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2019 ANNUAL REPORT

HEALTHIER. SMARTER. STRONGER.


The renovation of the Cammack Building in downtown Burlington was completed in 2018. The building is home to Impact Alamance’s offices as well as offices for other nonprofits. It also features meeting space and conference facilities available for use by community organizations.

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HEALTHIER, SMARTER, STRONGER


As the vision for Impact Alamance coalesced in 2014 and 2015, all of us involved in it became aware of a critical insight: Individuals, families and communities that are more educated are also healthier. We’ve committed to strengthening every facet of our educational system, funding programs that support academic preparation for pre-k children as well as students preparing for careers in our high schools and community colleges. One of our biggest investments has been Alamance Achieves, a collaborative, community-wide initiative that will measurably improve educational outcomes for all Alamance County students. Finally, we recognized then — and believe even more strongly now — that health care and education by themselves aren’t enough to create thriving communities. A robust grid of people and resources — nonprofit organizations and local government agencies, energetic volunteers and engaged citizens — are vital to the long-term success of our community. That’s why Impact Alamance has funded initiatives like the Leadership Institute for leaders of nonprofit organizations and community agencies. Though Impact Alamance has achieved a lot during its first five years, the foundation could not have achieved anything without the collaboration and creative energy of hundreds of people in our community. Thank you for your essential contribution to these efforts.

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Our board has always held a holistic vision of what it means to help Alamance County fulfill its potential of being a great place to live, work and raise a family. Given our hospital roots, health care and healthy living has always been a top priority. To that end we’ve worked to make fresh, healthy food more available through farmers markets, helped build and expand parks and recreational facilities, purchased equipment for clinics that that serve residents who otherwise would lack access, and more.

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We could not have predicted in 2015 everything that was going to happen in the next five years. However, we had hopes that Impact Alamance would provide a vision to improve our community, a forum for collaboration, and funds to start and grow important initiatives.

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With this 2019 report to the community, we not only celebrate another year of accomplishment, but we also document five years of impact. Impact Alamance was formed in 2015 with an endowment created when Alamance Regional Medical Center became a part of Cone Health.

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CONTENTS How We Work.....................................................2 New Words, Same Focus .............................3 2019 by the Numbers ....................................4 2015-2019 by the Numbers ........................5 Healthier...........................................................6-9 Smarter ........................................................ 10-13 Stronger ...................................................... 14-17 Community Voices ................................ 18-19 Our Partners .................................................... 20 Leadership......................................................... 21 Mapping the Impact ................ Back cover

Tracey Grayzer, President and F.D. Hornaday, Board Chair CONTENTS

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HOW WE WORK When Impact Alamance was created more than five years ago, we knew we would be funding initiatives that matched our strategic goals. But we wanted to do more than just provide financial support. We wanted to strengthen and expand the grid of resources that make Alamance County a great place to live, build a career and raise a family. From our first day, Impact Alamance has sought to bring together nonprofits, government agencies and residents to improve our community in significant and lasting ways. Our approach has been to catalyze change in ways that no single organization, no matter its funding, could do by itself. Connecting organizations, people and communities multiplies the impact of any individual effort.

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First, we seek to partner with others whenever possible. Sometimes this allows us to leverage more resources toward certain community goals, such as with the matching funds we provided to local governments to build and improve local parks and recreation facilities. Other times, partnerships allow us to drive smarter, more effective programs that yield measurable results, such as through our support to grow the existing Dolly Parton Library program. Second, we devote the bulk of our resources to projects that strengthen the grid of local resources that benefit all of us. That means that even after the program, and its funding, is over, the people and agencies involved have greater capacity to support children, families and organizations throughout the community. And third, we’ve made significant efforts to seed future community improvements by training new groups of leaders, such as teachers and nonprofit leaders. Effective leaders use their energy, influence and creativity to make Alamance County healthier, smarter, stronger.

HOW WE WORK

Based on what we’ve heard from partners, we believe the first five years of our efforts have created lasting, positive impact on Alamance County. During the next five years, we plan — with your help — to do even more.


NEW WORDS, SAME FOCUS This year we’ve adopted new language to better communicate to our stakeholders — including local leaders, grant recipients and the community at large — what Impact Alamance is focused on and how we can make a difference as we work with partners across Alamance County. Since our formation, Impact Alamance has been focused on three areas: healthy kids, healthy communities and supporting local organizations. Our mission and strategy remain the same today. However, it was sometimes difficult to understand where “healthy kids” end and “healthy communities” begin. This year we’ve begun to use new language: Healthier, Smarter, Stronger. These terms help us focus every dollar we invest. We can ask “How does this make Alamance County healthier, smarter or stronger?” Those three words have been our tagline since the start. Now, we’re moving those ideas to the center.

SO, WHAT DO THESE TERMS MEAN FOR ALAMANCE COUNTY?

HEALTHIER

SMARTER

STRONGER

Healthier means healthier physically, mentally and emotionally. It means not only being free of disease, but also being physically, mentally and emotionally ready to tackle whatever challenges we face — a kindergartener reading their first book, a high schooler planning for postsecondary education, a parent or grandparent nurturing the next generation, or a community leader helping Alamance County advance.

Smarter means more knowledgeable and more capable of taking on the challenges we face in the 21st century. For many of our employers, that means competing in a dynamic, fast-paced global economy. For our schools, it means preparing students to enter the world of work. For our local government agencies, nonprofits and individual leaders, it means knowing how to solve problems and maximize positive impact.

Stronger refers to the fact that we’re better, more capable and more resilient together than we are alone. Our community is more than a place or a group of people. Our community is a complex grid of interrelated individuals, businesses, nonprofits, churches, government agencies, civic clubs, teams and neighborhoods. When those relationships are stronger, when we know more about one another, when we’re better at collaborating and when we share the same overarching values and purpose, we are stronger.

It means not only our individual health, but also the capacity of our community to protect and enhance our collective wellbeing.

We’re humbled by the many partners — nonprofits, government agencies and individuals — who have joined us in the last five years to help make Alamance County healthier, smarter and stronger. We look forward to continuing that journey with you. HEALTHIER, SMARTER, STRONGER

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Investments Made

Agencies Funded

2019 BY THE NUMBERS

Total Invested

Contributions

Community Health Fund

Response to Community Needs

Healthy Community

Healthy Kids

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2019 BY THE NUMBERS

State and Federal Funds Leveraged Through Grant Writing Assistance

85 40 $ 1,895,104 $ 64,800 $ 163,950 $ 57,865 $ 870,818 $ 737,670 $ 300,000


363 52 $ 11,102,266 $ 204,753 $ 1,310,390 $ 105,497 $ 4,432,595 $ 5,049,031 $ 4,300,000

Investments Made

Agencies Funded

Total Invested

Contributions

Community Health Fund

2015-19 BY THE NUMBERS

Response to Community Needs

Healthy Community

Healthy Kids State and Federal Funds Leveraged Through Grant Writing Assistance

2015-2019 BY THE NUMBERS

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HEALTHIER 2019 During 2019, Impact Alamance continued to invest in programs and projects that increase opportunities for community residents to be fit and healthy.

Downtown to Elon Greenway Impact Alamance invested $300,000, the majority of the project’s funding, as part of a multi-agency plan to construct a pedestrian and bicyclist friendly greenway that runs from Elon to downtown Burlington. The city of Burlington, town of Elon, Elon University and LabCorp are also key partners in this project. The greenway creates a path — a mix of sidewalks, newly constructed pedestrian-and-cyclist paths, bike lanes on quiet residential streets and safety improvements at crossings. The 3.6-mile route allows people to travel from Elon University to downtown Burlington. The greenway serves multiple purposes. It provides safer transportation through the Elon-Burlington corridor that can be used by people without cars; creates a new recreational amenity; makes it easier for people to walk, jog and cycle through Burlington and Elon; and connects the university campus with downtown Burlington’s shops, restaurants and other businesses.

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Harmony Park in Elon The town of Elon wanted to enhance the recreational opportunities available through its parks and provide a unique, interactive feature that could serve families from across the county. The town’s Recreation and Parks Department proposed creating a musical playground at Lawrence Slade Park in central Elon. The park, which features a walking track, basketball courts and other facilities, already attracts some 10,000 visitors per year — including Elon University students and families. The musical playground would create a unique attraction that can’t be found anywhere else in Alamance County, drawing more families to the park. Impact Alamance funded a $25,000 grant to purchase and install several colorful instruments and mallets. The instruments are durable and low maintenance, constructed from aluminum, steel and fiberglass. They can be played individually or together as a group. The Recreation and Parks Department also plans to develop programming around the musical playground to further amplify the value the it brings to the community.

Tobacco Free Parks/City of Burlington The Alamance Wellness Collaborative, led by Impact Alamance, had successfully worked with the Burlington City Council to adopt a “Health in All Policies” resolution in 2018, which encouraged city government to view its activities and actions through a health and wellness lens.

A University of Southern California study published in 2016 found that musical experiences can accelerate brain development, especially language acquisition and reading skills. It also helps children learn sounds and improves their motor coordination.

A group of stakeholders, including Impact Alamance, city staff and the Alamance County Health Department, developed a tobacco-free policy for Burlington parks. The group also gathered a giant jar of cigarette litter from area parks and collected letters of support.

The Burlington Recreation and Parks Commission decided to put that perspective to work.

In January 2019, after hearing from 10 citizens who spoke in favor of the new policy and ordinance, the Burlington City Council adopted the tobacco-free policy for all city park properties.

The City of Burlington’s 25-plus parks and recreation facilities have had a smoke-free policy for children’s areas since 2012, but the ordinance was not always followed and tobacco was often still used during adult sporting events, on greenways and in the parking lots. Cigarette litter was also a problem.

“The new ordinance has been received positively by the community,” says Tony Laws, director of Burlington Recreation and Parks. “There have been a few complaints of course, but they have been few and far between. This ordinance depends on voluntary compliance and that is working. We are happy to have our parks system become a healthier place to be and more inviting for all.” HEALTHIER 2019

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HEALTHIER 5 YEARS Burlington Splash Park When we launched Impact Alamance, we knew it was important to have a noticeable impact immediately — one that would make a statement about our core values and areas of focus. That’s why our first project was the Burlington Splash Park. Centrally located in downtown Burlington, the splash park provides families from across the community — especially children — a fun way to stay active during our hot summers. It is understandably tempting, and easy, to stay inside (and likely glued to a screen) during the hot summer months. But we know those behaviors aren’t healthy, and we know many families wanted a better alternative. We partnered with a like-minded organization — the Burlington Recreation and Parks Department — to match city funding for the Splash Park, putting our philosophy of amplifying existing local resources into action. The result? A popular new recreational activity that has given thousands of children and families countless hours of fun and healthy outdoor activity. Splash parks have also been proven to help children, especially children of color, who haven’t been introduced to water play at pools or other recreational facilities.

Since the Splash Park opened in May 2016, an estimated 58,000 people have enjoyed running, splashing and playing there.

Graham Regional & Saxapahaw Island Parks Parks are critical nodes in the grid of resources that maintain health and wellbeing in a community. They are a place for adults to exercise, children to play and teams to practice and compete. They also provide a resource that makes Alamance County more attractive to new residents and young people who are considering whether they’ll stay here for their careers. Impact Alamance has contributed $350,000 in funding to help bring two new parks to areas of the county that previously had been underserved. 8

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The first phase of Graham Regional Park, which opened in 2017, included a youth challenge course, a zip line, playground equipment, a mixed-use trail and more. Long-term plans call for sports fields and additional facilities, as the park will grow to 118 acres. The Saxapahaw Island Park, an Alamance County Recreation and Parks Department facility, brings to life one of our natural treasures — an island in the Haw River near where it flows through the community of Saxapahaw. The park includes a hiking trail and the county’s first nature-based play areas.

Imaginative play is an essential activity to build healthy brains. The Saxapahaw Island park features a giant fish play structure that includes multi-level platforms and climbing holes to spark children’s creative potential.

Wellness Collaborative

THESE POLICIES INCLUDE:

When we launched Impact Alamance, we knew that no matter how much money we had, our most important results would arise from our ability to bring people together and foster collaborations across the community.

Opening all ABSS elementary school playgrounds and walking tracks for public use when the schools are closed.

The Wellness Collaborative is an example of that philosophy. The collaborative brings together stakeholders from across the community, including partners in local government, education, health care, the private sector and other nonprofits. Working together, the collaborative identifies opportunities to improve the health of the community. This can include improvements to physical infrastructure, such as new parks and walking trails, and new policies that create a healthier environment for all. Since 2015, the Wellness Collaborative has worked with local governments and other stakeholders to pass 10 significant policies to improve the health and wellbeing of our community.

Implementing 100% tobacco free policies in all Burlington parks, the Green Level park, all Graham city property and the ACC campus Banning smoking on Mebane city property and in Mebane business district streets and sidewalks. Enacting a complete streets ordinance in Mebane. Passing “health in all policies” resolutions in Burlington and Elon.

HEALTHIER 5 YEARS

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SMARTER 2019 ABSS Summer Symposium For three days in July, 515 ABSS teachers gathered to learn new strategies to engage students more deeply, create nurturing classrooms and help students master their academic subjects. The Summer Symposium was funded by a $40,000 Impact Alamance grant. It brought together teams from each of the district’s 36 schools. The goal was to give them guidance on ways to better align school improvement planning, the North Carolina Standards and evidence-based teaching practices. It was designed to strengthen the scaffolding of professional skills that support teachers as they manage their classrooms, plan lessons and instruct students. “You know how teachers sometimes get another new initiative and then the initiative’s gone and you do another one and you get sort of jaded about that kind of stuff? That’s not what this is. It’s not an initiative,” Western Alamance High School math teacher Denise Wall told The Times-News. “It’s educating us on how we should structure our classrooms to meet the needs of these individual kids because we are the ultimate melting pot. We’ve got kids from everywhere at all levels and we have to teach them all.” Skillful teachers braid together the strengths and interests a child brings to the classroom with the new concepts and skills they must learn at that grade level, strengthening academic skills and preparing students for future learning and careers. Dr. Bruce Benson, ABSS superintendent, has used symposiums like this in other districts to help teachers learn how to better instruct students.The goal is to have all ABSS teachers go through the ABSS Summer Symposium over the next 2-3 years. 10

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Impact Alamance funding helped bring in an inspiring keynote speaker, veteran educator John Antonetti, who helped drive home the value of individualized lessons for students.


Alamance Achieves Engages with Community for Kindergarten Readiness Alamance Achieves, a collaboration network that focuses on strengthening the community’s school-to-career pathways, deepened its engagement work in 2019, focusing especially on kindergarten readiness. In the winter, Alamance Achieves launched the Early Development Instrument (EDI), which provides a snapshot of the developmental health of incoming kindergarteners across five domains: physical health and wellbeing; social competence; emotional maturity; language and cognitive development; communication skills and general knowledge. In the spring, Alamance Achieves partnered with ABSS to launch Ready Freddy, an evidence-based program that supports children’s transition to kindergarten. Up to half of all kindergarteners struggle with the transition to school, and children from low-income families are particularly vulnerable. Ready Freddy involves free parent-child workshops and kindergarten camps. Children who participated in these programs scored higher, on average, than

their peers on the ABSS Kindergarten Screener, which assesses academic, social, emotional and motor skill readiness. Parents of these children also reported feeling more confident supporting their child’s transition to school and incorporating early learning activities at home. In fall 2019, Alamance Achieves also conducted four focus groups with 20 families who have children up to 8 years old. The goal was to better understand how community members understood “kindergarten readiness” and what community resources they rely on. The results were shared with the Alamance Achieves’ Kindergarten Readiness Network and community partners.

Eastlawn Nurtures Students, Grows Community with Garden Through their participation in the Teacher Leadership Academy, Eastlawn Elementary School teachers Sarah Waddell and J’Taime Lyons learned about agriculture’s role in the North Carolina economy, the importance of fruits and vegetables for health, and the impact community gardens can make. They applied for a $20,000 Teacher Leadership Creativity Grant in 2016 to create a garden at the school. The plan was to use the garden as an outdoor classroom and also as a way to engage the community. It started as three planting boxes, but has since grown to 32 raised beds with an irrigation system and a greenhouse. It has also blossomed into something much more than just a place to grow plants. Teachers at all grade levels have integrated the garden into their lessons. Students have sold produce they’ve grown at local farmer’s markets. An Elon University class is now taught at the school. And students are learning valuable life lessons, such as the power of delayed gratification — putting in months of work to tend crops before seeing (and sometimes eating) the fruits of their labor. SMARTER 2019

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SMARTER 5 YEARS Dolly Parton Imagination Library The first five years of a child’s life are critical for developing pre-literacy skills; children with these skills, which are learned through exposure to language and reading, are more likely to be academically successful in kindergarten and beyond.

Now, more than 5,700 children are enrolled, representing 64% of eligible children.

Children living in poverty — a group that includes more than a third of Alamance County families — tend to be exposed to 30 million fewer words than their peers by the time they enter kindergarten. That explains in part why 58% of Alamance County children scored below 3rd grade reading standards.

“Parents are pleased with the variety of books received — titles they might not have chosen themselves,” says Carrie Theall, executive director of Alamance Partnership for Children. “These positive comments let us know how much the books are appreciated and utilized by the families.”

The Dolly Parton Imagination Library provides children a free, developmentally appropriate book each month from birth through age five. The Alamance Partnership for Children began serving families in seven Title I schools in 2006. With additional funding from Impact Alamance, it expanded the program, so it was open to any child in Alamance County.

In families that receive the books, Theall notes, parents report they read more often to their children.

Vote 3 for Education Initiative In 2018, voters overwhelmingly approved $189.6 million in bonds to support education. The projects include a new high school for the fast-growing eastern portion of the county, repairs and renovations to existing buildings, and a new Biotechnology Center of Excellence for Alamance Community College. The Vote 3 for Education Initiative played a key role in spreading the word about the bonds and explaining why they are important for Alamance County. Impact Alamance was proud to be a supporting sponsor of the campaign. By June 2020, land had been purchased for the new high school — the single biggest project in the bond package — and work on many of the other projects was underway. 12

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Teacher Leadership Academy Strengthens Scaffolding that Supports Education Since its first cohort in 2016, scores of Alamance County teachers have graduated from the Teacher Leadership Academy, an intensive professional development experience that helps teachers become more effective and connect what they do in the classroom with community needs and opportunities.

“Through my experiences with Teacher Leadership Academy I have been able to use my personal and professional growth to support teachers, students and families. As a new administrator, I believe the academy has equipped me to be a compassionate servant-leader. In addition, I have been able to gain a deeper understanding of our community. Lastly, Teacher Leadership Academy has strengthened community connections, which has allowed needed student support resources to be shared and utilized.� Rickeya Jones, assistant principal, Newlin Elementary School

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STRONGER 2019 Future Challengers Pre-Kinders Program The Burlington Housing Authority received funding to provide up to 40 children ages 3-4 from BHA homes kindergarten preparation. The program uses a literacy preparation program design for pre-K students. Students who are better prepared for kindergarten do better in school and are subsequently more likely to graduate from high school and enter college or occupational training. But children from families living in poverty are less likely to succeed in school. The BHA Future Challengers program is designed to support those children. The $50,000 grant from Impact Alamance provided equipment for an outdoor learning area as well as upfits for classrooms, where children will receive 6.5 hours per day of instruction for 38 weeks out of the year. BHA has invested in the program by sending staff to Alamance Community College to earn their early childhood education credentials.

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Better Meetings Workshop for Nonprofits In late 2019, more than 100 nonprofit staff, executive directors, board members and community leaders attended a workshop sponsored by Impact Alamance. The 5-hour workshop, on conducting more effective meetings, was designed to help Alamance County organizations function more effectively. The meeting was led by professional trainers and featured interactive instruction to help attendees learn how to organize and conduct better meetings. It is one of a series of workshops that Impact Alamance has sponsored to help area agencies and nonprofits operate more effectively. In a post-workshop survey, one of the participants wrote:

“Thank you, Impact Alamance. This was one of the best trainings I have attended. The tools to organize or do pre-meeting work was the best resource I took away.”

Alamance Racial Equity Alliance Raises Awareness to Take on Systematic Racism The Alamance Racial Equity Alliance (AREA) is a growing nonprofit organization that aims to end racism in Alamance County. It conducts workshops and training to create a common understanding of racism as primarily a systemic problem, rather than just a matter of personal bias. Impact Alamance’s funding has allowed AREA to host Racial Equity Institute Phase 1 workshops as well as Groundwater presentations. In 2019, AREA reached 287 people with its education and training events.

The two-day workshops present a historical, cultural, structural and institutional analysis of racism, helping participants understand how institutions and systems produce unfair and inequitable outcomes. The three-hour Groundwater presentations complement the workshops, using a mix of data and storytelling to illustrate how racism is a systemic issue, not a personal one. Impact Alamance’s funding has allowed AREA to offer scholarships to its events, opening them up to more participants. The funding has also allowed AREA to develop a strategic plan to expand its programs and become a more sustainable organization. STRONGER 2019

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STRONGER 5 YEARS Leadership Institute Impact Alamance and the United Way of Alamance County launched the Leadership Institute to provide training and coaching to leaders from nonprofits and local government agencies. Since 2016, 35 organizations have sent participants to the program. The program provides a foundation of leadership essentials — including communications and management skills, self-development, navigating change and more. As we build the capabilities of leaders, we increase the capacity of local organizations to make positive changes throughout the community. Here’s what one participant said:

“The Leadership Institute provided me with strategies and a hands-on approach on how to apply these tactics and strategies. I feel a tremendous positive impact of the Leadership Institute is the networking and relationships I have formed in my community from this program... I now know the resources in my community and someone I can call when I want to recommend their services.” 16

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Strengthening Nonprofits In addition to the Leadership Institute, Impact Alamance has also invested in other capacity-building initiatives designed to strengthen our community’s nonprofit infrastructure. Those efforts include board development training, grant writing assistance, conference facilities and more. Effective boards are a hallmark of our community’s most dynamic and effective nonprofits. We have provided 10 nonprofits with board development training to strengthen their boards. Impact Alamance provides a board development consultant who leads the board through a formal strategy and development process. Our grant-writing assistance for local nonprofits has helped Alamance County organizations secure $4.3 million in private, state and federal grants since 2015. We sponsor and co-sponsor workshops open to all community nonprofits that provide ongoing professional development. The renovated Cammack Building, which Impact Alamance moved into in 2018 after renovating it, provides meeting and conference space for nonprofit organizations from across the county.

Community Health Fund Supports Organizations Promoting Health, Education, Economic Success The Community Health Fund is an annual grant making program that promotes health, education and economic success in Alamance County through opportunities that align with the county’s health priorities. Since 2015, more than $1.3 million has been awarded to nonprofits to strengthen the grid of resources available to families throughout the county. In one example, a $7,000 Impact Alamance grant supported the creation of 15 Little Free Libraries — weatherproof “little libraries” that people borrow books to read and leave books for others, while also inspiring volunteers to build another seven on their own.

In 2017, the Alamance Burlington School System and Alamance Community College applied for, and received, a $1.2 million grant from the Golden Leaf Foundation to create a STEM lab at Graham High School. The Community Health Fund provided another $250,000 in matching funds, and other community partners contributed an additional $450,000 to the effort. In the past five years, 49 Community Health Fund grants have supported 28 organizations in Alamance County for needed equipment and supplies. STRONGER 5 YEARS

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COMMUNITY VOICES

Impact Alamance has grown into a strong foundational asset within our community and a tremendous partner with Alamance-Burlington Schools. In its first five years, the nonprofit’s keen focus on the interconnectedness of health, education and prosperity has launched successful legacy programs like the Teacher Leadership Academy for our educators and the Leadership Institute for local community agencies. Working to grow and develop Alamance County leaders, targeting assets to issues of importance within our community, and helping to raise awareness, educate and involve citizens are Impact’s trademarks. Passionate and purposeful. That’s Impact Alamance. — Dr. W. Bruce Benson, superintendent, Alamance Burlington School System “Impact Alamance does just what the name states: They impact the community of Alamance County by providing resources to agencies to create, implement and sustain positive impacts. Impact Alamance’s work in assisting agencies has allowed life-giving and life-changing programs and services to be developed for the people of Alamance County. The foundation reaches into all communities, with no bias, to make a positive impact on systemic policies and services.” — LaTonya Penny, executive director, Family Abuse Services 18

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COMMUNITY VOICES


“Impact Alamance’s effect on our community has been phenomenal. The funding provided has allowed us to further our mission focus on education. Without this organization’s belief and support in what we do, our Pre-Kinders program and youth STEM programming may not have come to fruition. Just as the name says, they make an IMPACT!” — Veronica Revels, executive director, Burlington Housing Authority and Burlington Development Corp. “Impact Alamance is helping to lower the barriers to a healthy lifestyle for everyone in our community. Impact Alamance has been an invaluable partner, bringing focus and resources to our efforts to ensure everyone in Alamance County has access to great places to exercise and enjoy the natural world.” — Brian Baker, director, Alamance Parks “The funding received from Impact Alamance was vital in helping us to acquire updated, quality dental care equipment to replace our aged equipment. As a result of these updates, we were able to increase access to quality dental care for the children of this county through improved customer experience, improved patient and staff safety, and a reduction in overall maintenance costs. Most of all, we were able to serve up to 8,000 patient visits per year. We at the Alamance County Children’s Dental Health Center are very happy with our relationship with Impact Alamance and their continuous collaborative efforts to meet the needs of the underserved population in our county.” — Dr. Ibraheem Ackall, DDS, Alamance County Children’s Dental Health Center

“Impact Alamance has had a tremendous effect on our community, most recently in the way it has supported the local nonprofit community through COVID grants. We could not have continued serving our most marginalized citizens while maintaining our staffing infrastructure without Impact Alamance. We gratefully appreciate a community partner who recognizes the importance of helping stabilize nonprofits during these challenging times.” — Susan Watson, executive director, Women’s Resource Center “Congratulations to Impact Alamance on five years of working in our community to advance early childhood education, the built environment, physical health and our nonprofit sector through advocacy and financial support. United Way of Alamance County is proud to partner with Impact Alamance as we create a thriving Alamance County where everyone has the opportunity to succeed.” — Heidi Norwick, president, United Way of Alamance County COMMUNITY VOICES

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OUR PARTNERS Alamance Achieves

Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Raleigh

Healthy Alamance

Alamance Burlington School System

Children’s Museum Of Alamance County Inc.

Alamance Chamber of Commerce

City of Burlington

Healthy Places By Design (formerly Active Living By Design)

Alamance Citizens for Education

City of Graham Recreation and Parks Department

Alamance Community College

City of Mebane

Alamance Community Foundation

Co|Operative

Alamance County

Community YMCA of Alamance County

Alamance County Arts Council Inc.

Cone Health — Healthy Communities

Alamance County Department of Social Services

Connect 4 Faith

Reach Out and Read Carolinas

Alamance County Dispute Settlement and Youth Services Inc

Crossroads: Sexual Assault Response & Resource Center Inc.

Residential Treatment Services of Alamance Inc. Special Olympics North Carolina

Alamance County Health Department

D.A.R.E. Burlington Inc.

St. Paul’s United Methodist Church

Alamance County Meals on Wheels

Ebenezer United Church of Christ Inc.

StriveTogether

Alamance County Public Libraries

Elon University

Studio 1

Alamance County Recreation & Parks Department

Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina: Holy Comforter

Sustainable Alamance

Family Abuse Services of Alamance County, Inc.

The Salvation Army Boys & Girls Club

Alamance County Sheriff Department Alamance Eldercare Alamance Partnership for Children Alamance Racial Equity Alliance Alamance Regional Charitable Foundation Allied Churches of Alamance County Benevolence Farm Burlington Development Corporation Burlington Downtown Farmers Market

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OUR PARTNERS

Family Justice Center Friends of Alamance County Public Libraries Friends of Graham Recreation and Parks Friendship Adult Day Services Inc. Guardian ad Litem Program (Child Abuse Prevention) H.O.P.E. — Helping Other People Eat

Junior Achievement of the Triad Little Pink Houses of Hope New Leaf Society Open Door Clinic of Alamance County Positive Attitude Youth Center Inc.

The Exchange Club’s Family Center in Alamance Town of Elon Recreation and Parks Town of Green Level United Way of Alamance County Walter M. Williams High School Parent Teacher Student Organization Women’s Resource Center in Alamance County Young Musicians of Alamance


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M I S S I O N We strategically invest in our community for health, hope and prosperity.

V I S I O N Alamance County is the best place to live and thrive.

V A L U E S Collaboration, courageous leadership, integrity, innovation, measurable change, stewardship.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS F.D. Hornaday, Chair John Currin, Vice Chair Nicole Alston Yun Boylston, MD Vernetta Bridges Ted Chandler Kathy Colville Mandy Eaton

Brad Hayes Martha Krall Leo Lambert, Ph.D. Griffin McClure Chapman McQueen, MD Kathleen Treadwell Edward Woodall

IMPACT AL AMANCE STAFF Tracey Grayzer, MBA/MHA, APR President

Anne Baker Finance & Grants Manager

Marcy Green, MHA Vice President of Programs

Rob Linens Facility & Events Coordinator

Laura Fehlhafer Office Administrator

LEADERSHIP

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MPAC

INVESTING FOR 133 East Davis Street Burlington, NC 27215 336-221-0011

Profile for Alamance Reports

Impact Alamance 2019 Annual Report  

Impact Alamance 2019 Annual Report  

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