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Alabama

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FORESTS IN THIS ISSUE:

Timber Titan J.T. McShan Logger Profile of Parnell Inc. Logger of the Year John McGowin AFA Nov. 4 Endorsements

Don't Forget to Vote on November 4! See AFA Endorsements, page 13


Contents

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Alabama

FORESTS

Alabama Forestry Association, Inc. Chris Isaacson, Executive Vice President OFFICERS Fred T. Stimpson, Mobile, Chairman Ben Smith, Phenix City, President Stephan Tomlinson, Secretary Gray Skipper, Fulton, President-Elect Vaughn Stough, Mountain Brook, Treasurer DISTRICT DIRECTORS BLACK BELT DISTRICT Doug Bowling, Millbrook CAPITAL DISTRICT Clark Sahlie, Montgomery DELTA DISTRICT Frank Mozingo, Toxey LONGLEAF DISTRICT Tripp Winters, Chapman MOUNTAIN DISTRICT Todd Langston, Stevenson PIEDMONT DISTRICT Chris Langley, Camp Hill VALLEY DISTRICT Dewayne Oakley, Florence VULCAN DISTRICT Open WARRIOR DISTRICT Gee Allgood, McShan WIREGRASS DISTRICT Mike Dixon, Eufaula ALABAMA LOGGERS COUNCIL Chris Potts, LaFayette FORESTFUND Winston Bryant, Heflin AT LARGE DIRECTORS Paul Lohman, Prattville Hank Bauer, Perdue Hill Al Bracewell, Jasper Pat Holley, Millport Jim King, Jr., Tuscaloosa Mena McGowin Morgan, Point Clear Joe W. McNeel III, Montrose Virginia Macpherson, Fulton Lenn Morris, Jasper Tom Bradley III, Mobile ALABAMA FORESTS EDITOR Sam Duvall Alabama Forests (USPS #025-358) is an official publication of the Alabama Forestry Association, 555 Alabama Street, Montgomery, AL 36104-4359 and is published five times a year. The AFA reserves the exclusive right to accept or reject advertising or editorial material submitted for publication. Advertising rates quoted upon request. Periodicals postage paid at Montgomery, Ala. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Alabama Forestry Association, 555 Alabama St., Montgomery, AL 36104-4395.

Communicating news and information of, about, and for the Alabama forestry community.

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AFA’s 2014 Annual Meeting featured beautiful weather for fishing on the Gulf or just enjoying the beach.

DEPARTMENTS

FEATURES Timber Titan J.T. McShan

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AFA Candidate Endorsements

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Parnell Family Loggers

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McGowin Logging—Outstanding Logger of the Year

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AlabamaSAVES Can Save You $$

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Annual Meeting Highlights

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From the Executive Vice President

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Dean’s Notebook

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Contributors

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Log A Load

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ADVERTISERS Index to Advertisers

Especially for our tree farmers/ landowners: Green Horizons

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ABOUT THE COVER Alabama’s state capitol dressed for fall, and the 2014 elections!

Come explore our web site! alaforestry.org SFI-01273

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From Executive Vice President

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What Will You Do With Your Freedom? ike many in my generation, I grew up with a fascination of all things military. I can remember as a young child sitting in front of the TV with my dad watching “12 O’Clock High.” As I grew I read books about World War II and watched in rapt fascination movies like Stalag 17, and the Dirty Dozen. Even today my list of favorite movies is dominated by stories of war: The Patriot, We Were Soldiers, and Black Hawk Down. As my interest in war has grown, so has my fascination with American history, especially as that history has been shaped by war. As I studied the American Revolution and read about the Continental Army, I was struck by the question: WHY did they fight? Why would these untrained, illequipped and poorly supplied farmers, tradesmen, and merchants leave their homes, their families and their livelihoods to take on the world’s most formidable military force. I knew what the textbooks said (at least the textbooks of my childhood). They were fighting for freedom from English tyranny. But as a father of young children it was hard for me to understand how these husbands and fathers could abandon their families and fight a seemingly unbeatable foe. During one of those times of introspection, Kathy and I went to see Mel Gibson’s

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newly released movie Braveheart, based on the true story of William Wallace who led the Scots in the First War of Scottish Independence against England. In one scene Wallace was rallying Scottish clans to join the fight. Here’s the dialogue: Wallace: “I see a whole army of my countrymen, here in defiance of tyranny. You’ve come to fight as free men; and free men you are. What will you do with that freedom? Will you fight?” Clansman: “Fight? Against that? No! We will run. And we will live.” Wallace: “Aye, fight and you may die. Run, and you’ll live—at least a while. And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willing to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they’ll never take OUR FREEDOM!” As I listened to that exchange I suddenly began to understand. The freedoms we enjoy in America are not guaranteed and maintaining those freedoms comes with a price. For the men and women on the frontline of the battle, the cost of freedom is leaving family, relinquishing the safety and comforts of home, and, for some, laying down their life to protect ours.

For the rest of us, the cost of freedom is more abstract. From the beginning, our warriors have fought for the concept of freedom that is embodied in our democratic form of government: A republic governed by leaders elected by the people, a nation based on the rule of law that guarantees the rights of the individual, and an economy empowered by the sweat of its workers and investment of its business owners. You might argue that’s no longer the America we live in today. If true, we have only ourselves to blame. Edmund Burke, an 18th century British philosopher once wrote, “When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall, one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.…The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.” The upcoming elections on November 4th present us with an opportunity to “combine,” to unite behind men and women who have answered the call to serve in Congress, in the state capital and in the legislature. While the risks they willingly assume pales in comparison to our soldiers around the world, the service they render to our country, and to us, is no less important. In this issue we have provided a list of candidates endorsed and supported by the

Chris Isaacson

Alabama Forestry Association that share our commitment to limited government, private property rights, free markets and the rule of law. These candidates are willing to make the hard decisions to lead our state and our nation back toward those principles that were enshrined in the U.S. Constitution. Over the years I have come to appreciate that the stories of war are often stories about ordinary, unremarkable people transformed into warriors in the crucible of conflict. Countless soldiers have spilled their blood and scores have paid the ultimate price to ensure our freedom. To paraphrase William Wallace, we are free men and women. The question is what will we do with that freedom? On November 4th let us honor the sacrifice of our nation’s warriors, and VOTE! ▲ 3


Contributors Karen Boyd Karen Boyd is director of forestry programs for the Alabama Forestry Association, including program administrator for Alabama’s Tree Farm Program. She also works with forest certification issues, north Alabama membership and monitoring member issues in north Alabama. Karen brings over thirty years in forest management, wood procurement, and technical roles to her job. Karen has a BS in forest management and a master’s in forestry from Auburn University and is a registered forester in Alabama.

Barry Graden Barry Graden is director, SFI Forest Partners at Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. who manages the SFI Forest Partners® Program to encourage landowners and mill operators to certify to the SFI standards for forest management, fiber sourcing and chain of cus-

tody. SFI Inc. is an independent, nonprofit organization governed by a three-chamber board of directors representing environmental, social and economic sectors equally. Learn more at www.sfiprogram.org and www.sfiprogram.org/Buy-SFI.

Doug Link Link became active in the Tree Farm program in 1965 while working with Georgia Kraft Co. out of Rome, Georgia.

coordinator for the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Auburn University. Ken’s areas of expertise include, outreach methodologies and administration, international education, plantation establishment, and nurseries and international forestry.

Ashley Smith Ashley Parkman Smith

He has a BS in forestry from the University of Georgia and served for more than 14 years as chairman of the state Tree Farm Committee. He is a registered forester in Alabama and owns the consulting company ForestScapes. He retired from Alabama River Woodlands in 2000 where he managed their landowner assistance program.

Kenneth McNabb

currently serves as director of education programs for the Alabama Forestry Association. Ashley’s roles for the association include forestry education/outreach and membership development. She also serves as the SFI State Implementation Committee coordinator. Ashley graduated from Auburn University’s College of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences with a BS in forest operations.

Ken McNabb is the Mosley environmental professor, extension specialist, and international program

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Dean’s Notebook

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Forestry & Wildlife Education in the 21st Century:

The New Reality of Higher Ed am constantly reminded of how much things have changed from the time I was a forestry major in the ’70s. College cost less then and students carried heavier course loads yet still seemed to finish in 4 years. The cost of college has increased drastically since those days for many reasons: higher construction costs of academic buildings, costs of introducing newer technology, more competitive atmosphere for hiring the best faculty, etc. As we all know, everything costs more than it used to. Also, state support for higher education has decreased significantly which, in turn, has caused tuition to rise. Consequently, the cost of a four-year degree is now out of range for many potential students. Auburn University has taken action to keep education affordable for many by capping hours required to graduate, inducing lighter course loads for students, and other mechanisms that facilitate graduation in four years. Those changes are good in the long term although creativity on the part of faculty is required to ensure that quality is maintained in the abbreviated curriculum. Low numbers of potential students also jeopardize the viability of academic programs. Students, faculty, alumni, A L A B A M A F O R E S TS | Fa l l 2 0 1 4

and employers must know beyond question that a B.S. or graduate degree from our school in 2014 carries the same (or better) stamp of quality that it did 10 or 20 years ago. Ensuring that this is true can be quite a trick. State support and tuition cut a big chunk out of costs but there still remains a financial gap that must be covered from somewhere. As one of the units on campus with a strong need for field laboratories, the cost of a forestry or wildlife education is higher than that for some other units. As a result, we operate in the red along with a few other units with high costs. That’s where the creativity comes in. One answer to our financial gap is to teach larger numbers of students through more costefficient methods such as online education. We will be shifting a few of our elective courses that are suited for this mode of instruction (i.e. courses without labs) in that direction in the future. Another idea is to add new students which increases operating funds for the school, a goal that we have held for a long time. Thanks to our new Director of Student Services, Dr. Jodie Kenny, we are making progress there. Heather Crozier’s efforts with scholarships and other

funding related to development also help to cover the gap. There are also teaching grants available and one goal of the school is to seek those funds much more aggressively. However, as is often the case in life, just when you think you are on the right track, fate can muddy the water. In 2015, a proposed new AU budget model that is driven by (1) student numbers and (2) the amount of extramural funding brought in by units will be rolled out on campus. Charges for square footage used by units, utilities, tuition waivers for graduate students, and other costs that were previously covered by the upper administration will accrue to academic units. In return, we will receive funding based on the number of students in our majors and a lessor amount for other students taking forestry and wildlife classes. Also, the larger the fraction of the total AU extramural ‘pie’ that can be attributed to forestry and wildlife, the more research funds will be received from the university. Research is very valuable in and of itself but also sometimes subsidizes teaching. While (1) above would seem to suggest that the more students a unit has, the better, there is a general understanding that funds provided for rising numbers of students

Interim Dean Graeme Lockaby Auburn University will, at some point, not be sufficient to cover the costs of a quality education for the newcomers. We do not presently know what that point or student number will be but, once there, new numbers will shift from being an asset to a liability in terms of cost. More importantly, we could not ethically bring in new students for whom we cannot guarantee an education with our traditional level of quality. So, we adapt to changing conditions while never taking our eyes off the ball, the stamp of quality on all of our degree programs. We don’t know how we’ll fare in the next few years in terms of budgets but the future is always uncertain and is particularly so these days in academia. However, we will not depart from the goal of education quality. Luckily, we have some of the brightest and most creative people I’ve ever met to assure that this critical goal is always met. ▲ 7


A Titan of Alabama’s Forest Industry EDITOR’S NOTE: In Greek Mythology Titans were a race of immortal giants of incredible strength. Today, the term “titans of industry” has been used to refer to individuals who made an incredible impact on the development of an industry. Cornelius Vanderbilt, John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, J.P. Morgan and Henry Ford are listed among the Titans of American Industry. The following article will chronicle the life, work and contributions of some of our industry’s most influential leaders.

J.T. McShan Has Seen It All & Is Living to Talk about It! By Sam Duvall

The silver lining of the Alabama Forestry Association is that group of elder members who represent the walking, talking, historical record of both the association and the development of forestry in Alabama.

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JOHN TYLER “J.T.” MCSHAN III

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ne man who epitomizes this “elder statesman of forestry” role is John Tyler “J.T.” McShan III. The McShan family, goes back in the sawmill business well over 100 years and J.T. has been part of that history for 88 years. J.T. recalls how his grandfather laid the foundation stones for the company, which his father took over and nurtured and then turned over to J.T. With each generation of leadership the company has continued to move forward and today is still producing quality lumber for local markets and a robust export trade to more than 25 countries. The 107-year life of McShan Lumber shows the grit and determination of the family to see their business through the choppy economic waters all the way from the Great Depression in the 1920s and ’30s to the more recent, socalled, Great Recession. Happily, in addition to his great sense of fun and zest for life, J.T. McShan, is an accomplished raconteur who remembers almost every detail of his 88-year participation in that journey.

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J.T., proving that some trees are just too big to hug!

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A T i t a n o f A l a b a m a ’s F o r e s t I n d u s t r y : J . T. M c S h a n Getting the ball rolling for the family was Feaster McShan who moved to Alabama from South Carolina in 1844. In 1898, the town of McShan was named in honor of Feaster McShan and his sons, including Nathan. “McShan Lumber Company started operation in 1907. My grandfather, Nathan McShan, had mechanical talents and owned a cotton gin powered by steam. So, powering for a small sawmill was in place,” J.T. recalled. “With the railroad in operation and thousands of acres of virgin timber along the line there was a lot of activity with mills large and small blowing their steam whistles for start and end of a days’ sawing.”

J.T.’s father takes over just before the Great Depression “In 1927 my father (Tyler McShan) started an operation in DeKalb, Mississippi and sold to wholesalers in St. Louis, Chicago and other large cities,” said J.T. Just two years later (1929) the Great Depression hit bringing the chaos of the worst economic malaise in the history of the United States. “The Depression ended the DeKalb operation and my father returned to McShan where he had acquired Melrose Lumber Company from the family of his brother-in-law, Josh Sparkman. Money was scarce, my father told me of going to a

bank in Columbus, Mississippi to ask for a loan and being told, ‘Mr. McShan, we do not loan money to lumber people,’ ” J.T. said. Fortunately, Tyler McShan had a good reputation in a day when a good reputation went a long way and he was able to get financing from Parker-Manderson Lumber Company in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. “The arrangement was that McShan lumber would be advanced cash and Parker-Manderson had exclusive sales rights to the lumber. It turned out to be a good deal for both parties and lasted from 1933 to 1945. During the early years of the arrangement we were getting $7.00 per thousand for 1¥6 loaded in a boxcar which included $.50 per thousand in profit,” J.T. noted.

After serving in the war, J.T. hits it full time at age 26 “I started full time in the business in 1949 (the same year AFA was created). We only made boards which were sold in boxcar loads to wholesalers. When truckers came to the scene, they varied in size from a bob-tail trucker who could carry 7,500 feet to a customer to a tractor-trailer who could haul 15,000 feet. There were no lift trucks and the lumber was loaded directly on the truck one board at a time,” he recalled. The acquisition of a lift truck in 1952 greatly enhanced the efficiency of loading

the lumber and points to the McShan’s propensity to eagerly embrace new equipment and technology to enhance production. “Southern Pine developed a poor reputation just after World War II and northern markets preferred west coast woods. When Southern Pine Plywood hit the market about 1960 air dried boards for sheathing went south. As we switched over to dimension lumber, we seldom shipped anything north of Nashville,” J.T. recalled. “We didn’t have a sales manager until the 1970s. At a high cost, flexible mill such as ours, selling lumber is more complicated than selling for a dimension mill where yield and production are the big factors. We miss Mark Junkins (the much respected former sales manager who died unexpectedly). But we are blessed to have team members who have worked very hard during this crisis to ensure that our customers can expect the same level of dependability and integrity,” J.T. noted. Today, McShan Lumber has about 55 employees and specializes in one-inch thick lumber for decorative uses such as paneling and flooring. Around 50% of the production is exported. Each board that leaves the plant is stamped with “McShan Lumber USA.” “Most Southern pine mills just make two-inch lumber for framing houses. But we turn out what we call ‘appearance

= The McShan Way: High quality logs = High-quality lumber. 10

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EDITOR’S NOTE:

Some Well-Seasoned J.T. McShan Reflections A Privileged Life. “I have lived a privileged life. Not due to wealth or position, but exposure. I grew up in Melrose which was a plantation, including a sawmill. The House I grew up in was built in 1841, and members of the McShan family still live there. My Neighbors were the mill workers and their families. Their children were my playmates. Occasionally, in company of more sophisticated acquaintances I like to boast, ‘I bet I’m the only one here who grew up in a black neighborhood!’ With this exposure and the opportunities that have come since, I cannot think of anyone living a fuller life.” Perspective on Life and Living. “I was born January 10, 1926 in McShan, Alabama. I served in World War II. In perspective, if I had been born 88 years earlier, in 1838, I could have served under Robert E. Lee and seen him astride Traveler or met the fate of two great uncles who were killed in the Civil War. Or, if I had been born 88 years prior to them, in 1750, I could have served under George Washington...”

This is an early photo of McShan Lumber showing a steam-powered tractor bring logs to the mill, which was also powered by steam.

On Prices at the Company Store. “In addition to the sawmill, daddy owned a general merchandise store in McShan. Customers were workers at the mill and local farmers. It is interesting to see what they bought and the prices they paid. A box of shotgun shells sold for $1.00 (squirrels and rabbits were a good part of local diets). A box of snuff was 5-cents, but a bottle was 30cents. A pair of overalls, $2.25; a sweater, $1.50; a pair of shoes ranged from $1.25 to $3.50. Six yards of gingham cost $1.20 and an 8-pound bucket of lard sold for 85 cents.” About the Great Depression and Digging with a Shovel or a Spoon.“I am a child of the Great Depression. Hold your sympathy…I was never not fed, clothed or sheltered. My association with the Depression was the effect it had on my daddy. Today, the term for a mortgage greater than the value of the home is ‘under water.’ The value of everything Daddy owned was ‘under water.’ But, he thought he was better able to emerge by his own effort than through the agencies of the New Deal. A major [New Deal] project never finished was the Florida Barge Canal intended to cross the upper Florida peninsula to connect the Gulf of Mexico with the Atlantic Ocean. I recently read that a visitor to the construction site asked why there were so many men using shovels and so few machines. When told they were trying to keep people employed, the visitor said, ‘why don’t you let them use spoons?’ ” On Beavers. “Urban acquaintances are surprised by my negative attitude about beavers. Our mill is situated between two flowing streams about a quarter mile apart. Local land changes brought beavers to the area. Gradually we noticed that a heavy rainfall caused flooding and our rail-siding was almost under water…Some land we planted in trees completely flooded and we never harvested a single tree. Finally, about 1980, we hired an excavator to break the dams and open the streams. All good and well, except the beavers started all over again. So, I bought the excavator, learned to operate it and every time I see a beaver dam, I tear it down and they build it back, and I tear it down, etc. Sometimes… you think you have won, but six months later almost overnight there is a dam again. This is a battle I know I will not win, but what I am hoping for is a tie, and it keeps me busy as a beaver. I think our presidents and military could take a lesson from beavers when trying to solve the Al-Qaeda problem!” A L A B A M A F O R E S TS | Fa l l 2 0 1 4

Melrose was built in 1841. McShan procurement manager Grover Allgood and his wife, Melissa (J.T.’s daughter) have been living in the home for the last 29 years.

Some of the information herein was taken from the periodic columns that J.T. writes for the McShan Lumber Company newsletter, the “McShan Plane Dealer.” 11


A T i t a n o f A l a b a m a ’s F o r e s t I n d u s t r y : J . T. M c S h a n

J.T. and the McShans! Front, left to right, Missy Budd. J.T. and Melissa Allgood, J.T.’s daughters. Standing are J.T.’s sons Tyler (left) and Hunter McShan.

J.T. on his favorite ride! A 60 h.p. diesel Toro that cuts an 11-foot swath.

Having earned his time as a man of leisure, this is J.T. on a recent trip to Myanmar (formerly Burma).

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Enjoying an adult beverage, J.T. is flanked by beautiful daughters Melissa Allgood, left, and Missy Budd.

grade’ lumber that people use for how it looks,” said J.T. “We’ve shipped wood to Japan and a good bit to European countries and to the Caribbean and Africa.” Just as J.T.’s father, known affectionately as “Mr. Tyler,” passed on to J.T. the wherewithal to keep the business going, J.T. has passed on most of the day-to-day operation of the company to his sons John Tyler IV and Hunter, who serve as company board chairman and president, respectively.

J.T.’s new toy, a really big lawnmower! Although semi-retired, J.T. is still “the boss” at McShan Lumber. Despite his rough-hewn life, J.T. has mellowed a bit. Presently, he loves spending time tearing up beaver dams and mowing the mill yard. J.T. said he had heard of a wealthy lumberman from Mississippi who moved to Oregon in 1938, bought 100,000 acres of Ponderosa pine and built a town and a sawmill. “Years later I was told that the mill was unusually neat and even had grass growing around the whole facility. I had the opportunity to visit the mill and sure enough it was as I was told. By then, I was no longer youthful but old enough to consider my legacy as a protector of the plant. It did not look good,” said J.T. “So, I started cleaning up. It was not easy and has happened over a 20-year-plus period. Not only has it been good for appearance and my satisfaction, but probably added [years] to my life. Now, except for a few new projects, I am into maintenance and I can truthfully say I left things better than I found them. “Not only do I enjoy the work, but it keeps me out of the saloons and dance halls,” he chortled. “I have four fine, productive children and twelve very promising grandchildren. For my future, I always have a project or two in the works. I am not bored, have good health and a wonderful girlfriend. I like Satchel Page’s comment: ‘How old would you be if you didn't know how old you are?’ I am very thankful, especially for my liver!” ▲

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Alabama Forestry Association proudly endorses these candidates for the November 4th General Election. U.S. CONGRESS

U.S. House District 1 Ë Bradley Byrne

U.S. House District 2 Ë Martha Roby

U.S. House District 3 Ë Mike Rogers

U.S. House District 5 Ë Mo Brooks

U.S. House District 6 Ë Gary Palmer

STATEWIDE RACES

Governor - Robert Bentley Ë Lt. Governor - Kay Ivey Ë Attorney General - Luther Strange Ë Secretary of State - John Merrill Ë State Treasurer - Young Boozer Ë State Auditor - Jim Ziegler Ë Commissioner of Agriculture & Ë Industries - John McMillan

ALABAMA SENATE

District 1 - Tim Melson Ë District 4 - Paul Bussman Ë District 7 - Paul Sanford Ë District 8 - Steve Livingston Ë

District 10 - Phil Williams Ë District 12 - Del Marsh Ë District 13 - Gerald Dial Ë District 16 - Jabo Waggoner Ë District 21 - Gerald Allen Ë District 22 - Greg Albritton Ë District 27 - Tom Whatley Ë District 28 - Billy Beasley Ë District 29 - Melinda McClendon Ë District 30 - Clyde Chambliss Ë District 31 - Jimmy Holley Ë District 32 - Trip Pittman Ë District 35 - Bill Hightower Ë ALABAMA HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

District 1 - Phillip Pettus Ë District 2 - Lynn Greer Ë District 5 - Dan Williams Ë District 7 - Ken Johnson Ë District 8 - Terri Collins Ë District 16 - Kyle South Ë District 21 - Jim Patterson Ë District 23 - Tommy Hanes Ë District 27 - Will Ainsworth Ë

District 29 - Becky Nordgren Ë District 40 - K.L. Brown Ë District 47 - Jack Williams Ë District 56 - Darius Foster Ë District 79 - Mike Hubbard Ë District 80 - Lesley Vance Ë District 81 - Mark Tuggle Ë District 91 - Barry Moore Ë District 93 - Steve Clouse Ë There are also five proposed Constitutional Amendments on the Ballot. Following is a brief description of the amendment and the AFA position on each one:

Amendment 1 - Preclude Foreign Ë Law being enforced in Alabama SUPPORT

Ë Amendment 2 – Allow National

Guard to take money from the ATF* - OPPOSE

Amendment 3 – Maintain Ë

Fundamental Right to bear arms SUPPORT

Amendment 4 – Help Prevent Ë

Unfunded Mandates for Education SUPPORT

Amendment 5 – Protect Fishing & Ë Hunting - SUPPORT

* Alabama Trust Fund


Logging Professional Profile We believe loggers should be celebrated for the part they play in the wood fiber supply chain of keeping wood flowing to the mills.

At Parnell Inc.,

Bigger Is Better! By Sam Duvall

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he roots of the Parnell family of Stanton, Alabama run deep in the rich soil of Chilton County. In fact ancestors of the family have lived and farmed in Chilton County for nearly as long as the United States has been a country! In addition to a beef cattle operation the Parnell’s run a large and successful logging operation based in Chilton County. Family patriarch, James H. Parnell, started working in the logging operation in 1961 at the age of 16 when he inherited a chainsaw, a team of mules, a bobtail truck and a commitment to continue the family tradition of marketing timber products for his neighbors. Since then, James and his wife Sandra have built a family business and raised four children. Daughter Amy is a CPA working in Selma. Sons Jimmy, Jeff and Joseph joined their father James in the family business and helped grow the logging operation to one of the largest in the state. In characterizing the growth of the logging company, Jimmy likes to say: “We grew it as a family. I love to see things get bigger and better.” At the start, in appearance and practice, James Parnell was the hub of Parnell Inc. and sons Jimmy, Jeff and Joseph were the spokes. Together they made a very strong team. In the 1980s, sons Jeff and Jimmy began to take on more responsibility and look for ways to increase production through mechanized harvest systems. By 1990, they became one of the first logging companies in the region to adopt whole tree processing, increasing production from 60,000 tons a year, to more than 600,000 tons. Parnell Inc. added their second crew by 1998, and son Joseph started working in the family business. Jimmy said after his son James Robert Parnell graduates from Auburn University later this year he will join the firm, bringing yet another generation of Parnell’s into the family business. More recently, James, who is 70-years-old, has taken over one of the Parnell logging crews and runs a loader.

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Parnell crewman with a really big log.

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Although he was recently sidelined with prostate surgery, Joseph said his father did not stay on the sidelines for very long. “I think daddy is fully recovered now. They told him it would be six months for his recovery. He was back in the seat of that loader in about six weeks.”

Jimmy elected president of AFF and Alfa Insurance With his election as President of the Alabama Farmers Federation and Alfa Insurance Co. in 2012, Jimmy obviously has his hands full managing the affairs of one of the largest political and economic entities in the state. In the not too distant past, it was not unusual to see Jimmy riding around the family farm on horseback amongst 600 brood cows and a stocker operation of 2,500 head per year. But not to worry, Joseph and Jeff have stepped up their game and continue to keep the family’s high production logging operation humming. Based on their professionalism and outstanding performance as loggers, Parnell Inc. was named 2006 Logger of the Year by the Alabama Forestry Association. The Parnell’s have a long history of involvement in the AFA. Jimmy also serves on the ForestFund Board of Directors. ForestFund is the Workers Comp insurance fund for the forest products industry. The family also is involved in a host of other state and national organizations. In addition to their farming and forestry work, the Parnell’s are active in local church and community activities and in the state at large. Jimmy ran for the Alabama House of Representatives in 1998, losing a very close race. And although he does not consider himself to be a “political guy,” Joseph Parnell was appointed by Governor Robert Bentley to fill a vacancy on the Chilton County Commission, Feb. 10, 2014. In addition to being good citizens in the community, the Parnells employ some 67 full-time individuals working in their various operations. The logging operation alone, if you throw in trucking, accounts

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The Parnell’s were one of the first logging companies in the state to adopt whole tree processing in 1990. Bottom: A load of premium logs on one of Parnell Inc.’s 29 trucks.

for most of Parnell Inc.’s employees, about 55. “We have eight crews, a total of 26 woods employees. Then we have 29 truck drivers and 29 trucks,” said Joseph.

The Parnells are quick to adopt new technologies The Parnell’s have always been quick

to adopt cutting edge technology. They have onboard scales in all 29 of those trucks. They also utilize strong but lightweight trailers, some with wide single tires. Anything that reduces weight means more wood can be hauled per load and production is Parnell Inc.’s strong suit. The company toyed with the idea of converting their trucking fleet to natural 15


Lo g g i n g Pr o f e s s i o n a l Pr o f i l e : T h e Pa r n e l l Fa m i l y

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In an effort to improve the relationship between loggers and the law enforcement community, Jimmy Parnell (right) and his brother Joseph (center) talk about logging with Capt. Jack Clark, Unit Commander with the Department of Public Safety’s Motor Carrier Safety Unit. 2 The Parnell Inc. team, left to right, James, Jeff, Jimmy and Joseph Parnell. 3 Jimmy Parnell (right) in his new role as president of the Alabama Farmers Federation and Alfa Insurance, on a farm tour in a Chilton County peach orchard with U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions (left) and farmer Jimmie Harrison.

gas. But once federal subsidies were taken off the table, it became too close a call to convert their fleet. “Without the subsidies, it became a cash neutral investment, meaning you could save enough on natural gas to offset the cost and make it equivalent to what we were already doing running diesel,” said Joseph. “Those natural gas trucks cost nearly $200,000 apiece. At that time you could buy a new diesel truck for around $120,000. They are now up to about $140,000. We were looking at a $4 million investment to replace our trucks to get a minimum threshold of what it cost to run the natural gas trucks. There’s a lot of risk associated with a $4 million project. With no opportunity for any real savings, it just really wasn’t worth it to us.” Asked about current production for Parnell Inc., Joseph said, “We have weeks where we hit 600 loads a week. But that is an exceptional week. We’re usually in the 400 range.” Joseph said generally speaking, the company likes to try to stay within a 50-mile radius of Maplesville. “We average about a 50 mile haul, year in and year out. If you see us going outside of 50 miles, we’re going out after something that one of our big customers has asked us to do, because it’s not profitable for us,” Joseph noted. “If you cut a couple of hundred thousand tons a year for somebody and they ask you to go to Sumter County, you go to Sumter County.”

pulled Jeff out of the woods. He ran our multi-shift crew for years. He’s come out of the woods and kind of took over the fun part of what I did,” Joseph said, with a chuckle “We’re making it run pretty well. Jeff has really taken a burden off of me.” Of course, the Parnell’s logging operation wasn’t always so big. “Looking back, we didn’t add our third logging crew until 2003. Now we run eight. And we have the demand for a lot more than that. I just don’t feel like we could manage it,” Joseph said. “You kind of get to the point when you get too big, you start letting the little things fall through the cracks. Being able to manage those little things is what’s made us be successful.” How to be successful is something the Parnell’s have always been able to figure out. That despite the often very tight margins most loggers operate under. Joseph said that with federally-imposed emission control changes driving up the cost of trucks, and with the cost of just about everything else going up, except revenues, it is becoming increasingly difficult to pull the profit rabbit out of the economic hat. Asked about the good news, Joseph Parnell laughed again. “The good news is, we pay our bills and we keep a lot of people employed so that they can pay their bills. We keep riding this train and hope that eventually, it will turn in our direction.” ▲

Adjustments made after Jimmy takes position at ALFA Joseph said Jimmy’s election as president of the Alabama Farmers Federation and Alfa Insurance necessitated some adjustments within the company. “My workload has increased,” he said, laughing. “Jimmy is a great people person. If somebody comes in wanting talk, he could handle them and he could leave me in my cave to do the things that I do well, which are business models and computer work and buying and selling timber and trading. “I’m kind of the operations part of this and since he left, we

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A L A B A M A F O R E S TS | Fa l l 2 0 1 4


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McGowin Logging Inc. Named Alabama’s Outstanding Logger of the Year By Ashley Smith

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Alabama grows green – timberland covers approximately 23 million acres of the state. Driving from the capital at Montgomery down through the southern part of the state, trees grow along the roadside and all throughout the region. In the heart of this forested country, John McGowin makes his home. The forest provides a way of life for him in his profession as a logger. Alabama’s forests are where McGowin has lived, worked, and played for 60 years. He believes it is important to properly care for the land so that it can continue to provide for future generations.

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ecoming a logger was a natural fit for McGowin. As the son of a logger, McGowin grew up in the woods and worked for 15 years as a harvest operations manager for Union Camp. In his job there, he managed timberland and oversaw 20 logging crews for the subsidiary Rocky Creek Logging Company. He spent those years learning the ins and outs of forestry. When Union Creek disbanded Rocky Creek Logging Company and did away with McGowin’s job as harvest operations manager, he saw the opportunity to switch gears and go into logging on his own. McGowin was familiar with forestry as a renewable resource because of his background. When American Forest and Pulp Association (AF&PA) initiated the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI), training and education for loggers was a key component of the program. Still in the very early stages of his own logging career, McGowin realized the relevance of SFI. In 1994, he became one of Alabama’s first loggers to earn Alabama’s Professional Logging Manager (PLM) status and has maintained its yearly requirements ever since. In his harvest operations, McGowin operates according to the needs/requests of the landowner. Through the years, McGowin has seen firsthand the importance of properly following forestry best management practices. Maximizing production and minimizing inefficiencies are general rules in McGowin’s operations. McGowin’s tract analysis helps in a variety of decisions for harvesting. While he works hard to ensure that his equipment/trucks and his harvest jobs look good, McGowin is not just about the way it looks. He wants every job to be done right and appreciates the opportunity to make it happen. “McGowin’s and his crew’s attention to ground conditions and operability leave the harvest site in a condition ready for site prep,” states Jerry Brace with RMS. “McGowin goes above and beyond to protect the harvest site and roads as well as the interests of hunting clubs and neighboring land owners.” Safety proves an important feature in McGowin’s operations. Safety discussions occur in the woods with reminders coming at any time. Each year, McGowin hosts a full day of safety, professionalism, and educational opportunities. A number of people in A L A B A M A F O R E S TS | Fa l l 2 0 1 4

Maximizing production and minimizing inefficiencies are general rules in McGowin’s operations. the forestry community attend McGowin’s annual meeting, which typically qualifies for continuing education credits for loggers as well as foresters. With 18 employees, McGowin realizes the importance of every person on the job. “I am proud of my crew!” says McGowin. McGowin believes it is important to “come out here and work hard, go home and say our prayers, and come back out here tomorrow to do it again.” Through the years, McGowin has been an active member of the Alabama Loggers Council and the Alabama Forestry Association. His knowledge of the area and the forest business brings credibility and years’ worth of experience to any timber discussion. He actively participates in area Log-A-Load events benefiting Alabama’s Children’s Hospitals. McGowin spends many hours on the job with McGowin Logging but realizes the need to take time away from work as well. He enjoys spending time and traveling with his wife Sylvia. He claims that his list of hobbies is long, but calling turkeys in the spring and growing hardwood trees are high on his list. For these reasons and more, the Alabama Loggers Council is pleased to announce that McGowin Logging, Inc. was selected as this year’s Alabama Outstanding Logger of the Year. Congratulations to John and his crew for their achievement and for all they do to promote forestry in Alabama. ▲

Over five decades and millions of acres of experience www.larsonmcgowin.com Main Office: Mobile, Alabama / 251.438.4581

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NEWS & VIEWS

From My Neck of the Woods‌ s I walked outside this morning I felt a little less humidity and just maybe it felt a little cooler. I hope this marks the end of another hot summer and the beginning of a beautiful fall filled with crisp mornings, beautiful fall colors and family gatherings. I hope this time of year brings together families from far and wide. Back home to enjoy the land and get back to nature by bush hogging roads and fire lanes, planting food plots, cleaning shooting houses, scouting for signs of wildlife and just enjoying time together in the great outdoors. October marks the time when local forestry planning committees, natural resource committees or local chapters of the Alabama Treasure Forest Association host field days and tours. These field days are opportunities for you to reconnect with friends and family while learning about things that other landowners like you have tried and tested. Your Tree Farm state committee has devoted itself to helping landowners like you by helping to promote the Natural Resources Coordinating Council Field

A

Days. We hope that you will take advantage of these opportunities and encourage your neighbors to do the same. As I have mentioned before, management plans are required for participation in the American Tree Farm System. If your property is picked as part of the yearly required inspection, you will be asked to produce a copy for inspection. Take this time to look for your plan. Do you know where it is? Have you implemented any of the recommendations? Do you need to revise the plan because of changes in your goals, objectives, family needs or other reasons beyond your control? Take this time to consult with your natural resource professional and update your plan to account for any changes that may have occurred. In 2015, new standards will come out that will require plans to be updated to address any of the changes that may be implemented by the American Tree Farm System. So, 2015 may be a good year to look for your plan and update to the new standards. During the last quarterly meeting of

the State Tree Farm Committee, I looked around the table at all the various individuals present that represented all aspects of the natural resources profession in Alabama. Landowners, educators, professional foresters, extension specialists and agency representatives whom were all present because they believe in the Tree Farm program and the opportunity to educate others about the importance of what they do as stewards of the land. These individuals are devoted to a cause, not because they have to, but because they believe in it and what it stands for. It is truly an honor to serve as the state chairman of a committee that is full of such dedicated professional willing to serve Alabama because it’s the right thing to do. Until next time, I am, Paul E. Hudgins, R.F.

By Paul Hudgins, Alabama Tree Farm Chairman

Alabama Tree Farm Committee State Chairman Paul Hudgins (334) 376-9114 Black Belt District Bart Adams (334) 410-0608 Capital District Vacant Delta District Paul Hudgins (334) 376-9114 Longleaf District Mike Older (334) 222-0379 Mountain District Todd Langston (256) 434-4712

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Piedmont District Bruce Eason (334) 864-9357 Valley District Johnnie Everitt (256) 383-4376 Vulcan District Jason Dockery (256) 734-0573 Warrior District Tim Browning (205) 367-8232 Wiregrass District Heather Wierzbicki (334) 855-5394

Northern Vice Chairman Tim Browning (205) 367-8232 Southern Vice Chairman Heather Wierzbicki (334) 855-5394 At Large Directors: Tim Albritton (334) 887-4560 John Boutwell (334) 365-9221

Tom Carignan (334) 361-7677 Lamar & Felicia Dewberry (256) 396-0555 Don East (256) 396-2694 Chris Isaacson (334) 265-8733 Doug Link (251) 564-6281 Salem & Dianne Saloom (251) 867-6464 Charles Simon (334) 222-1125

Jim Solvason (334) 372-3360 Carolyn Stubbs (334) 821-0374 Allen Varner (334) 240-9308

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Fire Towers & Fire Lookouts an Early American Heritage By Doug Link, past chair and at large member of the Alabama Tree Farm Committee f we were to look back at the early history of forestry and attempts at forest management, the fire tower and fire lookouts played a very important role in the initial successes of American forestry. Often, especially in the American West, the observation point was a small structure sitting atop a hilltop or mountain peak with almost unlimited clear visibility over a far reaching landscape. Communication, though crude at times, was essential to getting the word out to potential fire suppression units to take action on detected smoke columns rising from a potential wildfire. These sentinels in the sky probably helped save millions of acres of potentially destroyed forests across the U.S. One of my first encounters of actually

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The rebuilt fire tower. Inset: The bottom portion of the tower being re-erected one piece at a time.

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climbing a fire tower was on a double date with another couple while I was enrolled in the School of Forestry at the University of Georgia in the late 1950s. The tower was located in a school forest just east of the main campus at the time. My second near encounter was when I was still in forestry school. I applied for a summer job with the U.S. Forest Service and was offered a position of fire lookout on the Flathead National Forest near Kalispell, Montana. I would be assigned at the tower full time except for a two hour walk in and out once a week for mail and 21


Green Horizons supplies. As time to go got nearer, I chickened out and let them know I wasn’t going to show. I ended up helping my carpenterbuilder dad in construction for the summer. When I went to work with Georgia Kraft in Macon, Georgia, on November 6, 1961, I was assigned to the Griswoldville district and management area office east of Macon, Ga. Griswoldville, during the War Between the States, was known for the production of the Griswold and Greer pistol, all of 7 per day, for the Confederate Army. I actually walked through the entrenchments of the battle site that was constructed to defend the small factory at that time. The Griswoldville fire tower stood just two miles away on a high ridge and overlooked much of the management area holdings in parts of Jones and Twiggs counties. Mr. Holliman, the state tower- man, consistently kept our office informed of any potential fire problems, and for the nearly three years, I was assigned to management area #13. He was always on the job except for bailing out during lightening storms. From the late 1960s to early 1980s I was employed by Hammermill Paper Company as a district forester on the Southern district. I managed the scattered company lands south of and east to west of Selma, with my office down in the river bottom at Portland in lower Dallas County. Much of the 37,300 acres scattered over 9 counties was in view of the Elm Bluff fire tower in south Dallas County. Alabama went through an intense fire season, sometimes called a “blow up” situation sometime in the 1970s. The Elm Bluff tower was no longer manned by state personnel at the time, but was accessible. I put together a several-county map with company property plotted on it and with a regular hand compass was able to orient the maps. For days, I performed surveillance and communication with company and state personnel, alternating with dis-

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trict employees until the danger period subsided. I remember a framed photo of the Allison Lumber Company fire tower near Bellamy, Alabama, in the office of Harold Hill, my supervisor with Hammermill at the time. Harold had spent earlier years of his career with American Can Company that controlled much of the old Allison property. The photo appeared to show a homemade wooden fire tower that proba-

The Salooms on top of the world—Salem, Dianne and brother Jimmy

bly overlooked much of the Allison property. This tower would date back to the days when the most common fire fighting tool was a green pine top to help beat out the fire. On April 18, 2013, I was one of 330 attendees at the “Managing Woodlands and Wildlife in Challenging Times” field day on Saloom Properties, LLC. The property is located in Conecuh County, Alabama, and owned by Dr. Salem Saloom, wife Dianne, and son Patrick. They were recipients of the 2010 National Tree Farm Family of the Year Award. What surprised me was a 100-foot-tall shining fire tower in a large food plot area near the equipment barn and camp house. Having been there with a tour group from the National Tree Farm Convention in Mobile in 2006, and maybe a few times since, there was no

fire tower. Salem had moved the Ben MayGopher Hill fire tower from near Rabun in Baldwin County to the Saloom Tree Farm, a distance of 76 miles. In the interview for this article I asked Salem “Why were you so interested in moving the tower to the property?” He explained, “I have always been intrigued by fire towers due to my interest in prescribed burning, longleaf pine management, managing for the gopher tortoise and the historical background of fire towers. It took three to four years of planning to get the tower. I am a member of the Forest Fire Lookout Association and get their magazine.” He mentioned that he started looking for the ideal fire tower and exclaimed, “I’ve climbed a lot of fire towers. Some I should have, some I shouldn’t have. Some were so rusty, and on many, the steps and landings were rotted out. They are a significant part of history and most were erected in the 1930s by the C.C.C. (Civilian Conservation Corps) and were well constructed at the time. All the cuts were 45 degrees on the steelwork on this tower opposed to folded end construction on others that held moisture and tend to rust through.” The tower was released to Dr. Saloom by the Alabama Forestry Commission. Many of the towers remaining in place today are there because they contain communications repeaters. Because of the longleaf pine and gopher tortoise management on Saloom Properties, the Ben May-Gopher Hill tower was a natural fit. A team from upstate New York was chosen to help dismantle and reassemble the tower. The cab roof also had a stopover in Citronelle, Alabama, to be regalvanized at a galvanizing plant and now is a shining example of its original self. Much work and thought went into this monument of the heritage of American forestry. We should all be thankful that the Salooms have preserved this treasure for all of us. ▲

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SFI Forest Partners® Program to help Alabama take advantage of global markets By Barry Graden orest certification is playing a rapidly growing role in company procurement policies across the United States and around the world. Consumer preferences and government regulations are favoring forestry companies and landowners who can prove they practice sustainable forestry. “We believe it is good business to be third-party certified to a credible standard. Third-party certification is an investment in maintaining our social license to grow, manage and harvest forests in a manner that meets client objectives,” said Craig Blair, CEO of Resource Management Service, LLC. While certification delivers obvious benefits like increased market access, the road to becoming certified is less clear without help. Becoming certified can be especially challenging for smaller familyrun businesses and medium-sized landowners who try to go it alone. That’s why the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) and founding partners Time Inc., National Geographic Society, Macmillan Publishers and Pearson launched the SFI Forest Partners Program. “We are pleased to be working with four leaders in publishing that are committed to promoting sustainability. Together we are encouraging more landowners, manufacturers, distributors, customers, conservation groups and government agencies to become certified,” said Kathy Abusow, President and CEO of the Sustainable Forestry Initiative. The SFI Forest Partners Program is helping Alabama landowners and mill operators take a cost-effective approach to accessing certified markets. Starting in the U.S. South, the program’s goal is to certify 10 million acres of forests to the SFI stan-

F

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dard by the end of 2017. “Certification has fundamentally changed the way forests are managed in North America. More than 250 million acres have been certified to SFI alone and, in collaboration with state forestry associations, universities and others, has trained more than 135,000 loggers,” said Larry Selzer, President and CEO of The Conservation Fund and Chair of the SFI board of directors. The SFI Forest Partners Program taps into this scale and experience — the quarter-billion acres of forests certified to the SFI Standard stretch from Canada’s boreal forest to the U.S. south. The program provides information, tools and regional expertise for smaller, family-run businesses and medium-sized landowners to develop the appropriate certification system for their situation. There are three ways to certify to the SFI Standard: forest management, chain of custody, and fiber sourcing. All require third-party audits to maintain an internationally recognized and trusted standard of practice. The SFI Forest Partners Program promotes certification by providing professional expertise and tools to help understand and navigate the SFI Standards. It offers pre-assessment meetings and times audits back-to-back in local areas for cost effectiveness. SFI staff also work with landowners and mill owners and operators to help prepare them to complete their first SFI audit. In Alabama, the SFI Forest Partners

Program is developing options to help reach the goal of certifying 758,000 acres of currently uncertified forestlands to the SFI Standard. This represents about a 4% increase over the number of acres currently certified to the SFI Standard. At least five mills are also slated to be certified under the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or the SFI Chain of Custody Standard. A coordinated project to encourage certification is currently being organized in Alabama. It will offer opportunities for organizations to reduce the overall cost of an audit, making it affordable for small to medium-sized mills to get certified under SFI standards. Each project participant will hold their own certificate, but the audits will be coordinated with the same thirdparty certification body to reduce overhead and auditing costs. SFI staff are also working with the Alabama Forestry Association to identify markets that are important to the state’s forest products industry. This will allow SFI to clearly identify market demand for certified products originating from Alabama. SFI can then encourage links between these markets and Alabama forest landowners and the Alabama forest products industry. “The SFI Forest Partners Program is growing across the U.S. South. We are excited that Alabama is on track to take advantage of growing forest certification across the supply chain,” said Abusow. ▲

Barry Graden is SFI’s Director of Southeast U.S. Community Outreach. Contact Barry to learn more about the SFI Forest Partners program: barry.graden@sfiprogram.org / 864-451-7958.

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Green Horizons

Celebrating Alabama’s Best! By Ken Mc Nabb and Karen Boyd

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labama is blessed with abundant, healthy, and productive forests covering more than two-thirds of the state. Alabama’s forests provide the raw material for our powerhouse forest products industry along with the wildlife, recreational, aesthetic benefits as well. So who owns these forests that provides us with

so much? It’s not the government—state, local, and federal government actually owns around 6%. Nor is it owned by forest industry (companies that own a wood processing plant), which controls only 9 % of our forests. Actually our precious forest resource is owned and controlled by the non-industrial private sector, most of

Landowners connect with forest industry representatives at 2013 Symposium and Banquet event.

which are family forests that have, in many cases, been passed down from generation to generation. It has been estimated there are over 400,000 family forest owners in Alabama, collectively owning around two-thirds of the state’s bountiful forests. We owe a lot to these family forest owners. For the most part they are highly conscientious landowners who are proud of their forests. Some show exemplary dedication to the principles of good stewardship, but then go even further to participate in activities that help educate other landowners and the general public about the nature of good natural resources

management. These individuals need to be recognized for their contributions to Alabama’s natural resources and their dedication to helping those around them. They are the best we have! The Alabama Natural Resources Council provides a forum to recognize these forest management leaders. The council is made up of the heads of various natural resources agencies, including the Alabama Forestry Commission, the Natural Resources Conservation Service, the Alabama Forest Foundation, the TREASURE Forest Association, the Alabama Cooperative Extension Service, and more than a dozen other public agencies dedicated to serving Alabama citizens. The council organizes an annual awards banquet to recognize outstanding family forest owners with awards given for (1) Alabama Tree Farmer of the Year, (2) Outstanding TREASURE Forest owners, (3) Outstanding county natural resources committees, and (4) winners of the W. Kelly Mosley Environmental Achievement Award. The awards banquet provides an opportunity to identify forest owners who have offered so much to the rest of us. The ANRC is proud to help sponsor an event which pulls together fellow citizens wishing to recognize and celebrate the accomplishments and contributions of Alabama’s family forest owners. The next award banquet is planned for February 6, 2015 at the Prattville Marriott Hotel and Conference Center. Immediately prior to the banquet there will be an outreach symposium with several qualified speakers covering topics of interest to forest owners. Please join us in Prattville next February to learn and celebrate the contributions of Alabama’s best. ▲

There are over 400,000 family forest owners in Alabama, collectively owning around two-thirds of the state’s bountiful forests. 24

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A LABAMA NATURAL R ESOURCES C OUNCIL a l a b a m a n a t u r a l r e s o u r c e s . c o m

Outreach Symposium & Awards Banquet

Friday, February 6, 2015 Come help us celebrate the achievements of award winning TREASURE Forest Owners, Tree Farm Owners, and County Natural Resource Committees! Hear about new applied science related to natural resource management! Applied Forestry & Wildlife Outreach Symposium

Awards Banquet

Marriott Prattville Hotel & Conference Center 2500 Legends Circle, Prattville, Alabama 36066 Cost $25.00 until January 15, 2015*

Marriott Prattville Hotel & Conference Center 2500 Legends Circle, Prattville, Alabama 36066 Cost $25.00 until January 15, 2015*

2:00 pm - 4:45 pm

5:00 pm - 7:30 pm

• Pro and Cons of Longleaf vs. Loblolly • Using the Forestry Internet • Forestry Content of the Farm Bill • Timber Theft & Land Security Issues • Eagles of Alabama

• Cocktail Reception (cash bar) • Dinner • Banquet Speaker • Awards Presentation - Tree Farm - TREASURE Forest - County Committees - W. Kelly Mosley

The Symposium & the Banquet will be held at the Marriott Prattville Hotel & Conference Center, Prattville, Alabama • Cost for both is $50.00*

Online Registration opens Oct. 1, 2014 at www.alaforestry.org *The registration fees change January 15, 2015 • Symposium $30.00 & Awards Banquet $30.00 Name: ___________________________________________________ Email:_______________________________________________ Address:______________________________________________________________________________________________________ Check #:_________ OR Credit Card #:_________________________________ Exp Date: ___________________ CV Code:_________ Symposium $25.00* __________ Awards Banquet $25.00*____________ Both $50.00*_________ Please mail to: ANRC Awards Banquet & Symposium • Alabama Forestry Association • 555 Alabama Street • Montgomery, AL 36104-4395 If you would like to register by phone or have questions please call 334.481.2135.


Under the gun for continuing education?

Get ’er done, now! www.alaforestry.org/cfe

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Connecting Kids to Nature

Activity Activ ity 2: Getting in T Touch ouch with T Trees rees By way of neighborhood trees and a mystery box, children will explore their sense of touch and discover different shapes and textures in nature.

‡ ‡ What would life be like without your sense of touch? ‡ Can you identify objects by only feeling them? You can also als bring along a blindfold and have children examine trees using only their hands. Can similarities and differences be found? To learn more m about the unique characteristics of a few American trees, check out Trees, Leaves, Leav and Bark by Diane Burns, 1998, ISBN: 1559716282.

www.plt.org

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Complete this word search puzzle to discover ten words that describe texture. Look below for the answers. Z

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asmith@alaforestry.org

Project Learning TreeÂŽ (PLT) is a program of the American Forest Foundation. In Alabama, PLT is sponsored by the Alabama Forestry Association.

Answers: bumpy, fuzzy, hard, moist, rough, sharp, smooth, soft, spongy, sticky


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ALABAMASAVES Can Save You labama businesses are saving over $5 million in estimated annual energy costs with the help of an innovative financing program aimed at improving the energy efficiency of companies operating existing facilities in the state. Launched in 2011, the Alabama SAVES loan program is helping businesses become more efficient and competitive by lowering energy costs. The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) created AlabamaSAVES to provide state businesses with low-cost financing for energy-efficiency upgrades and the installation of renewable energy systems. The upgrades significantly reduce operating expenses so that savings exceed loan repayments, creating extra cash flow for the business. Since awarding the first loan in June 2011, AlabamaSAVES has funded more than $25 million in loans for energy upgrades at 52 businesses in the state. A range of businesses have taken advantage of AlabamaSAVES loans, including large and small industrial companies, office buildings, hotels and retail businesses.

Before

Westervelt Sawmill at Moundville, Alabama After

Forestry Companies Benefit From Program Forest products industry companies have been among those reaping the benefits of participation in the program. The Westervelt Company was one of the first to make energy efficiency improvements to their facilities with assistance from AlabamaSAVES. An independent energy audit of the energy-saving upgrades indicates the improvements will cut utility costs by 25 percent in the headquarters building and by 12 percent at the sawmill. Other forest products companies participating in the program have included Harrigan Lumber Company Inc. in Monroeville and M.C. Dixon Lumber Company Inc. in Eufaula. 28

Loan funds can finance up to 100% of project costs for energy-efficient fixtures and retrofits installed on property owned or operated by an eligible business. Eligible energy-efficient fixtures and retrofits may include mechanical systems and components including HVAC and hot

water, electrical systems and components including lighting and energy management systems, doors and windows, insulation, refrigeration and combined heat and power. Process improvement upgrades that significantly improve the energy efficiency of production are also eligible for financing A L A B A M A F O R E S TS | Fa l l 2 0 1 4


through the program. Subsidized funding from the program is for retrofits of existing properties and not for new construction of buildings and factories. Renewable-energy systems installed on property owned or operated by an eligible business are eligible for financing through the program. Eligible systems may employ solar, biomass, biofuels, geothermal, micro-hydroelectric, methane capture and use or fuel cell technologies.

Program Can Also Fund Fleet Fuel Conversions In addition, ADECA recently announced that businesses wanting to convert their fleet vehicles to run on propane, liquefied natural gas or compressed natural gas and/or employ idle mitigation technologies are now eligible for AlabamaSAVES loans. Loans can cover the costs of converting existing vehicles to run on the alternative fuels and the installation of fuel pumps and other infrastructure needed to supply the new fuels. ADECA Director Jim Byard Jr. said the program provides a great resource for Alabama companies. “Alabama businesses are the engine of our state’s economy; by helping them become more efficient, we are expanding employment opportunities for our residents,” Byard said. “More and more Alabama businesses are experiencing the benefits of energy efficiency, and they are finding ADECA and the AlabamaSAVES program to be a strong partner.” ADECA established AlabamaSAVES with funds made available to the state by the U.S. Department of Energy’s State Energy Program. Loans of $50,000 to $4 million are available to help Alabama commercial and industrial businesses finance energy-saving improvements. Interest rates for the loans are currently as low as 1 percent. Projects are evaluated on potential for sustainable energy savings, cost savings, renewable energy generation, emissions reductions and job creation

A L A B A M A F O R E S TS | Fa l l 2 0 1 4

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and retention. The program utilizes a pool of qualified service providers (contractors, product vendors, consultants and engineers) to ensure quality. These service providers are familiar with the requirements of the program and can help facilitate the process for the loan applicant.

AFA Member Harrigan Lumber Praises Program Patrick Harrigan of Harrigan Lumber Company recently praised the assistance of one eligible service provider, SEMCO, that worked with the company to use an AlabamaSAVES loan to upgrade lighting at the company’s sawmill in Monroeville. “SEMCO made the AlabamaSAVES program simple and streamlined the entire process from start to finish,” he said. “The level and quality of light has improved; it’s brighter and you can certainly see better! The improved lighting has reduced our utility costs and provided a safer environment for our employees.” A listing of eligible service providers is available at www.alabamasaves.com. Businesses wishing to use a firm not currently on the list can encourage them to review the requirements and submit documentation of qualifications for participation. Abundant Power, a firm that collaborates with states and municipalities to design, administer and finance energy-efficiency and renewable energy programs is administering the AlabamaSAVES program for ADECA. The firm has been instrumental in increasing the initial loan pool from $25 million to $65 million by leveraging funds with private lenders. “AlabamaSAVES uses public funds with private capital to expand energy costs savings. This enables more businesses to participate in the program, creating more jobs and reducing dependence on fossil fuels,” Abundant Power CEO Shannon Smith said. Alabama businesses interested in participating in the program can find more information at www.alabamasaves.com.

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ENERGY B BILLS? ILLS? The AlabamaSAVES Program 1%+ Financing Use your own bankƚŽĮŶĂŶĐĞ the energy saving project WŽƐŝƟǀĞĐĂƐŚŇŽǁĐƌĞĂƚĞĚǁŝƚŚ ĞdžƚĞŶĚĞĚƚĞƌŵƐƵƉƚŽϭϬLJĞĂƌƐ

As facilitators for AlabamaSAVES we provide: ĨƌĞĞĞŶĞƌŐLJĂƐƐĞƐƐŵĞŶƚ ĂŶĚƐƵƌǀĞLJƚŽŝĚĞŶƟĨLJ ƐĂǀŝŶŐƐŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƟĞƐ ƐƐŝŵŝůĂƚĞĚƉƌŝĐŝŶŐĨŽƌ ŝĚĞŶƟĮĞĚƐĂǀŝŶŐƐŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƟĞƐ ĂůĐƵůĂƚĞZK/ ^ƚƌĞĂŵůŝŶĞƚŚĞůĂďĂŵĂ^s^ ĂƉƉůŝĐĂƟŽŶĂŶĚĂƉƉƌŽǀĂůƉƌŽĐĞƐƐ

www.thesemco.com w ww.thesemco.com

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Annual Meeting Highlights

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njoy some highlights of our 2014 AFA Annual Meeting in September at Perdido Beach, Ala. The background photo is a beautiful sunrise at Perdido Beach taken by Mike Moore.

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Governor Robert Bentley, center, spoke with Bob Dixon, Jr. (left) and Fred Stimpson as he made the rounds at the AFA reception on Sunday night. 2 Lt. Gov. Kay Ivey looks over the auction items at the Tree Farm auction. 3 Daniel Christensen, CEO of Hancock Natural Forest Resource Group, was part of the informative panel discussion on Monday, Sept. 8. 4 Moderating the Monday panel discussion was Attorney General Luther Strange. 5 Monday’s forestry discussion panel included, L to R, Attorney General Luther Strange moderator, Dan Christensen, CEO of Hancock Natural Resource Group; Kevin Thieneman, President of the Forest Products Division for Caterpillar, and John Luke, CEO of MeadWestvaco. 6 State Ag Commissioner John McMillan (right) visited with Greg Leatherbury, Jr. of the Hand Arendall law firm located in Mobile and several other cities. 7 Katherine Robertson represented the Alabama Policy Institute at the Tuesday morning panel discussion. 8 Representing MeadWestvaco at the meeting were, Ben Smith, CEO John Luke, Allen Owen and Alex Stoddard. 9 Tuesday’s panel discussion featured political strategist Jim McLaughlin (left) as moderator and featured (L to R) Katherine Robertson of API, Scott Beaulier of Johnson Center at Troy University and Johathan Williams, Director of the Center for State Fiscal Reform.

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Back and better than ever, the Sweet Young’uns kept things lively after the Monday night dinner. 11 Enjoying a day at the links on the Weyerhaeuser team of, L to R, Carlton Morgan, Monte Simpson of Weyerhaeuser, Todd Langston of RockTenn and Wendell Lindsey of RockTenn. 12 Filling out the Jamison Money Farmer team are, L to R, Courtney White of Shuqualak Lumber Co., Orman Wilson of JMS, Kasey Powell of JMS and Michael Minchew, of T.R. Miller. 13 Participating in the Monday panel discussion on the forest economy was John Luke, chairman of MeadWestvaco. 14 Part of the Monday program included a maritime forest field trip at the nearby state park. 15 Having a great time on the golf links were the Baseline team of, L to R, Johnny Carothers of Baseline, Mark Nolen of Nolen Land and Timber, State Senator Trip Pittman and AFA staffer Tom Saunders.

AFA would like to once again thank the following companies for sponsoring the 2014 AFA Annual Meeting GOLD Alabama AG Credit Alabama Farm Credit Rayonier, Inc. U.S. Forest Resources Taylor Machine Works SILVER ArborGen, Inc. Boise Georgia Pacific First South Farm Credit F & W Forestry Services, Inc IndusTREE Timber, Inc. MeadWestvaco Plum Creek Timber Company Scotch Plywood Company BRONZE Cooper Marine & Timberland International Paper Jamison Money Farmer PC Jasper Lumber Company, Inc. Mitchell McLeod Pugh & Williams, Inc. Resource Management Services, LLC

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n the background photo by Danielle Cavanaugh, the sun pops through the pines at a pier near the Peninsula Golf & Racquet Club golf course where Monday’s round was played.

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Gov. Robert Bentley reaches to shake hands with Jim Fletcher of SEMCO as Mrs. Bentley looks on. 2 The Alabama Ag Credit crew was out in force when the exhibitions opened. 3 Janet Ison selling chances on a Yeti cooler in exhibition hall. 4 Monte Simpson and Chris Potts and his wife, Sheila, enjoying each other’s company at the reception. 5 Rayonier’s Mark Shannon (left), Mark Davis and Billy Geier man the Rayonier exhibit in the exhibit hall at AFA meeting. 6 Scott Lawrence (left) got a lot of help from his wife Stephanie at the Southern Resources Mapping Corporation (SRMC) exhibit. 7 Jack Chappell of Meeks Nursery discusses seedlings with Salem and Dianne Saloom. 8 Johnny Thompson of Landmark Spatial Solutions explains some of his company’s products during exhibition. 8


SAFETY

Site Visits UTraining UVideo Library UBulletins UOSHA Compliance Accident prevention is the key to controlling the cost of workers’ compensation. ForestFund offers a wide range of services designed to make your workplace safer. The process starts with a site visit from experienced loss control professionals. Your employees are educated through training sessions that are supplemented by frequent bulletins and an extensive video library. Our highly trained staff emphasizes Drug Free programs, continuing education and OSHA compliance. ForestFund is in its fourth decade of providing safety compliance training and education for employers and employees who harvest, transport, manufacture, buy or sell forest products. Sure there are other programs that provide workers’ compensation coverage, but do they measure up to ForestFund ZKHQLWFRPHVWR6WDELOLW\6DYLQJV6HUYLFHDQG6DIHW\"0DNHWKHFDOOWR¿QGRXW*HQHUDO Liability quotes are also available.

For a quote, call Kelly Daniel at ForestFund: (334) 495-0024


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Kronospan, AU Forestry Club Hold Great Events he good folks at Kronospan and the Auburn University Forestry Club put on great events on September 19 and 20, respectively for the 2014 Log A Load for Kids program. The Kronospan event at Silver Lakes, Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, featured 132 players and raised more than $23,000, $11,000 more than last year, wow! Many thanks to Jeremy Oliver and the Kronospan crew for doing an outstanding job at this great event! Likewise, our thanks to the AU Forestry Club and event sponsor Tom Gallagher for their annual bow shoot at the Sportsman’s Outpost at Waverly, Ala. Tom said that the AU group raised $5,100, the largest amount since they started doing their event there several years ago. Congratulations to the young men and women who do the hard work to make this event a success! Log a Load is winding down with one scheduled event left on the docket.

REMAINING EVENT: ● Nov. 7. Westervelt Sporting Clays & Skeet Shoot at Westervelt Lodge near Aliceville. Contact: George Franklin at, (205) 562-5699 or Lydia Fields at (205) 562-5482.

Shown here is state Log A Load Chair Janet Ison with her son Brandon, who participated in an earlier bow shoot at Waverly.

JASPER L U M B E R

C O M PA N Y

Southern Wood Chips, Inc B&T Shavings, Inc “Tradi

and service—ever tional quality y day”

PO Box 1425 • Jasper, AL 35502 www.jasperlumber.com Phone: (205) 384-9088 / Fax: (205) 384-0000 34

FSC® – C109749

SFI – 00111

A L A B A M A F O R E S TS | Fa l l 2 0 1 4


Index to Advertisers

THANKS, PHIL. AGRICULTURAL LENDING

“We shall hereby be launching on a program of growing trees.”

Alabama Land Banks Associations ▲ AlabamaAgCredit.com ....................................6 COMMERCIAL TRUCK SALES

Truckworx Kenworth ▲ truckworx.com...........................................Inside Front Cover CONSULTANTS—FORESTRY

F&W Forestry Services ▲ fwforestry.com................................................................17 Larson & McGowin ▲ larsonmcgowin.com .............................................................19 McKinley & Lanier Forest Resources, Inc. ▲ mlforestresources.com ...........................17 FORESTRY EDUCATION

Alabama Forests Forever Foundation ▲ alaforestry.org...........................................35 Forestry Continuing Education ▲ alaforestry.org/ce................................................26 Project Learning Tree ▲ plt.org...............................................................................27 FOREST PRODUCT MANUFACTURERS

Cooper/T.Smith ▲ coopertsmith.com.........................................................Back Cover Jasper Lumber Company ▲ jasperlumber.com ........................................................34 INSURANCE

Forest Fund ▲ alaforestry.org.................................................................................33 Witherington Insurance Group ▲ witheringtoninsurance.com................................16

Weyerhaeuser Patented Premium Seedlings.

LANDOWNERS (COMPANIES, INDIVIDUALS & TRUSTS)

The Westervelt Company ▲ westervelt.com ...........................................................17 LOGGING CONTRACTORS

Mid-Star Timber Harvesting, Inc. ▲ midstartimber.com ..........................................36 LOGGING EQUIPMENT

Thompson Tractor ▲ thompsontractor.com ..............................................................4 SEEDLINGS

Arborgen ▲ arborgen.com .......................................................................................5 International Forest Company ▲ interforestry.com .................................................17 Rayonier ▲ rayonier.com........................................................................................17 Weyerhaeuser ▲ weyerhaeuser.com.......................................................................36 Whitfield Farms & Nursery ▲ whitfieldpineseedlings.com ......................................36 SUSTAINABLE ENERGY MANAGEMENT

SEMCO ▲ thesemco.com.......................................................................................................29 TIMBER PROCUREMENT

TR Miller ▲ trmillermill.com ....................................................................................2 UTILITIES

Southern Company ▲ southerncompany.com..................................Inside Back Cover

Frank Mozingo Linc: 185*338 Home: 251-843-5485 Cell: 334-456-2743 frank@midstartimber.com

Henry Lovette Linc: 185*201 Home: 205-673-2247 Cell: 334-456-2274

Justin Bonner Linc: 1*27565*20 Cell: 334-247-2427 justin@midstartimber.com

251-843-5407 midstartimber.com 36

A L A B A M A F O R E S TS | Fa l l 2 0 1 4


© 2014 Alabama Power Company

ELECTRICAL SAFETY TIP No.33

JANUARY IS ELECTRICAL SAFETY MONTH. AS IS FEBRUARY, MARCH, APRIL, MAY, JUNE, JULY, AUGUST, SEPTEMBER, OCTOBER, NOVEMBER, AND DECEMBER.

By Kenneth Hicks Alabama Power Lineman

Never let your guard down when dealing with electricity. That’s the advice given to every lineman who works at Alabama Power. It’s also the advice we give our customers. Here are a few “must-know” tips to help keep you and your family safe. You may have heard a few of these before, but it can’t hurt to hear them again. 1. Stay away from downed power lines. Don’t drive over one. And remember, it’s not just the power line that may be electrified, but the ground surrounding the line, as well. 2. If a power line is touching your car, stay inside the vehicle and call 911. 3. Call 811 before you dig.

6. Watch where you’re placing that ladder. Do not let it touch any electrical wires.

How do you know if your Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter is protecting you and your family? It’s easy. Press the “test” button on the outlet. Whatever is plugged into that outlet should turn off immediately.

7. Don’t overload outlets. We’ve got more gadgets to plug in these days than ever before. That doesn’t mean an outlet can handle them all. Overloaded circuits cause an estimated 5300 fires a year.

4. Install Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter outlets in your kitchen and bathrooms.

8. Don’t touch a damaged electrical cord or one showing bare wire.

5. If something that’s plugged in falls into a sink full of water, DON’T reach in to get it. Don’t even unplug it until after you’ve cut the power off at the circuit breaker.

9. Don’t run an electrical cord under a rug. Don’t staple or nail electrical cords. 10. If you’ve got kids, cover your unused electrical outlets with plastic safety covers.

For more electrical safety tips, visit AlabamaPower.com/safety.

If it does, you’re in good shape and can press the “reset” button to restore normal operation. If nothing happens, you’ve got a problem. See our website or call us for advice on what to do in such a situation.

In an emergency call:

1-800-888-APCO (2726)


#OMMITTEDTO #OMMITTEDTO !!LABAMAS&UTURE LABAMAS&UTURE

WWWCOOPERTSMITHCOM

Profile for Alabama Forestry Association

Alabama Forest - Fall 2014  

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