back of a horse’s legs are called the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons. They are responsible for flexing the joints of the horse’s lower leg, they prevent the fetlock from overextending and they help with bearing weight. Using your thumb, locate the flexor tendons at the back of the leg.

#2 LOCATE THE SUSPENSORY LIGAMENT

The suspensory ligament originates below the bottom row of the knee bones between the splint bones and extends down to the fetlock. It divides into two just above the fetlock and each branch joins to a sesamoid bone, blending with a common digital extensor tendon. Its job is to support and prevent overextension of the fetlock joint. 22

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

#3 LOCATE THE CANNON BONE

The weight bearing bone of the lower leg that stretches from the knee joint to the fetlock joint.

#4 FOLLOW THE SUSPENSORY LIGAMENT DOWN

Using your thumb, follow the suspensory ligament all the way down until you find the middle, or most convex point of the fetlock joint.

#5 DESTINATION: DIGITAL PULSE

From the middle of the fetlock, feel your way one finger-width back to find the digital arterial pulse.

A digital pulse can be hard to find in horses that are resting or cold. Once you can familiarize yourself with finding and feeling a normal digital pulse, it will be easy to determine the difference between a bounding pulse. In an increased digital pulse, you can feel the blood pump harder against your thumb and fingers. AB Dr. Dennis Rach is a certified equine chiropractor and certified equine acupuncturist, and member of both the American Association of Veterinary Chiropractors and International Veterinary Acupuncture Society. Dr. Rach offers a range of approaches for the treatment of lameness in the performance horse.


REGIONAL PRESENTATIONS COMING TO A CITY NEAR YOU!

This is your opportunity to have your questions answered, and to join in the discussion on how we can improve our equine community!

AEF MEMBERSHIP REFERRAL PROGRAM

REFER A BRAND NEW MEMBER

AND GET YOUR 2017 MEMBERSHIP for FREE!

For each NEW member you refer, receive $5 off your own membership to a maximum of your AEF basic membership fee. Simply ask the new member to provide your name AND membership number on their application and start saving!

Offset your membership costs and help us grow our herd! Refer ral credits have NO CASH VALUE.

2015 DATES OCTOBER 15 LETHBRIDGE, AB

Lethbridge Sport Council Community Room 6:30PM-8:30PM

OCTOBER 16 EDMONTON, AB Amberlea Meadows 6:30PM-8:30PM

OCTOBER 17

GRAND PRAIRIE, AB

Peace Area Riding for the Disabled Society 6:30PM-8:30PM

DOOR PRIZES Draws for a free membership

(individual, family, business or club membership)

AEF swag Visa/MasterCard gift cards Gift cards/donations from local businesses in your area Muck Boots™ *The AEF member that brings the highest number of non-members with them are eligible for this draw - minimum 2 non-members

$500 *The AEF Club member that brings the highest number of non-members with them are eligible for this draw - minimum 5 non-members

Did we mention great refreshments? And More! If you have questions or would like to offer any assistance with the presentation in your area feel free to contact Vanessa Morriss, Recreation & Industry Coordinator at 1-877-463-6233 ext. 4 or recreation@albertaequestrian.com A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

23


HORSEKEEPING

HERE: Weaned foals enjoy the fall season. BELOW: Now is the time to make necessary repairs to automatic waterers and fences.

AUTUMN CONCERNS Other than the obvious task of getting your winter hay supply in order, there are several things horse owners can do to prepare their properties and horses for winter. Story & Photos by JENN WEBSTER

Autumn is the gateway to the most challenging season in a Canadian year: winter. Hence, it’s crucial to begin preparing both your barn and your horses for the chilly weather ahead. Additionally, the cold and wet weather autumn typically sees in the province of Alberta, can sometimes present the most bonechilling conditions your equine may face throughout the course of the year. One ounce of prevention is always worth a pound of cure, so while the thermometer still boasts plus numbers, now is the time to work away on that to-do list. PASTURE MANAGEMENT: Surprisingly enough, now is the time of year to do some planning to promote the longevity of your pastures. Horses are hard on land and pastures grazed too severely in the fall season are more subject to winter damage – plus, a slow start to growth in the spring. If you have the good fortune of space to create “sacrifice areas,” you may want to pen your horses there during the wet / rainy days of autumn to prevent their hooves from trampling pasture plants and doing even more damage to heavily saturated places. Plus, it is often suggested that owners allow a pasture to “rest” prior to the winter season by removing horses when the grass plants still have a good amount of leaf growth on them. Since pasture plants become dormant in winter and no longer have the ability to grow, leaving 24

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5


HORSEKEEPING RIGHT: Thin-haired show horses are good candidates for winter blankets. BELOW: Ventilation that exchanges stale air for fresh air in a barn is essential.

grasses with some substance to them may help pastures better withstand a winter with horses above. BARN MAINTENANCE: Autumn is a great time to check the gutters and downspouts of your barn and arena. Ensure they are not clogged up with leaves or debris and make any necessary repairs or replacements to your runoff system, before the snow flies and later subsequently, melts off your roof. Divert rainwater away from paddocks or high traffic areas, thus cutting down on your chore time when mud management is a big concern. Analyze your barn ventilation. It’s a well-known fact that completely enclosed barns with little ventilation have significantly higher particle and ammonia concentrations than open-sided stables. Plus, many Canadian stables must keep doors and windows tightly closed during colder weather. Fans are a good way to allow for more air exchange, and a proper air exchange should occur four to eight times in an hour during winter. Ventilation that exchanges stale air for fresh air is essential (especially in winter), therefore a barn should have openings on each end of the building. The absence of such air escapes will cause condensation to build up inside the barn and mildew the roof, walls and structure. High levels of humidity can cause the barn to feel cold. Fans throughout a barn might serve to push air around, including heated air. You may also want to scrutinize your barn lighting requirements. If there’s a place that has inadequate lighting – especially during the short days of winter – now is the time to bring an electrician out. Put proper ventilation in place and illuminate dark spaces before the freezing temperatures arrive. HORSE CARE: Incidences of colic sometimes increase during the fall season, simply due to freezing temperatures affecting automatic waterers. Although colic can be caused by a number of different reasons, ensure your auto-waterers are in good working order before frost hits. On occasion, horses may drink less in cooler temperatures but ensure this doesn’t happen because of ice-covered water by checking your waterers carefully each morning after a freeze. Pasture animals are also

likely changing over from high moisture content grasses to diets of low moisture dried hay. Prevent colic from happening in autumn by monitoring a horse’s water intake and by staying on top of your parasite prevention program. Fecal egg counts and targeted deworming is now the preferred method of choice by most certified veterinarians. You can additionally help your horse endure the rigors of winter by ensuring his teeth are in good shape. In the winter a horse needs more energy and fiber to keep its body temperatures warm. On that note, some owners may also choose to blanket a horse during the winter season. Although blankets are not necessary for every horse, animals that are malnourished, ill or without a proper natural hair coat may benefit from a blanket. If you do choose to blanket your horse, make sure all blankets and hoods are clean, mended and fit individuals properly. Blanketed horses must also be monitored and groomed regularly to confirm the health of its skin and confirm that the animal is not sweating unnecessarily underneath. AB

One ounce of prevention is always worth a pound of cure, so while the thermometer still boasts plus numbers, now is the time to work away on that to-do list.

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

25


ASK THE INSURANCE GUY STRAIGHT ANSWERS FROM BECOME AN EQUINE CANADA

CERTIFIED I N S T R U C T O R / C O A C H CERTIFICATION

IS

AVAILABLE

IN

THE

FOLLOWING

DISCIPLINES:

ENG L I S H , W E S T E R N , S A D D L E S E A T & D R I V ING

All Equine Canada coaching programs are nationally recognized programs developed by discipline-specific coaching committees comprised of the best equine professionals around. They allow for growth, development and training opportunities amongst those involved – and eventually certification in one of either two streams: instruction (teaching those who enjoy their horses outside the competitive ring; ideal for those who teach beginner riders, riding schools or day camps) or coaching (for those individuals who work with students who compete). F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N C O N TAC T E R I N LU N D T E I G E N

coaching@albertaequestrian.com

O R V I S I T T H E A E F W E B S I T E A L B E R TA E Q U E S T R I A N . C O M

Alberta Equestrian Federation

©

LEARN TO RIDE ENGLISH OR WESTERN

THROUGH THE NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED EQUINE CANADA PROGRAMS WITH AN EXPERIENCED AND CERTIFIED EQUINE CANADA INSTRUCTOR OR COACH

Whether you are a recreational rider just starting out or competing in a sport, these programs are available to help build your skills and confidence a step at a time, from basic to advanced levels. Become a well-rounded horse person, able to care for your horse and ride in a safe and correct manner. A structured plan allows you to track your progress and supports each step. The programs are flexible and designed to assist you to progress at your own pace. Well-written manuals and equine stable management books are available through the AEF office. AT EACH LEVEL, YOU RECEIVE AN EQUINE CANADA CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION AND A BADGE

Check out the list of certified coaches on the AEF website; contact an Equine Canada certified Western or English coach and enroll in the ‘Learn to Ride’ program of your choice.

ALBERTAEQUESTRIAN.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT

Erin Lundteigen

coaching@albertaequestrian.com or phone 403-253-4411, ext 3

START RIDING TODAY

MIKE KING

QUESTION: I am a clinician who travels a fair amount to conduct clinics away from my home location. How can I ensure I am covered completely when I conduct a clinic at someone else’ s facility? ANSWER: Clinicians are typically self employed contractors and as such have liability exposures that are unique. They can be held legally responsible for injuries or damages caused to a client / customer as evidenced by legal proceedings all across Canada. The courts have long ago determined that where a person holds themselves out as an “expert” and/or charges for services rendered, the contractor (the clinician in this case) can be held to a very high standard of conduct. The type of liability insurance needed to protect the clinician is defined as “Commercial General Liability” (CGL), which is different than the Personal Liability insurance provided with your membership in AEF. A CGL policy coverage recognizes that there is a commercial transaction that requires coverage (ie. the clinician offers their expertise and is paid for that knowledge to be imparted.) Coverage on a CGL policy for a travelling clinician can be designed to protect operations on a “worldwide” basis, thus eliminating any restriction of coverage to any one place or premises. (Remember, the exposure to the insurer is really about the operation of equine related instruction etc. and not the location). As a matter of context, personal liability insurance, such as the automatic coverage provided through membership in AEF, does not deal with commercial transactions or commercial exposures but rather, deals only with liability associated with the personal ownership, leasing borrowing etc. and use of horse(s). Capri Insurance offers a number of specialized insurance products to the horse community in Alberta, including options related to insurance for tack and trailers. For more information you are encouraged to contact Capri Insurance directly (see our ad on page 2). AB Mike King is an equine insurance specialist with Capri Insurance Services Ltd. and is responsible for the insurance programs that benefit the Alberta Equestrian Federation and its members. Do you have a question on insurance? “Ask the Insurance Guy”...and we will provide an answer in the next issue albertabits@albertaequestrian.com

Are you covered?

AEF MEMBERS AUTOMATICALLY RECEIVE $5,000,000 EXCESS PERSONAL LIABILITY • $30,000 ACCIDENTAL DEATH AND DISMEMBERMENT • $10,000 FOR TRANSPORTATION OF NON-OWNED HORSES • INSURANCE THAT COVERS YOU 24/7, WORLDWIDE I F YO U ’ R E A N A E F M E M B E R , W E ’ V E G OT YO U C O V E R E D. G E T YO U R M E M B E R S H I P TO DAY !

Alberta Equestrian Federation Phone: 403-253-4411 Toll Free: 1-877-463-6233 albertaequestrian.com Capri Insurance is the official insiurance provider for the AEF

26

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5


LEFT: Trish-Mrakawa coaches a student.

CHECKLIST

TO CONSIDER WHEN SHOPPING FOR A COACH: What are your qualifications? Are you certified? Can I see your Coaching certificate? How long have you been coaching? What area is your specialty? Can you provide athlete references? What is the student-teacher ratio in lessons? What are your fees for lessons?

WHY YOU SHOULD TRAIN WITH A

CERTIFIED INSTRUCTOR/

COACH Thinking about taking riding lessons? Have you done your homework in selecting a coach?

Teaching someone to ride is a complex job that requires a patient mindset, a specific level of skill and knowledge, as well as a certain amount of responsibility. Riding instructors / coaches should be capable of teaching certain skills required to safely and properly handle and ride your horse and to produce a well-rounded knowledgeable horse person in the making. They, too, should be capable of demonstrating these skills and setting a good example for those around them, acting in a professional and ethical manner at all times. They should continually strive to better the horse community by teaching safe practices, as set out in the national program. The Equine Canada (EC) coaching program was developed

with the following objectives: to offer an acceptable standard of developing coaching/instructing expertise; to provide a structure whereby coaches / instructors can enter and progress as they improve their teaching expertise; to ensure the integration of the National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP) into an overall strategy of coaching education; and to improve the level of performance and competence of Canadian equestrian coaches / instructors and their athletes. What does this mean? Having certification as an EC Instructor / Coach testifies to the coach / instructor’s professionalism and competence as a teacher in equestrianism. To initially obtain a certificate, candidates are evaluated at the highest national standard, and must provide evidence of riding ability, a cleared Police check, adherence to the Equine Canada code of conduct and ethics, and hold a current Standard First Aid / CPR certificate. EC certified Instructors / Coaches are professional and accountable, display conformance, are knowledgeable in teaching and coaching best practices as well as the Long Term Equestrian Development (LTED) Model, and are committed individuals to the sport. A coach or instructor who maintains their certification is a professional who is actively involved in the equestrian community and maintains currency through regular professional development and First Aid updating. OTHER THINGS TO CONSIDER: • Go out and watch your prospective coach teach a few of their regular lessons. Make sure that you like their teaching style and techniques. • Inspect the facility by going out a few times in advance to making a commitment. Make sure that the horses look well cared for and content, that the facility appears to be well kept, suitable to your needs and safe for all concerned. • Set up an assessment ride. This ride will allow you to better determine if the coach is suitable for you. • Interview some of the other boarders / students, to see how they enjoy the facility and coach. Make sure that you are well prepared and educated when you are seeking a new instructor / coach. The Equine Canada / NCCP coaching program is the only Canadian internationally recognized certification program for equestrians and includes recognition from Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI), International Group for Equestrian Qualifications (IGEQ), Coaches of Canada and the Canadian Olympic Committee. This program represents coaching excellence in the sport of equestrianism within Canada. Ride or drive with a certified Instructor / Coach today, and join us in celebrating Equestrian excellence! Visit albertaequestrian.com to find your certified instructor or coach today. AB A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5

27


n r a e l to t n a You w e a horse ? h to rid ve fun wit Ha g

h ridin

Englis

Western rid in

g

t nze vemen Broseem oeent or sh f Achie e of AchHiev Silver cate o Certifinscat ifi ! rt Horseshoe e Celatio io Congratu C rtific at ns! ul at at e ofCeAc rthi gr ifiev Con cate emoen e f Atchie ing th Co the ngr To: complet vedmen leting at Gol . comp ulations!Con el ssfully succe Forlev essfully te: oe : t livre à colorier.indd 1

gratulation

cc For su ze Horsesh Bron

To

Issued by:

Da level. To: Horseshoe Silver Horseshoe Date: To: For succes sfully comFo pler ting succes IssuedGold the by: Horseshoe Plal.tin sfully compl leve um Ho eting Date: rseshoe lev the el.

s!

Issued by:

by: Issued

t nze vemen Broseem oeent or sh f Achie e of AchHiev Silver cate o Certifinscat ifi ! rt Horseshoe e Celatio io Congratu C rtific at ns! ul at at e ofCAc erthi gr ifiev Con caem te oen t ch e fA ing th Co the ngr To: complet leting at Gieolvedment . comp ulations!Con el ssfully lly succe Forlev te: oe : ccessfu

10-12-22 14:18

For su ze Horsesh Bron

To

Platin

um

Horse

Issued by:

shoe

Date:

-23 12:15

11-10

11-10-23 12:15 certificats_

certificats

classique-A

_classiqu

nouveau.indd

certificats_classique-ANG_

ouveau.in

dd 3

ouvea u.indd

4

d 1

au.ind

nouve

ANG_

classique-

certificats_

e-ANG_n

2

NG_n

English riding

Including the 120 page colour manual and a colouring book.

$

gratulation

Da level. To: Horseshoe Silver Horseshoe Date: To: For succes sfully com Fo plerting Issued Gol succthe es by: d Horseshoe Plal.tin sfully compl leve um Ho rseshoeeting the Date: level.

s!

Issued by:

by: Issued

um

shoe

Date:

Click!

39

Platin

Horse

-23 12:23

11-10

11-10-23 12:24 certificats_

weste

certificats

_western-ANG.ind

d 3

rn-AN

G.indd

4

d 2

certificats_western-ANG.ind

G.indd

rn-AN

weste

certificats_

11-10-23

1

11-10-23

12:16

11-10

-23 12:16

or

To order:

Western riding

12:24

Including the 98 page colour manual and a note pad with tracing patterns OR a colouring book.

www.ptittrot.ca

403 253-4411 • 1 877 463-6233 info@albertaequestrian.com

11-10

-23 12:24

© info@editionsviceversa.ca

Livre à colorier Coloring book


AEF MEMBER ORGANIZATIONS as of

AUG 11, 2015

I F YO U A R E I N T E R E S T E D I N F I N D I N G O U T M O R E A B O U T O N E O F T H E S E C L U B S , O R J O I N I N G, M A K E S U R E YO U C O N TA C T T H E M ! www.4h.ab.ca Alberta 4-H Provincial Equine Advisory Committee www.albertadriving-acda.ca Alberta Carriage Driving Association www.albertadonkeyandmule.com Alberta Donkey and Mule Club www.albertadressage.com Alberta Dressage Association digbits.wix.com/aeas Alberta Equestrian Awareness Society www.vaultcanada.org/AEVA Alberta Equestrian Vaulting Association www.afha.ca Alberta Friesian Horse Association www.albertahorsetrials.com Alberta Horse Trials Association www.albertamorganhorseclub.com Alberta Morgan Horse Club www.albertamountedshooters.ca Alberta Mounted Shooters www.atra.ca Alberta Trail Riding Association www.walkinghorse.ca Alberta Walking Horse Association 403-747-2240 Alix Agricultural Society www.saddlebredsofalberta.com American Saddlebred Horse Association of Alberta www.appaloosa.ca Appaloosa Horse Club of Canada 403-762-2762 Banff Light Horse Association 780-372-2080 Bashaw Light Horse Club www.bearvalleyab.org Bear Valley Rescue 780-518-3329 Bezanson Agricultural Society 403-862-1591 Black Diamond English Riding Club www.blackdiamondpolo.com Black Diamond Polo Club 780-449-5600 Blackfoot Trail Riders bordercowboysmountedshooters.com Border Cowboys Mounted Shooters Association www.bvra.ca Bow Valley Riding Association www.calgaryarabian.com Calgary Arabian Horse Association www.ca-ada.com Calgary Area Alberta Dressage Association www.calgaryappaloosa.wildapricot.org Calgary Regional Appaloosa Club www.calgaryregionaltrailriders.com Calgary Regional Trail Riders 403-804-3277 Calgary Western Riders www.canadianhorsebreeders.com Canadian Horse Breeders Association Rocky Mountain District www.crtwh.ca Canadian Registry of the Tennessee Walking Horse www.c-s-h-a.org Canadian Sport Horse Association - AB Chapter www.facebook.com/CentralAlbertaAdultRidingClub Central Alberta Adult Riding Cooperative www.hoofbeats.org Central Alberta Special Equestrians Association 780-500-3599 Central Peace Horse Association www.cha-ahse.org Certified Horsemanship Association www.albertadressage.com Chinook Country/Alberta Dressage Association 780-685-3305 Cleardale Riders Club clearwaterhorseclub.com Clearwater Horse Club www.cochranehorsetrials.com Cochrane Horse Trials Committee www.cookinglakesaddleclub.ca Cooking Lake Saddle Club 780-852-8520 Cottonwood Corrals Association (Jasper) 315-854-5474 Davisburg Pony Club www.delacourhall.ca Delacour Agricultural Society & Community Club www.didsburyagsociety.org Didsbury Agricultural Society www.albertadressage.com Edmonton Area /Alberta Dressage Association www.electricstrides.ca Electric Strides Drill Team www.enduranceridersofalberta.com Endurance Riders of Alberta www.evergreenpark.ca Evergreen Park (Grande Prairie Agricultural & Exhibition Society) extremecowboyalberta.ca Extreme Cowboy Alberta Association www.facebook.com/familyfun.rodeoseries Family Fun Rodeo Series foothillstherapeuticriding.com Foothills Therapeutic Riding Association 403-936-5985 Fort Calgary Wheel & Runner Association www.foesa.org Friends of the Eastern Slopes Association www.funcountryriders.com Fun Country Riding Club of Strathmore www.gaitwayequine.ca Gaitway to Equine Experiences Foundation - Central Alberta 403-652-7391 Gladys Ridge Riding Club 403-626-3250 Glenwood Riding Association www.braggcreektrails.org Greater Bragg Creek Trails Association 780-835-1280 H.E.D.J.E. Society 780-903-3665 Hastings Lake Pleasure Horse Association www.heartshavenranch.ca Heart’s Haven Society www.haylakesriders.tripod.com Hay Lakes Riders www.highcountrycarriagedriving.org High Country Carriage Driving Club 403-931-3361 High Country Pony Club 403-380-7046 Hilltoppers Gymkhana Club www.albertahorseindustry.ca Horse Industry Association of Alberta www.jtrs.ca Irma’s Lil Rodeo Club 780-754-3321 Irricana Riding & Roping Club Association www.facebook.com/irricanaridingropingclub Journeys Therapeutic Riding Society www.jumpalberta.com Jump Alberta Society 403-782-6472 Lacombe Light Horse Association 403-328-2165 Lethbridge Therapeutic Riding Association www.littlebits.ca Little Bits Therapeutic Riding Association 403-556-6266 Meadow Creek Vaulting Club www.millarvillepolocrosse.com Millarville Polocrosse Club www.miniaturesinmotion.ca Miniatures in Motion Horse Club www.mountviewriding.com Mount View Special Riding Association 780-905-0718 Mounted Games Across Canada Alberta Association www.northerntrailsridingclub.org Northern Trails Riding Club www.openinggaits.ca Opening Gaits Therapeutic Riding Society of Calgary 403-574-2197 Over the Hill Trail Riders www.pards.ca Peace Area Riding For The Disabled Society thedrafthorseclub.com Peace Draft Horse Club www.peaceregiondressage.com Peace Region Alberta Dressage Association B E S U R E TO S U P P O RT O U R B U S I N E S S M E M B E R S !

www.p-standardbreds.org Performance Standardbreds Association www.polocrossecalgary.com Polocrosse Calgary ponokaridingandroping.com Ponoka Riding & Roping Association sites.google.com/site/prairiedustersmusicalrideteam Prairie Dusters Drill Team Society www.qhaa.com Quarter Horse Association of Alberta www.rainbowequitationsociety.ca Rainbow Equitation Society sites.google.com/site/ranahanpolocrosse Ranahan Polocrosse Club www.albertawesternstyledressage.com Red Deer & Area Western Style Dressage Association 780-674-5191 Ridgeview Riding Club rimbeyswsclub.ca Rimbey Sleigh, Wagon & Saddle Club www.rockymountaingymkhana.com Rocky Mountain Gymkhana Club www.rundleriders.com Rundle Riders Therapeutic Riding Association www.saddleseatcanada.com Saddle Seat Canada www.shortgrassridingclub.ca Shortgrass Riding Club 780-837-0092 Smoky River Gymkhana Club www.joust.ca Society of Tilt & Lance Cavalry 403-223-8661 South Country Team Penning Association www.southpeacehorseclub.ca South Peace Horse Show Association www.satra.ca Southern Alberta Trail Riders Association 403-258-3691 Springbank Equestrian Society 403-289-9066 Springbank Pony Club 403-728-3074 Spruce View Gymkhana Club www.steelescouts.ca Steele’s Scouts Commemorative Troop Association www.stonebridgedrivingclub.com Stone Bridge Carriage Driving Club www.saha.ab.ca Strathcona All-Breed Horse Association www.twhawc.com Tennessee Walking Horse Association Of Western Canada www.calgaryhuntclub.ca The Calgary Hunt Club www.thompsoncountryponyclub.org Thompson Country Pony Club www.trailriding.ab.ca Trail Riding Alberta Conference 780-829-3628 Traildusters Horse Club of Smith 403-843-6873 Tri-Country Riding Club www.triplerridingclub.shutterfly.com Triple R Riding Club www.truegritmountedshooters.com True Grit Cowboy Mounted Shooters Association 403-362-2581 Uplift Therapeutic Riding Association 780-685-3305 Valley Riders Saddle Club www.valleyviewagsociety.ca Valleyview & Districts Agricultural Society 780-675-2572 Western Canadian Wagon Train www.wildrosemountedshooters.com Wildrose Mounted Shooters www.fourthirteentra.com Will For Riding Foundation

BUSINESS MEMBERS Alberta Carriage Supply Alberta Road Services Calgary Stampede Canadian Natural Horsemanship Inc. Capri Insurance Services Ltd Creekside Equestrian Centre Digger’s Place Equanimity Edge Equine Massage Courses Equine Connection Inc. Equine Therapy School First Place Feeds LTD. Foothills Horse Transport Hairy Back Ranch Healing Soles Ltd. Higher Trails Equine Ltd Hi-Hog Farm & Ranch Equipment Ltd Horse Trekking Adventures The Horse Store Ironhill Equestrian Centre J. W. (Jim) Lawton Professional Corporation Julie’s Natural Hoofcare Lane Moore Hoof Care Courses Martin Deerline Midnight’s Trail Moonlight Stables Ltd Moose Hill Ranch Equestrian Centre Moose Mountain Horseback Adventures Olds College Continuing Education Outpost at Warden Rock Paramount Saddlery Precision Canada Radisson Hotel Edmonton South Reitsall Auhof Sandridge Stables Spirit Winds Horse Centre SSG Gloves Strathcona Ventures The Mane Event Equine Education & Trade Show The Visions West Studio Western Horse Review Westwood Warmbloods Whispers Equine Learning Ltd. Willow Grove Stables Inc.

www.albertacarriagesupply.net www.albertaroadservices.ca ag.calgarystampede.com www.canadiannaturalhorsemanship.com www.capri.ca/horse 403-556-6266 www.facebook.com/pages/Diggers-Place www.equinerehab.ca www.equineconnection.ca www.equinetherapyschool.com www.firstplacefeeds.com foothillshorsetransport.com www.hairybackranch.com www.healingsolesltd.com www.highertrails.org www.hi-hog.com www.facebook.com/pages/Horse-Trekking-Adventures www.facebook.com/theHorseStore www.ironhill.ca 403-933-3348 www.juliesnaturalhoofcare.com www.centralalbertabarefoot.com www.martindeerline.com www.midnightstrail.com www.moonlightstables.org www.moosehillranch.com www.packtrips.ca www.oldscollege.ca www.outpostatwardenrock.com www.paramountsaddlery.ca www.precisioncanada.ca www.radisson.com/albertaequestrian www.reitstall-auhof.at 780-922-7383 www.spiritwindshorsecentre.com www.ssgridinggloves.com www.strathconaventures.com www.maneeventexpo.com 403-242-6162 www.westernhorsereview.com www.facebook.com/westwoodwarmbloods www.whispersequine.com www.willowgrovestables.com

AO LB FA 0 1S 5 T H O S E L I S T E D I N B LU E P ROV I D E D I S C UE NRT T S AT B OI T A SE F| M EL MLB E2 R

29


MEMBER PICK Kim Cox aboard her dressage horse, Roderick. With her new prospect London, Cox hopes to ride at the FEI level in the future. Photo by Bridget Baskin

Coaching a Winning Partnership After a childhood of riding, Kim Cox is now inspiring the dream in her dressage students. BY PIPER WHELAN

Kim Cox has been hooked on riding since her childhood Sunday morning rides with her grandfather. After moving from Kansas City, Missouri, to Calgary, Alberta, with her family at the age of 10, Cox began lessons at St. George’s Stables, under the instruction of Joe Sellinger. She calls this a “magic time,” and soon became active in jumping, setting it aside when she began her university studies. It was in her adult years, however, that in returning to riding, she decided to give dressage a try. “I figured it was time to really learn how to ride,” she laughs. Cox spent her career as a physical education teacher in Calgary, and subsequently as a substitute teacher in the Foothills School Division, and had the opportunity to coach a number of sports. After retiring, she began pursuing her certification as a dressage competition coach specialist. Before a candidate can receive this certification, they need practical coaching experience. Cox coached at Black Diamond Land and Cattle Company, and then moved to a stable in Springbank, AB, where she led their riding academy for two years. After this, she spent almost a year focusing on her own riding development. Today, Cox coaches at Black Whiskey Ranch, a dressage facility at Priddis, working with six students. As she is also a

dressage judge, competitors looking to improve areas of their performance will consult her prior to a show. “You want to make your best presentation, of course, any time you show. So there are these little things that they’re doing that can impact their mark,” she explains. “It’s good to be able to point that out to them from a judge’s perspective, as well as a coach’s perspective.” Cox coaches part time, allowing time for her own riding. “I’ve got a young horse that I’m bringing along, hopefully. We all have plans to ride at certain levels, and my goal is to ride at the FEI level with this horse, and I think he’s got it.” Her involvement in the AEF began as a member of the original Alberta Light Horse Association. She appreciates the insurance that comes with AEF membership, and how it encompasses all equestrian sport. “I love the fact that it brings all the different disciplines of equestrian sport together. I think sometimes the horse community loses sight that we’re all here for the good of the animal. The horse comes first; it’s absolutely fundamental. “I believe strongly in the coaching standards that are set out through the AEF by Equine Canada and the Coaching Association of Canada,” says Cox. “There’s a lot to becoming a professional coach. It’s more than just teaching lessons. You’re working with two athletes. The equestrian disciplines are unique, because you’ve got a human athlete and an equine athlete, and to reach their maximum potential, they both have to be at the same place at the same time … The whole function as a coach is to bring the athlete and horse along together in a harmonious partnership.” In completing her certification, Cox would like to thank Erin Lundteigen, AEF’s coaching coordinator, for her assistance. Cox is grateful to InMotion Network, which provided her with a grant to offset the evaluation costs. “They support women in sport who want to become a coach or upgrade their coaching certification, and they are fabulous,” she says. Cox would also like to thank her friend and mentor Dr. Monika Scholder of the University of Calgary. “She’s one of my foundation people. She grounds me, and if I have any coaching concerns or problems, I can always take it to her.” AB

“It’s more than just teaching lessons. You’re working with two athletes.”

30

A L B E RT A B I T S | F A L L 2 0 1 5


Alberta Bits - Fall 2015  

The official magazine of the Alberta Equestrian Federation.

Alberta Bits - Fall 2015  

The official magazine of the Alberta Equestrian Federation.