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Fall 2012 - 9th Edition

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Kenai Peninsula College a great choice for rural Alaskan contents students’ college success

2 Table of Contents Articles 4 Success Story Kenai Peninsula College 6 Article - Joys of Sobriety 10 ANCSA Economic Impacts Alaska Native Entities

Directory & Resources 14 Alaska Native Regions 20 Alaska SBA 8A Firms 23 US Congressional Delegation 24 Federally Recognized Tribes - Alaska 26 Federally Recognized Tribes - Lower 48 29 Fairbanks - Bus Map 30 Anchorage - Bus Map 31 Category Index 30 Yellow Pages A-Z

C ONTA CT S Jim Cocallas Publisher 907-727-7049 publish@ak.net Account Managers 907-257-2670 Dave Navaro Michael Hernandez Diana Marquez Alice Lopez "first name"@cbgusa.com

SITES

CBG "Live" Database Online Directory

SUCCESS STORY - KPC

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New student dorms and Career and Tech Center set to open August 2013

students from what will driv courses each s private college offers academ undergraduate arts and associ courses that le offered by othe to other unive most four-year Wi in the most effi education pro help with class and online ma Center providin Re from across Al Career and Tec student housin house the pro electronic prog existing buildi paramedic tech

because the larger university campuses are too far away, too large and too confusing. KRC housing will allow these students to take an intermediate step before moving onto Leaving home to go to college is a huge milestone in a young person’s life a large university and city, if they so desire. regardless of where a student comes from. But if you’re from a small village Students who choose KRC’s residential housing will live in a rural, wooded off the road system in Alaska, it is a rite of passage to leave family, friends area surrounded by 309 acres of University of Alaska owned land that includes a nature and all that is familiar to go to college or get career training. To suddenly find trail and frontage on the Kenai River. The two-story, apartment style complex is located oneself in the middle of a city trying to navigate complex university processes across the road from the campus and the Kenai River. The $17.8 million project will and living in dorms in completely unfamiliar surroundings can be challenging feature suites that house four students with a common living area and kitchen facilities, and even traumatic. four private bedrooms and two bathrooms, each shared by two students. There will be commons areas for studying, laundry facilities, lounge, exercise room, outdoor activity ince its establishment almost 50 years ago, KPC, The Association of ANCSA Regional Corporation Presidents and CEOs welcomesfield and an inviting lobby with fireplace. 907-727-7049 a community campus of the University of Alaska the delegates to the 2005 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention. In addition to the kitchen in each unit, students will Anchorage, has provided a transitional environment for WELCOME! It is with great pleasure to present your 9th Edition Alaska Native Business have access to the on-campus Kenai River Café. Students will students new to college. This has proven true for countless & Resource Directory. We are honored and proud to serve our Alaskan, American Indian and Alaska also have the option of buying a meal plan at neighboring Native communities. students from business small towns and villages across the Kenai Our purpose is to inform, enlighten and connect you to great companiesKenai Riv Alaska Christian College, a 5-minute walk from the dorms and great ideas for your corporation, village, tribe or business. Peninsula and the state. But without residential housing for along a paved, lighted trail. There are also several restaurants students, KPC couldSince not accommodate students who could 2007 over 130,000 copies have been distributed across Alaska to rural and urbanBristol Ba within a 10-minute walk from the housing complex. communities. FREE circulation is getting expensive so we ask your support. Please take out aServices, not commute to college, unless they lived off campus. And the Brist KRC is the only community campus in the UA system personal subscription that remained challenging for students withouttotheirthe own Native Directory. WHY? To support our 2013 scholarship drive. It's justwas awa thatfihas anto onsiterecive student health clinic. Theby clinicmail providesSpring & Fall. $35 for the year, (2) two editions and you will be one of the rst a copy vehicles or even driver’s licenses. bid for K educational, preventive, diagnostic, and treatment services and bega As a result of a statewide proposition passed Visit www.cbgusa.com, click "Submit Mailing Info" Enter "Scholarship" on the form. for students and is staffed by an Advanced Nurse Practitioner. by voters in 2010, KPC’s Kenai River Campus in Soldotna is “It seems office care or outpatient services, including family currently constructingWhen a 96-bed dormitory. on campus youThe subscribe we will donate the Routine proceeds to the MEDIA SCHOLAR- is taking planning and immunizations, are available to students. SHIP program. Results student h housing facility will give students accustomed to small will be reported on this page in future editions. KPC will partner with the Kenaitze Indian Tribe to Alaska N communities an option to attend college in state instead and Alask ensure NativeArts Alaskan students new to the area understand raise $100,000 for Media Scholars! of leaving or trying to surviveHelp the transitionus to a large said KPC all the resources available. The tribe is constructing a 52,000 city in Alaska. Students living in these areas have limited Scale models of the Career and Tech s.f. Wellness Center, slated for completion in 2014, that will be MEDIA ARTS TODAY Center (foreground) and the Student SCHOLARS choices to attend college and pursueSUPPORT high-demand degree Housing complex across College Road. available to residents and commuter Alaska Native students. programs like those offered at KPC. Many potential college YES, We to subscribe! ____ $35 Annual (2) two editions. students end up rejecting higherwould education aslike an option By Suzie Kendrick, Kenai Peninsula College

6

JOYS OF SOBRIETY

SANCSA ECONOMIC IMPACTS

8

_____ $99.00 for 10 copies. _____ $150 for 20 copies. ____ 50 copies + ( $5 ea. ) Checks payable to: CBG USA Inc. PO Box 112955 Anchorage, AK 99511

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success story

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Kenai Peninsula College a great choice for rural Alaskan students’ college success

New student dorms and Career and Tech Center set to open August 2013 because the larger university campuses are too far away, too large and too confusing. KRC housing will allow these students to take an intermediate step before moving onto Leaving home to go to college is a huge milestone in a young person’s life a large university and city, if they so desire. regardless of where a student comes from. But if you’re from a small village Students who choose KRC’s residential housing will live in a rural, wooded off the road system in Alaska, it is a rite of passage to leave family, friends area surrounded by 309 acres of University of Alaska owned land that includes a nature and all that is familiar to go to college or get career training. To suddenly find trail and frontage on the Kenai River. The two-story, apartment style complex is located oneself in the middle of a city trying to navigate complex university processes across the road from the campus and the Kenai River. The $17.8 million project will and living in dorms in completely unfamiliar surroundings can be challenging feature suites that house four students with a common living area and kitchen facilities, and even traumatic. four private bedrooms and two bathrooms, each shared by two students. There will be commons areas for studying, laundry facilities, lounge, exercise room, outdoor activity ince its establishment almost 50 years ago, KPC, field and an inviting lobby with fireplace. a community campus of the University of Alaska In addition to the kitchen in each unit, students will Anchorage, has provided a transitional environment for have access to the on-campus Kenai River Café. Students will students new to college. This has proven true for countless also have the option of buying a meal plan at neighboring students from small towns and villages across the Kenai Alaska Christian College, a 5-minute walk from the dorms Peninsula and the state. But without residential housing for along a paved, lighted trail. There are also several restaurants students, KPC could not accommodate students who could within a 10-minute walk from the housing complex. not commute to college, unless they lived off campus. And KRC is the only community campus in the UA system that remained challenging for students without their own that has an onsite student health clinic. The clinic provides vehicles or even driver’s licenses. educational, preventive, diagnostic, and treatment services As a result of a statewide proposition passed for students and is staffed by an Advanced Nurse Practitioner. by voters in 2010, KPC’s Kenai River Campus in Soldotna is Routine office care or outpatient services, including family currently constructing a 96-bed dormitory. The on campus planning and immunizations, are available to students. housing facility will give students accustomed to small KPC will partner with the Kenaitze Indian Tribe to communities an option to attend college in state instead ensure Native Alaskan students new to the area understand of leaving or trying to survive the transition to a large all the resources available. The tribe is constructing a 52,000 city in Alaska. Students living in these areas have limited Scale models of the Career and Tech s.f. Wellness Center, slated for completion in 2014, that will be Center (foreground) and the Student choices to attend college and pursue high-demand degree Housing complex across College Road. available to residents and commuter Alaska Native students. programs like those offered at KPC. Many potential college students end up rejecting higher education as an option By Suzie Kendrick, Kenai Peninsula College

S

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5 As important as the addition of KPC’s residential housing facility is to students from rural Alaska, access to high quality, post-secondary education is what will drive students to attend KPC. Large enough to provide more than 200 courses each semester in more than 44 disciplines, KPC has the uniqueness of a private college and is small enough that students always feel important. KPC/UAA offers academic programs leading to occupational endorsement certificates and undergraduate certificates that can be obtained in one year or less and associate of arts and associate of applied science degrees can be earned in two years. KPC offers courses that lead to completion or near completion of several four-year degrees offered by other campuses of the University of Alaska. Students planning to transfer to other universities can complete coursework equivalent to the first two years for most four-year degrees while attending KPC. With an emphasis on student success, retention and degree completion in the most efficient time frame as possible, KPC has built a strong developmental education program administered through the Learning Center. Students needing help with classes will find supportive staff that provides free tutoring in all subjects and online math and writing labs. The campus library is adjacent to the Learning Center providing a wealth of reference materials and quiet study space. Requests for KPC’s high demand job programs, which attract strudents from across Alaska and the lower 48, continue to increase. The new $15.25 million Career and Technical Center, currently being constructed at KRC in tandem with the student housing, will allow for continued expansion of these programs. The CTC will house the process technology, industrial process instrumentation and computer electronic programs. The migration of these programs will free up space in the existing buildings for expansion of other high demand programs such as nursing, paramedic technology, welding, elementary education and art.

Kenai River Campus Student Housing

It is estimated that more than $1.4 billion leaves Alaska annually in non-resident salaries; students who earn degrees in high demand will get the jobs that will slow this trend. The CTC will enable Alaska industries to hire more Alaskans, trained in Alaska. Students from rural Alaska can attend KPC and live on campus for two years, graduate with high demand degrees that make them eligible for shift workers’ schedules (two weeks on, two weeks off) and then return to their home villages to live and commute to jobs on the Kenai River Campus welding student Floyd Armstrong is North Slope or Cook Inlet. Their salaries will happy to be attending college help sustain local economies where there at KPC. are limited employment opportunities. KPC has seen unprecedented growth during the last five years, including a dramatic increase in the number of Alaska Native students enrolling. Hopefully this success will intensify as more First Alaskans find their place at KPC, living in the new residential housing. KPC will begin accepting students’ applications for the housing facility April 1, 2013 for the fall 2013 semester. KPC’s Resident Life Student Handbook and Resident Life website will be available from the home page of the KPC website at www.kpc.alaska. edu. For more information, contact KPC Campus Services at the Kenai River Campus at 907-262-0330 or toll-free at 877-262-0330.

Architects rendering of the new Student Housing facility provided by Bettisworth North. Note the access to the existing campus across College Road via the sidewalk on the left.

Bristol Bay Environmental Remediation Services, LLC, a subsidiary company of the Bristol Bay Native Corporation, was awarded the general contractor bid for KPC’s student housing facility and began work in late June. “It seems appropriate that this company is taking the lead on this project. KPC student housing is being built by an Alaska Native corporation with rural and Alaska Native students in mind,” said KPC Director Gary J. Turner.

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article

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Joys of sobriety-led life featured in new video By McKibben Jackinsky

The broad smiles and sparkling eyes of elders and youth, images of dancers swaying to music and scenes of berries and salmon being harvested tell a powerful and joyous story of a sobriety-lived life in “Stand Up & Stay Alive,” a new video produced for Ahtna Incorporated by Paul Gray of Exploring Alaska. The message becomes more powerful compared to scenes of addiction-caused disasters: injured drivers being removed for wrecked automobiles, encounters with law enforcement, handcuffs snugly fit around young wrists, a young pregnant woman facing an uncertain future alone, grieving families standing by the graves of loved ones. The six-and-a-half minute video is available through Ahtna and can be viewed on YouTube at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQBF96yhDuA. The idea for the production came from Ken Johns, current board member and former president of Ahtna Inc., as he was driving to the funeral of a young Copper Center woman whose death was alcohol-related. As Johns knew all too well, it was not an isolated experience. According to information provided by the state of Alaska, between 2006-2008, alcohol-induced deaths in Alaska were approximately three times higher than the U.S. rate, and significantly higher for Alaska Natives than non-Natives. That statistic does Paul Gray on location at fish camp not include causes indirectly related to alcohol use, such as accidents and homicides. In 2010, Alaska ranked 13th in the nation for heavy drinking. “(Gray) said it was doable. I told him exactly what I wanted to “The song ‘Staying alive’ came on the Anchorage radio and I include in it and he put it together,” said Johns. Gray recalled Johns’ emphasis thought maybe I would try to use that song to put it in perspective,” said that the video “should be all about the positive things you can do in life to Johns. “‘Staying Alive’ is about positive things you can do, but the song also help you succeed and be a better person, but if you fall under the influence of says ‘going nowhere.’ There’s a lot of negativity in that.” alcohol, here’s some of the roadblocks you’ll probably encounter,” said Gray. Written by the BeeGees for the soundtrack of “Saturday Night Fever,” Cain pulled in the participation of Liana Charley-John, with the “Staying Alive” climbed to the top of the Billboard Hot 100 immediately after Ahtna Heritage Foundation in Glennallen. In turn, Charley-John involved its release in 1978, its popularity keeping it there for four weeks. The lyrics Amanda Maxin and the Ahtna Heritage Dancers. Charley-John also expanded meshed with the movie’s leading character, Tony Manero, played by John the project to include the rap song “Stand Up,” by Johns’ nephew, Samuel Travolta, but also carried a message that fit what Johns had in mind, especially Johns. the chorus: Whether you’re a brother/Or whether you’re a mother/You’re “(Johns) wanted the ‘Staying Alive’ version, and as we were working stayin’ alive, stayin’ alive. on it, we started to look at who our target audience was, young people. I just In addition, the song’s disco beat is an attention grabber, setting didn’t think they’d relate to that song. It’s disco and they don’t listen to that,” listeners’ toes tapping, heads bobbing and fingers snapping. Johns took said Charley John. his idea to Bruce Cain, Ahtna’s vice president of administration and finance, who put him in contact with videographer Paul Gray. Gray’s television show, “Exploring Alaska,” is seen weekly throughout the state, nation and beyond. He has fine-tuned the focus of his show to feature an Alaska Native 688206_03721 perspective.

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7 Cook Inlet Tribal Council stands for people, partnership, and potential. We are a tribal nonprofit organization helping Alaska Native and American Indian people residing in the Cook Inlet region of Southcentral Alaska reach their full potential.

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Instead, she saw a connection between the video project and the rap beat and unifying lyrics of “Stand Up:” There’s a lot of problems in this world/But anybody or anyone/It doesn’t matter who you are/You can have a solution to anything/It’s up to you to let it out/ Let’s not point fingers but put our heads together/Everybody stand up with your faith. The song was born out of Samuel Johns’ personal struggle with alcohol. “It’s is pretty much about all the problems that were going on in m life, said the 27-year-old musician who had been sober two years when he started writing the piece. “Most of my lyrics are against alcohol.” When Gray was asked how difficult it would be to switch songs, he offered an even better solution: one video, two songs. Gray drew inspiration for the video from his Baha’I faith which forbids the use of drugs or alcohol unless there is a medical benefit.

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economic impacts

ANCSA REGIONAL ASSOCIATION The ANCSA Regional Association exists to promote and foster the continued growth and economic strength of the Alaska Native Regional Corporations on behalf of their shareholders. The ANCSA Regional Association board of directors includes one member from each of the 13 Alaska Native Regional Corporations. These members represent the highest level of each corporation’s management. Also serving on the board is the President of the Alaska Federation of Natives. The mission of the Association is to promote and maintain the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, and economic enterprise through cooperative efforts and advocacy; and to foster the continued growth and economic strength of the Alaska Native Regional Corporations on behalf of their shareholders. Among the goals are: Coordinating efforts on Gov't, legislative, and regulatory issues -- Enhancing ANCs ability to develop resources that are subject to ANCSA Section 7(i) -- Promoting joint business ventures among ANCs -- Informing the general public about ANCs -- maximizing shareholder employment among ANCs.

ANCSA Regional Association P.O. Box 240766 Anchorage, AK 99524 Tel: 339-6052

The Association of ANCSA Regional Corporation Presidents and CEOs welcomes

• Total employment worldwide rose by 15 percent, from 30,929 to 35,430. 'TRANSFORMATIONS' - OVERVIEW OF THE ECONOMIC IMPACTS OF the delegates to the 2005 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention. ALASKA NATIVE REGIONAL AND VILLAGE CORPORATIONS ANCSA corporations constitute the largest component of Alaska’s private sector economy that is controlled by Alaskans. Key indicators of the large and growing economic impact of the ANCSA regional corporations include the following: • Revenues for the combined ANCSA regional corporations in 2008 totaled $6.89 billion, an increase of 17 percent from the 2007 total of $5.87 billion. • Total corporate assets rose by five percent, from $4.39 to $4.61 billion.

• Total dividends payments rose by 39 percent, from $125 million to $171 million.

These statistics under report the total economic impact of ANCSA corporations because they only include data from the 12 regional corporations and do not include data from the nearly 170 village corporations.

Historic Context The passage of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) in 1971 marked a radical shift in the way the United States of America dealt with the indigenous people of North America. For almost 200 years, the relationship between the federal government and Native Americans had been based primarily on treaties. ANCSA marked an entirely different approach. Through ANCSA, the federal government settled the aboriginal claim to land and established the corporations that have contributed very significantly to the preservation and renaissance of Alaska Native societies and cultures. ANCSA established an unprecedented level of self-determination that has become the worldwide benchmark for indigenous people who aspire to control their own destinies. ANCSA has provided Native people with considerable economic clout. Its passage also marked a point in history at which the opportunities available to Alaska Native individuals began to rise precipitously. Prior to the passage of ANCSA in 1971, most Alaska Native people had very limited economic prospects. Jobs were scarce, educational opportunities were limited, health care was often inaccessible, public services were sparse, and racial discrimination was common. Nearly 40 years after the passage of ANCSA,Alaska Native people have become leaders in Alaska, not only in business but also in society, government, the arts, and virtually all aspects of community life. A landmark piece of legislation that was originally envisioned as a relatively narrow economic development initiative has transformed the face of modern Alaska. The essential structure of ANCSA provided that in return for relinquishing claims to nearly all of Alaska’s 375 million acres, Alaska Native people received fee simple title to 44 million acres, plus $962.5 million in cash. This was payment for Alaska Native lands that were lost and was used for seed capital for future economic investments. The cash was paid over 11 years with half coming from the federal government and half from the state government. The recipients of this payment of land and cash were not Alaska Native individuals or tribal organizations, but rather for- profit corporations incorporated under Alaska’s corporate code. All individuals who could show that they were at least one-fourth Alaska Native were granted stock in these

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corporations. These shareholders were granted stock both in one of the 13 regional corporations and also in one of more than approximately 200 village corporations.Approximately 80,000 individuals were originally enrolled as shareholders. There are approximately 100,000 shareholders today.

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ANCSA Village Corporations In addition to the 13 regional corporations originally created by ANCSA, more than 200 village corporations were also formed. Each of these village corporations is associated with a distinct region under ANCSA, but they are legally separate entities. The precise relationships between regional and village corporations are complex, but they often have overlapping shareholders. Over the years, village corporations have achieved varying stages of development, with some operating worldwide and some primarily in their own community. It is estimated that 169 village corporations are currently active, due to both mergers and discontinued operations.

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economic impacts

The village corporations have organized the Alaska Native Village CEO Association. Information about this organization can be found at anvca.biz.

Financial Performance Despite this challenging environment, Alaska Native corporations fared well. This was due in large part to the substantial diversity of operations, with investments in government contracting, resource development and a wide variety of other activities. In 2008, revenues for the 12 ANCSA regional corporations grew to $6.9 billion, a 17.5 percent increase over prior year revenues of $5.9 billion. Net profit for the group fell, however, to $260 million from 2007 levels of $474 million. This decrease in net profit was primarily attributable to investment portfolio losses.A significant portion of these profits was paid out to shareholders in the form of dividends. 2008 dividends totaled $171 million, up from 2007 dividends of $125 million. This dividend payout ratio of 66 percent in 2008 evidences ANCSA regional corporations’ strong commitment to their shareholders despite economic uncertainty.

Jobs The impact on the workforce of ANCSA corporations is often overlooked; however, 35,430 jobs worldwide were attributed to the business activities of the 12 regional ANCSA corporations in 2008. These jobs ranged from entry-level positions to executive-level positions. Based on $1.68 billion in total worldwide payroll, the 12 regional corporations provided average compensation of $47,000 per employee. The job growth from 2005 through 2008 amounted to 16 percent or the creation of nearly 5,000 jobs worldwide. Of these jobs, 13,848 were in Alaska, often associated with corporate headquarters operations or resource development. In Alaska, a total of $774 million in payroll was paid in 2008 at an average of nearly $56,000 per employee. These jobs are an essential addition to the Alaska

economy, representing a significant portion of private sector employment. ANCSA corporations are also an important source of employment for the Alaska Native community. In 2008, the 12 regional corporations employed 3,577 Alaska Native people, or more than 10 percent of their total employment basewasAlaskaNative.Furthermore,ANCSAcorporations are important employers of minorities, with 11,278 minority employees worldwide in 2008, or nearly 32 percent of their total workforce.

Charitable Contributions ANCSA corporations are also good neighbors and strong partners in their communities. In 2008, charitable contributions amounted to $24.3 million, more than nine percent of net profits. From 2005 through 2008, the 12 regional corporations made $70.5 million in charitable contributions to a wide variety of non-profits and community organizations. One of the organizations that benefited from charitable contributions made by Alaska Native corporations includes the Alaskan Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP) at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). Dr. Herb Ilisaurri Schroeder is the founder and executive director of ANSEP and a professor of engineering. In 1995, as an associate professor of engineering, Dr. Schroeder was dismayed that there were only a handful of Alaska Native engineering students in a state where a significant portion is Alaska Native. He decided to design and launch ANSEP, an academic learning community within UAA. UAA has graduated 149 Alaska Native scientists and engineers since 2002.According to Dr. Schroeder,ANSEP was created to effect a systemic change in the hiring patterns of indigenous people in the fields of science, technology, engineering & mathematics. ANSEP worked with approximately 700 Alaska Native middle school, high school & university students during the 2009-2010 academic year. Nearly 250 of these students are enrolled in BS degree programs in science & engineering at the University of Alaska.

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11 Subsistence Hunting and Fishing Rights ANSEP receives generous support from Cook Inlet Region, Incorporated, & Arctic Slope Regional Corporation who, along with other organizations, endowed an ANSEP Faculty Chair for the program with a $4.4 million initial endowment. The chair ensures that there will be a faculty advocate for Native science & engineering students on the campus in perpetuity. NANA Regional Corporation has also been a long-term major sponsor.ANSEP is making a positive impact on the lives of the students, their families, their communities, the state & within the ANSEP partner organizations that Will endure for generations.

Education Advocacy Advances in educational achievement since 1970 have contributed significantly to a reduction in poverty among Alaska Native people. Significant statistics include the following: • The proportion of Alaska Natives who have not attended high school has dropped from 79 percent to 18 percent. • The proportion of high school graduates has increased from 14 percent to 46 percent. • The proportion of Alaska Native students who have graduated from a four-year college has increased from one percent to eight percent. ANCSA corporations have been advocates for both secondary and post-secondary education. They have heavily promoted post-secondary education through scholarship programs and internship program initiatives for college students. They also have been actively involved in supporting innovative approaches to education such as the Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program (ANSEP) at the University of Alaska Anchorage.

The Unmet Needs of Alaska Natives: The Continuing Advocacy Role of ANCSA Corporations The corporations that are members of the ANCSA Regional Association typically have mission statements that explicitly articulate the goal of working for the economic and social well-being of their shareholders, a rare goal in corporate America. ANCSA corporations were not created to resolve all the social challenges confronting Alaska Native people. However, they choose to address these issues because it is part of their corporate missions. ANCSA corporations have worked to advance shareholder social well-being by making generous corporate contributions and also by taking an advocacy role on policy issues. They work closely with tribal and non-profit organizations in advancement of goals. These goals relate to the issues of subsistence hunting and fishing rights, education, community development, health care, housing, cultural education and family issues.

Subsistence hunting and fishing have been the economic cornerstone of Alaska Native communities for more than ten thousand years. In most rural Alaskan communities, these activities are still critically important today. Despite the economic advances of Alaska Native people since 1970, life in the villages is still challenging. The cost of living in villages is extremely high, with heating oil often costing more than $7.00 per gallon. Basic grocery commodities are similarly expensive. In addition, there are often few sources of cash employment in villages. Thus, traditional hunting and fishing activities provide the nutritional safety net for village people. In 1985, the Alaska Supreme Court overturned a state of Alaska statute that brought Alaska into full compliance with the subsistence title of ANILCA. Since that time, there have been different resource management regimes on federal land and on state lands. This split management regime is awkward, as fish and wildlife freely travel across different jurisdictions. Left unresolved, this split management will significantly compromise the subsistence rights of Alaska Natives and other rural residents. Secretary of the Interior, Ken Salazar, initiated a review of the federal subsistence management program in Alaska in late 2009. ANCSA corporations, working with other Alaska Native advocacy groups, redoubled their efforts to promote a management regime that truly delivers preference to rural residents.

Social Impact of ANCSA: Upward Mobility Alaska is a radically different place today than it was in 1971. A significant amount of the transformation in Alaska society can be attributed to ANCSA. Although ANCSA has positively impacted all Alaskans, the benefits of ANCSA have been especially significant for Alaska Native people. The University of Alaska has documented the statistical details of the social transformation of Alaska Natives since 1970. Continued on page 13

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13 Continued from page 11 Significant social changes between 1970 and 2007 include the following: • Inflation-adjusted household income rose by 50 percent, from $28,516 to $42,703. • The proportion of Alaska Natives living below the poverty line dropped from 47 percent to 22 percent. • The proportion of Alaska Natives with incomes at 200 percent of the poverty level or greater rose from 29 percent to 54 percent. • The proportion of Alaska Native households without complete plumbing dropped from 51 percent to 13 percent. Certainly not all of the advances made can be attributed to ANCSA. However, the upward social mobility of Alaska Native people has definitely been facilitated by dividends, jobs and scholarships made available through ANCSA corporations. One of the most dramatic sociological impacts of ANCSA has been the emergence of an influential new class of young Alaska Native professionals, working in all sectors of the Alaska economy. Due in part to ANCSA, they have obtained the education and work experiences necessary to be successful in today’s competitive professional environment. 'Transformations' - Editorial content is published with permission from the ANCSA Regional Association taken from their Annual Report titled 'Transformations'. Many thanks to Cindy Allred for coordinating. You may contact the ANCSA

Continued from page 7 “If you want to accomplish something, you need your full capacity and alcohol just takes that away,” said Gray. “To see other people see the benefit of living without alcohol is a powerful manifestation of people’s freewill to choose to be their best… That’s what made me thrilled to be part of this.” Just released, the video is already having an impact. “We did a premiere a couple of weeks ago in Anchorage and the crowd was really impressed with it. We got a lot of good feedback,” said Charley–John. “Kids are going to see what we talked about as we developed it, the good times you have in your life versus the negative, the sorrowful grief, the hurtful things you bring in when you bring alcohol into your life.” Gray envisions the video being used to show “how people can be happy, successful and achieve their potential by just avoiding some of the things in life that can pull you down.” For Ken Johns, the video is exactly what he first imagined, including the scene of smiling youngsters walking down a school hallway with “Staying Alive” playing in the background. “It starts with a positive,” he said. “They look like they’re having fun.” To view the video, visit YouTube at: www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQBF96yhDuA. Ahtna Inc. can be contacted in Anchorage at (907) 868-8250 or in Glennallen at 822-3476. For more information on Paul Gray and Exploring Alaska, visit www.exploringalaska.com.

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2012 Fall Alaska Native Dir Section 1 Magazine 9th Ed.