__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

14 - 23 March 2014

s t a n d

1 3 3

Galerie Meyer O c ea n ic   A rt   &   E sk im o   A rt


Early Oceanic Art &

Archaic Eskimo Art

Works of Art from the collections of Dr. Arthur Bässler Jean Castex Rosalind & Philip Goldman Dr. Albert Hahl Dr. Hans Himmelheber Dr. Augustin Krämer The Voyage of the Korrigane The Linden Museum Steyler Mission Sankt Augustin Pierre Vérité & Private Collections Le texte en français de ce catalogue est téléchargable sur le site internet de la galerie www.galerie-meyer-oceanic-art.com et sur www.issuu.com

Galerie Meyer O c ea n ic   A rt   &   E sk im o   A rt A N T H O N Y   J P   M E Y E R

1 7 R u e   d e s   B e a u x -­‐ A r t s   P a r i s   7 5 0 0 6   F r a n c e TEL:  +  33  1  43  54  85  74          FAX:  +  33  1  43  54  11  12      MOB:  +  33  6  80  10  80  22 ajpmeyer@gmail.com                      www.galerie-­‐meyer-­‐oceanic-­‐art.com Syndicat  National  des  Antiquaires Syndicat  Français  des  Experts  Professionnels  en  Œuvres  d’Art  et  Objets  de  Collection Chambre  Européenne  des  Experts  d’Art  


1


A Royal seat. Society Islands, Polynesia. Probably pua wood (Fagraea berteriana) with a coat of old, yellowed varnish. 62,2 x 23,5 x 37,1 cm. 18th/19th century. Pen & ink inscription “J.M. from OTahiti(e)” on underside. Ex private collection, UK. The marks on this seat show it to be made with non-metal tools.

Various types of monoxyle royal seats were used in the Society Islands and other Central Polynesian Islands such as the Austral, Cook and Tuamotu Archipelagos. The best known type, from Tahiti, with its curved seat on tall, straight, joint legs was first observed on the Cook voyages in the last quarter of the 18th century. A small number exist in public collections and even fewer are in private hands. The most notable example is the so-called “Omai seat” represented in the portrait of Omai painted by Nathaniel Dance in 1774 and now in the collections of the Musée de Tahiti et des Iles, Tahiti. The most common form of Polynesian royal seat is the superbly elegant model from the island of Atiu in the Cook Islands with its curved plateau set low on arched legs ending in drop-shaped pads. Other variations exist from the Australs and the Tuamotus. So far only a small number of seats with waisted, flared legs are known, notably the examples in the Otago Museum in New Zealand and in the Musée de la Castre in Cannes, France. These seats were used by Royals and Chiefs of supreme importance - the reason for the variation from curved to flat plateau remains to be determined; it is possibly a question of rank, local geographical origin, or simply part of an evolutionary process. In the beautifully rendered painting below by Pavel Nikolaevich Mikhailov, the artist on the First Russian Antarctic Exploration voyage of 1820/1821, we can see three Europeans seated on low seats. To the far left of the scene is a man preparing food on what appears to be the same type of platform and in the lower right hand corner is an upturned possibly larger oval table. Pomare II, the King of Tahiti, is receiving Captain Bellingshausen, Commander of the expedition, at breakfast. While the King and Queen remain seated on woven mats the three visitors of distinction are offered low, four-legged stools, identical to the one offered here.

With regard to the above scene, Captain Fabian Gottlieb Thaddeus von Bellingshausen writes on July 23 1820 : “(…) At 8 am I went ashore with Mr. Lazarev to visit the King (Pomare), his secretary Paofai, and Mr. Nott (…) Mr. Mikhailov was busy sketching the view of Matavai Harbour (…) I invited Mr. Mikhailov to accompany us, in the hope that he might see other objects of interest which he might record with his brush (…) The King and his family were sitting, tailor fashion and were breakfasting on suckling pig, dipping it in sea water contained in smoothly polished cocoa-nut shells (…) The King shook hands with us and said "Yurana" (welcome). At his command we were given low stools with feet, not more than six inches in height, and each was served a glass beaker full of fresh cocoa-nut milk, a refreshing and most delicious beverage (…) Meanwhile Mr. Mikhailov had sat down about six yards off, to one side, and was sketching the whole Royal family as they sat at breakfast…" (pages 267, 268 in Debenham, 1945).


The four images here show the same type of seat in various artistic renderings ranging from the naive through to the realistic. They date from 1802 up to 1847 and show that this type of royal seat was already in use in the Society Islands in the earliest years of the 19th century. Clockwise from top they are Bellingshausen & Pomare II at breakfast by Pavel Nikolaevich Mikhailov (1820); “Ari’i - Chief of Otahiti”, Pomare II as a young man by John William Lewin (1802); King Tapoa II by Sir Henry Byam Martin (1846/47); and “Objects of the Society Islands” by Jules-Louis Le Jeune (1823).


The inscription on the underside of this seat appears to read in English “J.M. from OTahiti or OTahite”. There is a possibility that it is written in French. Either way the initials J.M. (or possibly I.M.) have not yet been identified. If the words are French then the middle word might be “Trone” as in “J.M. Trone Otahiti(e)” which would translate as J.M. throne or royal seat/chair from Tahiti. The inscription is written with a ferro-gallic ink that has faded to a light brown and while visible in U.V. light it does not react well in the Infrared due to its high carbon content.


One of the two other recorded examples of this type of seat is in the Otago Museum, Dunedin, New Zealand (D56.4), shown here to the right as N° 39. It was originally donated to the Elgin Museum, Elgin, Scotland on 29/12/1886, on behalf of Miss Gordon of Thunderton. In 1955 Kenneth Athol Webster purchased the seat along with a group of artifacts from the Elgin museum and subsequently sold it to the Otago Museum. The detail (lower left page B/W) shows the underside and one can see the identical treatment of the wood and the shaping of the legs in comparison to the seat offered here. The example here below, in the Musée de la Castre in Cannes, was collected circa 1843-47 by Edmond

de Ginoux de La Coche who obtained it in Tahiti from a man by the name of Mare. This seat has a gently curved plateau, which projects the legs slightly outward.

Over the years and throughout the various publications relating to Oceanic Art, Central Polynesian seats and pounding tables have often been confused and misrepresented. In order to set the record straight, suffice to show that pounding tables are conceived for their function in a very specific and technologically developed manner. The repeated blows of the basalt, coral or wooden pounders on the top of a pounding table send massive shockwaves into the wood. Thus pounding tables are carved with a “belly” or thickened plateau - this deeper section of wood placed centrally to the pounding area absorbs, and evenly spreads the shockwaves throughout the entire structure. The legs of pounding tables are massive, short trunks, capable of sustaining the tremendous repetitive pressures brought about by countless hours of pounding taro, breadfruit and banana on the plateau. The Tahitian pounding table shown below (Otago Museum, Dunedin, New Zealand, N° D31.174) has the same type of waisted feet as the present Royal seat which helps to identify its cultural origin but it also has the conical “belly” that proves its function and which can only be seen in profile. The pounding has caused a depression to form over time in the center of the plateau and one can see that the overall patina of the table is consistent with it being left more or less to the elements outside the dwelling in the cooking area. Seats on the other hand are preserved as important elements of the household and as royal accoutrements they are respected and cared for.


A remarkable photo showing Henry (Harry) Devenish Skinner (1886-1978), former Director of the Otago Museum sitting on a very large bench - probably Tahitian as the legs are of the waisted cylinder type with flared feet.

This ceremonial food bowl or umete is reported to have been found in an English furniture shop by a curator of the British Museum, London.

The small pounding table with typical waisted cylinder legs and flared feet from the AndrĂŠ Breton collection, Paris.

A footed umete with waisted legs and flared feet in the Bernice P. Bishop Museum, Honolulu.

A unique footed bowl or umete carved from a massive block of black basalt and acquired from the Tahitian chief Tu in 1775. Museo Nacional de Antropologia, Madrid.

This is a selection of objects showing the multiple variations of the typical Tahitian waisted leg with flared foot in comparison to the seat offered here. The large, footed umete and the pounding tables appear to be more popular - at least more common than seats, and seem to have been brought back in larger numbers by travelers in the early days of European presence in Polynesia. The sampling here is not exhaustive and presents only published examples.


2

A master-carver’s wood working adze mounted with a long, tanged, triangular blade. The elegance and dimensions of the blade as well as its remarkable state of preservation show that this was a tool of the utmost importance. It is reported that artists would put their favorite adze “to sleep� in the temple on the night before beginning an important sculpture so that the adze would benefit from the powers instilled by the gods. The shaft is superbly rendered with a complex cross section ranging from the flared, perfectly circular pommel to oval and on to a sharp ended egg shape towards the heel of the adze. The binding is made of sennit (braided coconut husk) tightly wrapping the tanged blade to its carved-out lodging and buffered with a section of shark or stingray skin. Rarotonga or Mangaia Islands, Cook Islands, Polynesia. basalt, coconut fiber, fish skin, wood. 66,5 x 9,2 x 26,7 cm. 18th/19th century. From the private collection of a British antique furniture dealer c. 1940/50.


3

An extremely fine ivi po'o or toggle, powerfully carved to represent a deified ancestor known as Tiki. This ivi po'o is unusual in that the left hand of the ancestor is turned upwards. It retains a tuft of sennit-mounted human hair, which was originally worn as a body ornament. Marquesas Islands, Polynesia. Human bone with a superb patina of age and light wear; human hair and coconut fiber cord. 3,8 cm (bone only). 18th/19th century (pre-contact and carved with non-metal tools). Acquired on the French art market in the 1960/70's. Pub. : OCEANIE : les Esprits Vagabonds. Galerie Dodier, Avranches, 2013, N° 37.


4

An extremely fine ivi po'o or toggle delicately carved to represent a deified ancestor known as Tiki. It retains a tuft of sennit-mounted human hair, which was originally worn as a body ornament. Marquesas Islands, Polynesia. Human bone with a superb patina of age and light wear; human hair and coconut fiber cord. 3,7 cm (bone only). 18th/19th century (pre-contact and carved with non-metal tools). Acquired on the French art market in the 1960/70's. Pub. : OCEANIE : les Esprits Vagabonds. Galerie Dodier, Avranches, 2013, N° 26.


5

A very fine and unusually small apa'apai war club completely engraved all over with classical geometric motifs and incorporating a standing human figure and a stylized bird in flight or flying-fox (large fruit-eating bat). The figure has both arms stretched out to either side holding a bird in profile in each hand. The butt has a small pierced lug. Tongan Islands, Polynesia. Iron-wood (casuarina equisetifolia). 66,2 cm. 18th/19th century. Ex private collection, Paris.


6

An extremely fine war club of a type named moungalaulau or apa'apai and usually described as of Tongan origin. I believe however that this style was developed on ‘Uvea, better known as Wallis Island, under Tongan influence. The size, workmanship and motifs are of course similar to Tongan examples yet this type of club is smaller, more delicate and lighter than its Tongan counterparts. The decor here is remarkably well thought-out and extremely well rendered with refinement and a certain softness contrary to the decor on most of these clubs, which seem to be scratched in or carved with little regard to quality, making them appear to be of much later manufacture - and possibly dance clubs or curios. ‘Uvea Island, Wallis & Futuna Archipelago, Polynesia. Wood. 109,2 x 9 x 4 cm. 19th century. Ex coll. : the French artist Jean Castex (1927/2012), Paris.


7

8

The ula is a short heavy-headed club used both as a hand-weapon for in-fighting as well as for throwing at an out-of-reach enemy. A well thrown ula can hit its target at more than 15 meters. The ula is specific to the islands of Fiji in Western Polynesia though Tongan examples are recorded. 7) : I Ula Drisa, ball-head type with a large section of whale tooth inset into one of the natural holes of the head. Casuarina Equisetifolia. 43 x 10 Ă˜ cm. 18/19th century. Ex Private collection, UK. 8) : I Ula Tava Tava, the head carved as a segmented fruit. Casuarina Equisetifolia. 43 x 11,7 Ă˜ cm. 19th century. Ex Private collection, UK.


9

An exceptionally large bowai, or pole-club of unusual length and weight. The butt is deeply recessed and the rim is decorated with three concentric engraved rings. Fiji, Western Polynesia. Casuarina Equisetifolia. 126 x 6 cm. 19th century.


10

A very fine ceremonial war-spear carved with an exceptionally large, archaic-style ancestor head. A weapon of this caliber and quality would be the property of an important chief. The superb and large head is carved in the manner of the great apouema masks worn for the funerary rituals of the chief with the beehive-like coif and the long beard. It has the unusual particularity of the teeth showing between the open grimacing lips. New Caledonia, Melanesia. Wood with burnt bancoul nut blackening (both extremities shortened). 204,5 cm total (head 8,5 cm). 18th/19th century. From the BouĂŠ collection of exotic weapons, Indre, France.


11

A fine ceremonial war-spear carved with a large classical-style ancestor head. A weapon of this caliber and quality would be the property of a chief. New Caledonia, Melanesia. Wood with burnt bancoul nut blackening. 215,7 cm total (head 4,9 cm). 19th century. Ex William & Ernest Ohly, Berkeley Galleries, London (1942-1977); by descent.


12

A very fine male pubic-cover and waist ornament worn with the wood block to the rear above the buttocks(flat side to the body) and the beaded fiber bundle hanging in front of the crotch. The fiber bundle is composed of a single strand measuring over 300 meters in length and doubled back on itself. The strand is spirally wrapped with an extremely fine fiber thread. Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu. Wood with fiber, glass trade beads and red European yarn. 27,5 x 9 cm (wood block), +/- 45 cm total. 19th century. Originally found on a flea market near Maastricht, the Netherlands.


13

A small, finely carved mast-head ornament supporting an ancestor figure. The ancestor is in the power-stance or crouch with strong thighs and flexed arms. The figure is a protective amulet attached to the tip of the mast of the canoe and while the larger examples support the halyard, the smaller ones are purely protective. Murik Lakes, Lower Sepik River, PNG, Melanesia. Wood with a weathered patina due to exposure, original cassowary feathered coif. 46,5 x 40 cm. 19th/ 20th century. Ex coll. : The S.V.D (societas verbi divini) Mission Museum of the Steyler Mission at Sankt Augustin, Germany, Inv. N° 7?.2.316 in white on underside. Collected in the field by a missionary of the order. Deaccessioned from the museum to Ulrich Hoffmann circa 2001.


An ancestor figure carved with several unusual features : the beard is “cobblestoned”, the eyes have their pupils placed to the inner edge and the eye-white area is carved with dentate or foliate ornaments. The figure retains its original tapa loincloth, fiber nose and ear ornaments. Ramu River, PNG, Melanesia. Wood with red pigment, fiber and tapa. 37 x 13 cm. 19th century. Acquired by Dr. Arthur Bässler (1857-1907)) prior to 1898. Inventoried into the Linden-Museum, Stuttgart in 1899 as N° 6109, “20 MeilenInseln, Dr. Bässler” and “IC6109, NG”. Deacquisitioned by exchange to Hermann Seeger on January 15, 1954; Private collection, Germany.

14

Dr. Bässler, who acquired thousands of pieces from New Guinea, many of which are inscribed with the collection location “20 Meilen-Inseln”, never actually visited the spot as he did not field collect. He purchased pieces and groups of objects mainly from ship captains, plantation owners, and colonial administrators in the ports and trading posts. To give an idea of the extent of the Bässler collections he gave over 5000 Pacific objects just to the Völkerkunde Museum of Dresden between 1899 und 1904. The rest of his collection is divided between Berlin and Stuttgart, the latter having sold or traded out pieces in the 1950/60’s which explains the presence of notable pieces with early German provenance on the art market today. “20 Meilen-Inseln” is mentioned by Ernst Tappenbeck, the leader of the Second Ramu Expedition (Zweite RamuExpedition) of 1898. He also took part in the Kaiser-Wilhelmsland-Expedition of 1896 (also known as the First Ramu Expedition). Maximilian Krieger illustrates several figures and a headrest in his publication NEU-GUINEA of 1899 as being from Tappenbeck and with the provenance as “20 Meilen-inseln’. As Bässler did not go into the field, it is quite possible that the pieces annotated as collected at “20 Meilen-Inseln” were acquired directly from Tappenbeck or other members of the two Ramu expeditions.

Arthur Bässler


15

A fine and elegant suspension hook carved with the ancestor head placed at the top of an elongated diamond body surmounting the wide-spread hook-points. Blackwater River Area, Sepik River, PNG, Melanesia. Wood with a thick crusty patina of soot. 71,7 x 27,2 x 4,5 cm. 19/20th century. Ex Rosalind & Philip Goldman, Gallery 43, London (original base by Frank Thomas); subsequently Mia & Loed van Bussel.


16

A very rare armband ornament representing an ancestor figure reduced to the bare essentials. The overly large head is powerfully carved with an expressive face over the simplified body ending in a tapered stick representing the legs. These figures were displayed stuck in woven fiber bands worn on the upper arms by male dancers. Lower Sepik, PNG, Melanesia. Wood with traces of pigments and a very good patina of age and usage. 26 cm. 19th century (carved with non-metal tools). Collected in the field by the La Korrigane Expedition, 1934/1936. Field Inv. N ° 1847 ; Musée de l’Homme deposit N° D.39.3.1458., acquired at Kanganaman Village. Subsequently acquired from Jean Roudillon, Paris. Pub. : OCEANIE : les Esprits Vagabonds. Galerie Dodier, Avranches, 2013, N° 41.


17

A very fine amulet-mask worn either attached to the side of a man’s bag or perhaps to the edge of his beard. The segmented nose ornament is worn by the men of the Lower Sepik area and the offshore Schouten Islands. Lower Sepik River and Schouten Archipelago, PNG, Melanesia. Wood with nassa shell inlay (one missing). 16,3 x 5,2 x 3,5 cm. 19th century. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868/1945), Governor of German New Guinea (1902/1914); by descent; acquired from the family.


18

A very fine amulet carved in the form of a free standing male ancestor figure. Ramu River, PNG, Melanesia. Wood with a fine patina of use and age with traces of red ocher. 13,4 cm. 19th century. Ex private collection, Switzerland. Pub. : OCEANIE  : les Esprits Vagabonds. Galerie Dodier, Avranches, 2013, N° 19.


D9 D14

D20 D7

D10 D8

D26

D17

D13

D21

D27

D12

D18

A collection of twenty-seven bone daggers from New Guinea (N°15 is an arm band ornament made from an old dagger). These are all old and well-used weapons and highly-prized prestige objects. The earliest is probably N° 5 as it appears to have been collected by Lt. Berard on the voyage of the Coquille under the command of Louis Isidore Duperrey between 1822 and 1825. Notably of interest are the two human bone examples respectively from the Boiken area (N° 11) with its concentric diamond decor and the Upper Sepik River example from Swagup (N° 22) with its beautiful and deeply engraved floral motifs. A group of very finely carved and superbly decorated Iatmul daggers were collected on the Sepik River by the French expedition of the Korrigane between 1934 and 1936 (N° 3, 7, 14, 20, 25). The Abelam daggers are all of wonderful design and their patina shows many decades of use and handling. Among the 5 Asmat daggers, two (N° 12, 19) are made from the lower jaw bones of crocodiles and still have teeth inset into the grip and two are of human bone (N° 2, 13). N° 2 is superbly designed with a splayed, full-figure ancestor, sporting a stylized Cockatoo head and carved in relief astride the aggressively notched blade.


D11

D1

D3 D24 D4

D23 D25

D15 D6

D2

D16

D5

D22

D19

D1) Abelam. 33,1 cm. D2) Asmat. Human bone. 34 cm. D3) Iatmul. La Korrigane (N° D.39.3.762) 32,9 cm. D4) Abelam. 33,1 cm. D5) Abelam. Probably collected by August Berard as officer on the Coquille 1822-1825, Inv. “NG 13”. ; then Faculté des Sciences, Montpellier. 32,7 cm. D6) Abelam. 30,5 cm. D7) Iatmul. La Korrigane (N° D.39.3.1572). 21,8 cm. D8) Abelam. 36,2 cm. D9) Abelam. 29,3 cm. D10) Abelam. 37,2 cm. D11) Boiken. Human bone. 30,9 cm. D12) Asmat. Crocodile jaw bone. Coll. Gert Lambregts; W. & H. van Halm. 46,5 cm. D13) Asmat. Human bone. 31,5 cm. D14) Iatmul. La Korrigane (N° 10, auction Rennes, 20/02/12, Coll. Ratisbonne) 33,8 cm. D15) Abelam. Arm band ornament. Coll. Dr. Sempe. 36,4 cm. D16) Unidentified. 29,8 cm. D17) Iatmul. 36,9 cm. D18) Iatmul. Coll. Dr. Sempe. 22,8 cm. D19) Asmat. Crocodile jaw bone. 33,8 cm. D20) Iatmul. La Korrigane (N° D.39.3.1582) 37 cm. D21) Abelam. 36,6 cm. D22) Swagup. Human bone. 36,3 cm. D23) Abelam. 36,3 cm. D24) Abelam. 39,4 cm. D25) Iatmul. La Korrigane (N° D.39.3.1576) 35,9 cm. D26) Asmat. 37 cm. D27) Abelam. 32,4 cm. Unless indicated all are carved from the leg bone of a cassowary (Casuarius).


19

A superb paint dish in the form of a turtle. The outside edges of the body forming the receptacle are carved with fine, deep chevron motifs and the animal’s head is expressive and naturalistic. The underside is beautifully painted with a central “dumbbell” motif framed in a double circle of cobblestones - the outer carved and painted, the inner only painted. Iatmul People, Middle Sepik, PNG, Melanesia. Wood with original polychromy. 25,5 x10,7 x 3,3 cm. 19th century. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868/1945), Governor of German New Guinea (1902/1914); by descent; acquired from the family. An identical example, possibly by the same hand is illustrated in Neuhauss, R. : DEUTSCH-NEU-GUINEA, Verlag Dietrich Reimer, Berlin, 1911, fig. 224, p. 326, Vol. I.


Dr. Albert Hahl (1868/1945), arrived in German New Guinea in 1896 at the age of 28 as the imperial judge (1896–98) based at Herbertshoehe, New Britain. He was then named Acting Governor of German New Guinea (1899-1901) replacing the ailing Governor Rudolph von Benningsen. In 1902 Dr. Hahl was appointed Governor. In 1914, after eighteen years of colonial service of the highest order, he traveled to Germany on official business and remained in Europe due to the declaration of WWI which effectively ended German rule over New Guinea.

20

A small wonderfully whimsy paint dish in the form of a crocodile. The outside is decorated with incised chevron motifs and the underside is scored to form a light checkerboard design. Iatmul People, Middle Sepik, PNG, Melanesia. Hard wood with original polychromy and a superb patina of use and age. 20 x 4,2 1,8 cm. 19th century. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868/1945), Governor of German New Guinea (1902/1914); by descent; acquired from the family.


aze

21

9

A fine early war-shield with a remarkable and unusual decor. The outer dentate rim and the interlocking scrolls are typical of the local iconography, however the arrangement of the motifs inside this framework is quite different. The norm of one or several distinguishable faces is “exploded” here to form suggestions of disassembled mouths and eyes floating around one central stylized smiling face. The original woven cane strap handles are still present on the rear. Wogamush (Biaka) Village ?, Wogamush River, Upper Sepik River, PNG, Melanesia. Wood (cutout and carved from the gigantic buttress roots of rainforest Ficus trees), pigments and Oldman collection, Plate 46 cane. 176,5 x 52 x cm. 19/20th century. Ex collection of a Dutch artist c. 1970’s.

Oldman collection, Plate 51


22

An extremely rare archer’s war-shield, decorated with an incised stylized representation of a human figure wearing a kina shell chest ornament and stylized body paint or keloid “tattoo”. The original fiber carrying strip is still attached (lower knot missing). Mendi Area, Southern Highlands, PNG, Melanesia. Wood-carved with non-metal tools. 76 x 30,5 cm. 19/20th century or earlier. Ex coll. : De Belfond, Limoges, France; collected during an expedition in the 1950/60’s. Musée des Arts d'Afrique et d'Océanie, Paris, deposit number D.94.1.58. This exceptional shield was on loan from the De Belfond collection to the MAAO for an exhibition in 1994 and was inventoried as a long-term deposit thus the museum inventory number painted on the reverse.


23

Headrest supported by a powerfully carved Janus, kneeling ancestor figure. Tami Islands, Huon Gulf, PNG, Melanesia. Wood with lime infill. 11 x 12,8 x 6,6 cm. 19th century. Ex Hans Himmelheber (1908 - 2003); Augustin Krämer (1865–1941); Paul Missner (1889-1958); private collection, the Netherlands.


To the left here is an excerpt from the original list of objects that Hans Himmelheber offered to Prof. Augustin Krämer on February 2nd, 1932. Himmelheber wrote in the cover letter that if Prof. Krämer did not wish to pay with money then trade was also an option. This headrest is N° 316 and was valued at 28 Reichmarks. Krämer also acquired a Tami Island mask, a Sepik River Mask as well as a Trobriand Island lime spatula from this list. Hans Himmelheber was a student of Dr. Augustin Krämer. He subsequently sold and traded many marvelous pieces to his mentor and teacher - several which, through Krämer, later entered the Missner collection. Prof. Krämer, as first Director of the Linden Museum in Stuttgart, brought Paul Missner from Dresden to work as a restorer in the museum in 1911. Missner worked at the museum for over 40 years retiring in 1954.

Director Augustin Krämer, King Wilhelm II and Duke Ulrich von Urach at the opening of the Linden-Museum in Stuttgart in May of 1911.


24

A lime spatula by an unknown MasterCarver showing a very rare (possibly unique) configuration of what can be construed as Mother & Child or Male & Female or simply two seated figures - one on the raised knees of the other. The figures are carved in the typical Massim pose with the body seated, arms bent with elbows on knees (smaller figure only) and hands raised to the chin. The larger figure is shown holding the head of the smaller one between its elbows conferring a touch of tenderness and humanity rarely encountered in Massim art. Massim Area, PNG, Melanesia. Ebony wood with lime infill. 32,4 x 3,2 x 2,8 cm. 19th century. Ex Emil Stรถrrer (1950/60), Zurich; by descent.


26

25

27 28 Four kapkap from the Bismarck Archipelago illustrating the diversity and seemingly boundless variation of designs. 25) Admiralty Islands, Bismarck Archipelago, PNG, Melanesia. 10,1 Ø cm. Tridacna and glass trade beads. 26) Admiralty Islands, Bismarck Archipelago, PNG, Melanesia. 10,8 Ø cm. Tridacna and turtle shell. 27) New Ireland, Bismarck Archipelago, PNG, Melanesia. 9,2 Ø cm. Tridacna and turtle shell. 28) New Ireland, Bismarck Archipelago, PNG, Melanesia. 6,7 Ø cm. Tridacna and turtle shell. All date from the 19th century and are from the private collection of Dr. Albert Hahl (1868/1945), Governor of German New Guinea (1902/1914); by descent; acquired from the family.


29

A war-club with bulbous head and conical pointed butt. These weapons were used both to crush and to poke the enemy. Sulka war-shields (see N째 30) often show the pockmarks caused by the tips of clubs. Sulka People, Eastern New Britain, Bismarck Archipelago, PNG, Melanesia. Hard wood. 19th century. 130,5 x 7 cm. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868/1945), Governor of German New Guinea (1902/1914); by descent; acquired from the family.


30

A very fine dance wand in the form of a stylized war-club with a beautiful, engraved decoration representing floral motifs around the face of an ancestral spirit to each side. Kilenge, New Britain, PNG, Melanesia. Painted wood. 100 x 8 x 3.4 cm. 19/20th century. Field collected by Pierre Langlois c. 1950/60. Ex coll. : Jorge Camacho, Paris; Galerie Meyer, Paris; Mr. & Mrs. Van der Weerdt, the Netherlands.


31

A superb war-shield, or ngaile, with carved and painted decoration to both sides. These magnificently colored shields are one of the most desirable objects of Oceanic Art and are a true icon and goal for collectors. The wonderfully graphic designs form strangely structured faces representing spirits and/or ancestors. The elements of the faces are made up of parts of bird heads with the concentric eyes focusing the enemy’s attention and probably distracting him in combat. For the moment there seems to be no true consensus on the representational aspects of these designs. The colors on the shields are of prime importance and New Britain is one of the very few places in Oceania where natural green and blue were manufactured from the juices of certain plants before the arrival of European paint. Actually used in warfare, this shield shows not only the stigmata of fighting with clubs but also has the remains of a spear point thrown with such strength as to actually pierce the shield through. The point is cut off to both sides but a fragment remains embedded just above the central knob to the right. Sulka People, Eastern New Britain, Bismarck Archipelago, PNG, Melanesia. Alstonia wood, cane and pigments. 19th century. 119 x 38,5 cm. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868/1945), Governor of German New Guinea (1902/1914); by descent; acquired from the family.


32

A kepong mask representing an ancestral forest spirit, a form of wild counterpart to humans. The nose is carved as a separate piece and develops a complex assemblage of a bird (hornbill ?) holding the tail of a snake that zigzags downward while being bitten behind the head by a shark. An inverted stylized bird beak supports the snake from under. The eyes are carved as tight ovals with raised edges containing the shell pupils. The cheeks are painted with oval lines that terminate in the two oblique corners with black silhouettes of angelfish. Possibly Lavongai Island (ex New Hannover), Northern New Ireland, Bismarck Archipelago, PNG, Melanesia. Alstonia wood with pigments and turbo marmoratus opercula. 88 x 36 x 22 cm. 19th century. Ex coll. Pierre Verité & Claude Verité, Paris (acquired circa 1930/1950) Inv. N° 3277.


33

A very rare, figurative, multi-pointed ceremonial spear representing a stylized male ancestor. The four multi-barbed points issue from the coif, which is decorated with incised motifs that, while geometric in design, represent a stylized grimacing human face. The shaft of the spear is cut down and shows extensive patination due to age and prolonged use. Admiralty Islands, Bismarck Archipelago, PNG, Melanesia. Wood, string, seeds, with red, black, and white pigments. 176.5 x 9 x 6.5 cm. 19th century. Ex coll. : Alfred Bühler (former director of the Museum für Völkerkunde, Basel); Lorenz Eckert, Basel; Udo Horstmann, Zug. The only other example I have ever found is the one in the Musée d’Ethnographie at Neuchâtel, N° V.421 (B/W image) and which is quite obviously carved by the same artist. It was acquired from A.J. Speyer in the 1920’s and has an old unidentified museum number (3290).


34

A food dish, or apia nie, of waisted rectangular form. The thick floor slopes down to the bottom of the dish making for a very small foot and the in-curved sides are extremely thin walled. These platters were used to serve food both for ceremonial occasions as well as normal meals. While the island of Wuvulu is only some eighty kilometers from New Guinea, its inhabitants are of Micronesian origin. Maty (Wuvulu) Island, Bismarck Archipelago, PNG, Micronesian Outliers. Wood (calophyllum) with its original crusty patina of use. 59 x 32 x 11.2 cm. 19/20th century. Ex coll. : Mia & Loed van Bussel, Amsterdam; Gal. Meyer, Paris; private collection, USA.


35

A short double-sided dagger or fighting knife that is reported in the early literature to be exclusively used by women. Knives of this type were normally equipped with a sheath or protection made of two sections of pithy soft wood. Maty (Wuvulu) Island, Bismarck Archipelago, PNG, Micronesian Outliers. Wood with bull shark teeth (Carcharhinus leucas), string and lime. 21 x 6,7 x 2,6 cm. 19th century. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868/1945), Governor of German New Guinea (1902/1914); by descent; acquired from the family.


36

A rare and exceptionally large tjuringa (churinga), or sacred board. The front is covered with an incised and varied geometric decor. The size of this tjuringa places it amongst the greatest of the Aboriginal sacred art works. A tjuringa exists for every living soul in the Aboriginal tribes. The personal tjuringa are usually smallish, often not more than 50 or 60 centimeters long. The larger ones, which very rarely exceed 2 meters in length, represent deified ancestors and mythological spirits. They are clan tjuringa and are presented to the young initiates during the manhood ceremonies. The back of this tjuringa is beautifully adzed with non-metal tools. Wongkais Tribe (?), Ooldea Area, Central Australia. Hard wood, with a fine patina. 228 cm. 17th/19th century. Exhibited : "Au Commencement Etait le RĂŞve", Galerie Le Gall-Peyroulet, 18 Rue Keller, Paris 75011, 19 june/13 july 1990.


Archaic Eskimo Art

Okvik Punuk Thule Yup’ik


37

A hair comb decorated on both sides with incised motifs. One corner is pierced probably for the attachement of beaded ornamentation. Punuk Culture, Alaska. Mineralized walrus tusk. 9,5 x 4,1 cm. 400 to 900 AD.


38

A hunting charm in the form of a whale, carved with geometric motifs on the dorsal area. Punuk culture, Bering Strait, Alaska. Mineralized walrus tusk. 8,4 cm. c. 600-900 AD. Ex Lin & Emile Deletaille, Bruxelles. Ex private collection, Italy.


39

A very rare central section probably from a composite cuirass. Armors made of slats of walrus, seal or caribou ribs sewn together were worn in battle as upper-body protection in the early Eskimo cultures. Some rare examples were made of thin slices of walrus tusk such as the cuirass in the Musée d’Ethnographie at Neuchâtel (left). The present centerpiece is possibly in the form of a stylized vulva, however the incised decor of concentric chevrons does have a very definite and bellicose downward spear-point in the middle. The lateral edges of the object are pierced three times along their length. Punuk Culture to early Thule Culture, Alaska. Mineralized walrus tusk. 9,5 x 5,5 cm. 400 to 1200 AD. Ex private collection, U.K.


40

A large votive or magical effigy of a hunter in his kayak. The figure and vessel appear to be carved from the same piece of wood and assembled with two lateral pegs. The kayak is pierced through at both ends with the holes directed so that the object can be hung in its upright position. This and other aspects, such as being unpainted as well as found under rocks, indicates that it was a shaman’s object. Cape Nome, Alaska. Wood with a weathered patina and traces of scorching or tar. 38 cm. 19th century or earlier. Found buried under large rocks on Cape Nome in 1968 along with a wooden figure. Ex coll. : Josephine L. Reader. Pub. : ESKIMO ART, Tradition and innovation in North Alaska. Dorothy Jean Ray, University of Washington Press, Seattle, 1977, p. 119, fig. 56.


41

A minute, light wood figure of a pregnant woman. The face shows conventionalized Eskimo features notably a round face with flattened nose and squinted eyes. The artist ingeniously used a knot in the wood to represent the distended belly-button on the swollen abdomen. Effigies of pregnant women do not seem to be common and it seems likely that a figure of this type would rather be a shamanic doll, given for use as a fertility amulet to a woman in the hope of child bearing, than a simple doll. Point Hope, Western Alaska. 7,9 cm. Thule Culture, c. 1600/1800 AD.


42

A very rare bark beater, or ees’ee used to hammer and soften the bark of the Yellow Cyprus, often known as Yellow Cedar (Cupressus nootkatensis). The strands of pliable bark were then woven into clothing and baskets. The shape of the beater is reminiscent of a whale (possibly the sperm-whale) with the large rectangular body and long fluked tail. The grooves and general shape of the object are similar to Polynesian tapa beaters but there is no known link between the two cultural areas as yet. What is remarkable here is the fact that this exact type of bark beater from the Nootka people is mostly recorded as being collected in the last third of the 18th century notably by Captains Cook and Vancouver. Nine related examples are recorded as collected on Cook’s third voyage alone (museums of Göttingen, Vienna (now lost), London (2), Berne, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Wellington (2)). No less than seven of these Nootka beaters collected by Captain Cook were sold at auction by the Leverian Museum in 1806. A further example collected by Vancouver is in the British Museum. There is no early provenance for this example but there is the trace of a label which was removed long ago and the typology of the beater as well as its obvious age relate very favorably with those of the 18th century. Nootka People (Nuuchah-nulth), Western Coast, Vancouver Island, Canada. Whalebone. 28 x 5 x 4,5 cm. 18th century or earlier.


As always my thanks go to the TEFAF team and to STABILO for their excellent & ongoing work organizing the fair. My thanks to our photographer Michel Gurfinkel; our art-handlers Philippe Delmas & Francis Viera; our base-makers (Manuel Do Carmo, the Atelier Punchinello, and Francois Lunardi); and to our restorers Brigitte Martin & Edouard Vatinel. A special thanks to my faithful and hardworking assistants Manuel Benguigui in Paris & Fang in Maastricht. A special mention for Jos Hu and family, and of course to my wife and children for their unfailing support, patience and affection. For their assistance and support I give thanks to all of our friends and colleagues, most notably : Harry Beran; Laurent Dodier; Steven Hooper & Karen Jacob, Sainsbury Center for the Visual Arts, Norwich; Moira White at the Otago Museum, Dunedin; Phillip Prodger, Dan Finamor, Barbara Kampas, Sarah Chasse, & Christine Bertoni at the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem; the Polynesian Society & the Journal of the Polynesian Society; the Trustees of the British Museum; Natalia Zhukova at the The State Historical Museum, Moscow; Laurette Thomas & Laboratoire ARTANALYSIS, Paris; Pieter Lunshof; Betty Kam at the The Bernice P. Bishop Museum, Honolulu; Roland Kaehr & the staff at the Musée Ethnographique, Neuchâtel; Klaus Maaz; Philippe Peltier at the Musée du Quai Branly, Paris; Ingrid Heermann at the Linden Museum, Stuttgart; the family of Dr. Albert Hahl; Anita Schroeder; Mr. K.G. for the flowers at the very least; Heather Townsend at the Elgin Museum; Christophe Roustand Delatour at the Musée de la Castre, Cannes. Photo credits : All works of art Michel Gurfinkel, Paris. © Galerie Meyer - Oceanic Art, Paris. Other images : • Watercolor (inside cover) : King Tapoa, Sir Henry Byam Martin, © The Peabody Essex Museum, Salem • Watercolor : Pavel Nikolaevich Mikhailov, © The State Historical Museum, Moscow • Engraving : “Objects of the Society Islands” by Jules-Louis Le Jeune • Watercolor : Ari’i, John William Lewin, © http://histoire.assemblee.pf/articles.php?id=97 • Watercolor : King Tapoa, Sir Henry Byam Martin, © The Peabody Essex Museum, Salem • B/W photo : Detail royal seat © Otago Museum, Dunedin • B/W photo : Royal seat © Collection Musée de la Castre, Cannes. Photo C. Germain • B/W photo : royal seat on catalogue page © Otago Museum, Dunedin • B/W photo : Pounding table & pounder © Otago Museum, Dunedin • Drawing of pounding table : © Lee Oscar Meyer • B/W photo : Dr. Skinner on seat © http://archaeopedia.com/wiki/index.php?title=Skinner_H_D & Skinner Family Archives, New Zealand • B/W photo : Wood Umete © The British Museum, London • B/W photo : Pounding table © http://www.andrebreton.fr/ • B/W photo : Basalt Umete © Museo Nacional de Antropologia, Madrid • B/W photo : Wood Umete © The Bernice P. Bishop Museum, Honolulu • B/W photo : Berkeley Galleries © http://www.michaelbackmanltd.com • B/W photo : Arthur Bässler, Foto: Eva Winkler, MVD © http://www.voelkerkunde-dresden.de • B/W photo : Butress roots © http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v648/painmaster/son%20of%20painmaster/MossmanGorgeTrees-3.jpg?t=1292055999 • B/W photo : Director Augustin Krämer, King Wilhelm II and Duke Ulrich von Urach at the opening of the Stuttgart Linden-Museums in May of 1911© http:// www.tagblatt.de/Home/nachrichten_artikel,-Das-Linden-Museum-feiert-in-diesem-Jahr-sein-100-jaehriges-Bestehen-_arid,122104_print,1.html • B/W photo : Admiralty spear © Musée d'Ethnographie, Neuchâtel Every effort has been made to ensure correct copyright procedure. In the event you feel that your copyright has not been correctly asserted please contact Galerie Meyer - Oceanic Art, Paris. Layout and artwork : Galerie Meyer - Oceanic Art, Paris. English to French translation : Manuel Benguigui. Reproduction or publication in any form or format, either whole or partial, of the items, images, photos, works of art and texts contained in this publication is prohibited without formal written approval. Printed by TREFLE COMMUNICATION, Paris. February 2014, one thousand five hundred copies.

Selected Bibliography Oceania : • Debenham, Frank (ed.) : THE VOYAGE OF CAPTAIN BELLINGSHAUSEN TO THE ANTARCTIC SEAS 1819-1821. Translated from the Russian, The Hakluyt Society, London, printed by Ashgate Publishing Ltd., digital print 2010. • Himmelheber, Hans : http://www.germananthropology.com/short-portrait/hans-und-ulrike-himmelheber/229 • Hooper, Steven : Pacific Encounters: Art & Divinity in Polynesia 1760-1860. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu, 2006. • Lavondes, Anne : LA CULTURE MATERIELLE EN POLYNESIE. Vol. 1-3. Thèse, Université René Descartes, Paris V. reprint ORSTOM. 1987. • Krämer, Augustin : https://researchspace.auckland.ac.nz/handle/2292/6050 • Krieger, Maximilian : NEU-GUINEA. Alfred Schall, Berlin,n.d. (1899 ?) • Martin, Henry B. : THE POLYNESIAN JOURNAL OF CAPTAIN HENRY BYAM MARTIN. Peabody Museum of Salem, 1981 • Meyer, Anthony JP : OCEANIC ART / OZEANISCHE KUNST / ART OCEANIEN. Könemann Verlag, Köln. 1995 • Missner, Paul : http://www.tribal-art-auktion.de/en/news/109/ • Nootka tapa beater : http://www.nma.gov.au/online_features/cook_forster/objects/bark_beater_eesee_am620 • Tahiti seat : http://www.jps.auckland.ac.nz/document/Volume_73_1964/Volume_73%2C_No._1/Great_women_and_friendship_contract_rites_in_prechristian_Tahiti%2C_by_Niel_Gunson%2C_p_53_-_69/p1?page=0&action=searchresult&target=#note9 Eskimo : • Carpenter, E. (ed.) : Upside Down LES ARCTIQUES. musée du Quai Branly et la Réunion des musées nationaux, Paris, 2008. • Fienup-Riorden, Ann : YUP'IK ELDERS AT THE ETHNOLOGISCHES MUSEUM BERLIN - Fieldwork Turned on its Head. University of Wisconsin Press, Seattle and London, 2005. • Fitzhugh, W.W.; Hollowell, J.; Crowell, A.L. (ed.) : GIFTS FROM THE ANCESTORS - Ancient Ivories of Bering Strait. Princeton University Press, Princeton, 2009. • Hurst, Norman : ARCTIC IVORY : Two Thousand Years of Alaskan Eskimo Art and Artifacts. Hurst Gallery, Cambridge,1998. • Ray, Dorothy Jean : ARTISTS OF THE TUNDRA AND THE SEA. University of Washington Press, Seattle, 1961 • Wardwell, A. : ANCIENT ESKIMO IVORIES OF THE BERING STRAIT. Hudson Hills Press, NY, 1986. • Website : (http://archserve.id.ucsb.edu/courses/rs/natlink/old_natlink/NATraditions/Yup'ik/HTML/OralTraditions.html)


1) Siège royal. Iles de la Société, Polynésie. Probablement bois de pua (fagraea berteriana) recouvert d’un vernis ancien jauni. 62,2 x 23,5 x 37,1 cm. XVIIIe-XIXe siècle. Inscription à l’encre « J.M. from OTahiti(e) » sous l’assise. Ex collection privée, R.-U. Les marques sur le siège indiquent une fabrication à l’outil non métallique. Des types variés de sièges royaux étaient utilisés dans les Iles de la Société ainsi que d’autres îles de la Polynésie centrale telles que les Archipels des Australes, Cook et Tuamotu. Le type le plus connu, celui de Tahiti, avec ses pieds longs, droits et joints a été le premier observé au cours des voyages de Cook, dans le dernier quart du XVIIIe siècle. Diverses collections publiques en abritent un petit nombre, et ils sont encore plus rares dans les collections privées. L’exemple le plus connu est celui qu’on appelle le « Siège de Omaï », représenté sur le portrait de Omaï par Nathaniel Dance en 1774, aujourd’hui dans les collections du Musée de Tahiti et des Iles. La forme la plus commune de tabouret royal polynésien est l’élégant modèle provenant de l’Ile Atiu dans les Iles Cook, avec son assise incurvée reposant sur de petits pieds arqués dont la base est en forme de goutte. Il existe d’autres variations dans les Iles Australes et Tuamotu. A ce jour, seul un nombre extrêmement restreint de tabourets avec des pieds évasés sont recensés, notamment celui du Musée d’Otago, à Dunedin (Nouvelle-Zélande), et du Musée de la Castre, à Cannes (France). Ces tabourets étaient employés par les membres des familles royales et les chefs les plus importants. La raison du passage d’une assise incurvée à plate reste à déterminer  ; il est possible que cela soit dû à une question locale, de rang ou d’origine géographique, ou bien pourquoi pas à une simple évolution de la conception de l’objet. Sur la magnifique peinture ci-dessous, œuvre de Pavel Nikolaevich Mikhailov, artiste embarqué avec la Première Expédition Antarctique Russe de 1820-1821, trois Européens sont assis sur des tabourets bas. A l’extrême gauche de la scène, un homme est en train de préparer de la nourriture sur ce qui semble être une plateforme du même type, et en bas à droite, on remarque la présence d’une table posée contre un mur, possiblement plus grande et ovale. Pomare II, le Roi de Tahiti, reçoit le Capitaine Bellingshausen pour le petit-déjeuner. Tandis que le Roi et la Reine sont installés sur des nattes tissées, les trois invités de marque ont été placés sur des tabourets bas à quatre pieds identiques à celui présenté ici. De la scène illustrée ci-dessus, le Capitaine Fabian Gottlieb Thaddeus von Bellingshausen écrit le 23 juillet 1820 : “[…] A huit heures du matin, j’ai débarqué avec M. Lazarev pour rendre visite au Roi (Pomare), son secrétaire Paofai, et M. Nott […] M. Mikhailov était en train de faire une esquisse du Port de Matavai […] J’ai convié M. Mikhailov, dans l’espoir qu’il pourrait observer d’autres objets d’intérêt dont il pourrait garder trace au moyen de ses pinceaux […] Le Roi et sa famille étaient assis en tailleur, mangeant du porc qu’ils trempaient dans de l’eau de mer contenue dans des coques de noix de coco […] Le Roi nous a serré la main et dit « Yurana » (bienvenue). Sous son ordre, des tabourets bas munis de pieds, ne mesurant pas plus de six pouces de haut, nous furent proposés et chacun d’entre nous se vit servir un verre de lait de coco, breuvage des plus délicieux et rafraîchissants […] Pendant quoi M. Mikhailov s’était assis à quelques mètres, sur le côté, effectuant un croquis de la famille royale en train de prendre son petitdéjeuner […] (pp. 267-268 in Debenham, 1945, version anglaise) Ces quatre reproductions d’œuvres d’artistes différents illustrent le même type de tabouret, dans des verves naïves à réalistes. Ces œuvres ont été réalisées entre 1802 et 1847, et montrent que ce type de tabouret royal était déjà en usage dans les Iles de la Société au cours des premières années du XIXe siècle. Dans le sens des aiguilles d’une montre, on peut voir Bellingshausen et Pomare II par Pavel Nikolaevich Mikhailov (1820) ; «  Ari’i - Chef de Otahiti  », Pomare II en jeune homme par John William Lewin (1802) ; le Roi Tapoa II par Sir Henry Byam Martin (1846-47) ; et « Objets des Iles de la Société » par Jules-Louis Le Jeune (1823). L’inscription sous le tabouret semble indiquer en anglais «  J.M. from OTahiti  » ou «  OTahite  ». Il est possible qu’elle soit en fait rédigée en français. Les initiales J.M. (ou I.M.) n’ont pas été identifiées à ce jour. Si le texte est en français, le mot du milieu pourrait être «  trone  ». L’inscription a été réalisée avec une encre ferro-gallique qui a viré au marron clair. Visible à la lumière U.V., elle ne réagit pas bien à l’infra-rouge en raison de son taux de carbone élevé. L’un des deux exemplaires recensés de ce type de siège se trouve dans les collections du Musée d’Otago, à Dunedin en NouvelleZélande (D56.4), ici visible sur la droite avec le N° 39. Il est à l’origine le fruit d’une donation de Miss Gordon of Thunderton au Musée d’Elgin en Ecosse le 29 décembre 1886. En 1955, Kenneth Athol Webster a acheté un ensemble d’objets au Musée d’Elgin, dont le siège, qu’il a par la suite vendu au Musée d’Otago. Le détail (en bas de la page de gauche, en noir & blanc) montre le dessous de l’objet, ce qui permet de constater un traitement identique du bois et des pieds par comparaison avec notre exemplaire. L’autre tabouret ci-dessous, celui du Musée de la Castre de Cannes, a été collecté vers 1843-47 par Edmond de Ginoux de La Coche, qui l’a obtenu à Tahiti auprès d’un homme du nom de Mare. L’assise de cet exemplaire est légèrement incurvée, ce qui projette les pieds vers l’extérieur. Au fil des années et dans les diverses publications liées à l’Art Océanien, les sièges de Polynésie Centrale et les tables à piler ont souvent été confondus et mal représentés. Afin de clarifier les choses, il suffit de montrer que les tables à piler sont conçues selon des critères technologiques très spécifiques correspondant à leur fonction. Les coups répétés des pilons en basalte, en corail ou en pierre sur le plateau de la table à piler transmettent de violentes ondes de choc au bois. C’est la raison pour laquelle ces tables sont munies d’un « ventre » ou plateau épais – cette section de bois placée sous le centre de la table permet d’absorber et de répartir les ondes de choc sur l’ensemble de la structure. Les pieds des tables à piler sont massifs, tels de courts troncs, et capables de supporter les intenses pressions répétées, fruit de milliers d’heures passées à piler le taro, le fruit de l’arbre à pain et la banane. La table à piler ci-dessous (Musée d’Otago, Dunedin, Nouvelle-Zélande, N° D31.174) possède le même type de pieds cintrés que le siège royal que nous présentons, ce qui facilite l’identification de la culture d’origine, mais il possède également un «  ventre  » conique, visible seulement de profil, prouvant sa fonction. Avec le temps, le pilage a créé une dépression au centre du plateau et l’on peut constater que la patine générale de l’objet est cohérente avec le fait qu’il était laissé à l’extérieur de l’habitation, dans la zone où l’on préparait la nourriture. Les sièges, eux, étaient préservés comme des éléments importants du foyer, des attributs royaux respectés en conséquence.


Photo montrant Henry (Harry) Devenish Skinner (1886-1978), ancien directeur du Musée d’Otago, assis sur un long banc – probablement tahitien d’après les pieds de type cintré et évasé. Ce bol à nourriture cérémoniel aurait été trouvé dans un magasin de meubles anglais par un conservateur du British Museum de Londres. Bol ou umete à pieds de type unique, taillé dans un bloc de basalte noir et acquis auprès du chef tahitien Tu en 1775. Museo Nacional de Antropologia, Madrid. Umete à pieds cintrés et évasés, Bernice P. Bishop Museum, Honolulu. La petite table à piler aux pieds cintrés et évasés typiques de la collection André Breton, Paris. Cette sélection d’objets permet d’observer les multiples variations des pieds cintrés et évasés et de les comparer avec ceux du siège que nous présentons. Les grands umete à pieds et les tables à piler semblent plus populaires, du moins plus courants que les sièges, et semblent avoir été rapportés en plus grand nombre par les voyageurs au début de la présence européenne en Polynésie. Les exemples illustrés dans ces pages ne visent pas à l’exhaustivité, et proposent simplement les pièces publiés. 2) Herminette de travail de maître-sculpteur dotée d’une longue lame triangulaire. L’élégance et les dimensions de la lame, ainsi que sa remarquable préservation indiquent à quel point cet outil était important. Il a été rapporté que les artistes faisaient « dormir » leurs outils dans le temple au cours de la nuit précédant l’élaboration d’une sculpture importante, de façon que l’herminette bénéficie du pouvoir des Dieux. Le manche est superbement taillé, avec un croisement complexe depuis le pommeau évasé parfaitement circulaire puis ovale, jusqu’à une forme en œuf sur le talon de l’objet. La ligature est en sennit (fibre de noix de coco tressée) serrée autour de la lame, et le logement stabilisé par un morceau de peau de requin ou de raie. Iles Rarotonga ou Mangaia, Iles Cook, Polynésie. Basalte, fibre de noix de coco, peau de poisson, bois. 66,5 x 9,2 x 26,7 cm. XVIIIe-XIXe siècle. Collection privée d’un marchand de mobilier anglais, circa 1940/50. 3) Superbe ivi po’o, petit ornement représentant un ancêtre déifié connu sous le nom de Tiki. Détail inhabituel, la main gauche de l’ancêtre est ici orientée vers le haut. Une touffe de cheveux humains nouée avec du sennit, à l’origine portée en ornement corporel, est insérée dans l’objet. Iles Marquises, Polynésie. Os humain, superbe patine d’âge et d’exposition à la lumière, cheveux humains et fibre de noix de coco. 3,8 cm (os uniquement). XVIIIe-XIXe siècle (pré-contact et sculpté à l’outil non métallique). Acquis en France dans les années 1960-70. Pub. : OCEANIE : les Esprits Vagabonds. Galerie Dodier, Avranches, 2013, N° 37. 4) Superbe ivi po’o, petit ornement représentant un ancêtre déifié connu sous le nom de Tiki. Une touffe de cheveux humains nouée avec du sennit, à l’origine portée en ornement corporel, est insérée dans l’objet. Iles Marquises, Polynésie. Os humain, superbe patine d’âge et d’exposition à la lumière ; cheveux humains et fibre de noix de coco. 3,7 cm (os uniquement). XVIIIe-XIXe siècle (précontact et sculpté à l’outil non métallique). Acquis en France dans les années 1960-70. Pub. : OCEANIE : les Esprits Vagabonds. Galerie Dodier, Avranches, 2013, N° 37. Magnifique massue de guerre apa’apai de format inhabituellement réduit, entièrement couverte de motifs géométriques classiques sculptés comprenant une figure humaine en pied ainsi qu’un oiseau stylisé en vol (ou une chauve-souris frugivore). Les bras de la figure sont écartés, un oiseau de profil tenu dans chaque main. Le pommeau est percé pour la fixation d’une dragonne. Iles Tonga, Polynésie. Bois de fer (casuarina equisetifolia). 66,2 cm. XVIIIe/XIXe siècle. Ex collection privée, Paris. 6) Splendide massue de guerre moungalaulau ou apa'apai, habituellement décrite comme d’origine tongienne. Je pense cependant que ce style était développé sur l’Ile d’‘Uvea, plus connue sous le nom de Wallis, sous influence tongienne. Le format, le travail et les motifs sont bien sûr similaires aux modèles tongiens, mais celui-ci est plus petit, plus raffiné et plus léger que ses équivalents. Le décor est remarquablement pensé et extrêmement bien rendu, avec un grand raffinement et une certaine douceur, contrairement au décor observé sur la majorité des massues de ce type, qui semblent être grattées ou sculptées avec peu d’attention quant à la qualité, ce qui porte à penser qu’elles sont souvent de fabrication plus tardive – et possiblement des massues de danse ou des curios. Ile d’‘Uvea Island, Archipel de Wallis & Futuna, Polynésie. Bois. 109,2 x 9 x 4 cm. XIXe siècle. Ex coll. : Jean Castex (1927-2012), artiste français, Paris. 7 & 8) Les ula sont des massues à lourde tête utilisées à la fois comme arme de poing et comme arme de jet. Une ula correctement lancée peut toucher sa cible à plus de 15 mètres. Les ula sont spécifiques aux Iles Fidji en Polynésie occidentale, même si des exemples tongiens sont connus. 7) : I Ula Drisa, type à tête en boule, un gros morceau de dent de cachalot inséré dans l’une des anfractuosités naturelles de la tête. Casuarina equisetifolia. 43 x 10 Ø cm. XVIIIe/XIXe siècle. Ex collection privée, R.-U. 8) : I Ula Tava Tava, la tête travaillée de façon à ressembler à un fruit découpé. Casuarina equisetifolia. 43 x 11,7 Ø cm. XIXe siècle. Ex collection privée, R.-U. 9) Grand bowai, ou massue en forme de poteau, d’une longueur et d’un poids exceptionnels. Le pommeau est profondément creusé et son rebord orné de trois anneaux concentriques. Fidji, Polynésie. Casuarina equisetifolia. 126 x 6 cm. XIXe siècle. 10) Superbe lance de guerre cérémonielle ornée d’une tête d’ancêtre de style classique. Une arme de cette taille et de cette qualité était la propriété d’un chef important. La grande tête est sculptée à la manière des grands masques apouema portés lors des rituels funéraires du chef avec la coiffe en forme de «  ruche  » et la longue barbe. On remarquera la particularité inhabituelle des dents exhibées entre des lèvres grimaçantes. Nouvelle-Calédonie, Mélanésie. Bois noirci à la noix de bancoule brûlée (les deux extrémités ont été raccourcies). 204,5 cm au total (tête 8,5 cm). XVIIIe/XIXe siècle. Collection Boué d’armes exotiques, Indre, France.


11) Superbe lance de guerre cérémonielle ornée d’une tête d’ancêtre de style classique. Une arme de cette taille et de cette qualité était la propriété d’un chef. Nouvelle-Calédonie, Mélanésie. Bois noirci à la noix de bancoule brûlée. 215,7 cm au total (tête 4,9 cm). XIXe siècle. Ex William & Ernest Ohly, Berkeley Galleries, Londres (1942-1977) ; par descendance. 12) Superbe protection pubienne et ornement de taille masculin, dont le bloc de bois était porté au-dessus du postérieur (côté plat vers le corps), la partie en fibre perlée pendant sur l’entrejambe. Le paquet de fibres est composé d’un unique brin mesurant plus de 300 mètres de long doublé sur lui-même. Il est entouré en spirale d’une ficelle extrêmement fine. Esperitu Santo, Vanuatu. Bois, fibres, perles d’échange en verre, fil rouge européen. 27,5 x 9 cm (bloc de bois), +/- 45 cm au total. XIXe siècle. Acquis sur un marché aux puces à proximité de Maastricht, Pays-Bas. 13) Ornement de tête de mât de petite taille orné d’une figure d’ancêtre. L’ancêtre est dans une position classique, les genoux musclés et les bras pliés. Il agit comme un charme de protection fixé à l’extrémité du mât de la pirogue. Alors que les grands exemples soutiennent la drisse, les plus petits fonctionnent comme de simples charmes. Lacs Murik, Bas Sépik, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois exposé aux éléments, coiffe en plumes de casoar d’origine. 46,5 x 40 cm. XIXe/XXe siècle. Ex coll. : Musée de la S.V.D (societas verbi divini), Mission Steyler à Sankt Augustin, Allemagne, Inv. N° 7?.2.316 en blanc sous l’objet. Collecté sur le terrain par un missionnaire de l’ordre. Dé-acquisitionné par le Musée au profit d’Ulrich Hoffmann vers 2001. 14) Figure d’ancêtre comprenant plusieurs éléments inhabituels : la barbe est en « pavés », les pupilles sont placées du côté interne et la sclère est ornée d’éléments dentelés. La figure porte toujours son pagne en tapa, ainsi que ses ornements de nez et d’oreille d’origine. Fleuve Ramu, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois, pigment rouge, fibre, tapa. 37 x 13 cm. XIXe siècle. Acquis par le Dr. Arthur Bässler (1857-1907) avant 1898. Inventorié au Linden-Museum de Stuttgart en 1899 sous le N° 6109, « 20 Meilen-Inseln, Dr. Bässler » et « IC6109, NG ». Dé-acquisitionné dans un échange avec Hermann Seeger le 15 janvier 1954 ; collection privée, Allemagne. Le Dr. Bässler, qui a acquis des milliers de pièces de Nouvelle-Guinée, dont un grand nombre portaient l’inscription de lieu de collecte « 20 Meilen-Inseln », ne s’est en fait jamais rendu sur place puisqu’il n’allait pas collecter sur le terrain. Il a acquis des objets et des ensembles de pièces auprès de capitaines de bateau, de propriétaires de plantation et d’administrateurs coloniaux dans les ports et les relais de commerce. Pour donner une idée de l’étendue des collections de Bässler, celui-ci a par exemple donné plus de 5.000 objets océaniens rien qu’au Völkerkunde Museum de Dresde entre 1899 et 1904. Le reste de sa collection a été divisé entre les musées de Berlin et de Stuttgart. Ce dernier a vendu ou échangé des pièces dans les années 1950-60, ce qui explique la présence de pièces notables de provenance allemande ancienne sur le marché de l’art aujourd’hui. La mention «  20 Meilen-Inseln  » figure sur des objets d’Ernst Tappenbeck, le leader de la seconde Expédition du Ramu (Zweite Ramu-Expedition) de 1898. Tappenbeck a également pris part à la Kaiser-Wilhelmsland-Expedition de 1896 (aussi connue comme la première Expédition du Ramu). Maximilian Krieger a illustré plusieurs figures et un appuie-nuque dans sa publication NEU-GUINEA de 1899 comme provenant de Tappenbeck avec comme provenance « 20 Meilen-Inseln ». Etant donné que Bässler n’allait pas sur le terrain, il est fort possible que les pièces possédant l’inscription « 20 Meilen-Inseln » aient été acquises directement auprès de Tappenbeck ou d’autres membres des deux expéditions sur le Ramu. 15) Elégant crochet de suspension orné d’une tête d’ancêtre sculptée au sommet d’un corps en losange allongé surmontant deux crocs. Région de la Rivière Blackwater, Fleuve Sépik, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois à patine croûteuse de suie. 71,7 x 27,2 x 4,5 cm. XIXe/ XXe siècle. Ex Rosalind & Philip Goldman, Gallery 43, Londres (socle d’origine de Frank Thomas) ; Mia & Loed van Bussel. 16) Très rare ornement de brassard représentant une figure d’ancêtre réduite à ses éléments essentiels. La tête démesurée est puissamment sculptée, avec un visage expressif sur un corps simplifié se terminant en un bâton fuselé représentant les jambes. Ces figures étaient fichées dans les brassards en fibre portés par les danseurs. Bas Sépik, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois, traces de pigments, belle patine d’âge et d’usage. 26 cm. XIXe siècle (sculpté à l’outil non métallique). Collecté sur le terrain par l’Expédition de La Korrigane, 1934/1936. N° de collecte 1847  ; Musée de l’Homme N° de dépôt D.39.3.1458., acquis au village de Kanganaman  ; acquis auprès de Jean Roudillon, Paris. Pub. : OCEANIE : les Esprits Vagabonds. Galerie Dodier, Avranches, 2013, N° 41. 17) Masque-amulette porté ou attaché sur le côté du sac ou peut-être sur le bord de la barbe. Les ornements de nez segmentés du type représenté sur l’objet étaient portés par les hommes de la région du Bas Sépik et des Iles Schouten. Bas Sépik et Archipel des Iles Schouten, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois serti de coquillage nassa (un des deux inserts manquant). 16,3 x 5,2 x 3,5 cm. XIXe siècle. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868-1945), Gouverneur de la Nouvelle-Guinée allemande (1902-1914) ; par descendance ; acquis auprès de la famille. 18) Amulette en forme de figure d’ancêtre masculin en pied. Fleuve Ramu, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois, belle patine d’âge et d’usage, traces d’ocre rouge. 13,4 cm. XIXe siècle. Ex collection privée, Suisse. Pub.  : OCEANIE  : les Esprits Vagabonds. Galerie Dodier, Avranches, 2013, N° 19. Dagues) Ensemble de 27 dagues de Nouvelle-Guinée (le N° 15 est un ornement de brassard fabriqué à partir d’une ancienne dague). Ces objets anciens ont tous été utilisés comme armes de combat et étaient considérés comme des pièces de grand prestige. La plus ancienne est probablement le N° 5, puisqu’il semble qu’elle a été collectée par le Lieutenant Bérard au cours du voyage de La Coquille sous le commandement de Louis Isidore Duperrey entre 1822 et 1825. On remarquera les deux exemples en os humain, respectivement de la région Boiken (N° 11), avec son décor en losanges concentriques, et Swagup dans le Haut Sépik (N° 11), avec ses motifs floraux profondément incisés. Le groupe de splendides dagues Iatmul richement décorées a été collecté par l’Expédition de La Korrigane entre 1934 et 1936 (N° 3, 7, 14, 20, 25). Les dagues Abelam sont toutes magnifiquement ornées et leur patine indique des décennies d’usage. Parmi les 5 dagues Asmat, deux (N° 12, 19) sont fabriquées à partir de la mâchoire d’un crocodile, dont certaines dents sont encore présentes dans la poignée, et deux autres sont en os humain (N° 2, 13). Le N° 2 est orné d’un ancêtre entier portant une tête de cacatoès et sculpté en relief à cheval sur la lame agressivement crénelée.


D1) Abelam. 33,1 cm. D2) Asmat. Os humain. 34 cm. D3) Iatmul. La Korrigane (N° D.39.3.762) 32,9 cm. D4) Abelam. 33,1 cm. D5) Abelam. Probablement collectée par Auguste Bérard, officier à bord de La Coquille, 1822-1825, Inv. “NG 13”. ; puis Faculté des Sciences, Montpellier. 32,7 cm. D6) Abelam. 30,5 cm. D7) Iatmul. La Korrigane (N° D.39.3.1572). 21,8 cm. D8) Abelam. 36,2 cm. D9) Abelam. 29,3 cm. D10) Abelam. 37,2 cm. D11) Boiken. Os humain. 30,9 cm. D12) Asmat. Mâchoire de crocodile. Coll. Gert Lambregts ; W. & H. van Halm. 46,5 cm. D13) Asmat. Os humain. 31,5 cm. D14) Iatmul. La Korrigane (N° 10, Rennes Enchères, 20/02/12, Coll. Ratisbonne) 33,8 cm. D15) Abelam. Ornement de brassard. Coll. Dr. Sempé. 36,4 cm. D16) Non identifiée. 29,8 cm. D17) Iatmul. 36,9 cm. D18) Iatmul. Coll. Dr. Sempé. 22,8 cm. D19) Asmat. Mâchoire de crocodile. 33,8 cm. D20) Iatmul. La Korrigane (N° D.39.3.1582) 37 cm. D21) Abelam. 36,6 cm. D22) Swagup. Os humain. 36,3 cm. D23) Abelam. 36,3 cm. D24) Abelam. 39,4 cm. D25) Iatmul. La Korrigane (N° D.39.3.1576) 35,9 cm. D26) Asmat. 37 cm. D27) Abelam. 32,4 cm. Sauf indication, toutes les dagues sont sculptées dans l’os d’une patte de casoar (Casuarius). 19) Superbe plat à pigments en forme de tortue. Les rebords extérieurs du corps formant le réceptacle sont incisés de motifs en chevrons. La tête de l’animal est expressive et naturaliste. Le dessous de l’objet est magnifiquement orné en son centre d’un motif « en sablier » entouré d’un double cercle de pavés – le cercle extérieur incisé et peint, l’intérieur seulement peint. Population Iatmul, Moyen Sépik, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois, polychromie d’origine. 25,5 x10,7 x 3,3 cm. XIXe siècle. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868-1945), Gouverneur de la Nouvelle-Guinée allemande (1902-1914) ; par descendance ; acquis auprès de la famille. Un objet similaire, peut-être de la même main, est illustré dans Neuhauss, R. : DEUTSCH-NEU-GUINEA, Verlag Dietrich Reimer, Berlin, 1911, fig. 224, p. 326, Vol. I. Le Dr. Albert Hahl (1868-1945) est arrivé en Nouvelle-Guinée allemande en 1896 à l’âge de 28 ans comme Juge de l’Empire (1896-98) basé à Herbertshoehe, Nouvelle-Bretagne. Il fut ensuite nommé Gouverneur par intérim de la Nouvelle-Guinée allemande (1899-1901), en remplacement du gouverneur souffrant Rudolph von Benningsen. En 1902, le Dr. Hahl prit officiellement le poste. En 1914, après 18 ans de service colonial, il retourna en Allemagne pour des affaires officielles et resta en Europe à cause de la Première Guerre mondiale, qui mit un terme à la présence allemande en Nouvelle-Guinée. 20) Petit plat à pigment en forme de crocodile. L’extérieur est orné de motifs en chevrons tandis que le dessous de l’objet comporte des stries formant un damier. Population Iatmul, Moyen Sépik, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois dur, polychromie d’origine, superbe patine d’âge et d’usage. 20 x 4,2 1,8 cm. XIXe siècle. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868-1945), Gouverneur de la Nouvelle-Guinée allemande (1902-1914) ; par descendance ; acquis auprès de la famille. 21) Bouclier de guerre au décor inhabituel et remarquable. Le rebord dentelé et les volutes entrelacées sont typiques de l’iconographie locale, cependant la disposition des motifs à l’intérieur de ce cadre est très différente. La norme classique d’un ou plusieurs visages distincts est ici «  explosée  » pour former des suggestions de bouches et d’yeux flottant autour d’un visage souriant central. Les poignées en rotin d’origine sont toujours fixées à la poignée derrière l’objet. Village de Wogamush (Biaka) ?, Rivière Wogamush, Haut Sépik, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois (découpé et sculpté dans les racines gigantesques d’un ficus de forêt pluviale), pigments et rotin. 176,5 x 52 x cm. XIXe/XXe siècle. Ex collection d’un artiste néerlandais dans les années 1970. 22) Bouclier d’archer orné d’une représentation stylisée de figure humaine portant un ornement de poitrine en coquillage kina et une peinture corporelle stylisée ou tatouage « kéloïde ». La fibre de fixation d’origine est toujours présente (nœud inférieur manquant). Région Mendi, Sude des Hautes Terres, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois, sculpté à l’outil non métallique. 76 x 30,5 cm. XIXe/XXe siècle ou antérieur. Ex coll. : De Belfond, Limoges, France ; collecté au cours d’une expédition dans les années 1950-60. Musée des Arts d'Afrique et d'Océanie, Paris, N° de dépôt D.94.1.58. Cet exceptionnel bouclier a été prêté par De Belfond au MAAO pour une exposition en 1994 et a été par erreur inventorié comme un dépôt de long terme, d’où le numéro du musée peint au dos de l’objet. 23) Appuie-nuque soutenu par une figure d’ancêtre en janus à genoux. Iles Tami, Golfe Huon, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois, chaux. 11 x 12,8 x 6,6 cm. XIXe siècle. Ex Hans Himmelheber (1908-2003) ; Augustin Krämer (1865-1941) ; Paul Missner (1889-1958) ; collection privée, Pays-Bas. Sur la gauche, un extrait de la liste originale d’objets que Hans Himmelheber a proposé au Pr. Augustin Krämer le 2 février 1932. Himmelheber explique dans la lettre accompagnant la liste que si le Pr. Krämer ne souhaitait pas payer pour les objets, il était possible de procéder à un échange. Cet appuie-nuque est le N° 316. Sa valeur était fixée à 28 Reichmarks. Au sein de cette liste, Krämer a également fait l’acquisition d’un masque des Iles Tami, d’un masque du Sépik et d’une spatule à chaux des Iles Trobriand. Hans Himmelheber fut un étudiant du Dr. Augustin Krämer, son mentor. Il lui a par la suite vendu et échangé de nombreux objets, dont plusieurs qui, par Krämer, sont plus tard entrés dans la collection Missner. Le Pr. Krämer, en tant que premier Directeur du Linden Museum de Stuttgart, fit venir Paul Missner de Dresde pour travailler comme restaurateur au musée en 1911. Missner y est resté pendant plus de 40 ans, prenant sa retraite en 1954. Le Directeur Augustin Krämer, le Roi Wilhelm II et le Duc Ulrich von Urach à l’ouverture du Linden Museum à Stuttgart en mai 1911. 24) Spatule à chaux réalisée par un Maître-sculpteur inconnu, ornée d’une configuration rare (et peut-être unique) montrant une mère à l’enfant, ou un homme et une femme, ou encore, plus simplement, deux figures assises l’une sur les genoux de l’autre. Les figures sont sculptées dans la position Massim typique, assises, les bras repliés, les coudes sur les genoux (pour le petit personnage) et les mains au menton. La figure la plus grande tient la tête de l’autre entre ses coudes, apportant une touche de tendresse et d’humanité rarement observée dans l’art Massim. Région Massim, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois d’ébène, chaux. 32,4 x 3,2 x 2,8 cm. XIXe siècle. Ex Emil Störrer (1950-60), Zurich ; par descendance. Quatre kapkap provenant de l’Archipel Bismarck et illustrant l’infinie variété des motifs sur ce type d’objet. 25) Iles de l’Amirauté, Archipel Bismarck, PNG, Mélanésie. 10,1 Ø cm. Tridacne et perles d’échange en verre. 26) Iles de l’Amirauté, Archipel Bismarck, PNG, Mélanésie. 10,8 Ø cm. Tridacne et carapace de tortue. 27) Nouvelle-Irlande, Archipel Bismarck, PNG, Mélanésie. 9,2 Ø cm. Tridacne et carapace de tortue.


28) Nouvelle-Irlande, Archipel Bismarck, PNG, Mélanésie. 6,7 Ø cm. Tridacne et carapace de tortue. Les quatre objets datent du XIXe siècle et proviennent de la collection privée du Dr. Albert Hahl (1868-1945), Gouverneur de la Nouvelle-Guinée allemande (1902-1914) ; par descendance ; acquis auprès de la famille. 29) Massue de guerre à tête en forme de bulbe et à extrémité inférieure en pointe conique. Ces armes étaient utilisées à la fois pour écraser et transpercer l’ennemi. Les boucliers de guerre Sulka (voir N° 30) ont souvent des marques causées par la pointe des massues. Population Sulka, Est de la Nouvelle-Bretagne, Archipel Bismarck, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois dur. XIXe siècle. 130,5 x 7 cm. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868-1945), Gouverneur de la Nouvelle-Guinée allemande (1902-1914) ; par descendance ; acquis auprès de la famille. 30) Bâton de danse en forme de massue de guerre stylisée, orné de motifs floraux autour du visage d’un esprit d’ancêtre de chaque côté. Kilenge, Nouvelle-Bretagne, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois peint. 100 x 8 x 3.4 cm. XIX/XXe siècle. Collecté sur le terrain par Pierre Langlois circa 1950-60. Ex coll. : Jorge Camacho, Paris ; Galerie Meyer, Paris ; Mr. & Mrs. Van der Weerdt, Pays-Bas. 31) Superbe bouclier de guerre, ou ngaile, sculpté et peint des deux côtés. Ces boucliers magnifiquement décorés comptent parmi les objets les plus iconiques et les plus recherchés de l’Art Océanien. Les motifs forment des visages à l’étrange structure représentant des esprits et/ou des ancêtres. Les éléments des visages sont composés d’éléments de têtes d’oiseaux aux yeux concentriques focalisant l’attention de l’ennemi pour le distraire probablement au cours du combat. Il ne semble pas y avoir pour l’instant de consensus quant à la signification de ces motifs. Les couleurs utilisées sur le bouclier sont d’une importance cruciale, et la Nouvelle-Bretagne est l’un des très rares endroits d’Océanie où les pigments verts et bleus étaient fabriqués localement, à partir du jus de certaines plantes, avant l’arrivée des Européens. Ce bouclier porte les stigmates de combats – il a non seulement reçu des coups de massue, mais on peut observer les restes d’une pointe de lance projetée avec une telle force qu’elle a traversé l’objet. La pointe a été coupée de chaque côté, mais des fragments sont encore visibles juste au-dessus du nœud central sur la droite. Population Sulka, Est de la Nouvelle-Bretagne, Archipel Bismarck, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois d’alstonia, rotin et pigments. XIXe siècle. 119 x 38,5 cm. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868-1945), Gouverneur de la Nouvelle-Guinée allemande (1902-1914) ; par descendance ; acquis auprès de la famille. 32) Masque kepong représentant un esprit ancestral de la forêt, une forme d’équivalent sauvage des humains. Le nez est sculpté dans une pièce séparée, constituée d’un assemblage complexe montrant un oiseau (calao ?) tenant la queue d’un serpent zigzagant vers le bas tout en étant mordu derrière la tête par un requin. Un bec stylisé à l’envers soutient le serpent par en-dessous. Les yeux sont sculptés en amandes oblongues avec des rebords surélevés et contiennent les pupilles en coquillage. Les joues sont peintes de lignes ovales se terminant dans les deux coins par des silhouettes noires de poissons-anges. Peut-être Ile de Lavongai (ex Nouvelle-Hanovre), Nord de la Nouvelle-Irlande, Archipel Bismarck, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois d’alstonia, pigments, opercules de turbo marmoratus. 88 x 36 x 22 cm. XIXe siècle. Ex coll. Pierre Vérité & Claude Vérité, Paris (acquis circa 1930-1950) Inv. N° 3277. 33) Exceptionnelle lance cérémonielle figurative à plusieurs pointes représentant un ancêtre masculin. Les quatre pointes à multiples barbelures sortent de la coiffe. Celle-ci est ornée de motifs incisés qui, bien que géométriques, représentent un visage humain stylisé en train de grimacer. Le manche de l’objet, qui a été raccourci, indique un grand âge et un usage prolongé. Iles de l’Amirauté, Archipel Bismarck, PNG, Mélanésie. Bois, ficelles, graines, pigments rouges, noirs, et blancs. 176.5 x 9 x 6.5 cm. XIXe siècle. Ex coll. : Alfred Bühler (ancien directeur du Museum für Völkerkunde, Bâle) ; Lorenz Eckert, Bâle ; Udo Horstmann, Zug. Le seul autre exemple que j’ai pu recenser d’un objet similaire se trouve au Musée d’Ethnographie de Neuchâtel, N° V.421 (image en noir & blanc). Il est manifestement de la main du même artiste et a été acquis auprès de A.J. Speyer dans les années 1920. Il possède un numéro de musée non identifié (3290). 34) Plat à nourriture, ou apia nie, de forme rectangulaire cintrée. Le fond épais est incurvé des deux côtés, ce qui donne à l’objet une assise très restreinte. Les parois sont extrêmement fines. Ces plats étaient utilisés pour servir la nourriture aussi bien lors des repas qu’à l’occasion de cérémonies. Si l’Ile de Wuvulu n’est située qu’à 80 kilomètres environ de la Nouvelle-Guinée, ses habitants sont d’origine micronésienne. Ile Maty (Wuvulu), Archipel Bismarck, PNG, Para-Micronésie. Bois (calophyllum), patine croûteuse d’usage d’origine. 59 x 32 x 11.2 cm. XIXe/XXe siècle. Ex coll. : Mia & Loed van Bussel, Amsterdam ; Galerie Meyer, Paris ; collection privée, USA. 35) Courte dague ou couteau de combat. D’après la littérature, ces objets étaient à l’usage exclusif des femmes. Les couteaux de ce type étaient habituellement rangés dans des fourreaux constitués de deux sections de bois tendre. Ile Maty (Wuvulu), Archipel Bismarck, PNG, Para-Micronésie. Bois, dents de requin taureau (carcharhinus leucas), ficelle, chaux. 21 x 6,7 x 2,6 cm. XIXe siècle. Provenance : Dr. Albert Hahl (1868-1945), Gouverneur de la Nouvelle-Guinée allemande (1902-1914) ; par descendance ; acquis auprès de la famille. 36) Rare tjuringa (churinga) d’une taille exceptionnelle, ou tablette sacrée. La face avant est couverte d’un décor géométrique incisé. Le format de ce tjuringa le place parmi les plus sacrés objets d’art des Aborigènes. Chaque âme vivante des tribus aborigènes possède son propre tjuringa. Le tjuringa personnel est habituellement de petite taille et mesure le plus souvent 50 ou 60 centimètres de long au maximum. Les plus grands, qui dépassent rarement les 2 mètres, représentent des ancêtres déifiés et des esprits mythologiques. Ces tjuringa claniques étaient présentés aux jeunes garçons au cours de leurs cérémonies d’initiation. Le revers de l’objet est superbement taillé au moyen d’outils non métalliques. Tribu Wongkais (?), Région de Ooldea, Centre de l’Australie. Bois dur à belle patine. 228 cm. XVIIe/XIXe siècle. Exp. : "Au Commencement Etait le Rêve", Galerie Le Gall-Peyroulet, 18 Rue Keller, 75011 Paris, 19 juin-13 juillet 1990. 37) Peigne orné des deux côtés de motifs incisés. Un coin est percé, probablement pour fixer un ornement perlé. Culture Punuk, Alaska. Défense de morse minéralisée. 9,5 x 4,1 cm. 400 to 900 AD.


38) Charme de chasse en forme de baleine, orné de motifs géométriques sur la zone dorsale. Détroit de Béring, Alaska. Défense de morse minéralisée. 8,4 cm. c. 600-900 AD. Ex Lin & Emile Deletaille, Bruxelles ; ex collection privée, Italie. 39) Très rare section provenant probablement d’une armure composite. Les armures composées de plaques d’os de morse, de phoque ou de caribou cousues ensemble étaient portées au combat dans les anciennes cultures Eskimo. Quelques rares exemples étaient faits de fines tranches de défense de morse, comme celui du Musée d’Ethnographie de Neuchâtel (gauche). La pièce centrale présentée ici est peut-être en forme de vulve stylisée ; on peut cependant voir dans le décor incisé à chevrons concentriques une pointe de flèche orientée vers le bas. Les côtés de l’objet sont percés à trois reprises sur la longueur. Culture Punuk-début de la Culture Thule, Alaska. Défense de morse minéralisée. 9,5 x 5,5 cm. 400 to 1200 AD. Ex collection privée, R.-U. 40) Grande effigie votive ou magique représentant un chasseur dans son kayak. La figure et l’embarcation, assemblés au moyen de deux chevilles latérales, semblent avoir été réalisés dans la même pièce de bois. Le kayak est percé à ses deux extrémités. L’orientation des trous est telle que l’objet pouvait être suspendu de façon à rester droit. Cet aspect et d’autres, comme le fait qu’il n’ait pas été peint et qu’il ait été retrouvé sous des rochers, indique qu’il s’agissait d’un objet de shaman. Cape Nome, Alaska. Bois à patine d’exposition aux éléments, traces de calcination ou de goudron. 38 cm. XIXe siècle ou antérieur. Retrouvé enterré sous de gros rochers à Cape Nome en 1968 avec une figure en bois. Ex coll. : Josephine L. Reader. Pub. : ESKIMO ART, Tradition and innovation in North Alaska. Dorothy Jean Ray, University of Washington Press, Seattle, 1977, p. 119, fig. 56. 41) Minuscule figure de femme enceinte en bois léger. Le visage est taillé selon les conventions Eskimo traditionnelles, notamment un visage rond, un nez aplati et des yeux bridés. L’artiste a ingénieusement utilisé le nœud du bois pour représenter le nombril distendu de l’abdomen enflé. Les effigies de femmes enceintes ne semblent pas communes, et il est vraisemblable qu’une figure de ce type était une poupée shamanique offerte comme amulette de fertilité plutôt qu’une simple poupée. Point Hope, Ouest de l’Alaska. 7,9 cm. Culture Thule, circa 1600/1800 AD. 42) Très rare battoir à écorce, ou ees’ee, utilisé pour frapper et attendrir l’écorce du cyprès jaune, souvent appelé cèdre jaune (cupressus nootkatensis). Les brins d’écorce étaient ensuite tissés pour réaliser des vêtements et des paniers. La forme du battoir rappelle celle d’une baleine (peut-être un cachalot), avec un grand corps rectangulaire et une longue nageoire caudale. Les sillons et la forme générale de l’objet sont très proches des battoirs polynésiens, bien qu’aucun lien n’ait été établi à ce jour entre les deux aires culturelles. Fait remarquable, les autres exemples de ce type exact de battoir provenant de la population Nootka ont essentiellement été collectés dans le troisième quart du XVIIIe siècle, notamment par les Capitaines Cook et Vancouver. 9 exemples sont recensés rien que pour le troisième voyage de Cook (musées de Göttingen, Vienne (aujourd’hui perdu), Londres (2), Berne, Edinbourg, Glasgow, Wellington (2)). Pas moins de 7 de ces battoirs Nootka collectés par le Capitaine Cook furent vendus aux enchères par le Leverian Museum in 1806. Un autre exemple collecté par Vancouver se trouve au British Museum. La provenance de l’exemple présenté ici n’est pas connue, mais il porte la trace d’une étiquette, et sa typologie ainsi que son évidente ancienneté font pencher en faveur d’une collecte au XVIIIe siècle. Nootka People (Nuu-chah-nulth), Côte Ouest, Ile de Vancouver, Canada. Os de baleine. 28 x 5 x 4,5 cm. XVIIIe siècle ou antérieur.


3 - 6 April 2014

9 - 14 September 2014 Paris

Regent’s Park,  London 16  -­‐  19  October  2014

13 - 22 March 2015

Galerie Meyer

O c e a n i c A r t   &   E s k i m o   A r t

www.galerie-meyer-oceanic-art.com 1 7 R u e   d e s   B e a u x -­‐ A r t s   P a r i s   7 5 0 0 6   F r a n c e TEL:  +  33  1  43  54  85  74          FAX:  +  33  1  43  54  11  12      GSM:  +  33  6  80  10  80  22 ajpmeyer@gmail.com                      www.galerie-­‐meyer-­‐oceanic-­‐art.com

Profile for Galerie Meyer - Oceanic Art

Galerie Meyer - Oceanic & Eskimo art, catalogue for Tefaf 2014  

A selection of superb Oceanic & Eskimo works of art on view and for sale during TEFAF 2014 in Maastricht (the Netherlands). 42 wonderfully w...

Galerie Meyer - Oceanic & Eskimo art, catalogue for Tefaf 2014  

A selection of superb Oceanic & Eskimo works of art on view and for sale during TEFAF 2014 in Maastricht (the Netherlands). 42 wonderfully w...

Profile for ajpmeyer