Page 1

SPRING 2018

8th Annual

AMAZING AIRDRIE WOMEN ARTS

Celebration

Airdrie’s First

BREWERY

She shoots, she scores!

Midget Elite Hockey

airdrielife.com

8”


2018 Amazing Airdrie Women

A a

SPRING 2018

w 2018

Meet our

31 nominees

8th Annual

AMAZING AIRDRIE WOMEN ARTS

Celebration

Airdrie’s First

BREWERY

She shoots, she scores!

Midget Elite Hockey

airdrielife.com Untitled-1 1

Read about them on page

The 2018 Amazing Airdrie Women nominees, from left: Lisa Darlene Ammirati, Nicole Proseilo, Jody Amsing, Kendra Varga-Reichelt, Alisa Jones, Nicole Jones, Caroline Marie McKay-Siguenza, Marie Lauer, Katherine Funk, Crystal Boys, Janine Hartsook, Wendy Bates-Wiebe, Kate Dekker, Naomi Keane, Victoria-Lynn Scattergood, Heather Doyle, Kerri Williams, Megan Lockhart, Caitlin Taylor, Veronique Dewilde, Pam Smith, Dr. Heather Cowie, Kimberley Ford, Charlotte Blackwell, Madeleine McKee, Dr. Mindy Gautama, Samantha Laycock, Veronica Boccinfuso, Preet Nijjar, Amanda Tozser and Kara Fulton. See full story on page 119.

119

Vote online at airdrielife.com Attend the awards luncheon May 11

2018-02-14 8:14 PM


2018 Amazing Airdrie Women

A a

SPRING 2018

w 2018

Meet our

31 nominees

8th Annual

AMAZING AIRDRIE WOMEN ARTS

Celebration

Airdrie’s First

BREWERY

She shoots, she scores!

Midget Elite Hockey

airdrielife.com Untitled-1 1

Read about them on page

The 2018 Amazing Airdrie Women nominees, from left: Lisa Darlene Ammirati, Nicole Proseilo, Jody Amsing, Kendra Varga-Reichelt, Alisa Jones, Nicole Jones, Caroline Marie McKay-Siguenza, Marie Lauer, Katherine Funk, Crystal Boys, Janine Hartsook, Wendy Bates-Wiebe, Kate Dekker, Naomi Keane, Victoria-Lynn Scattergood, Heather Doyle, Kerri Williams, Megan Lockhart, Caitlin Taylor, Veronique Dewilde, Pam Smith, Dr. Heather Cowie, Kimberley Ford, Charlotte Blackwell, Madeleine McKee, Dr. Mindy Gautama, Samantha Laycock, Veronica Boccinfuso, Preet Nijjar, Amanda Tozser and Kara Fulton. See full story on page 119.

119

Vote online at airdrielife.com Attend the awards luncheon May 11

2018-02-14 8:14 PM


2018 Amazing Airdrie Women

A a

SPRING 2018

w 2018

Meet our

31 nominees

8th Annual

AMAZING AIRDRIE WOMEN ARTS

Celebration

Airdrie’s First

BREWERY

She shoots, she scores!

Midget Elite Hockey

airdrielife.com Untitled-1 1

Read about them on page

The 2018 Amazing Airdrie Women nominees, from left: Lisa Darlene Ammirati, Nicole Proseilo, Jody Amsing, Kendra Varga-Reichelt, Alisa Jones, Nicole Jones, Caroline Marie McKay-Siguenza, Marie Lauer, Katherine Funk, Crystal Boys, Janine Hartsook, Wendy Bates-Wiebe, Kate Dekker, Naomi Keane, Victoria-Lynn Scattergood, Heather Doyle, Kerri Williams, Megan Lockhart, Caitlin Taylor, Veronique Dewilde, Pam Smith, Dr. Heather Cowie, Kimberley Ford, Charlotte Blackwell, Madeleine McKee, Dr. Mindy Gautama, Samantha Laycock, Veronica Boccinfuso, Preet Nijjar, Amanda Tozser and Kara Fulton. See full story on page 119.

119

Vote online at airdrielife.com Attend the awards luncheon May 11

2018-02-14 8:14 PM


2018 Amazing Airdrie Women SPRING 2018

A a

w 2018

Meet our

31 nominees

8th Annual

AMAZING AIRDRIE WOMEN ARTS

Celebration

Airdrie’s First

BREWERY

She shoots, she scores!

Midget Elite Hockey

airdrielife.com

Read about them on page

119

Vote online at airdrielife.com Attend the awards luncheon May 11


SPRING SUMMER COLLECTION 2018

THE STORE UPSTAIRS Airdrie’s Local Developer for 30 Years!

STOREUPSTAIRS.CA 209 CENTRE AVE SW AIRDRIE


SPRING SUMMER COLLECTION 2018

THE STORE UPSTAIRS Airdrie’s Local Developer for 30 Years!

STOREUPSTAIRS.CA 209 CENTRE AVE SW AIRDRIE


2018 Amazing Airdrie Women

A a

w 2018

PHASE 1

PHASE 4

RECEIVE $10,000 OFF ALL REMAINING SINGLE FAMILY LOTS

NEW POND & GREENSPACE BACKING LOTS AVAILABLE

Limited opportunities remaining

Read about them on page

119

Vote online at airdrielife.com Attend the awards luncheon May 11

OPEN FOR VIEWING

SINGLE FAMILY FRONT DRIVE HOMES STARTING FROM THE

Visit our Single Family Front Drive Sales Centre 604 Midtown Place SW, Airdrie

THE BETTER WAY TO BUILD.

435’S

$

*

Railway Gate SW

Ironhorse Park

N

Midtown Crossing SW Paired + Street Town Sales Centre

Midtown Gate SW Midtown St SW Midtown Place SW

Front Drive Sales Centre

Midtown Parkway SW

2 DESIGNER SHOWHOMES

Midtown Blvd SW

31 nominees

8th Street SW

Meet our

“I believe that if I can give the consumer confidence in the food they have chosen to put in their bodies, it’s worthwhile”

Midtown Drive SW Yankee Valley Blvd. SW

Future Showhomes

For more information, contact Karen at 403-536-2312 or email midtown@shanehomes.com

Showhome Hours: Mon - Thurs: 2-8 pm • Sat, Sun & Hol: 12-5 pm info@shanehomes.com shanehomes.com #betterwaytobuild *Price includes house, lot & GST. Subject to change without notice.

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

127


INTRODUC ING A IRDRIN IETR ’SONDU ECI WRBR WNG E SATNE OO PA COM KS MU MN IDKF UN EIECLD ITY Y, COMING SOO OM IT REGISTER AT CHIN OO KG NO ATE.

W S E L L IN G

ODUCING A NEW BR OOKFIELD COMMUN ITY, COMING SOON. REGISTER AT CHIN OO

COM FOR UPDATE S.

KGATE.COM FOR UPDATES.

ODUCING A NE W BROOKFIEL D COMMUNITY , COMING SOO REGISTER AT CHINOOKGAT E.CO M FOR UPDA TES.

LEARN MORE C HINOOKGATE.C OM


Our philosophy reflects our commitment to building

beautiful custom homes for the families who love in them. Specializing in new home construction and acreages. Ask about our 2018 promotions and flexible building options!

NEW

Waterfro nt lots just rele ased!

B u i lt f o r t h e w ay y o u l i v e

C O ME VISIT O UR SHO W HOME 1217 Cooper’s Drive | Airdrie, AB Monday-Thursday Weekends & Holiday

2 pm - 8 pm Noon - 5 pm

C O NTAC T US 403-912-7900

sales@harderhomes.ca

• HO M E S STA RTI N G I N T H E 5 00 S • H ARD E RH OME S.CA •


PERFECT SPACES FOR FAMILY TIME

Welcome your family home to a spacious kitchen with plenty of room for the budding chefs, and personalize it to suit your taste at our Design Centre. Experience neighbourly charm, easy walks to Windsong School, and areas of play and relaxation – a place to feel at home in Southwinds and The Gates at Hillcrest. Visit our Sales Centre today to learn more about current promotions and lot availability for all home styles.

AIRDRIE Front-Drive Homes

Village Townhomes

From $381,990

From $279,990

Now Selling Phase 5

Manor Townhomes

From $301,990 SALES CENTRE

907 Windsong Drive 403-980-8765

SALES CENTRE HOURS Monday - Thursday 1 pm-8 pm; Friday 1 pm-6 pm; Saturday, Sunday and Holidays 11 am-6 pm Home prices, models, and promotions subject to change. Please see a sales representative for details.

MATTAMYHOMES.COM/CALGARY 907 Windson Drive, Airdrie, AB T4B ON5 | Tel: 403-980-8765


ing ly serv Proud s familie Airdrie

PUBLISHER/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Sherry Shaw-Froggatt

ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER

Becky Salmond

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

DESIGN DIRECTOR

Vanessa Peterelli Kim Williams

CONTRIBUTORS

Sergei Belski, Amanda Benner, Matt Carre, Michelle Carre, Raphael Codio, Leslie Davies, Sherry Jenkins, Dr. Mo Korayem, Britton Ledingham, Sara Lester-Vanderheide, Tara Levick, Cat Nantel, Dr. Sarah Pedersen, Vanessa Peterelli, Kim Purvis, Kristy Reimer, Jolene Rudisuela, Claudia Sasse, Dawn Smith, Mario Toneguzzi, Wyatt Tremblay, Meghan West, Kathryn Zondag Stock images by iStock/Getty Images

SALES DIRECTOR

Wendy Pratt

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

CONTACT US

Sharie Tanner

PRINTING Transcontinental

EDITORIAL sherry@frogmediainc.ca ADVERTISING wendy@frogmediainc.ca

WHERE TO FIND US airdrielife is delivered to all homes in Airdrie and surrounding areas. If you do not receive an issue please contact sherry@frogmediainc.ca airdrielife is available at more than 100 locations around the city. You can also find airdrielife in every Airdrie showhome, at CrossIron Mills and at more than 100 locations in Calgary. airdrielife is published quarterly by Frog Media Inc. with the co-operation of the City of Airdrie Economic Development Department.

VOLUME 15, NUMBER 1 | ISSN 1916-355X

Contents copyright 2018 by Frog Media Inc. May not be reproduced without permission. The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertisement, and all representations of warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertiser and not of the publisher.

EDITORIAL POLICY airdrielife editorial is not for sale. Editorial is completely independent from advertising, and no special editorial consideration or commitment of any kind can form any part of the advertising agreement. All editorial inquiries must be directed toward the editor. airdrielife does not accept unsolicited submissions. Freelance writers and photographers interested in assignments are asked to send an inquiry, with published samples, to sherry@frogmediainc.ca

14

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


General Dentists

Now offering Aesthetic Botox


Do you want people to eat, play or stay with YOU? Then you need to be seen HERE

contributors

Ayesha Clough I wasn’t sure what to expect as I walked up to the Spiritual Event Centre on Main Street. I had read both of Kim Wuirch’s books – Waking Up an Empath (an honest and often comical account of her spiritual awakening) and Awakened Empath (a more esoteric ride into the world of angels, dimensions, portals and such). The woman I met is hard to describe. On the one hand, she’s a tough and capable single mom with a high-power corporate job. On the other, she’s also a spiritual healer, with the gift of being able to communicate with angels. Even Wuirch doesn’t fully understand the new world in which she lives, but there’s no denying her warmth, sincerity, confidence and passion. Britton Ledingham I love hockey, and it was a pleasure to meet up with the players, parents and coaches from the Airdrie Lightning female midget AA team. The four girls I interviewed are smart, competitive characters full of personality. Each just 16 years old, I could tell they were allowing the sport to bring out the best in them. It was obvious they were having fun and giving it their all, not just saying so. As a young parent, I enjoy learning from head coach Ray Hoppins as he gives his time to support and encourage his daughter and her friends. I wish Airdrie’s first midget AA female hockey team all the best as they vie for an Alberta Female Hockey League Elite title in their second year as a team. Cat Nantel I am a freelance writer and marketing/public relations specialist. Thanks to freelance writing, I get to meet people I might never encounter in my everyday life. For this issue, I had the pleasure of interviewing the Hanson family, owners of Your Local Ranch, and beef producers for more than a century. I also got to meet a young couple pursuing their dream to become microbrewers right here in Airdrie. I loved learning about both these small businesses and the unique approach they took in order to ensure they would be successful.

Kristy Reimer I always enjoy photographing airdrielife’s Amazing Women because I get to meet each person and hear about their unique stories before they are released in the magazine. The photo, inspired by Vanity Fair’s celebrity groups by Annie Leibovitz, is actually a composite of eight groups combined into one, with many hours in Photoshop. It was fun posing each person and (hopefully) making them feel a bit like celebrities because they are all celebrities in my book!

Dawn Smith This issue, I was privileged to have the opportunity to interview the wonderful women nominated for the Amazing Women Awards. These passionate women had diverse backgrounds, but shared the characteristics of humility, strength and a desire to brighten the lives of others. I was left with a great hope for the future and a feeling of gratitude to be sharing a community with so many wonderful women.

Mario Toneguzzi As a longtime business writer, I am always intrigued by how people come up with ideas and become entrepreneurs. A passion for dogs and a Facebook community was the genesis of a great business for Nikki Nordick of Airdrie Puppy Pals, which captured the city’s Emerging Business Award last fall.

16

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


They’re going...they’re going...

but they aren’t gone yet! Don’t miss your opportunity to buy your dream home in King’s Heights. Final lots are now selling.

NEW PRICES

NEW LOTS

NEW SHOWHOMES

SEMI-DETACHED HOMES Starting from $330’s

HOMES WITH ATTACHED GARAGE

FRONT DRIVE HOMES Starting from $400’s

Visit us today!

VISIT US TODAY AT ONE OF OUR SALE CENTRES: SEMI DETACHED: 2 & 6 KINGFISHER CRES, AIRDRIE | (403) 980-0558 FRONT DRIVE: 91 & 95 KINGFISHER CRES, AIRDIRE | (403) 980-6664 SHOW ROOM HOURS: MON-THURS 2-8PM, SAT-SUN 12-5PM, FRI CLOSED

Jayman BUILT homes and growing. Join our family.


publisher’s note

T

here is a little medallion on our cover that says Vol. 15 No. 1. That means airdrielife is now entering its 15th publishing year. Yes I am a bit impatient – waiting until 2019 to say it’s our “15th anniversary” would be the traditional way to do things but – anyone who knows me well knows I don’t like to do things the “normal way.” (After all normal is just a setting on the washing machine.) There is nothing normal about the cover as I am sure you have surmised, unfolding (and unfolding again) the cover photo of our 31 Amazing Airdrie Women nominees. This is one of the most creative collaborations we have done thanks to the genius of photographer Kristy Reimer who has been shooting airdrielife covers since 2007. It involved eight separate photo shoots and once I saw the entire image I knew we had to go big and opt for the gatefold. I hope you like it as much as we do. The other subtle changes are with our masthead. We’ve decided it’s time to freshen up our look. The last time we changed the masthead font was in 2010. We’ve also decided “exploring the good life” wasn’t enough for our 15th season; in a way what we have been doing for the past 46 issues is celebrating the good life so why not say it out loud? We have a lot to celebrate in this issue – from the glam of the TD Mayor’s Night of the Arts, to our very own Awesome Airdrie Kids celebration, to local ranchers, volunteers, elite athletes, gorgeous artwork, Airdrie’s first brewery … we needed 130 pages to tell it all! But we don’t stop at the printed page – our online presence is evolving dramatically with a soon-to-be-revamped website (coming this summer) and a very active social media scene. (We gave away more than $10,000 in prizes last year!) We’ve created and host our own branded events and promotions with TASTEairdrie, we are accepting applications for the Anne Beaty Memorial Scholarship and, of course, nominations are open for both the 2019 Amazing Airdrie Women and our 2018 Awesome Airdrie Kids. Since 2004 we have donated more than $75,000 in ad space to local community groups and donate our time and expertise to promote the local arts scene. As we lean into this spring issue, my mind is already jumping ahead to the next issue…. (Yes, we have to work that far in advance – we have gorgeous photos of locally grown heirloom tomatoes taken LAST August that we are so excited to print this June.) I feel re-energized by our little makeover and I hope when you are enjoying a quiet moment, you can savour every page in that magical way magazines have to engage you like no other media can. So start reading … and celebrating ... with us!

Sherry Shaw-Froggatt Editor and Publisher

18

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


LESS TIME IN YOUR CAR... MORE TIME AT YOUR HOME

NEW

TOWNHOMES

DUPLEXES

LANED HOMES

FROM THE

FROM THE

FROM THE

FRONT GARAGE

SHOWHOMES $ 249’S $ 330’S $ 380’S NOW OPEN NuVista Homes 403.980.9525

Broadview Homes 403.980.8581

McKee Homes 403.980.1092

$

SEMI-ESTATE FROM THE

FROM THE

460’S $ 500’S

Pacesetter Homes 403.980.8625

ZEN by Avalon MB 403.805.0423

B I G C I T Y A M E N I T I E S , S M A LL TOW N C O M M U T E

Airdrie's endless amenities and a short commute to the City of Calgary. With 3 schools just a short walk away, welcoming streets, parks and pathways, larger lots, and new

2

lower pricing, maybe it’s time for you to discover the value of Ravenswood. A I R D R I E

Please contact your home builder for more info, or visit

ravenswoodairdrie.ca

Qualico Communities are built with one thing in mind - you. Our thoughtfully master-planned spaces are built with an intuitive sense of community that nurtures individuals, families and friendships.

Yankee Valley Blvd Kings Heights Gate SE

to Airdrie

Located in Southeast Airdrie, Ravenswood offers its residents close proximity to

Ravenswood Dr SE


48

26 greatlife

119 82

On the Cover

Our four-page cover spread (a first!) is a brilliant compilation of eight separate photo sessions, thanks to the keen eye and talent of photographer Kristy Reimer. Go to airdrielife.com to see how Kristy did her magic to create one AMAZING photo. PHOTO BY KRISTY REIMER

20

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

26 32 36 40 44 47 48 52 56 62 64 70

Emotional Colours Chandra’s Choices Spiritual Writings Events TASTEairdrie Vinelife In the Kitchen Marvellous Makeover AMNAs Parentlife Healthylife Petlife

homelife

74 76 78 80 82 84 85 86

Getting Ready to Garden Southpoint Community Excel Homes Furniture Trends Showhomes Decorlife Real Estate Home and Garden Show


OWN A HOME FOR LESS THAN $1,450 PER MTH* Starting from Mid $300’s | Move in Ready Homes

*Monthly payment of $1,444.71 is based on a $334,900 purchase price, with a 5% down payment. Payments based on a 2.26% VRM rate and amortized over 25 years. Rates as per January 22, 2018 and subject to change without notice. Rates and approval acceptance are not guaranteed and are subject to availability. Rules and restrictions may apply.

FIND YOUR PERFECT HOME AT SOUTHPOINT Southpoint is a one-of-a-kind community situated in southwest Airdrie that stands apart for its wide selection of homes and expansive green space. When complete Southpoint will feature a charming mix of detached single-family homes, rowhomes, townhomes, paired homes and condos – an option for every budget and lifestyle. With 12 acres of parks and green space woven throughout the neighbourhood, great amenities like a tennis court, basketball court, playgrounds and BBQ areas, plus an elementary school planned for 2019, Southpoint is the ideal place to raise your family.

VISIT OUR SHOWHOMES & PRESENTATION CENTRE! E LAKE BLVD

KINGSVIEW BLVD SE

305 SOUTHPOINT GREEN SW (Corner of 40th Avenue SW & Reynolds Gate)

MAIN ST

24 ST SW

YANKEE VALLEY BLVD

1 ST AVE NW

8 ST SW

40 AVE SW

QUEEN ELZABETH II HIGHWAY

REYNOLDS GATE

HOURS OF OPERATION Monday to Thursday - 2pm to 8pm Friday Closed Saturday, Sunday & Holidays - 12pm to 5pm

VESTASOUTHPOINT.COM

southpoint@vestaproperties.com

403.980.1979

The developer reserves the absolute right to modify, cancel or extend this offer at any time without prior notice. Actual interiors, exteriors and views may be noticeably different than what is depicted in photographs. This is not an offering for sale. Any such offering may only be made with the applicable offer to purchase and agreement of sale and disclosure statement. Prices and availability are subject to change without notice. E. & O.E.


106

91

56 worklife

90 Businesslife 91 On Tap 94 Puppy Pals 96 Community Cents 100 Carbon Credits 102 Financiallife

citylife

109

126 22

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

106 109 112 114 116 119 126

Elite Female Hockey Project Linus 2-4-6-8 Cheer! LEADing the Way Awesome Celebration Amazing Women Rural Roots


! e m o H t a n u F More

Midtown, Airdrie’s Newest Amenity Rich Community Features Pond & Pedestrian Bridge · Promenade + Sitting Area · Tot Lot Park, Walking Paths + Greenspace · Shopping Centre

In the heart of Airdrie with homestyles for all.

Street Towns

Laned Duplexes

Front Drive Duplexes

Front Drive Homes

from the mid $300’s

from the mid $300’s

from the mid $300’s

from the low $400’s

Now Selling Phase 4! Pond + Greenspace Lots Available!

www.MIDTOWNinAIRDRIE.com Hours of Operation: Monday to Thursday - 2 to 8 pm | Saturday, Sunday & Holidays - 12 to 5 pm *Price subject to change without notice.


Offering services for the entire family! Hygiene services, general dentistry, Invisalign®, cosmetic treatments, and more!

Helping Airdrie grow healthy smiles this spring!

#1 704 Main St., Airdrie

403 768 2084

AIRDRIEDENTAL.CA/LIFE

WELCOMING NEW PATIENTS DR. NEIL McDERMID DR. VICTORIA McDERMID General Dentists

24

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Office hours Monday - Thursday: 8:00 - 4:00 Friday: 8:00 - 3:00


greatlife

W H AT T O S E E , D O , E AT, L I ST E N T O A N D M O R E

48 26 Emotional Colours • 52 Marvellous Makeover • 56 Culture Spotlight


G R E AT L I F E | A R T I ST P R O F I L E

The colour of emotion Story by Wyatt Tremblay | Photos by Raphael Codio

26

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


P

eople think you just slap colour down on canvas, but it’s much more than that,” says Airdrie artist Verone Solilo.

“Every brushstroke has a purpose, every colour a meaning.” Solilo and her husband moved from Saskatchewan two years ago to be near family and, of course, her easel and brushes followed. “I’ve been doing this a long time, since I was really little,” Solilo, who is 62, explains.

“Every brushstroke has a purpose, every colour a meaning”

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

27


G R E AT L I F E | A R T I ST P R O F I L E

However, because she was busy raising a family, and working as a playschool teacher and then a coffee shop owner, painting was always something she did on the side. Five years ago, the purpose of Solilo’s art took on a new meaning after her family experienced a tragedy. “Until then, I was always a careful painter, very quiet, very water colour-ish, always worrying about what people thought,” she admits. Solilo’s art is anything but quiet. Her style is reminiscent of the Group of Seven’s Tom Thomson or of French impressionist Claude Monet. Her paintings, in either acrylic or watercolour, erupt off the canvas in energetic brushstrokes with splashes of brilliance and movement, sometimes abstract or more realistic, insinuating but not entirely describing what she imagines. It was the family tragedy that released this, says Solilo, because it taught her that life is too short to worry about what people think. One evening, angry and unable to sleep, she sat at her easel and be-

28

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

gan to paint a scene of ocean waves. But the intense emotion she was feeling soon began pouring out. “I was like, in my mind, ‘No, no!’ and paint began to splatter.” The result was the most moving piece she had ever put to canvas. “Now, I paint with my emotions. I no longer care what people think about my work.” It has been freeing, she explains, but her images are not dark. “I don’t like stories that have a sad ending, and I don’t like painting to make people feel sad,” she explains. “There’s a lot of sorrow in the world, but there’s also a lot of joy and wonder. That’s what came out of that night.” Solilo is becoming known in her adopted community, participating in art shows and in the Voice and Vision Collaboration. People connect with her art, she says, and often tell her how it affects them. “It’s so amazing to be able to do something that brings joy into someone’s life.” life


S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

29


30

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


Bene

an

dict

Trist ct Tristan i d e Ben

Brun

Ivan

o Ivan o Brun

McCor

mick

Hawth

orne

ck

mi or C c

M

ne or th aw

H

Benedict

Tristan

Benedict

Tristan

Bruno

Ivan Bened

ict

n

Ivan

Bruno

McCorm

ick

Bened

ict

ick

McCorm

McCor

Bruno

mick

Trista

ne Hawthor

Trista

Ivan

Hawthor Brunone

Ivan

n McCor

mick

Hawth

orne


G R E AT L I F E | M U S I C I A N P R O F I L E

“I just try to follow what feels authentic and genuine to me”

Chandra Baeuchle, doing it her way STORY BY WYATT TREMBLAY | PHOTOS BY RAPHAEL CODIO

32

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


Chandra Baeuchle has a simple rule she lives by.

“I’m very much a DIY person. I’m trying to use what I have to my advantage. That’s one of the (rules) I go by.” Baeuchle, who has lived in Airdrie since she was a child, has graced the pages of airdrielife before. Both she and her younger sister Alena were featured in a 2012 article when Chandra was 19, and in her second year at the University of Calgary working toward a degree in music. The two siblings, both passionate about music, performed together as a duo called Arrow. That was five years ago. “We haven’t been doing it as much, because she’s busy with her last year at university,” Chandra explains, “but once (Alena’s) done, she’d like to get back into it.” “Then we’ll see where it takes us,” she says laughing. Chandra graduated in 2016 with her Bachelor of Music, majoring in voice, and has her own business as a music instructor (voice and piano), singer/songwriter, and as an artist and graphic designer. “I’d like to find a way to bring it together into one package,” she says in true DIY fashion. Chandra’s latest project, an original single called No Shadows, is as close as she’s gotten to her ideal. For the project, which has seen radio airtime and can be purchased on iTunes, she designed her own website, wrote, arranged, preformed, and recorded the piece, and provided the artwork for the cover. No Shadows is simply Chandra on piano recorded with Apple’s GarageBand, but she offers a tightly woven blend of world music, jazz, electronic, and scat anchored by her smooth vocals that at times become as much a part of the musical tapestry as the instruments. She’d also like to do her own music video for the song’s theme of vulnerability. “Maybe some sort of motion graphics,” she says laughing. “I’m still trying to figure it out.” It’s this drive that pushes Chandra to experiment beyond what she and her sister were doing as a duo. “I’m very much discovering different areas where I’d like to expand even more. I’m not a hundred per cent where I want to be with my style and genre.” That’s one of the challenges, she admits. “I like music so much that I want to bring (it into everything) that I do.” Artists like Adele, Amy Winehouse, Banks, Allan Rayman, Charlotte Cardin, and various alternative bands influence her. Chandra’s tastes tend to run counter to mainstream pop music. “It’s not that I don’t like popular music; I just try to follow what feels authentic and genuine to me, because I feel that people can tell when you’re just doing it to be popular.” In keeping with her do-it-yourself strategy, she has a definite plan for the future. “I’d like to advertise my music to people in the film and TV industry. I’ve always thought that’d be really cool.” But that’s a story for the next five years. life S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

33


ADVERTORIAL

Sedation Dentistry

Get years of dental work done in one appointment under IV sedation.

FREE consultation 0% payment plans

5103 - 35 Mackenzie Way, Airdrie (Next to Sobeys) westairdriedental.com

587-600-2127

Convenient Evening & Weekend Hours

Dentistry for families & children

130 Sierra Springs Drive SE, Airdrie

587-600-2939 34

airdrielife.com

|

(Next to Canadian Brewhouse & Mr. Mikes)

southairdriesmiles.com

S P R I N G 2018

Have you wondered what your smile would look like if it were straighter?

A

irdrie Springs Dental (ASD) is incorporating proven and cutting-edge technology that can show you the results before you begin. With the use of the iTero Scanner from Align Technology (the makers of Invisalign), their dentists can generate images of what your teeth will look like after treatment. “It allows patients to see what their smile may look like after treatment, before deciding to proceed.” said Dr. Hubert Ng. “It makes instant before-and-after images.” ASD has been utilizing Align Technology’s industry-leading expertise for years. Align is also responsible for the creation of the invisible orthodontics market with the invention of the Invisalign system in 1999. The company has helped treat over five million patients with Invisalign clear braces, a system that Dr. Ng has been using to help his patients achieve a better smile. The intraoral scanner has replaced physical impressions (the goopy material most dentists use) with digital images, and is able to improve almost every type of dental treatment offered, from Invisalign impressions, as well crown or bridge restorations, nightguards, dentures, veneers and dental implants. This new technology can help enhance the accuracy


AFTER

0%

payment plans

Full orthodontics services for children, teens and adults BEFORE of records, treatment efficiency and the overall patient experience and means more value for patients, and less time in the dental chair.

The Invisalign process It starts with a consultation to come up with a personalized treatment plan. Dentists use the scanners to take the digital impressions and then, your series of customized clear aligners are made. You’ll bring home a few sets of aligners at a time, wearing each set for a week at a time. Unlike traditional braces, the aligners are light and nearly invisible when worn so you can get your orthodontic treatment done, while not having them visible during big events like weddings or graduations. You will quickly start to see your smile straighten right before your eyes. Plus, you only need to stop by ASD every six to eight weeks for a quick follow up and to pick up your new trays. Most treatment is completed by 9 months to a year.

Invisalign Orthodontics

Benefits Straighter teeth are generally healthier, with fewer symptoms of gum disease and cavities. “That’s because they’re easier to care for,” said Dr. Ng. “With Invisalign, you won’t need extra tools or appointments to keep your teeth clean — just brush and floss as normal.” Another benefit is confidence. “I have seen that when people feel good about the way their teeth look, it does wonders for their personal and professional life,” said Dr. Ng. Contact Airdrie Springs Dental today to request a consultation for you or your teen by phoning 587-600-0560 or visiting airdriespringsdental.com today. (With files from aligntechnology.com)

587-600-2443

280 2700 Main Street S (by Co-op), Airdrie

airdriespringsdental.com S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

35


G R E AT L I F E | B O O KS

Airdrie woman’s journey from ordinary to awakened

Kim Wuirch is struggling to find her way around the Keurig machine. “I think it goes in here,” she says, as she flips the green tea pod this way and that, finally stuffing it into the right spot with a triumphant grin. She’s dressed for a boardroom, with an elegant blouse atop black dress pants and ankle boots, her short boyish hair framing deep-set blue eyes. In fact, she’s just driven over from her day job in Calgary, where she works as an IT analyst for the City of Calgary, a position she’s held for the last 10 years.

Spiritual trailblazer STORY BY AYESHA CLOUGH | PHOTO BY SERGEI BELSKI

36

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


BORN AIRDRIE. RAISED AIRDRIE. SELLS AIRDRIE.

“What you do in your home is your business. Finding you one is mine!”

airdriehouses.com |403.862.0096


G R E AT L I F E | B O O KS

So what is this corporate warrior doing at a spiritual event centre in Airdrie, located in a basement under a tattoo parlour at Main and First? “Welcome to my crazy life,” says Wuirch, who has lived in Airdrie for 10 years with her son Seth, who’s now 13. She was caught off guard three years ago by her spiritual awakening. “I couldn’t have been more green or more clueless about this stuff … I thought I was losing my mind, but after a couple of days, there was just no denying,” she says. It started simply enough with a book she was reading on a camping trip with Seth and her former partner on the September long weekend in 2014. The book was a paranormal fiction called Haunted on Bourbon Street. One of the characters who was labelled an ‘empath’ described her to a tee. Although Wuirch had never heard the word before, it stuck in her head. Once she got home, she began researching the word, took some online quizzes, and was shocked when the results confirmed that she in fact was an empath – someone who is highly sensitive to the emotions and energy of others, and who can use this gift to help heal others emotionally, spiritually or even physically. “It was almost like being three years old again, and the whole world is completely new to you,” Wuirch says. Fast forward to 2015, and Wuirch was completely immersed in this spiritual awakening, having sought out teachers and online resources on everything from healing crystals, reiki, Akashic records reading, numerology, card readings and more. “It was just like following a crumb trail,” she recalls. She began to journal – mostly to create a guide for Seth, convinced that he too has spiritual powers, and not wanting him to feel alone and crazy as he grows up. “I thought, ‘Poor kid, what’s he in for?’” But her friend and spiritual mentor urged her to publish her writings to help other people who were also awakening, as there were almost no books on the subject at the time. “Eventually, I realized it would be selfish and wrong to not put it out there,” she says. And so, in December 2016, Wuirch self-published her first book, Waking Up An Empath. In it, she lays bare her remarkable journey from awakening to spiritual healer, writing down what she learned about spirit guides, chakras, angel signs, totem animals and more.

Hailed by other spiritual healers as the ‘go-to’ resource for people coming to grips with their empathic abilities, the book has sold 1,500 copies since its launch in February 2017, she says. Wuirch quickly followed this up with her second book, Awakened Empath, written in only two and a half months, in the evenings after work and on weekends. “This one was more automatic writing, which is a form of channelling, where the information just comes and there’s no thought process … I’m just typing as fast as the words are coming.” Awakened Empath goes even further than the first book, discussing how pastlife regression shed light on her short-lived second marriage and introduced her to Ken Lewicki, her partner in life and business. In a chapter titled ‘The A-Team,’ Wuirch highlights her ability to communicate – pretty much on demand – with angels and archangels, especially Archangel Razial. “I run everything past Razial,” she writes. The book includes passages he reveals to her on complex spiritual concepts such as dimensions, realities and realms – things even she doesn’t fully grasp. Sometimes she writes the first draft, and then he tells her to edit certain words or phrases. She also regularly uses Razial as a messenger to talk to other angels and otherworldly beings. She readily admits it can sound “terrifying” to folks on the outside. “I understand it’s not for everybody … I’m really not trying to convince anybody. All I really am trying to do is find the other ones that already want to know, or already know and just want to find a community,” she adds. Wuirch opened The Spirit Within spiritual centre in Airdrie in January 2017. Together with Ken and other likeminded practitioners, they run weekend workshops, reiki sessions and other healing events there. But she also offers her services via Skype to clients as far away as the U.K., Australia and New Zealand, she says. Wuirch believes people are waking up in waves all over the world. Her angel guides tell her it’s part of the evolution of mankind, and can’t be stopped. “I think what’s going to happen is that the majority of people are going to awaken, to the point where you’re going to be the weird one if you’re not,” Wuirch says. In the meantime, she goes about her business with the confidence of a woman with an archangel in her corner, and a waitlist for her services that’s three months long. Mundane earthly contraptions like coffee makers, however, still occasionally trip her up. life

“It was almost like being three years old again, and the whole world is completely new to you” 38

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


G R E AT L I F E | E V E N TS

Spring into fun MARCH 15-17 THE MOUSETRAP BY AGATHA CHRISTIE Airdrie Victory Church Presented by Torchlight Theatre. A group of strangers is stranded in a boarding house during a snowstorm, and one of them is a murderer…. Nightly at 7 p.m., plus a Saturday matinee at 2 p.m. Admission $15-25. MARCH 16 APL TEEN GAMING Airdrie Public Library Gamers unite! Drop in for a free evening of board games, video games, giant games, all games! Plus a smorgasbord of tasty treats! For grades 7+. 6-8 p.m.

MARCH 8 CANADA’S BALLET JÖRGEN: ANASTASIA Bert Church Theatre Canada’s Ballet Jörgen brings back the magical tale of the Russian Grand Duchess Anastasia for the 100th anniversary of the story and the 10th anniversary of the production. Created by acclaimed choreographer and artistic director Bengt Jörgen, Anastasia is set to an original full orchestra score by Russian/Canadian composer Ivan Barbotin. 7:30 p.m. Admission $45. MARCH 10 PSYCHIC EXPO The Spirit Within and Forever Keepsakes Mediums, psychics, card readers, Reiki masters, aura photography, crystal healings, and much more, intro to advanced. Family friendly. Nibbles and water/tea/ coffee provided. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Admission is an item or cash donation for Airdrie Food Bank. Readings are available and will be priced by individual practitioners. MARCH 11 BOWL FOR KIDS SAKE AIRDRIE Shamrock Lanes A fun, family-friendly fundraising event in support of the Big Brothers Big Sisters mentoring programs for kids. Join the teams for glow bowling, food, music, prizes and more! Details at bbbsairdrie.com/bowl

40

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

MARCH 12-24 ANNUAL AIRDRIE ROTARY FESTIVAL OF PERFORMING ARTS Bert Church Theatre, Grace Baptist Church The festival promotes the appreciation of music and speech arts and encourages amateur performers and students to participate and perform in a positive, non-competitive environment. The disciplines of piano, musical theatre, speech, vocal, choral, band/ instrumental and strings are offered. Free and open to the public. Details and daily schedule at airdrierotaryfestival.org MARCH 14 APL WRITERS WORKSHOP Airdrie Public Library This program is for adults looking to share their writing and ideas and get constructive feedback from other writers in the community. Everyone welcome. 7-8 p.m. No registration required. MARCH 15 THE AIRHEADS: EAT IT COLES NOTES! Town and Country Centre Improv troupe The Airheads presents this hilarious and probably-not-accurate retelling of the classics. 7 p.m. Admission $10.

MARCH 17 SHAMROCK SHIMMY FUNDRAISER Town and Country Centre All proceeds support Airdrie Food Bank. Cash bar, silent and live auctions, 50/50, Irish entertainment. Cocktails 6 p.m., dinner 7 p.m., dance to follow. Tickets available at Airdrie Food Bank or call 403-948-0063. MARCH 17 JUNIOR ARTISTS/ADULT ARTISTS WORKSHOP Airdrie Public Library Join Airdrie artist and educator Deb Lawton in creating a sculpture from materials that can be found in most homes. Students will express their creativity using wire and plaster bandages to create form, then paint their creations to bring their work to life. Junior artists 1-2:30 p.m.; adult artists 1-2:30 p.m. (teens welcome). Limited spots. Register in advance at the library. Admission $4. MARCH 24 AIRDRIE ROTARY FESTIVAL SHOWCASE/BENEFIT CONCERT Bert Church Theatre Visit airdrierotaryfestival.org for details. Tickets available at Bert Church Theatre.


MARCH 24 PEDAL FOR A PURPOSE SPIN-A-THON PUSH Cycle Studio The Boys and Girls Club of Airdrie and PUSH Cycle Studio have teamed up to host this first annual event. Teams will spin for four hours and raise money through pledges. All proceeds raised will go directly back to the BGCA’s programs and services which support children, youth and families. Details at bgcairdrie.com MARCH 27-29 8th ANNUAL RIDE OF THE MUSTANG George McDougall High School All money raised through this fundraising event, organized by George McDougall High School students and staff, is donated to the Alberta Children’s Hospital Foundation to help kids who are fighting cancer. Prior to the event, teams of students collect pledges to take part in the 48-hour stationary bike relay. MARCH 29 A NIGHT OF BOWIE - THE DEFINITIVE BOWIE EXPERIENCE Bert Church Theatre Syl Thompson has been paying tribute to David Bowie’s music since the early ’80s; he has been acclaimed as providing the most credible and realistic Bowie experience in North America. A celebration of Bowie’s extensive list of memorable hits, eerily close to hearing and seeing the star himself. 8 p.m. Tickets at ticketpro.ca APRIL 2 OLATE DOGS Bert Church Theatre The Olate Dogs are the winning participants from Season 7 of America’s Got Talent. Led by Richard Olate and his son Nicholas, the Olate Dogs are a high-energy, fast-paced canine theatrical act filled with amazing dog tricks, human acrobatics and humour. 7 p.m. Admission $28, seniors (65+) and children (12 and under) $25.

APRIL 13 SWEET ON FIDDLIN’ 2018 Bert Church Theatre Presented by The Calgary Fiddlers. A jam-packed evening of sizzling-hot fiddle music, Art Fiddles and a dessert buffet. The only time you will have the chance to see this fantastic group of up-and-coming young musicians perform a full show. Doors open 6:15 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Admission $31.50. APRIL 14 AIRDRIE FARMERS MARKET SPRING FLING Town and Country Centre Favourite Airdrie market vendors on site plus some new and unique ones, too! Food trucks, feasts and fancy spring offerings. Admission is a donation for Airdrie Food Bank. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. APRIL 14 CROSSFIELD SPRING FARMERS MARKET Crossfield Community Centre The Crossfield Spring Market hosts a large variety of artisans and food vendors, the perfect stop to pick up one-of-a-kind unique gifts. Free admission, food bank donations accepted. 10 a.m.-4p.m. APRIL 14-15 NAME THAT TUNE VOL. 2 Overtime Lounge A ridiculously fun fundraiser organized by the Boys and Girls Club of Airdrie. 6 p.m. Details at bgcairdrie.com APRIL 15 NATIONAL VOLUNTEER WEEK RED CARPET MOVIE EVENT Landmark Cinemas Roxy Airdrie Celebrate volunteerism in Airdrie at this third annual event hosted by Volunteer Airdrie. Volunteers and their families can get free tickets and enjoy a morning with a free breakfast, movie, treats, door prizes and much more! 8-12 p.m.

APRIL 16 DRUM CIRCLE The Spirit Within and Forever Keepsakes No drumming experience required, just a desire to have fun and connect with like-minded people. Drums supplied but participants are welcome to bring their own and receive $5 off. Adult admission $20; youth and seniors $10. Drop in welcome although pre-purchase is advised to secure a space (limited). APRIL 19 THE AIRHEADS: EAT IT COLES NOTES! Town and Country Centre Improv troupe The Airheads presents this hilarious and probably-not-accurate retelling of the classics. 7 p.m. Admission $10. APRIL 28-29 AIRDRIE HOME & LIFESTYLE SHOW Genesis Place An excellent way to connect with your community and explore home and lifestyle solutions. Shop, compare, try and buy. Be sure to visit the ARTS Market (free admission), hosted by Airdrie Regional Arts Society, located in the main gymnasium at Genesis Place. Show admission is $5; children 12 and under enter free with adult. Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. APRIL 29  JOHN MCDERMOTT Bert Church Theatre John McDermott is an international recording star and household name. In concert, he never fails to enchant audiences with his beautiful voice and tasteful remembrance tributes. Though time and travel have introduced McDermott to a wealth of new material and experiences, he manages to incorporate that diversity into his performances while retaining the beguiling sense of humour that audiences have loved from the beginning. 2 p.m. Admission $35.

APRIL 7 PRAIRIE MOUNTAIN FIDDLERS Bert Church Theatre Back by popular demand! A foot-stomping, toe-tapping afternoon full of good old-time fiddle music. This group plays for the people and for their love of the music. 2:30 p.m. Admission $16.

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

41


G R E AT L I F E | E V E N TS

JOIN US!

may 26, 2018

MAY 3-5 THE SECRET GARDEN BY GARY PETERSON Airdrie Victory Church Presented by Torchlight Theatre. Mary, a lonely and spoiled orphan girl, arrives at Misselthwaite Manor to no fanfare. Left to her own devices, she discovers a secret garden, as well as her cousin Colin, a sickly boy who’s always kept isolated. Mary’s attention and nurturing for both creates magical transformations. Thursday and Friday night at 7 p.m., plus a 2 p.m. Saturday matinee. Admission $12-15. MAY 11 8th ANNUAL AMAZING AIRDRIE WOMEN AWARDS LUNCHEON The Woods Restaurant The biggest celebration of women in Airdrie! Presented by airdrielife and Pharmasave on Centre. Tickets $50, available through woodsidegc.com/ store. 11 :30 a.m.

MAY 17 INFINITUS Bert Church Theatre A critically acclaimed beatboxing string trio known for their unique sound and upbeat performance style. With a repertoire featuring classical standards and original jazz/hip-hop arrangements and compositions, Infinitus is quickly becoming one of North America’s premiere chamber groups. 7:30 p.m. Admission $24. MAY 17 THE AIRHEADS: EAT IT COLES NOTES! Town and Country Centre Improv troupe The Airheads presents this hilarious and probably-not-accurate retelling of the classics. 7 p.m. Admission $10. MAY 24-26 NOSE CREEK PLAYERS: JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH Bert Church Theatre By Roald Dahl adapted by David Wood, presented by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. May 24 and 25 at 6:30 p.m.; May 26 at 2:30 p.m.

FOR THE

KIDS! BY DAWN SMITH

Families are invited to attend a youth-friendly event at Nose Creek Park on May 26 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The full-day event, free for all Airdrie and area residents, is being organized by the Airdrie Children’s Festival Society (ACFS), a new organization made up of local parents dedicated to enriching the lives of children and celebrating cultural differences. The inaugural event will feature a Children’s Village play area, children’s entertainment and inspiration stations, created to inspire kids in learning activities with the goal of exposing them to future career opportunities. Youth can also take part in free workshops located around the city, such as cooking, pottery, art, writing and computer coding. The day will end with a free outdoor family movie. “Our goal is to inspire young people to become more curious and creative through learning and fun,” says Pete Lewis, ACFS chair, noting the event is geared toward both children and teens. “We want young people to not only have fun, but also to see opportunities for their futures.

airdriechildrensfest.com 42

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

We want them to know they can aspire to be biologists, aircraft technicians, farmers or any other career they choose.” life


Available Exclusively at:

Corkscrew Charlie’s Wine and Spirits • Horseman Liquor Store • Platina Liquor • S&S Liquor Store • Titan Liquor • Everest Wine and Spirits • Peter’s Liquor Hub • Thumbprint Craft Beer Market

Tamarack Jack’s Honey and Meadery is surrounded by tamarack trees and buzzes with activity and excitement. We use our very own raw honey full of flavour from the various wildflowers that surround us. Made from all Canadian ingredients, our mead is light, refreshing and different! We put a new world spin on an ancient recipe that will be sure to leave you wanting more.

To learn more about TAMARACK Jack and our products visit our website.

tamarackjacks.com S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

43


G R E AT L I F E | TAST E A I R D R I E

Great flavours abound this spring from Airdrie’s best TASTE purveyors! STORY BY DAWN SMITH

First & Vine

Hayloft

44

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


I

f you haven’t visited Fitzsimmons Brewing Co., be sure to head over for two new seasonals or enjoy their signature Big Hill Blonde or East Lake Amber beers. Airdrie’s only microbrewery has created a classic Irish cream ale for the season that boasts a warm flavour balanced with thick creamy head. Also on tap starting May is a new roasted pineapple beer made with fresh fruit caramelized on the grill that infuses the sour ale with a sweet, tropical and fruity finish. If you are looking for high-end dining at approachable prices this spring, look no further than Hayloft Restaurant. The popular  burgerand-a-beer special, featuring Your Local Ranch beef and beer for $20, is  available for lunch, Tuesdays through Sundays. Weeknight specials include a burger for $18 on Tuesdays, homemade pasta and wine features on Wednesdays and a featured flatbread for just $10 on Thursdays. Hayloft’s brunch and afternoon tea is available from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the weekends. The Woods Restaurant & Patio has been named Airdrie’s Best Brunch location for the last nine years. Located at Woodside Golf Course, the Sunday Brunch, served buffet style, offers a variety of fresh, seasonal options including carved AAA Alberta prime rib, custom omelettes, waffles, desserts and breakfast favourites such as eggs benedict, fresh seasonal fruit and pastries. This popular restaurant offers great views overlooking the golf course. All group sizes can be accommodated, although reservations are recommended. Not only does Sorso Espresso & Wine Bar have a large selection of on-tap beers and wines, it is also one of the best cocktails spots in Airdrie. Thanks to a new mixologist who combines fresh, high-quality items, such as kombucha and premium teas, with spirits, the restaurant’s cocktail has been elevated and expanded. So whether you’re craving an old-fashioned or a unique choice, like a martini crafted with aloe water, look no further than Sorso. First & Vine, recently voted second-best overall restaurant in the Calgary area on OpenTable, is expanding its single entrée choices. A new 15-ounce double-cut pork chop served with sarsaparilla barbecue sauce and grilled cabbage coleslaw promises to be a hit. New sandwiches, including a delicious offering made with smoked-and-grilled pork belly and garnished with arugula, tomato and a black garlic buttermilk ranch sauce, now grace the restaurant’s casual, approachable menu. Using its own pure, raw honey produced on a farm near Didsbury, Tamarack Jack’s offers a unique lineup of meads available at numerous liquor stores in Airdrie. Both Buzz Saw and Sawyer are carbonated, all-natural, gluten-free meads. Buzz Saw is a traditional mead and Sawyer has hops added, giving it a more beer-like quality. A seasonal, limited-edition mead, Sougan comes with a jar of honey and spices for mulling and is only available at the meadery or at farmers markets. If you have an important event coming up, be sure to check out Good Earth Coffeehouse Airdrie. The restaurant caters and will bring its salads, sandwiches, breakfasts, snacks, beverages, sweets and everything in between to you. Good Earth has you covered with its disposable cutlery, napkins and dishware, provided at no additional charge, and offers allergy-friendly and gluten friendly options.

Voted #2 Best Over-all Calgary Area Restaurant Now some of your favourite shared plates are entree sized!

Expanded lunch & Sunday brunch menu

Wine Bar & Bistro firstandvine.ca

Reservations Recommended

403.980.WINE

136 1st Ave NE Airdrie

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

45


G R E AT L I F E | TAST E A I R D R I E

it’s about experiences Airdrie’s Premier Wine Club www.vinelifewine.com

Airdrie’s Favourite Italian with a few new ingredients...

Ilforno Fusion

el Whe o Tw ur e To D SOON t s a T CE NEW

ES DAT

+

FOLLOW US & WIN WEEKLY + PRIZES PLUS GET DETAILS ON UPCOMING EVENTS! N NOU

AN

@TASTEAIRDRIE

Bites,Blues &Beer

at Fitzsimmons Brewing Co. We’re bringing our taste partners and a live blues band to Airdrie’s first brewery for a great night out. Tickets on sale at airdrielife.com

46

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Ilforno is now Ilforno Fusion and that, dear foodies, is a GOOD thing! Turns out two longtime chefs, Escoffier Nick (Jimmy) and Rakesh Roshan, had dinner at Ilforno a few months back and loved the experience so much they approached Sal and Anna Maria Monna about a partnership. The timing was great and now Sal and Anna Maria can relax a bit more as Jimmy and Rakesh join in the kitchen keeping Anna Maria’s Italian recipes intact while complementing the menu with some new flavours. The boys have a long resume of experience on cruise ships and even restaurants in Italy and Sal, being very particular about his longtime customers having the same high standard of service and traditional dishes, is very happy with how the partnership is working. Watch for a new menu in the spring with all your favourite Ilforno dishes and few new tastes from the new team members. life Introducing

BREAKFAST BOWLS

Creekside Crossing – Airdrie @GoodEarthAirdrie

Cocktails Wine Beer Espresso Breakfast Lunch Dinner Patio


G R E AT L I F E | C O L U M N

The key to picking a quality bottle of wine vinelife

WITH KATHRYN ZONDAG

W

e’ve all been there. You walk into the liquor store wanting to pick up a special bottle for an occasion. You look around at the countless rows of options – different countries, labels in different languages, different grapes … different price points. You want to try something new, get something special … but you feel like you are taking a gamble. Shopping for a special bottle doesn’t have to be a gamble. Using this quick strategy, it can be easy to identify a high-quality bottle of wine from a generic one. High-quality wines are produced from low-yielding vines. This means that the grapes being picked need to be concentrated in their juices, and not bloated with excess water. A great wine is one that is balanced, and offers up an array of complex flavours in the glass. It is not diluted. If you can’t pick out more than one or two flavours, you are probably not drinking a very high-quality wine. While not always true, chances are good that if a large producer is sourcing their grapes from here there and everywhere, wine quality suffers. Generally speaking, the smaller the geographical area that the grapes in your glass came from, the more regulation and attention to detail were probably paid in the production of the wine. Be wary of wines that simply state they are from a large area such as “California.” Instead look for bottles that label themselves with a specific regulated region – like Lodi, California. Better yet, look for wines that have the name of the vineyard site from which the grapes were harvested. This is a sure sign that extra pride was taken in identifying a group of vines with a special quality for producing a unique flavour profile. In European Union countries this method of labelling is standard practice, and directly equates to the quality level of the wine. Known as appellation wine law, and a cru system, higher-quality wines are identified based on the sites at which their grapes were grown. It is so integral, in fact, that it is why grape varieties are often not listed on a French wine label! Strict laws dictate that only specific grapes may be grown on specific sites, under specific conditions. While this may sound limiting, it is actually a benefit to the consumer. When you buy a bottle of French wine, you know EXACTLY what you are getting, just by reading the label! That is, if you can decipher it. An example of this hierarchy in Burgundy goes as follows: Grand Cru, to Premier Cru, down to Village Wine, down to generic Bourgogne. So next time you are browsing the aisles, stop and take a good read. If you are in a boutique store, ask for help! You will have more luck in finding something complex and special, and the staff are friendly and knowledgeable enough to help you decipher those foreign bottles. life Kathryn Zondag is a certified sommelier, and holder of the advanced certificate in wine and spirits from the Wine & Spirit Education Trust (WSET) in London, England

Sunday Brunch... Airdrie life ad-8.pdf 1 11-Feb-18 10:30:04 AM

the legend is real

Join us for a pint

Fitzsimmons Brewing Co.

AIRDRIE’S BREWERY 220 East Lake Blvd NE | 587-892-BREW fitzsimmonsbrewing.com | @fitzbrewing S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

47


G R E AT L I F E | R E C I P E S

BIG-BATCH SALADS Staying on top of what to take for lunches or having healthy options ready to go can seem intimidating. Try these big-batch salads to give yourself a head start on a busy week! These recipes use simple measurements so they are ultra flexible to halve, double or triple to fit your menu-planning and meal-prep needs. Confetti Salad 2 bell peppers, thinly sliced 2 cups zucchini, spiraled or thinly sliced 2 cups cabbage, thinly sliced 2 cups quinoa, cooked ½ cup golden raisins Ÿ cup flaxseeds Cook quinoa according to directions on package. Prep all veggies. Once quinoa has cooled, combine with veggies, raisins and flaxseeds. Store in the fridge for up to five days. Serve with your favourite dressing.

Broccoli Cashew Salad Try adding feta cheese or apples if desired 4 cups broccoli florets and stems, chopped 2 cups chickpeas, rinsed 1 red pepper, sliced 1 cup cashews 1 cup peanut butter balsamic dressing or dressing of your choice Prep broccoli and pepper. Rinse chickpeas. Combine all ingredients in large bowl and mix with 1 cup of dressing. Store in the fridge for up to five days. Peanut Butter Balsamic Dressing 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar 2 tsp brown sugar 2 tbsp peanut butter 1/2 tsp salt 2/3 cup olive oil Combine all ingredients in measuring cup, whisk well with fork until combined or process in blender. Store in the fridge for up to one week.

48

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

In the Kitchen with

MEGHAN WEST

Airdrie Food Bank Community Kitchen


Let’s get cooking! Pie Making 101

Come for a relaxed introduction to pastry and pie making. Participants will take home one sweet and one savoury pie to freeze and enjoy at their convenience.

Freezer Meals & Crock Pot Classes

Let’s roll up our sleeves together to stock up on popular family dishes! Participants will prepare a selection of dishes to take away.

Seasonal Favourites Join us to explore fun and easy recipes featuring seasonal produce. Participants will take home what they make!

THREE WAYS TO MAKE THE MOST OF BIG-BATCH COOKING

Classes are updated and scheduled on an ongoing basis, check out our website!

airdriefoodbank.com/kitchen

Use your time wisely: Creating “picture-perfect” meal preps isn’t in the cards for all of us. Which meal of the day creates the most stress for you? If you’re going to carve out time to do one big-batch cook or prep, spend it on something that can take care of that stressful mealtime whether it be breakfasts, lunches, dinners or even snacks. Give yourself options with basics: Try making big batches of basics like a simple green salad, rice or pasta that can be used to give leftovers a boost or be topped to fit what you’re in the mood for on a specific day. Don’t shy away from favourites: The dishes you or your family love have become favourites for a reason! Keeping a few classic dishes in the freezer is the safety net of meal planning or food prep. Use them after a long day or when you just can’t figure out what you feel like eating. life

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

49


NOW OPEN,

IN COOPER’S CROSSING.

Teeth... they are milestones in your life. We all have pictures celebrating your first tooth and losing your first tooth. Let Cooper’s Dental help you take care of your teeth through all of life’s milestones. th

Lost first too

oth

t to ’s firs

Baby

D

c

Follow us 50 airdrielife.com

|

coopersdental.com

N

403-800-9248

M 502, 401 Cooper's Blvd SW Airdrie, AB T4B 4J3

S P R I N G 2018


S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

51


G R E AT L I F E | M A K E OV E R

Monica’s New Style STORY BY LESLIE DAVIES | PHOTOS BY KRISTY REIMER

BEFORE

52

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


D

uring my consultation with Monica Simpson, our spring makeover winner, our conversation turned to the recent exposé TV programs on how ‘fast fashion’ is adding to the world’s clothing waste problem. It’s a huge global issue and we’re all contributing to it with our insatiable appetite to have the latest, greatest and cheapest clothes constantly. THAT conversation and our joint concern over wardrobe waste was the catalyst for our makeover direction! Together, our goal was to create a super functional, mixand-match wardrobe module where everything co-ordinates, conveys Monica’s personality, feels good on AND will take her to work, casual outings and dressy-casual functions using only seven garments plus footwear and minimal accessories. And since this is EXACTLY my plan when I do a Shop Your Closet session for a client, I couldn’t wait to get started! Here’s the breakdown of what items are included in a wardrobe module: two jackets/cardigans/ vests; two bottoms; three tops; footwear and accessories; plus undergarments and outerwear. The concept is that any of these pieces can be combined together to create totally put-together, fantastic-looking outfits. The key is that each item needs to co-ordinate with the others. How many outfits can you see in these seven pieces? I count 21 when the tops are layered over one another; 21 outfits from just seven garments!! YES, it’s totally possible! For Monica, I used the colors of olive, ivory and pink. Before I dive into our adventure and the pieces we selected, you need to meet Monica. She is a

mom of two teens; a wife; and a busy and caring professional where communicating warmth and approachability through her appearance is important. Monica stressed that comfort is key as is feeling classy and understated. She prefers easy, uncluttered, versatile style. And through her style discovery homework, I saw a delightfully surprising little kick of vintage feminine showing up in all its airy yet earthy splendour. Shopping for this spring makeover was scheduled for the end of January (magazine production schedules are always months in advance). Were there even going to be spring clothes in the stores yet? We lucked out and then supplemented with a few of my own items. Our first stop was Lucky Brand to see if we could find that feminine vintage vibe that was key in Monica’s style discovery. Bingo! Found it! We scooped a pretty silky ivory blouse with embroidery details (super hot for spring 2018), a pair of olive skinny stephem jeans, a pair of stone and tassel drop earrings and two bracelets. Cleo provided us with a pretty floral-print sleeveless blouse, an olive knit cardigan and coral-beaded tassel necklace. We lucked out at Melanie Lyne for the dressier bottoms (ivory trousers) we needed to round out Monica’s wardrobe options. Despite much searching, we were stumped for another jacket/cardi and top – so the pink leather jacket and olive deep-V tee were provided by me. Town Shoes had the footwear and handbag we needed: a pair of cognac western-style kicks pair nicely with a leopard-print cross-body bag. A metallic sneaker added a fun feel to Monica’s work and

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

53


G R E AT L I F E | M A K E OV E R

3 Tops

1 - 2 Bottoms

1 - 2 Third Pieces

Accessories

play outfits and a pretty pair of pointy metallic flats were a lovely complement to her work and dressy-casual options. (The gold metallic handbag and pink scarf were provided by me.) Of course, no makeover is EVER complete without hair, makeup, brows and lashes! Wendy Bates-Wiebe from The Hair Lounge warmed up Monica’s bob with a rich, deep auburn shade running through her natural colour. The day of the shoot, flirty curls were added. Sarika M. brought out Monica’s olive eyes with rich tones of earthy browns and added a pop of warm pink on her lips and cheeks. Ashley from Byoode Bar gave Monica flirtatious, fringy lashes and perfectly defined brows with a lash-tint service. Special thanks to the merchants of CrossIron Mills and our makeover partners: The Hair Lounge; Byoode Bar; Leslie Davies, The Stylish Insider; and Kristy Reimer of Kristy Reimer Photography. life Leslie Davies of The Stylish Insider helps clients use items they ALREADY own to create their own super-functional, affordable and versatile wardrobes

54

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

55


G R E AT L I F E | C E L E B R AT I O N

From left: Jennifer Benner (CAS), Dr. Daniel Doz (ACAD), Chris Reid (kneeling, recipient), Claudio Palumbo (Qualico), Ayesha Clough (recipient), City Councillor Ron Chapman, Bethany Taylor (recipient), Glenn Smaha (Davis Chevrolet), Kim Cheel (recipient), Darcy Forbes (Vitreous Glass), Chelsea Restall (recipient), Becky Salmond (airdrielife), Vern Gray (recipient)

ARTS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

PHOTOS BY AMANDA BENNER

T

he fourth annual TD Airdrie Mayor’s Night of the Arts was a resounding success with 250 people in attendance to honour and celebrate Airdrie’s arts community. From the free-flowing prosecco to the exotic Moroccan decor, the evening was one of Airdrie’s best event nights as declared by so many in attendance. The Moroccan-themed food included lamb lollipop and hummus cups prepared by The Woods Restaurant and served in the “spice tent,” and The Avenue Cakery outdid themselves with a colourful display of Moroccan colours and motifs on everything from cupcakes to macarons. The awards program and show, which is produced by the Creative Airdrie Society, was top notch, hosted by TV and video personality Phoenix. Interspersing the awards presentations were professional performances by singers Barbara King, Amy Hef, Willy SnypeS and the T. Buckley Trio. The youth finalists collaborated on What a Wonderful World, with Rex Mulder on trumpet, Bethany Taylor on piano and Jillian Frederick dancing. SIX AWARDS WERE PRESENTED FOR ARTISTS, PATRONS AND ARTS CHAMPIONS. THE RECIPIENTS ARE: DAVIS CHEVROLET PATRON OF THE ARTS: Derrick and Ayesha Clough QUALICO YOUTH ARTIST: Bethany Taylor (also received a $1,000 scholarship) ACAD EMERGING ARTIST: Chris Reid (also received a $1,000 scholarship) VITREOUS GLASS CHAMPION OF THE ARTS AWARD: Kim Cheel MCKEE HOMES PROFESSIONAL ARTIST AWARD: Chelsea Restall JORO MANUFACTURING ARTS EDUCATOR AWARD: Vern Gray All of the recipients received custom-designed-and-forged metal statutes by Airdrie designer Emily Fleming. Nominations for the 2019 AMNAs are now open at amnaawards.com

56

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


Lambert Fox, Honourary Chief of the Kainai First Nation, brings an Elder Blessing

The Midnight Mustangs performed house-band duties

Amy Hef, YYC Female Artist of the Year, brought her energy to Airdrie T. Buckley Trio closed the show

Jillian Frederick dances to What a Wonderful World

Barbara King hit all the right notes

Willy SnypeS brings his rap to the stage

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

57


G R E AT L I F E | C E L E B R AT I O N Moroccan stage set

Bethany Taylor on piano

AMNA committee member Tina Petrow puts finishing touches on stage

Moroccan-themed desserts by Avenue Cakery were a hit

Rex Mulder on trumpet

The “Spice Market� tent held Moroccan-themed food from The Woods Restaurant

58

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


present

Eat It Coles Notes! A hilarious and probably not accurate retelling of the classics by Airdrie’s own improv comedy troupe.

March 15 April 19 May 17

NEW

SEMI DETACHED

340s

$

showhomes

$10 admission All shows 7 pm at the Town & Country S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

59


g

nin n i w

Follow us on social media and visit us online at airdrielife.com for your chance to win weekly prizes totalling more than $2,500!

WIN

Complete contest details online at airdrielife.com

Live Theatre Tickets Torchlight Theatre The Mousetrap The Secret Garden

WIN

Airheads Improv Comedy Nights Nose Creek Players James and the Giant Peach Theatre Calgary The Secret Garden Bert Church Theatre Olate Dogs Prairie Mountain Fiddlers John McDermot Infinitis

Fitness Fun

Oranj Fitness 1of 2 20 class passes 1of 6 10 class passes Woodside Golf Course Golf for 4 Breathe A 10 class pass

Win gift cards from your favourite Airdrie taste purveyors: Hayloft, First & Vine, Sorso, Good Earth, Ilforno Fusion & Fitzsimmons Brewery

Awesome Airdrie Kids!

WIN

Home & Auto Home Hardware 1of 6 $25 gift cards Smart Auto 1of 4 $50 gift cards

WIN Fashion

Sullys 1 of 4 $50 gift cards The Hair Lounge 1 of 6 $25 gift cards

The MANover Get your man a whole new look!

Send us a photo and tell us in 150 words or less why your man needs some new grooming and fashions. We’ll clean him up nice with the help of Sully’s, The Hair Lounge and CrossIron Mills Enter online at airdrielife.com

Nominate an Awesome Airdrie Kid today!

Our 2nd annual recognition program to honour kids between the ages of 6 and 14 is looking for nominations. Airdrie is home to hundreds of awesome kids from all walks of life who inspire family, friends and community members with their determination, spirit, compassion and leadership.

Who qualifies for the program? Any Airdrie kid between 6 and 14 (on Sept. 1, 2018). Must be a resident of Airdrie and district (school busing areas) for a minimum of one year. Get complete details online at airdrielife.com

Determination

60

Spirit

airdrielife.com

|

Leadership

Compassion

S P R I N G 2018


G R E AT L I F E | C O L U M N

Talking to children about the news

A

s a parent I always pondered how much information is too much information for my child… Is my child too young to know what is happening in the news every day? I remember when I was a child… my dad used to have the news channel on after supper and we all watched it together. We did not have big discussions about what we saw on the daily news, but I clearly recall asking my dad a few questions about what was being forecasted. One big thing at my house was when we would have a price hike on something; it could have been on gas, mortgage rates, school fees; anything about prices going up would make the whole family talk about it for days. Now, as a mother, I understand that was a great teachable moment of which my parents took advantage to discuss with us about economy and so many other aspects of life based on what we heard on the news. I always tried to do the same with my daughter, we would watch the news together and she would ask questions about what she was seeing on TV and I would explain the details she missed or did not understand. These days, thankfully, they warn you in advance when there is some sensitive content that will be displayed, which has saved us from a few hurdles! My parents weren’t so lucky…. Parents should be the ones making the decisions about what can be watched in their homes in terms of news or any other broadcasted program on TV. They can assess what their children can watch Do your children ask questions about what they see on TV? If so, they are showing interest and that is a great time to discuss and share the family’s point of views on what is being broadcasted. We need to take into consideration their age, no doubt about that, but knowing your child’s interests will also help with a possible discussion about what is happening in the world and around them every day. As my daughter grew older, I was able to have deeper discussions with her about the daily news, and to my admiration, we had similar points of view on some subjects. Was that a result of my previous discussions where I revealed my perspective on things? Probably. But, isn’t that what we look for when teaching our kids? Don’t we want them to follow in our footsteps? The baseline is, children will be informed of what is happening in the world no matter what we do, especially these days with the easy access to the Internet. The school brings the news to the classroom to be discussed almost every day; I do that as a teacher as well. What will make a difference is how our child perceives what is happening around the world, and for that, parents still are the best teachers! Supporting your children to understand what is happening around them every day and helping them to develop their own perspective on events are great learning tools for life. life

parentlife

WITH CLAUDIA SASSE

“What will make a difference is how our child perceives what is happening around the world”

Claudia Sasse is a mom and teacher, with a master’s degree in elementary education. Born in Brazil, Sasse has lived in Airdrie with her husband and daughter since 2009.

62

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


Presents...

s e Jamiant G h c a e P nosecreekplayers.com

IRI

SP #

GI FT

By Roald Dahl adapted by David Wood presented by special arrangement with SAMUEL FRENCH, INC.

TH

E

May 24, 25 & 26 2018 Bert Church Theatre

T

and the

HEAR T, E H T M O FR

T LIFT

S P R I N G 2018

|

O

airdrieli fe.com

63


G R E AT L I F E | C O L U M N

Hair that turns heads...

healthylife

5 - 2145 Summerfield Blvd. 403.948.7091 maneimage.ca

.

DKNY OUTLET

.

MICHAEL KORS OUTLET

.

. COACH FACTORY . WINNERS

VICTORIA’S SECRET

.

. .

CALVIN KLEIN OUTLET

POLO RALPH LAUREN FACTORY STORE

200+ Outlet & Fashion Brands

.

OLD NAVY OUTLET

.

TOYS ‘R’ US .

. BASS PRO SHOPS

.

NIKE FACTORY STORE H&M .

CIM_Airdrie Life Ad-Spring.indd 1

airdrielife.com

H

aving straight teeth and a beautiful smile has many obvious advantages. It boosts self-esteem, increases self-confidence, and can even improve job prospects. But what other benefits are there to having straight teeth? Dr. Mo Korayem gives us the straight facts.

. SAKS OFF 5TH

64

WITH DR. MO KORAYEM

ROCKPORT - COMING SOON

.

ARITZIA - COMING SOON

|

S P R I N G 2018

Five littleknown benefits to having straight teeth

7/2/2018 11:29 AM

1. Fewer cavities When teeth are well-aligned, they are much more self-cleansing than when overlapped and crowded. The most difficult-to-clean areas become much more accessible for brushing/flossing as well as contact with the tongue, helping to keep them healthy and cavity-free. 2. More thorough digestion A healthy, balanced bite is much more efficient at breaking down food during chewing, making it easier for the rest of the digestive system to process. The stomach and intestines can then extract the most nutrition from food, and the chances of having some digestive issues like indigestion and flatulence (gas) are reduced. 3. Healthier gums Crowded teeth place additional stresses on gum tissue, especially the vulnerable areas between teeth. Crooked or spaced teeth can lead to increased likelihood for gum problems like gum recession and gingivitis. Straight teeth also help gums stay healthy by making it easier to remove plaque and tartar. 4. Better speech and swallowing Front teeth play a large role in generating proper speech sounds and proper swallowing. It is necessary for front teeth to make contact in order to properly vocalize certain letters and sounds and for a proper swallowing pattern to be established. When the upper and lower front teeth do not touch with the mouth closed (a condition known as “open bite”) the tongue is positioned forward in the mouth in order to form a seal. This “tongue thrust” then becomes an engrained habit that can adversely affect jaw growth and development and contribute to worsening of the open bite. 5. Decreased change of traumatic damage to teeth It’s not just hockey players who can lose teeth to trauma. Teeth can be damaged or entirely knocked out of the mouth in all kinds of traumatic situations; however, when the teeth are well-aligned, the chances of them getting damaged when exposed to a traumatic impact is lessened as the force of the impact is distributed over a large number of teeth and a larger surface area of supporting bone. Dr. Mo Korayem is a certified orthodontist with Quest Orthodontics


G R E AT L I F E | C O L U M N

What is integrative animal care?

petlife

WITH DR. SARAH PEDERSEN

T

here are many definitions of “integrative” health care, but all involve bringing conventional and complementary approaches together in a co-ordinated way. While regular preventative care such as vaccinations and dental cleanings are at the core of your animal’s well-being, complementary care is growing.

What are some of the therapies offered? Some complementary therapies available are acupuncture, chiropractic care, laser therapy, and shockwave therapy. Acupuncture care for pets? Yes! Acupuncture has been practiced for thousands of years on people. It’s been effective on horses and, more recently, transposed into therapy for pets. In fact, most animals tolerate acupuncture very well. No sedation is needed and even many cats love it.

Is complementary care safe? Yes! Complementary care is very safe when performed by a properly trained individual, and effective in 75-85 per cent of cases. Common goals of all therapies include pain relief, improved quality of life and increased energy levels. What is right for my animal? Just like people, every therapy is not right for every animal. That is why a thorough assessment of each patient is required to determine the correct course of treatment. Often, complementary therapies can help reduce medication requirements or speed up healing of an injury; however, it is important to remember that each animal is an individual, and therefore will require individualized care. life Dr. Pedersen is a graduate of the University of Calgary Veterinary Medicine and a Certified Veterinary Spinal Manipulation Therapist and Veterinary Medical Acupuncturist

70

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Yankee Valley Blvd

E Lake Blvd

Shockwave therapy? Yes! Although it sounds alarming, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive treatment that has been scientifically proven to alleviate pain, improve lameness associated with osteoarthritis, and speed the recovery of wounds and other injuries that affect the mobility and overall health of your animal. Working from outside the body (extracorporeal), the machine generates intense shock or pressure waves, which are pulsed at the site of injury to accelerate the healing process. The shock waves create instant pain relief by reducing inflammation, encouraging new blood vessels in soft tissue (neovascularization), and can help new bone formation (osteogenesis).

2

To CALGARY 

Laser therapy? Yes! Laser therapy is a therapeutic treatment that utilizes light energy (photons) to stimulate tissue healing and reduce pain. Working at the cellular level, the light energy penetrates deep into damaged tissues and cells, encouraging the body to quicken its own healing process. This process is known as photobiomodulation.

1 Ave NW

AIRDRIE

Main St

“Common goals of (complementary) therapies include pain relief, improved quality of life and increased energy levels”

Veterans Blvd

8 St SW

Chiropractic care for pets? Yes! Spinal and limb palpation of joints is performed to assess for normal motion of joints. Lack of normal motion is helped with a high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) “thrust.” Lack of joint motion leads to a cascade of events that results in pain, instability of joints, muscle weakness and increased risk for injury. Correcting this motion improves the overall function of the neuro-muscular system, blood flow and the health of the patient.

567


G R E AT L I F E | C O L U M N

What is integrative animal care?

petlife

WITH DR. SARAH PEDERSEN

T

here are many definitions of “integrative” health care, but all involve bringing conventional and complementary approaches together in a co-ordinated way. While regular preventative care such as vaccinations and dental cleanings are at the core of your animal’s well-being, complementary care is growing.

What are some of the therapies offered? Some complementary therapies available are acupuncture, chiropractic care, laser therapy, and shockwave therapy. Acupuncture care for pets? Yes! Acupuncture has been practiced for thousands of years on people. It’s been effective on horses and, more recently, transposed into therapy for pets. In fact, most animals tolerate acupuncture very well. No sedation is needed and even many cats love it.

Is complementary care safe? Yes! Complementary care is very safe when performed by a properly trained individual, and effective in 75-85 per cent of cases. Common goals of all therapies include pain relief, improved quality of life and increased energy levels. What is right for my animal? Just like people, every therapy is not right for every animal. That is why a thorough assessment of each patient is required to determine the correct course of treatment. Often, complementary therapies can help reduce medication requirements or speed up healing of an injury; however, it is important to remember that each animal is an individual, and therefore will require individualized care. life Dr. Pedersen is a graduate of the University of Calgary Veterinary Medicine and a Certified Veterinary Spinal Manipulation Therapist and Veterinary Medical Acupuncturist

70

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Yankee Valley Blvd

E Lake Blvd

Shockwave therapy? Yes! Although it sounds alarming, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive treatment that has been scientifically proven to alleviate pain, improve lameness associated with osteoarthritis, and speed the recovery of wounds and other injuries that affect the mobility and overall health of your animal. Working from outside the body (extracorporeal), the machine generates intense shock or pressure waves, which are pulsed at the site of injury to accelerate the healing process. The shock waves create instant pain relief by reducing inflammation, encouraging new blood vessels in soft tissue (neovascularization), and can help new bone formation (osteogenesis).

2

To CALGARY 

Laser therapy? Yes! Laser therapy is a therapeutic treatment that utilizes light energy (photons) to stimulate tissue healing and reduce pain. Working at the cellular level, the light energy penetrates deep into damaged tissues and cells, encouraging the body to quicken its own healing process. This process is known as photobiomodulation.

1 Ave NW

AIRDRIE

Main St

“Common goals of (complementary) therapies include pain relief, improved quality of life and increased energy levels”

Veterans Blvd

8 St SW

Chiropractic care for pets? Yes! Spinal and limb palpation of joints is performed to assess for normal motion of joints. Lack of normal motion is helped with a high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) “thrust.” Lack of joint motion leads to a cascade of events that results in pain, instability of joints, muscle weakness and increased risk for injury. Correcting this motion improves the overall function of the neuro-muscular system, blood flow and the health of the patient.

567


Excel Homes Now Open on Fridays from 12pm – 5pm

Life here is naturally uplifting

2 NEW LANED SHOWHOMES

NOW OPEN

CO M E H O M E TO H I LLCR E ST – TH E H E IG HT O F FAM I LY LIVI N G O N A SCE N IC AI R D R I E H I LL S I D E

Make Your Move to the Airdrie Community Above All Others

SINGLE FAMILY LANED + PAIRED HOMES Yankee Valley Blvd

N Highway 2

Hillcrest Drive

8th Street SW

Hillcrest Way

Turn off for Yankee Valley Blvd

2

Hillcrest Ave

Hillcrest Rd

300’S

$

*

• Featuring character homes with spacious & stylish floorplans

FEATURES • LARGE FRONT VERANDAS • SPACIOUS BACKYARDS ALLOWING FOR DOUBLE DETACHED GARAGE

• Close to schools, shopping, parks and pathways

Calgary

...IT DESERVES A GREAT FRAME FRONT DRIVE GARAGE TOWNHOMES & LANED TOWMESHOMES (NO CONDO FEES)

FRONT DRIVE GARAGE DUPLEXES

SINGLEFAMILY LANED HOMES

FRONTDRIVE GARAGE HOMES

FROM THE

FROM THE

FROM THE

FROM THE

$310s

$340s

$350s

$430s

Prices & terms are subject to change without notice.

403.912.0999

VISIT TODAY! 8 SHOW HOMES OPEN HillcrestAirdrie.com

4 NEW PAIRED SHOWHOMES OPENING IN MARCH!

Laned Showhomes Calgary

STARTING FROM THE MID

• Ideal Airdrie location offering quick access to Calgary

Visit our Laned Sales Centre at 204 Hillcrest Road SW, Airdrie For more information, contact Jamie at 403-536-2316 or email: hillcrest@shanehomes.com

A FA C E IS LIKE A WORK OF A R T. . .

101-120 2ND AVE NE

DISTINCTIVE HOMES from AWARD-WINNING BUILDERS

THE BETTER WAY TO BUILD.

Showhome Hours: Mon - Thurs: 2-8 pm • Sat, Sun & Hol: 12-5 pm info@shanehomes.com shanehomes.com #betterwaytobuild *Price includes house, lot & GST. Subject to change without notice.

DUPLEXES

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

Excel Homes

McKee Homes

Shane Homes

David Zanini 403.948.9359

Steve Frazer 403.869.2072

Jamie Ivey 403.536.2316

AIRDRIEEYECARE.COM S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

69


Excel Homes Now Open on Fridays from 12pm – 5pm

Life here is naturally uplifting

2 NEW LANED SHOWHOMES

NOW OPEN

CO M E H O M E TO H I LLCR E ST – TH E H E IG HT O F FAM I LY LIVI N G O N A SCE N IC AI R D R I E H I LL S I D E

Make Your Move to the Airdrie Community Above All Others

SINGLE FAMILY LANED + PAIRED HOMES Yankee Valley Blvd

N Highway 2

Hillcrest Drive

8th Street SW

Hillcrest Way

Turn off for Yankee Valley Blvd

2

Hillcrest Ave

Hillcrest Rd

300’S

$

*

• Featuring character homes with spacious & stylish floorplans

FEATURES • LARGE FRONT VERANDAS • SPACIOUS BACKYARDS ALLOWING FOR DOUBLE DETACHED GARAGE

• Close to schools, shopping, parks and pathways

Calgary

...IT DESERVES A GREAT FRAME FRONT DRIVE GARAGE TOWNHOMES & LANED TOWMESHOMES (NO CONDO FEES)

FRONT DRIVE GARAGE DUPLEXES

SINGLEFAMILY LANED HOMES

FRONTDRIVE GARAGE HOMES

FROM THE

FROM THE

FROM THE

FROM THE

$310s

$340s

$350s

$430s

Prices & terms are subject to change without notice.

403.912.0999

VISIT TODAY! 8 SHOW HOMES OPEN HillcrestAirdrie.com

4 NEW PAIRED SHOWHOMES OPENING IN MARCH!

Laned Showhomes Calgary

STARTING FROM THE MID

• Ideal Airdrie location offering quick access to Calgary

Visit our Laned Sales Centre at 204 Hillcrest Road SW, Airdrie For more information, contact Jamie at 403-536-2316 or email: hillcrest@shanehomes.com

A FA C E IS LIKE A WORK OF A R T. . .

101-120 2ND AVE NE

DISTINCTIVE HOMES from AWARD-WINNING BUILDERS

THE BETTER WAY TO BUILD.

Showhome Hours: Mon - Thurs: 2-8 pm • Sat, Sun & Hol: 12-5 pm info@shanehomes.com shanehomes.com #betterwaytobuild *Price includes house, lot & GST. Subject to change without notice.

DUPLEXES

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

Excel Homes

McKee Homes

Shane Homes

David Zanini 403.948.9359

Steve Frazer 403.869.2072

Jamie Ivey 403.536.2316

AIRDRIEEYECARE.COM S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

69


Excel Homes Now Open on Fridays from 12pm – 5pm

Life here is naturally uplifting

2 NEW LANED SHOWHOMES

NOW OPEN

CO M E H O M E TO H I LLCR E ST – TH E H E IG HT O F FAM I LY LIVI N G O N A SCE N IC AI R D R I E H I LL S I D E

Make Your Move to the Airdrie Community Above All Others

SINGLE FAMILY LANED + PAIRED HOMES Yankee Valley Blvd

N Highway 2

Hillcrest Drive

8th Street SW

Hillcrest Way

Turn off for Yankee Valley Blvd

2

Hillcrest Ave

Hillcrest Rd

300’S

$

*

• Featuring character homes with spacious & stylish floorplans

FEATURES • LARGE FRONT VERANDAS • SPACIOUS BACKYARDS ALLOWING FOR DOUBLE DETACHED GARAGE

• Close to schools, shopping, parks and pathways

Calgary

...IT DESERVES A GREAT FRAME FRONT DRIVE GARAGE TOWNHOMES & LANED TOWMESHOMES (NO CONDO FEES)

FRONT DRIVE GARAGE DUPLEXES

SINGLEFAMILY LANED HOMES

FRONTDRIVE GARAGE HOMES

FROM THE

FROM THE

FROM THE

FROM THE

$310s

$340s

$350s

$430s

Prices & terms are subject to change without notice.

403.912.0999

VISIT TODAY! 8 SHOW HOMES OPEN HillcrestAirdrie.com

4 NEW PAIRED SHOWHOMES OPENING IN MARCH!

Laned Showhomes Calgary

STARTING FROM THE MID

• Ideal Airdrie location offering quick access to Calgary

Visit our Laned Sales Centre at 204 Hillcrest Road SW, Airdrie For more information, contact Jamie at 403-536-2316 or email: hillcrest@shanehomes.com

A FA C E IS LIKE A WORK OF A R T. . .

101-120 2ND AVE NE

DISTINCTIVE HOMES from AWARD-WINNING BUILDERS

THE BETTER WAY TO BUILD.

Showhome Hours: Mon - Thurs: 2-8 pm • Sat, Sun & Hol: 12-5 pm info@shanehomes.com shanehomes.com #betterwaytobuild *Price includes house, lot & GST. Subject to change without notice.

DUPLEXES

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES

Excel Homes

McKee Homes

Shane Homes

David Zanini 403.948.9359

Steve Frazer 403.869.2072

Jamie Ivey 403.536.2316

AIRDRIEEYECARE.COM S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

69


G R E AT L I F E | C O L U M N

What is integrative animal care?

petlife

WITH DR. SARAH PEDERSEN

T

here are many definitions of “integrative” health care, but all involve bringing conventional and complementary approaches together in a co-ordinated way. While regular preventative care such as vaccinations and dental cleanings are at the core of your animal’s well-being, complementary care is growing.

What are some of the therapies offered? Some complementary therapies available are acupuncture, chiropractic care, laser therapy, and shockwave therapy. Acupuncture care for pets? Yes! Acupuncture has been practiced for thousands of years on people. It’s been effective on horses and, more recently, transposed into therapy for pets. In fact, most animals tolerate acupuncture very well. No sedation is needed and even many cats love it.

Is complementary care safe? Yes! Complementary care is very safe when performed by a properly trained individual, and effective in 75-85 per cent of cases. Common goals of all therapies include pain relief, improved quality of life and increased energy levels. What is right for my animal? Just like people, every therapy is not right for every animal. That is why a thorough assessment of each patient is required to determine the correct course of treatment. Often, complementary therapies can help reduce medication requirements or speed up healing of an injury; however, it is important to remember that each animal is an individual, and therefore will require individualized care. life Dr. Pedersen is a graduate of the University of Calgary Veterinary Medicine and a Certified Veterinary Spinal Manipulation Therapist and Veterinary Medical Acupuncturist

70

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Yankee Valley Blvd

E Lake Blvd

Shockwave therapy? Yes! Although it sounds alarming, Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive treatment that has been scientifically proven to alleviate pain, improve lameness associated with osteoarthritis, and speed the recovery of wounds and other injuries that affect the mobility and overall health of your animal. Working from outside the body (extracorporeal), the machine generates intense shock or pressure waves, which are pulsed at the site of injury to accelerate the healing process. The shock waves create instant pain relief by reducing inflammation, encouraging new blood vessels in soft tissue (neovascularization), and can help new bone formation (osteogenesis).

2

To CALGARY 

Laser therapy? Yes! Laser therapy is a therapeutic treatment that utilizes light energy (photons) to stimulate tissue healing and reduce pain. Working at the cellular level, the light energy penetrates deep into damaged tissues and cells, encouraging the body to quicken its own healing process. This process is known as photobiomodulation.

1 Ave NW

AIRDRIE

Main St

“Common goals of (complementary) therapies include pain relief, improved quality of life and increased energy levels”

Veterans Blvd

8 St SW

Chiropractic care for pets? Yes! Spinal and limb palpation of joints is performed to assess for normal motion of joints. Lack of normal motion is helped with a high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) “thrust.” Lack of joint motion leads to a cascade of events that results in pain, instability of joints, muscle weakness and increased risk for injury. Correcting this motion improves the overall function of the neuro-muscular system, blood flow and the health of the patient.

567


#InsanelyOutrageous

Limited Time Offer

SHAREHOLDER UNLIMITED

MEMBERSHIP Limited # Available

SAVE 40%

$6,500 Value NOW Just $3,900

+GST

Instigating the creation of Insanely Outrageous Stories Start writing your Woodside story today!

Contact us today! 403.948.6717 or info@woodsidegc.com www.woodsidegc.com

best ne w pl ay 2016 tony award winner

The Humans by Stephen Karam March 6 to 31 theatrecalgary.com 403-294-7447 #tcTheHumans Arts Commons Max Bell Theatre

P H O T O B Y D AV I D C O O P E R

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

71


Voted

Calgary’s Top

YOGA STUDIO 2015 - 2016 - 2017

Airdrie

McKenzie Towne

Avenida Nolan Hill

7 Studios 4 Locations

One Price

Over 195 hot & non-heated drop-in classes per week! PLUS registered programs, workshops & wellness services* *additional fees apply

Visit www.breathehotyoga.ca to view the full schedule ~ Nolan Hill 412-8 Nolan Hill Blvd NW (403) 475-9642

Airdrie 309-800 Yankee Valley Blvd SW (403) 945-9642

use your mouse to

find your house

To find out what your house is worth in today’s market, call me! Kathy Anderson

REALTOR ® Accredited Staging Professional

c. 403.969.2347

e. kathya@CIRREALTY.ca w. mouse2house.ca Executive Platinum Award Club

Discounts + House Hacks + Workshops

72

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


homelife

IDEAS AND ADVICE FOR YOUR HOME, INSIDE AND OUT

76 74 Spring Gardens • 78 Excelling • 80 Trends


HOMELIFE |COLUMN

2018 Growing Trends

gardenlife

A

WITH DAWN SMITH

74

airdrielife.com

fter a long, cold season of being stuck indoors, there is nothing better than purchasing and planting the plants that will make your garden bloom this summer. And when it comes to garden choices, green thumbs have much to be excited about this year. According to Rich Oke of Bylands Nurseries, gardeners can choose from a number of new flowering shrubs this year. Proven Winners is introducing three new Invincibelle hydrangeas featuring lime, mauve and white flowers this spring. Three new potentillas will also be available; Happy Face, Creme Brulee and Lemon Meringue are sure to brighten gardens with their yellow and white flowers. The company also has a new variety of ninebark: Ginger Wine features red and purple foliage with flowers ranging from white to pinky-red; and a new lilac, Virtual Violet, which boasts dark purple buds opening to lighter purple flowers. Rose aficionados will love the latest Oso Easy by Proven Winner: Hot Paprika features reddish orange buds that open to bright orange flowers. But there are more than just new ornamental shrubs to spruce up your garden, says Oke, explaining fruit trees and bushes remain popular choices. He notes that hot varieties include the Cherry Romance series; combination trees, which feature several varieties of pears, plums or apples grafted onto one tree; and smaller fruits such as blueberries, raspberries, saskatoons and grapes. Gardeners are also planting other edibles, such as herbs and vegetables, in growing numbers, says Colleen Fulton, of Fulton’s Home Hardware Building Centre in Airdrie. “[Growing your own food] promotes healthy eating and pride in growing what you feed yourself and your family,” she says, noting hydroponics, a method of growing plants without soil using mineral nutrient solutions in a water solvent, is also becoming popular. Oke notes there is a growing trend toward combining perennials and annuals in hanging baskets and planters. Gardeners also favour patio-table sized bowls, filled with succulents, sedums, weeping maples and lavender. Fulton says outdoor spaces can be beautiful, no matter the size. Small spaces can be decorated with planters overflowing with flowers and herbs set beside small bistro sets or space-saving tables and chairs, she says, adding those with larger spaces often choose conversations sets, complete with fire tables or patio heaters to take the chill off cool summer evenings. Whatever plants and accessories you choose for your outdoor space this year, experts agree that gardens stimulate the senses and promote peace and tranquility. “I was introduced to gardening at a young age and the love has stayed with me my entire life,” says Fulton. life

|

S P R I N G 2018


Spring-Final.pdf 1 29/01/2018 12:12:03 PM

Your Family Dentist. A Whole Health Approach

• Orthodontics • TMJ/TMD Treatment • BOTOX® • Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy • Sleep Apnea Treatment • Dental Implants • Oral Surgery • Cosmetic Services • General Dentistry

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

Book your Appointment Today!

K

Happy International Women’s Day from our team!

All services provided by Dr. Thayne Blunston, General Dentist

1.877.620.7522 1, 620 1 Ave NW blunstondentalgroup.com

◊ Chiropratic ◊ Acupuncture ◊ Laser Therapy ◊ Shockwave Therapy ◊ Integrative Care

Motion Equine is a mobile veterinary practice providing equine and small animal integrative veterinary services throughout Alberta.

MOTIONEQUINE.COM ◊ 403.999.4822 S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

75


H O M E L I F E | D E V E LO P E R P R O F I L E

Making a Point

VESTA BUILDS ON REPUTATION STORY BY MARIO TONEGUZZI

V

esta Properties, a company based in Langley, B.C., has built new homes in Airdrie since 2000 and to this point it’s the only market in the province for the homebuilder. A.J. van der Linden, Alberta sales manager for Vesta Properties, says Airdrie has been a very fast-growing community for the last 20 years. “The draw for Airdrie is that we are located right on Highway 2. So there’s the accessibility between Calgary and Edmonton. Also, our proximity to the airport has given us more of a draw for people who are looking to be in a smaller community but not necessarily in the city itself,” he says. “We specialize in family-style homes and Airdrie is a fairly young community so it works really well for the product types that we sell. Another big draw is young professionals that work in Calgary who can’t necessarily afford the prices of homes in Calgary. Airdrie is still a little bit more of an affordability option for most people.” Vesta Properties currently has the Southpoint development on the go in Airdrie, which is located in the southwest, just off the new 40th Avenue bridge and nestled between the community of Hillcrest and the train tracks. The Southpoint community has a wide selection of homes and expansive green space. When complete, the community’s quiet, tree-lined streetscapes will feature a charming mix of detached single-family homes, townhomes, row homes, paired homes and con-

76

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

dos. Included in the community’s master plan are 12 acres of green space and recreational amenities, including a tennis court, basketball court, children’s playground, covered pavilion with picnic tables, and barbecue areas. A new school will be also built within walking distance and is scheduled to open in 2019. “We have a huge park that should be opened in the spring,” says van der Linden. “The idea behind it is we wanted to create a large central space where community can gather. So it’s a nice open space for everybody to use.” Vesta Properties was established in 1989 and the company has only been exclusively in Airdrie to this point. It started building in Airdrie in 2000. Later this year it will expand into Calgary.


“We wanted to create a large central space where community can gather. So it’s a nice open space for everybody to use.”

“When we bring communities to the market we try and include as much of a mix of properties as we possibly can,” says van der Linden. “So the majority of our communities, when we bring them to market, are geared toward a wider demographic instead of just focusing on just single-family homes or just townhouses. We sell to a broad spectrum of clients.” Showhomes for Southpoint were launched last November. The actual grand opening takes place this spring. The community

403.948.2733 airdrievets.com Partner

Retired or retiring soon? I can help you define retirement your way.

Carman Thiessen, CFP

Financial Planner 403-462-7727 carman.thiessen@rbc.com

Chris Friesen, CFP

Financial Planner 403-807-3010 chris.friesen@rbc.com

will have a total of 584 homes on the site when complete. According to van der Linden, it typically takes the company about five or six years to do a full build-out on a project of this magnitude. The company’s last major master-planned community in Airdrie, completed a couple of years ago, was Williamstown in the city’s northwest corner. Other Airdrie projects have included Willowbrook and about half of Luxstone. life

Talk to an RBC® advisor.

RBC Financial Planning is a business name used by Royal Mutual Funds Inc. (RMFI). Financial planning services and investment advice are provided by RMFI. RMFI, RBC Global Asset Management Inc., Royal Bank of Canada, Royal Trust Corporation of Canada and The Royal Trust Company are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. RMFI is licensed as a financial services firm in the province of Quebec. † Personal lending products and residential mortgages are offered by Royal Bank of Canada and are subject to its standard 36425 (01/2018) lending criteria. ® / ™ Trademark(s) of Royal Bank of Canada. © Royal Bank of Canada, 2018. VPS100533

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

77


HOMELIFE | BUILDER PROFILE

“We’re optimistic that we have price point and product that meets the demand for all of the different families and first-time homebuyers as well”

Excelling at home creation STORY BY MARIO TONEGUZZI

E

xcel Homes has established a strong presence in Airdrie for the past six years or so and continues to build residential properties for the burgeoning community. Carrie Smith, marketing manager with Excel Homes, says one of the keys is affordability as the homebuilder continues to solidify its presence in Airdrie with homes in the communities of Midtown, Hillcrest and Chinook Gate. “There are communities in Calgary that are just too expensive,” says Smith, noting buyers realize they can get more for less in Airdrie when comparing square footage, price per square foot, front-drive garage homes and duplex homes. “And there’s also that quality of life and all of the things a smaller town brings,” says Smith. “We’ve also seen quite a few relocation inquiries from people moving back to Calgary. That’s something important to note. People coming from the outskirts, especially areas like Red Deer or Fort McMurray, prefer to live … in that town lifestyle because they’re used to some of the smaller town living and so they really enjoy the amenities that Airdrie brings.”

78

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Smith says Excel Homes is introducing a new townhome lineup and new front-drive garage homes in the Midtown community. Selling is in the pre-construction phase and there will be 20 homes available this year in a mix between duplexes, townhomes and front-drive garage homes. Midtown is set on 90 acres in the heart of downtown Airdrie. It has walkable access to the city’s many shops, restaurants and service amenities. Hillcrest is in its final phase with Apex Development and Excel has about 40 units left to sell within this year which will also be a mix of townhomes, front-drive garage homes and duplexes. The community is perched on a southwest hillside in Airdrie. The Chinook Gate development just opened and Excel will have about 30 homes there this year in a mix of duplexes, laned and frontdrive garage homes. Chinook Gate is a new community located in the southwest quadrant of Airdrie with quick access to Yankee Valley Boulevard and Chinook Winds Park. “We’re optimistic that we have price point and product that meets the demand for all of the different families and first-time homebuyers as well,” says Smith.


YARN POTTERY classes willownwool.com 111-120 2nd Ave NE, Airdrie 403-980-1886 The Airdrie Chamber of Commerce Presents…

Discover Trends,

Products & SERVICES. Connect, Explore, Shop

Your life Excel Homes first broke ground in 1988. Since then it has built more than 10,000 homes and received over 50 builder awards for design and industry excellence. Today, the company’s mission is simple: to create a homebuying experience that delivers the most joy and value to the homeowner. life

April 28 & 29, 2018

Genesis Place Airdrie

Saturday, April 28th 9 am to 5 pm Sunday, April 29th 10 am to 4 pm News is News! Here’s No“Good”

THE

SCOOP

airdriehomeshow.ca S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

79


HOMELIFE | TRENDS

What’s new and trending in home furnishings?

If it’s distressed, reclaimed or antiqued – it’s hot!

We went searching for fresh looks for our homes and discovered the new line of furniture accents at Fulton’s Home Hardware in Kingsview Market.

WINE RACKS Store your wine in this gorgeous fountain-pen blue distressed cabinet (there are optional wine racks inside the drawers), enough for 18 or 36 bottles! STORAGE A trio of stylish storage options for the bedroom, foyer or wherever you need to store things in style. Rich in details – multi-colour distressed finish, hand-forged iron base and nailhead accents – perfectly on trend with the reclaimed look. Barn-door sliders are up-to-the-minute on trend.

80

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

DINING Natural slate tiles accent this dark-chocolate stained breakfast nook. The distressed finish brings old-world style.


KITCHENS Urban-rustic is very now. This kitchen island is made of solid pine with a multi-step antique-white/natural-distressed finish. Custom metal accents finish the look.

Next mee ng: Tuesday May 29th 7 pm @ Apple Creek Golf Course

100womenwhocareairdrie.com

NOW INSTORE! New Accent Furniture for Your Home

20%

off

all regular priced indoor furniture until March 30

GARDEN CENTRE OPEN MAY 1! Weather Permitting

FREE PACKAGE ESTIMATES: GARAGE DECK FENCE

35 Market Blvd. S.E. Airdrie 403.948.5535 homehardware.ca

Mon-Fri 7 am - 8 pm Sat 8 am - 6 pm Sun 9 am - 6 pm

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

81


H O M E LLI IFFEE || S H OW HHOOM MEE S

At home in King’s Heights

Homes by Avi is offering two new showhomes in King’s Heights: the Hawthorne and the McCormick, expertly designed homes for life today and tomorrow. Both homes are over 2,000 square feet and designed for maximum living and comfort with ample space inside and out. Presenting 2,054 sq. ft. of unbeatable luxury and elegance is the McCormick. This home is great for multi-generational living with a main-floor bedroom and features stunning architectural elements highlighted by the most sought-after finishings. The Hawthorne, which sits at 2,390 sq. ft., is the perfect balance of form and function with great living spaces on both levels.

82

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

83


HOMELIFE | COLUMN

A Spring Refresh TOP 5 design trends I am

S decorlife

WITH KIM PURVIS

pring is such an exciting time of year. The new year is a fresh start, but in many ways spring is also a new beginning of sorts. We start to have hope that winter may actually be coming to an end. As the snow melts and the days get longer, there’s a certain energy and excitement for what the future holds. We can open the windows again and not just because we overcooked dinner. We put lighter blankets on the beds and maybe brighten some of the cozy winter decor throughout the house. Some of us have been barbecuing through the winter, but now we can do it without our boots and tuques! There are more reasons than the weather or change of seasons to refresh our homes. Perhaps hosting a large upcoming gathering has us re-evaluating our decor, our kids are growing out of their bedroom theme, an out-oftown guest is coming to stay for a while, or we’re just bored with the look of our home.

“Spring is the perfect time to create a new beginning in your own private space”

Photo by Cassidy Moen, courtesy Aurora Decor

I’ll be honest, the last room in my house to get a refresh is the basement rec room because, let’s face it, the kids playing mini sticks don’t care if the pillows match the curtains. I also suspect that one of the least common rooms to get a refresh is our master bedrooms. The master bedroom is often a shared space with a loved one, a place to rest at the end of a long day, where you likely recover from illness and the place you retreat for some quiet. I would suggest that while it’s lovely to have a beautiful main floor to entertain friends and family, it’s also very special to invest in your own bedroom. Spring is the perfect time to create a new beginning in your own private space. Make your master suite a special retreat that allows you to take a deep breath every morning and offers a comforting place to land each night. Even a new duvet cover and co-ordinating pillows will breathe new life into your bedroom. Consider creating a feature wall behind the headboard with wallpaper or paint. Change up the hardware on your dressers and nightstands. Change the light fixture, or just install a dimmer switch (only if you understand electrical; otherwise, call in the experts). New lamps on the bedside tables will add another layer of lighting and act as art at the same time. No matter how you decide to refresh your space, create a plan first and have fun with it! life Decorator Kim Purvis, owner of Aurora Decor, is pursuing her lifelong passion of creating beautiful home spaces

84

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

loving in 2018!

Design trends are tricky. Like any trend they can be over-used and exhausted long before they’re out of style. The key is to only use something if you actually love it and it truly complements your space. 1. MIXING METALS In a bedroom, for example, you could have a different metal for the light fixture, your furniture hardware, bedside lamps and a side table for the cozy-chair corner. You want your like pieces to have the same metal – all dressers have the same hardware, both bedside lamps are the same, etc. Caution: if every single thing has a different metal you run the risk of things appearing cluttered. (Then you just call it eclectic, wink wink.)

2. JEWEL-TONED ACCENT WALLS Paint is always a great way to add a little personality to a space, but be careful in your selection of an accent wall. You want to be featuring a wall. If the wall has no feature to it, like a fireplace or grand window, add beautiful artwork that complements the wall colour.

3. FLORALS PATTERNS These are making a comeback, especially watercolour florals. Whether it’s wallpaper, accent pillows, artwork and rugs, pairing beautiful florals with edgy geometric patterns create a bold statement.

4. BRASS AND GOLD This trend is still going strong as a beautiful accent, hardware colour and accessory choice. I’m still a little gun-shy on this one as I haven’t forgotten the over-use of it in the early nineties. It does really warm up a space and, used as an accent, is really stunning. You won’t see me using it on door knobs and hinges any time soon, though.

5. MILLWORK FEATURE WALLS Who doesn’t love a gorgeous dimensional accent wall? It’s such a simple and cost-effective DIY project, with huge impact in a space. These walls are great in living rooms, dining rooms and especially on a headboard wall in a bedroom. Unlike the paint feature wall the dimension of these walls are the feature! Caution: this project requires math skills!


HOMELIFE | COLUMN

homelife

WITH MICHELLE & MATT CARRE

Positive takeaways

S

ince airdrielife is about “celebrating the good life” in Airdrie, let’s not talk about 2017 and just skip to 2018. Just kidding … kind of. The truth is, 2017 started off well but when spring hit, that confidence in the market turned into a large increase in inventory. We were able to maintain a similar number of home sales in 2017; however, pricing did take a hit, with the average sale price going down $10,000. This was the first time since the start of the recession that we saw the average sale price decrease significantly.  Although things are getting better, we are still working on our recovery. The Calgary Real Estate Board recently put out their forecast for Calgary and area and said the number of sales should be about the same and pricing should stay pretty level. We are leading the country in GDP growth, but we are also coming back from a greater deficit. Other pieces to the real estate pie for 2018 include the job market and mortgage rules. Both of these things have pros and cons that impact buyers and sellers. Regardless, there are still positive takeaways. Takeaway No. 1: Buyers can be confident that buying today will be a good decision and they should not lose value in their homes. It is especially a great time for first-time buyers to jump into the market and start building equity in their home. Takeaway No. 2: Airdrie’s benchmark pricing (call us if you want an explanation) is approximately $127,000 cheaper than in Calgary for a detached home. So, if Calgarians want to stretch their dollar and buy their dream home or sell what was their dream home and put some equity in their pockets, Airdrie is a fantastic choice. Takeaway No. 3: Airdrie is becoming more vibrant every day. With great restaurants, shopping, recreation and a wonderful community spirit, it’s a great place to call home. life Michelle and Matt Carre are real estate professionals with The Carre Group/Redline Real Estate Group

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

85


HOMELIFE | EVENT

2018 Spring Art Show and Sale

APRIL 28 &29

saturday 9-5 sunday 10-4

Take home an original piece of local Art!

genesis place gymnasium 800 east lake blvd

airdrieartssociety.ca

Anne Beaty

Silent Auction Live Art Wars Entertainment

Memorial Scholarship for Journalism & Communications Applications are now available for the 2018 scholarship at airdrielife.com

86

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Show celebrates local businesses and attractions STORY BY DAWN SMITH

T

he Airdrie Home and Lifestyle Show may be a longtime staple in the community, but it is anything but boring. The 41st show will be held at Genesis Place on April 28-29, 2018 and will feature more than 200 exhibitors. But this year’s family-friendly event also has some new and returning attractions sure to appeal to a wide variety of Airdrians, says Ashley Frame, membership services and event manager at the Airdrie Chamber of Commerce, organizer of the event. “We are trying to make sure we are keeping the event fresh and new by adding new exhibits this year,” says Frame. “We are also hoping to bring back a sense of community by having attendees and exhibitors engage with one another.” To that end, attendees can take part in some fun activities, such as a non-traditional form of bingo, which will require them to interact with exhibitors for the chance to enter a draw.


Residential Property Management “We are also hoping to bring back a sense of community by having attendees and exhibitors engage with one another”

587-296-3880

blackthornoakestates.ca

AIRDRIE • OLDS • CROSSFIELD • DIDSBURY • CALGARY • COCHRANE

As featured in

There will also be a free money tunnel with Show Bucks, which can be spent at the event, up for grabs. Other attractions include the events stage featuring great local talent, two food trucks, food vendors, a free photo booth and a fashion show organized by The Store Upstairs. Attendees can also expect to see a presentation by local animal rescue organization EJ Rescue Canada, complete with a visit from some cute adoptable animals. Frame is excited about this year’s event. “I think these new attractions bring a little more spunk and excitement back to the show.” She encourages everyone to attend to learn more about the products and services available in Airdrie. “There are so many great businesses in the show, and it’s important to support them,” says Frame. Admission to the event is $5. The show is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 28 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 29. life

The Financial Post, we are now

FRANCHISING!

•Est. 2008•

Ask about information on how you can own your own Pink Wand Cleaning Franchise.

THEPINKWAND.COM • (587)775.7524 S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

87


See ad page 11

See ad page 11 See ad page 9

See ad page 10

Harder Homes and McKee Homes

See ad page 130

See ad page 9

See ad page 70

See ad page 59

See ad page 23

featuring McKee Homes See ad page 19

See page 21

See ad page 13

See ad page 85

88

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


worklife

MEET THE MOVERS, SHAKERS AND BUSINESS MAKERS

91

94 Business Pals • 96 Community Cents • 100 Credit Due


WORKLIFE | COLUMN

businesslife

WITH TARA LEVICK

Entrepreneurs always welcome

B

eing born and raised in Airdrie I’ve seen our city grow and change in more ways than I can count. From the first traffic light to traffic circles, the rat hole to highway interchanges, the SAAN store to Wal-Mart, Airdrie is always on the move, getting bigger and better. Looking back at my youth, it’s amazing to see how Airdrie businesses have changed and evolved. I remember being dropped off at Towerlane Mall with my friends, enjoying one of the best taco salads I’ve ever had from the food court and wandering the Super Drug Mart and Radio Shack for hours. We’d then walk over to Brian’s Card Shop to do a bit more window shopping before catching a movie at the Roxy. Those memories are forever engraved in my brain as some of the “good old times.” The downtown was a great place to meet up and gather. It was central, and easy to walk to the various places that kept us entertained. Now, the choices we have in Airdrie are not just good, but great! You can enjoy nationally renowned cuisine, unique mom-and-pop boutiques, large box stores, a place for every health need out there and tons of fun entertainment options. It’s clear that Airdrie entrepreneurs are really trying to diversify to meet the wants and needs of our residents. As an Economic Development Officer, I see entrepreneurs come in with great ideas weekly and it’s always such a thrill for me to watch them achieve their dream and open the doors to their business.

“Being an entrepreneur takes more guts and courage than I think people realize” Growing up I was naive about what it actually takes to open a business. I always thought to myself, “Why don’t we have that here?” Businesses just popped up and we were excited to try whatever the new option was. Now, having learned so much more about business, I realize it takes a certain type of person to choose that path and become an entrepreneur. It’s certainly not for everyone. Being an entrepreneur takes more guts and courage than I think people realize. Taking that leap, putting your heart and soul into a business idea with only a small chance that it will succeed, is not a gene that everyone has. The commitment to tireless hours of work, sweat, stress, pain and passion is something that cannot be taught. An entrepreneur has to have a desire to work harder than they’ve ever worked before, all before that ‘open’ sign is even on the front door. To Airdrie entrepreneurs, each and every one of you, thank you for taking the leap. You make Airdrie a great place to live, work and play! Being a proud Airdrie girl, I try to stay local whenever I can to play my part to keep businesses coming to Airdrie! I can’t wait to see where we go from here. The future of Airdrie is exciting and I feel privileged to be a small part of it. Also, to the old Towerlane food court taco salad maker: if you’re out there, please feel free to open up again. I will be your most frequent customer! life

90

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


WORKLIFE | NEW VENTURE

I

f you’re a beer drinker, you might not realize it, but a 2013 change in Alberta Gaming and Liquor Commission (AGLC) licensing policies opened a whole new world of beers to you. That very same law also helped Airdrie lay claim to its first microbrewery. Opened in November 2017, Fitzsimmons Brewing Co. is owned by Pamela Jarosz and husband Cody Fitzsimmons. For many years the two had had a passion for microbrewing, with Fitzsimmons concocting homebrews in the couple’s condo. At the time however, the AGLC required that all Alberta brewers produce at least 500,000 litres per year – the equivalent of 10,000 50-litre kegs or

UN“TAPPED”

MARKET

FITZSIMMONS BREWING CO. BRINGS MICROBREWING TO AIRDRIE STORY BY CAT NANTEL | PHOTOS BY KRISTY REIMER

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

91


WORKLIFE | NEW VENTURE

900,000 20-ounce pints in order to obtain a license. The production requirement was such that it made startup costs prohibitive. In December 2013, the AGLC announced it would be eliminating the minimum production capacity requirement for Alberta brewers. The result? According to the AGLC, in 2013, Alberta had 20 licensed breweries. By early 2018, there were 72. One of which is Fitzsimmons Brewing Co. Prior to the licensing change, microbrewing in Alberta seemed unattainable to the pair. Fitzsimmons went on working as a plumber and Jarosz in disaster management. “The AGLC changes got us thinking about opening a microbrewery again,” explains Jarosz. “By 2015, we started researching the market and looking for the perfect location.” Eighteen months later, they settled on a location in Airdrie’s industrial sector, across from East Lake. “Airdrie seemed to be an incredible young market that no one was paying attention to,” says Jarosz. “It has a fairly large population, its residents are young, but no other brewer was setting up shop in the community.” 92

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Airdrie has welcomed Fitzsimmons Brewing Co. with open arms. Wednesday through Sunday, patrons fill the brewery’s 20-seat tap room and game room  On tap, Big Hill Blonde, East Lake Amber and two seasonal brews. Named after Big Hill Springs Road, Big Hill Blonde is a light, fresh and crisp blonde ale with subtle hints of citrus. Meanwhile, East Lake Amber, named after the lake that faces the brewery, is a rich, flavourful amber ale with a unique whiskey finish. To develop these complex and flavourful beers, Jarosz and Fitzsimmons hired Allen Douglas, a professional brewer who had previously worked with Big Rock. When brewing Big Hill Blonde, Douglas brings a blend of toasted barley and wheat, and a locally sourced two-row barley, to rest four times, each time at different temperatures. In other words, he brings the mash up to a specific temperature, stops it, lets it rest and then repeats this process a total of four times. With every rest, enzymes are activated in the grains, causing them to break down and release their sugars, flavour and colour.   This unique four-rest process, albeit time intensive, allows Big Hill Blonde to develop a tremendous amount of flavour while still remaining light and


crisp. The forefront, or initial, flavour is that of the two-row barley. On the back end, one can taste toasted barley, wheat and citrus. East Lake Amber, an ale, gets three rest cycles. It is brewed using a red rye that Fitzsimmons loves. “I practically eat this rye as though it were candy,” he says. “I can really taste it in the East Lake Amber. It gives the beer a wonderful caramel-like taste on the forefront and then a whisky finish on the back end.” All Fitzsimmons beers are unpasteurized, unfiltered and naturally carbonated allowing them to keep their complex yet subtle flavours. The natural carbonation that occurs in all of the company’s beers yields a rich, creamy natural bubble. Many commercially brewed beers use forced carbonation, which Jarosz says creates “big carbonated bubbles that bite.” While Fitzsimmons is available at liquor stores throughout Airdrie, residents may want to take home one of their 32- or 64-ounce growlers. Poured straight from the tap, growlers are ceramic or glass jugs used to transport draft beer. As microbreweries continue to multiply across the province, the use of growlers is growing in popularity. “Growlers are the freshest way to enjoy our product,” explains Fitzsimmons. “Just keep in mind that they are meant to be enjoyed the day or two of being poured.”

For Jarosz and Fitzsimmons, the future looks bright. They’re finally able to pursue their true passion of owning a microbrewery. Airdrie residents are pretty happy, too; businesses like Fitzsimmons Brewing Co. are transforming the city into a truly unique community. Fitzsimmons’ tap room is open Wednesday through Friday 3 to 8 p.m., Saturday noon to 8 p.m. and Sunday noon to 5 p.m. The tap room and game room are available for private events and can hold up to 100 people. life

SEASONAL BREWS TO ENJOY: March: Shipping Up to Airdrie – Irish Cream Ale just in time for St. Patrick’s Day. Brewed with English hops and amber malts, this cream ale features a warm flavour balanced with a thick creamy head. May: Roasted Pineapple Sour – This sour ale will be infused with caramelized pineapple to give it a sweet, tropical and fruity finish, perfect for spring.

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

93


WORKLIFE | PROFILE

GONE TO THE DOGS Award-winning business started with a passion STORY BY MARIO TONEGUZZI | PHOTO BY KRISTY REIMER

N

ikki Nordick has turned a passion for dogs into a thriving business in Airdrie. Airdrie Puppy Pals, which was incorporated in 2015 with the daycare opening in October of that year, actually started just as an online community. “There was no business aspect to it,” says Nordick. “We would just organize community play dates and get owners to bring their dogs to one of Airdrie’s

94

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

dog parks. I used to take my dog Rosa and we would go to the dog park and there would be nobody there. And Airdrie has about 10,000 licensed dogs. So that’s what originally started Puppy Pals.” From that, Nordick heard stories about people having difficulty finding good, reliable dog walkers. So she started a dog-walking side of the business and that evolved to what it is today as a dog daycare, boarding and training centre.


“WE STRIVE TO PROVIDE A SAFE AND RELIABLE

Goodbye Winter, Hello Spring!

SERVICE THAT PEOPLE CAN DEPEND ON” The success of the venture has not gone unnoticed as it won the Airdrie Emerging Business Award in 2017. “We’ve sort of grown from just a Facebook community to what we are today,” says Nordick, a certified professional dog trainer. She says the foundation of Airdrie Puppy Pals is built on three core values: safety, family and community. “We strive to provide a safe and reliable service that people can depend on,” she says. “We treat puppy pals and their parents how we would want and expect to be treated. And we actively participate in and host a variety of community events.​” Nordick and her husband Ray (Cossette) have two Alberta Rescue Foundation dogs: a Lab cross named Rosa and a Shepherd cross named Ryder. Airdrie Puppy Pals is located on Kingsview Rd S.E. in one big open-concept space, conveniently adjacent to the off-leash dog park. The location also has a small selection of retail items and a do-ityourself dog wash bay open to the public. “We don’t go by numbers. We go by behaviours, anxieties and personalities. We ask all of our Puppy Pal parents to schedule their services a day in advance so we can modify depending on who’s coming,” says Nordick. “We’ve had dogs sleep over for one night and we’ve had dogs sleep over for over a month. Some puppies will come for a few hours. Other puppies will come from the moment we open to the moment we close which is 12 and a half hours a day.” “Every day Ray and I are so grateful that we’re able to do what we love in a community that we love. We live here,” says Nordick. “Ray and I love what we do and the fact we get to do it every day with an amazing team and amazing clients, we’re happy.” life

TIFUL #KEEPING AIRDRIE BEAU

hl

FULL-SERVICE

SALON

Like Us!

113 1st St. NW

403.980.2820 theHairLoungeAirdrie.com

MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS

Purchases Refinances Debt Consolidation Rate Comparison

Sherry Jenkins Mortgage Consultant

133 1st St. NW Airdrie WeMortgage.ca

P 403.804.3694 F 1.866.899.6813 E sherry@wemortgage.ca S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

95


WORKLIFE | CAREERS

SHERRY JENKINS IS A BUSY AND SUCCESSFUL BUSINESSWOMAN WHO HAS MANAGED TO JUGGLE HER CAREER AND MAKE ROOM FOR BOTH HER PERSONAL LIFE AND GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY.

Jenkins, a mortgage consultant with Axiom Mortgage Solutions with her own office and her own employees, says it’s important to make a commitment in whatever you do. “Once you commit to something you just have to do it,” says Jenkins, who has been in the mortgage business for about 16 years. “I guess you just work a lot of hours sometimes too. Being a mother, that’s your biggest thing. I was a single mother for a long time….That’s your biggest job as a woman and a business owner. “Raising your family. I think that’s the biggest challenge,” says Jenkins. “Especially with the extracurricular activities you have with your kids. Soccer, piano and whatever else comes up. “For me, it’s fortunate that I can work kind of anywhere. So my cell phone a lot of times is always on. But I’ll be honest. I don’t take calls like I used to take calls. But I still get calls in the evenings and I still get calls on the weekends. I try not to work on Sundays and I try not to work on Friday nights.” Jenkins belongs to the Airdrie Business Club, a group of local professionals committed to promoting the growth of their businesses and themselves. “We meet every Thursday morning at the Toad ‘n’ Turtle. Our function is to be involved in just helping people with their business. Give referrals. We are also looking more at the community side as well by getting involved with community projects,” says Jenkins. That has included putting together Lioness Christmas Hampers. “We are starting and we’re going to really focus more on the community right now,” she adds. Jenkins has also been on the board of the food bank, as well as donating to and volunteering for the organization.

Dollars and Sense

Meet three women in finance roles who are also equally committed to their role in the community STORY BY MARIO TONEGUZZI | PHOTOS BY KRISTY REIMER

96

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


SHELLEY BITZ IS NO STRANGER TO THE COMMUNITY IN AIRDRIE.

For more than a decade, the energetic banking professional has played a key role in the city’s economic development as well as in the community itself. “In business, as in community work, my door, my time and efforts are available to any of the groups or businesses in Airdrie when they need it. At times it may be support in attending events, or assisting in some way at an event or business idea. For others, it is help in the greater overall projects of the organization itself,” says Bitz, Business and Agriculture Banking relationship manager with the Bank of Montreal, who in 2012 won airdrielife’s Amazing Leadership Award. She has been at BMO for about four years and part of the banking industry in the city for about 16 years. Bitz ran for city council last fall. While she didn’t get in, she’s well-known throughout the city for her community work.

“Because the community’s really important to me, I don’t … when I do things within the community for many different organizations … I don’t find it work. It kind of gives me personal satisfaction although much of it does have a relationship with my job,” says Bitz. “I would say that I’m really lucky to work for a bank that actually allows me a lot of time throughout the day to use those work hours to do some giving back depending on what’s required.” Bitz, who is a member of the rotary club, has been involved with the Airdrie Chamber of Commerce and is currently an executive. She and BMO are also part of the SMARTstart program, which helps entrepreneurs set their businesses up for success, through online learning, in-person seminars and mentorship. Every year she also visits high school students with the Building Futures program, giving them financial advice. In the past, Bitz was with the Airdrie Health Foundation for seven years. S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

97


WORKLIFE | CAREERS

CARMAN THIESSEN, AN INVESTMENT AND RETIREMENT PLANNER FOR THE ROYAL BANK, FELL IN LOVE WITH AIRDRIE THE VERY FIRST DAY SHE DROVE INTO IT TO LOOK FOR A HOUSE.

She’s lived here since 2005 and been a vital part of the community’s business environment as well as its charitable features. “It doesn’t matter how big this city gets. It always feels small. Everybody just loves to help everybody and I like to be a part of that,” she says. Thiessen is involved with the 100 Women Who Care Airdrie organization, a local group of women who get together once a quarter. “We basically listen to charities who are looking for funds and then we all donate $100 every quarter … whichever charity gets the most votes, that’s who gets our $10,000.” “We get to actually put in submissions on who we want to come speak with us. So every quarter there will be two or three people vying to get our $10,000,” says Thiessen, who was one of the very first members of the group which is into its second year. 98

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

“It’s a way for local women to make a big impact.” Thiessen is also an Airdrie Chamber of Commerce director in her fifth year with the business organization. As well, she helps out with the Airdrie Chamber golf tournament and volunteers every year with the home and garden show in Airdrie. So where does she find the time to juggle her professional life with her volunteer work and personal life? “I can’t say I’m very good at that sometimes. It’s not so much always like a perfect work/life balance but I do make my own hours at work which allows me to do some scheduling for personal time as well,” says Thiessen. “You have to be organized. So I’m very much in charge of my schedule. I’m in charge of my own days. I schedule what needs to be done with work and family and work around that as well. So I work around both of them.” life


Do you want people to eat, play or stay with you? Then you need to be seen HERE!

creambodyandbath.com

NOW BOOKING lingerie

When was the last time you had a professional bra fitting?

SAY HELLO

Follow Us

C O ME ON IN!

The ONLY Airdrie publication available across Southern Alberta Visitor Info Centres

Airdrie 403-945-3114 208 - 304 MAIN ST. AIRDRIE, AB

Wendy Pratt 403.863.4785 wendy@frogmediainc.ca

MyPureform.com

Booking: 403-726-9729

1 in 8 Alberta women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.

Saturday, March 24

Knowing is a Important First Step. Pureform’s Airdrie location offers mammograms with state of the art technology including Tomosynthesis to effectively monitor your ongoing breast health. We take requisition forms from any provider, and offer wide range of diagnostics services for your whole family including Ultrasound, X-ray, Pain Management, Biopsies, and Bone Density, Speciality Pediatric Testing right here in Airdrie. We have minimal wait times and you are always welcome to come in and book your appointment! X-rays no appointment necessary, just walk in!

Ask your doctor if a regular Mammogram or BMD test should be part of your health routine.

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrieli fe.com

99


W O R K L I F E | I N T E R N AT I O N A L S U C C E SS

CREDIT DUE

100 100 airdrielife.com airdrielife.com || SSPPRRI N I NGG2018 2018


“We simply can’t afford to continue business as usual in the world because climate change and global warming is a real thing” STORY BY MARIO TONEGUZZI | PHOTOS BY SERGEI BELSKI

A

n Airdrie-based company is gaining international recognition for its work to help slow global warming by removing greenhouse gas emissions from the atmosphere and sequestering carbon in farmland where they use no-till farming. Carbon Credit Solutions says it has eight million acres of land for this purpose and the result is equal to removing emissions from 702,000 cars in Alberta. “This company is doing an immense amount of good,” says Ed Alfke, the company’s CEO and chairman of the board. “I’m committed to making the world better for my children and grandchildren and to create a company that’s both profitable and sustainable in order to achieve that. “We’re working hard. We’re doing really well. We’re going global so that’s pretty cool…. We’re the largest in the globe at what we do. We sink and hold carbon in the ground.” Carbon Credit Solutions measures the success of green projects, develops carbon credit projects, and consults on carbon credit projects. The company uses its proprietary software and processes to develop carbon credits and measure performance against environmental standards. It implements key performance indicators to monitor, measure, report and verify the outcome of sustainable projects. It identifies risks and implements preventative, detective and corrective controls to mitigate the risk of project failure. And it uses a data-centric, transparent, disciplined and controlled development process, leveraging experts in its global network. Alfke says climate change is one of the single biggest challenges facing global development today and the company is committed to making a difference. Carbon credits are part of the solution and are financially and environmentally rewarding. Last fall, Alfke captured the 2017 EY Entrepreneur of the Year Award for the Prairies in the Cleantech and Environmental category. Carbon Credit Solutions is Alfke’s 23rd company and he has more than 30 years of business growth experience in industries as diverse as auto, finance and tech. He has been pivotal in helping the company become the largest aggregator of carbon credits in North America. The company, which currently has 42 employees, began in 2008 and Alfke joined in 2013. Since its inception, it has expanded its operations to the United States and South America. China is next on the list for expansion as the company has grown by 400 per cent in 40 months. “It is exciting to know that the important work that we are doing is being recognized by the business community,” says Alastair Handley, the company’s president and founder. Alfke says Alberta was the first carbon market in the Americas that started the whole idea of reducing emissions. The company has helped the Ontario government set up its carbon markets and it advised the government of Alberta as well. “Our Climate Smart Group is the global brand that we’re expanding under outside of the country,” he says. “We’re starting to take the carbon knowledge and our major software and processes into different global markets based on what we’ve learned here. “We simply can’t afford to continue business as usual in the world because climate change and global warming is a real thing,” says Alfke. “It’s disastrous in Africa, the Middle East. Lots of places in the world are being impacted by this whole change in temperature and weather patterns. “Things are changing. It’s happening and it’s real. We’re part of slowing that down.” life S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

101


WORKLIFE | COLUMN

The PERFECT TIRES for your vehicle AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

moneylife

WITH SHERRY JENKINS

!

KNOW A GU U Y YO

Greg Tranter, OWNER

M

Seize the Rockies

Capture a landscape. Or be absorbed by one. Ski, snowshoe or stay in and pursue new extremes of comfort. Our rustic mountain lodges energize the body and settle the soul.

Elev. 1731 m Deer Lodge, Lake Louise Views from the rooftop hot tub.

102

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

MORE CANADIANS PURCHASING SECOND HOMES

crmr.com

ore Canadians than ever are purchasing second homes. No longer just for the wealthy, second-home ownership has gone mainstream. For many Canadians, it’s the dream of a summer cottage, golf retreat or a winter chalet. For others, career or family demands fuel the desire for a second home: for business stays or to shelter the university student studying in a distant community. When the “Second Home” Program was introduced – helping Canadians borrow up to 95 per cent of the home’s value – the purchase of a second home became easier than ever. The attraction of this real estate investment is just as compelling with your second home, as it is with your first. There are a few provisions here: either the borrower must occupy the property for at least some part of the year or a family member must occupy the property on a rent-free basis. The property must be winterized and be accessible for year-round occupancy.

“No longer just for the wealthy, second-home ownership has gone mainstream”


Below are some questions to keep in mind when you finance a second home. What are your financing options? The Second Home Program has been a big breakthrough for Canadian second-home buyers. Genworth or Canada Guarantee will insure a property purchased for a family member attending post-secondary away from home. The program is also very popular as a means of purchasing a vacation property, however it must be located in Canada. A line of credit for a second home? A line of credit is the most common way to use your home equity. No need to wait until you’ve saved a down payment for a second-home investment, but you must have the funds and cash flow to comfortably make both mortgage payments. It’s your second home? This means that it’s primarily for your own or your family’s use. If you’re looking to purchase an investment property, your mortgage professional can help with that too … but it’s not the same as purchasing a second home. If there’s a family cottage in your dreams or a student condo in your plans, this is the time to get serious about a mortgage plan to make it happen. Be sure to check out your options. life Sherry Jenkins with Axiom Mortgage Solutions is the licensed mortgage professional and founder of We Mortgage Team

Coming

Summer 2018

MAN

Booking deadline April 30 Street date June 6

The

issue

Booking deadline April 30 Street Date June 6

Contact Wendy Pratt Sales Director TODAY wendy@frogmediainc.ca

YOUR

LOCAL NERD

Michael Duffy • 403.471.8082

PROUDLY SERVING ROCKY VIEW COUNTY FOR 10 YEARS

We Come On-Site to you • Complimentary Up-Front Quote

Imagination

is free... and now so is your Airdrie Public Library card! Get your FREE APL card today!

111, 304 Main St. SE | 403-948-0600 airdriepubliclibrary.ca

S P R I N G 2018

|

Follow us on:

airdrielife.com

103


WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED, AIRDRIE. Airdrie and area’s trusted source of news for 43 years and counting. In print every Wednesday and online 24/7.

ie

dr

Air

o

Ech

Airdrie Echo

403-948-7280 | 112 - 1st Ave N

www.airdrieecho.com

104

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


citylife

A C LO S E R LO O K AT YO U R C O M M U N I T Y

112 106 Elite Hockey • 109 Comfort Care • 116 Awesome Kids


C I T Y L I F E | S P O R TS Airdrie Lightning forward Sarah Nusl moves the puck ahead as the Lightning midget AA team takes on the Red Deer Sutter Fund Chiefs in Alberta Female Hockey League Midget Elite (AA) division action at Genesis Place Jan. 5, 2018, in Airdrie, Alta.

Lightning on Ice Airdrie’s female midget elite AA team forms a sisterhood on the ice and off STORY AND PHOTOS BY BRITTON LEDINGHAM

106

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


A

irdrie’s midget AA female hockey players are proving to be strong contenders in their second season. The Airdrie Lightning, which is made up of 15- to 17-year-old players, reportedly had the youngest average-age roster to join the restructured Alberta Female Hockey League’s Midget Elite AA division in the fall of 2016 with eight first-year midget players. They finished with a reasonable 11win, 15-loss record, but were bumped out in the first round of playoffs. This season, the squad is a contender for first place in the south half of the league. “This year when we score, it’s like, ‘Alright, I want more,’” says Sarah Nusl, a right winger from Cochrane. In this December interview with airdrielife, Nusl is joined by her second-year teammates Madelyn Schulze, Madison Black and Emma Hoppins, sitting closely around a table in the lobby at the Ron Ebbesen Arena before practice. The round-table interview has a similar flow to the girls’ play on the ice. Set up, pass, goal and assist. “We’re all cohesive,” says Schulze, a defenceman from Airdrie. “We just roll the lines easily,” chimes in Nusl, noting the even strength of all three lines. “Even if we have the D playing forward, they all have the hockey sense, and they can all do everything.” Emma, whose father Ray Hoppins is the head coach, says every skater on the roster had a goal, an unmatched feat in the league at the time. “We all recognize we’re all good hockey players,” says the left winger from Olds and linemate with Black.

LEAGUE-LEADING SCORER CONTENDER Madison Black is the quietest during the interview, perhaps a lead-by-example type. She led the league in goals for the first half of the season, netting 13 in 11 games. By late January she dropped to the second spot behind Calgary Fire Red’s Sydney Benko. The Cremona-based centre is humble. “We all have different strengths, and we use them together,” says Black. Schulze has more interesting insight. “Our team isn’t competitive for points or anything,” says Schulze. “We just love it when each other score.” “It kind of gets us going,” chimes Black. “When someone scores, the momentum totally shifts our way,” adds Nusl. “We definitely can pick it up after we get that first goal.” Schulze says her team is good about staying calm in the face of adversity. “Once we score, the game totally changes,” says Schulze. That was seen when the Lightning rallied back from a 4-3 deficit after the first period to score eight straight goals in an 11-4 win over the Lethbridge Cyclones on the road on Dec. 2. Black has a target on the Cyclones, scoring hat tricks twice against the team.

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

107


C I T Y L I F E | S P O R TS

PQ – “This year when we score, it’s like, ‘Alright, I want more”

Airdrie Lightning head coach Ray Hoppins addresses his players before his team takes on the Red Deer Sutter Fund Chiefs at Genesis Place Jan. 5, 2018. Airdrie lost 2-1 in a shootout.

The girls often faced-off against each other throughout their earlier minor hockey years playing in and around their hometowns of Airdrie, Cochrane, Olds, Crossfield, Cremona, Didsbury and Bowden. Those memories of seeing each other at the other end of the ice are fresh enough to be remembered, but the girls laugh as they open up about the respect they had for one another then and now. Emma begins, followed by Schulze. “When we played, I was like ‘Sarah Nusl, she’s so good. I hate playing Sarah,’” says Emma. “We were just like, ‘Awe, she’s so good,’” says Schulze. As the girls head off to get ready for practice, coach Hoppins says he attributes the girls’ success to simply working on scoring in practice by breaking down technical aspects and working on team and individual strategies. A vast majority of players returned from 2016-2017, and Ray says many of the girls could play AAA. He also tips his hat to strong play from the Lightning’s two new goalies, starter Cianna Weir and backup Kayla Savoie-Penton. Savoie-Penton is based in Airdrie and played with the Banff Hockey Academy last season, while Weir is from Olds and travelled to Lloydminster to play in the Elite league last year. “Both goalies have bailed us out of frantic play,” says coach Hoppins. Weir was leading the league with 11 wins late in January, while holding a .92 save percentage (SV%) and 2.18 goals against average (GAA). Backup Savoie-Penton only started in one game, a loss to the South division-leading Calgary Fire Red. Ray says he has taken note of the transformation from opponent to comrade. 108

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

They’ve taken steps to form friendships, which Schulze says gives them an edge. “I think as a team because we’re all close it helps us connect better when we’re on the ice,” she says, noting it’s an accomplishment the girls are so tight, as hardly any go to the same schools, being from different centres. Notably, the midget team, in partnership with an atom girls squad, fundraised turkeys for families in need to have for Christmas, donating a whopping 236 turkeys to Airdrie Food Bank. “It’s just a fun team to play on,” says Schulze. life

Airdrie Lightning defenceman Kayla Bell battles for the puck with Red Deer Sutter Fund Chiefs forward Zoe Lorenz-Boser.


CITYLIFE | CARING

“So many are drawn here by the chance to make a difference in a child’s life”

Hooked on hugs Airdrie blanketeers help kids in crisis

T

he noise level in the conference room is rising. Colourful blankets are piling up on chairs, bolts of fabric rest against the walls, and balls of yarn are stacked four deep on a table to the side. The “blanketeers” are attending their monthly meeting in donated space at an Airdrie car dealership. It’s a chance for the women to drop off their creations, learn new techniques, and enjoy each other’s company. But this is no ordinary crochet club. “So many are drawn here by the chance to make a difference in a child’s life,” says Kim Ferrier, a spokeswoman for the group.

STORY BY AYESHA CLOUGH | PHOTOS BY KRISTY REIMER

Ferrier joined after a friend’s husband passed away suddenly in his early 30s, leaving behind two heartbroken children and their devastated mom. Ferrier wanted to help, but didn’t know what to do. Then she saw the boys receiving two blankets – handmade, colourful, cozy and comforting. A lifeline. A warm safe hug in sad and uncertain times. She was hooked. A budding crocheter, she joined the little-known Airdrie Project Linus, a small but loving group of women – armed with only needles, hooks, yarn and fabric – who provide blankets of love to children going through serious illness or a crisis in their lives. S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

109


CITYLIFE | CARING

In October, Ferrier helped the group secure a $10,000 donation from the 100 Airdrie Men Who Give A Damn (more on them in airdrielife’s summer issue). She was blown away. But more so by the stories the men shared after her presentation. One man cried. Another recalled his childhood blanket that was sewn for him by his grandmother. Ferrier says she’s never been hugged by so many men she doesn’t know! Project Linus is a worldwide volunteer-run organization. It’s named after the Peanuts character who’s rarely seen without his trusty blue blanket. There are 44 chapters across Canada, six of them in Alberta. The Airdrie chapter was started in 2011 by the Heslop family. Longtime resident Shirley Heslop found out about Project Linus through her daughter who lives in Washington State. At first, she took her blankets there, but soon saw a need right here in our own community. 110

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Recently, blankets were gifted to the children who lost their home as a result of the Sharp Hill grassfire last October. Other recipients include a boy who underwent open heart surgery and his little sister; a father of three who was struggling and eventually had the heat shut off in their home; and another little boy with a terminal illness. “His mother emailed to say that nobody can touch that blanket. He has it all the time, and it has been such a help,” Heslop recounts. A year ago, there were six or seven blanket makers. Now, on a dark and cold winter’s evening, there are more than 30 crowded into the community room at Cam Clark Ford, quilting away, sipping coffee and chatting up a storm. Becky Simmons, a local crochet master who sells her patterns online, is showing the women how to join their squares using a ‘continuous granny stitch.’ She stands at one end of the table, her crotchet needle pumping like


a well-oiled machine, and she’s not even looking down at her work. As if by magic, a scalloped yellow border appears around a small brown square of yarn. Six such squares will be joined together following her cleverly-devised mathematical diagram to form another blanket hug for an Airdrie child. The women – of all stages and ages – are free to make their own style of blanket. Tonight’s drop-offs are patterned with pink teddy bears, big yellow emoticons, and everything in between. Some 25 to 30 cuddle blankets are donated each month. And last year alone, the group gave out 300 blankets, each one a labour of love. “Nothing goes to waste here,” says Leslie Gould, the chapter co-ordinator. “We are frugal – times three!” Even when people donate blankets that don’t meet Project Linus’ needs (all blankets must be new, handmade and 100 per cent acrylic for ease of washing),

the group works with schools, hospitals, emergency services, community and seniors groups to find homes for them. Aside from blankets, the group gratefully accepts donations of fabric (especially fleece and flannel), yarn and quilt batting – one of their most expensive purchases. Like the other group leaders, a part of Gould’s basement is given over to supplies and blankets – each carefully checked, lovingly finished, thoroughly washed, neatly packed, and individually labelled with an image of Linus – ready to go for the next child in our community in need of a warm loving blanket hug. life There’s no shortage of love. If you know a child who could use a Project Linus blanket, please email airdrieprojectlinus@gmail.com

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

111


Cheer Squad CITYLIFE | SPIRIT

I

n the world of competitive cheerleading, all that separates you from success on the mat is two and a half minutes. The cheer season runs from September to April, with practices that include stunting, tumbling, dance and jumps. Along with that comes blood, sweat, and more than a few tears. But for the George McDougall High School Division 1 small squad, it’s all worth it. “Last year we started with very few veterans on the team,” says head coach Liese Reichert. “We started with 10 girls but two left due to illness.” With the remaining eight girls, Reichert saw a number of factors contribute to the squad’s remarkable season. First and foremost, Reichert says that attitude was everything. “Every one of them tried to build the others up. It was an ‘all-in-this-together’ mentality.” Hope Warthe, former squad member and now assistant coach, attributes positivity to not only the team’s success but also to making the team. “If you can’t do something, don’t quit; don’t be afraid to try,” says Warthe. “It’s hard but rewarding in the end.” Another key factor in the GMAC cheer team’s success is their ability to help and support one another. Khushveer Chowhan, a Grade 11 student and now third-year squad member, says this interdependency helped her learn the ropes easier. “I was on the middle school team for a year, and when I came here and learned that some of the moves I was doing were wrong, the team really came together to help.” “I like being with a team because we all (work) together, we (are) able to give feedback, and our drives to competitions (are) hilarious,” adds Chowhan. With all of their hours put in, the GMAC cheer squad has a lot to be proud of. The athletes attended six competitions in total last season which including showings at Northlands in Edmonton and Stampede City Showdown in Calgary.

112

airdrielife.com

|

Left to right, back: Liese Reichert (coach), Milena Garza, Kyra Pearson, Danielle Edwards, Brooklyn Ree and Hope Warthe (assistant coach) Middle: Savannah Speer, Khushveer Chowan, Kayla Firth, Lauren McLeod Front: Taylor-Jade Calhoun, Shantelle Farn

S P R I N G 2018


STORY BY SARA LESTER-VANDERHEIDE | PHOTOS BY SERGEI BELSKI

“Cheer is two and a half minutes of your life. It’s what you do before that, and what you do with whatever happens after, that matters.” The big win came during Zones in Lethbridge where they placed first in their division. Finally, at provincials, the GMAC cheer squad was tenths of a point away from a second-place finish. “It was a strong routine, a good routine, and the group of girls [was] bound and determined to make the season successful no matter what,” says Reichert. This year, there are 11 girls on the team. “This is the strongest team I have ever coached,” says Reichert. “They are truly dedicated to the sport and work hard to accomplish each element of the routine. “ The squad plans to attend five competitions this season, travelling to Athabasca, Edmonton, Calgary and Lethbridge. This year, adds Reichert, the squad is competing in Game Day as well. This is a new competition which falls back to the traditional role of cheerleaders. “The team will prepare an offensive and defensive cheer, a spirit cheer and a half-time dance,” explains Reichert. This was debuted at Provincials last year and we have decided to compete this year because it allows us to expand our repertoire.” Another change for this year has seen the squad cheering for all Mustang football home games. “This allowed the girls a chance to practice their cheers and be comfortable performing in front of crowds,” says Reichert. “It also allowed them to become more visible in the school. “Thus far, our season has really been a great one.” Thanks to the squad’s overall success, cheerleading has begun to pick up in the community. Reichert attributes that to the efforts of her team, both past and present. “I have had a lot of former cheerleaders come back, whether it be to help part time, for a year, or go on to help the middle school team,” she says. “These girls are taking what they’ve learned on my mat and sharing it with other people “Our choreographer, Hannah Watson, has created a challenging dance sequence both for our Cheerleading routine but also for our Game Day half-time dance,” says Reichert. “Both Hannah and Hope are previous members of the George Mac team and it is exciting that they are back to help train new team members. “In the big picture, cheer is two and a half minutes of your life. It’s what you do before that, and what you do with whatever happens after, that matters.” life

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielif e.com

113


CITYLIFE | LEARNING

LEADING THE WAY STORY BY JOLENE RUDISUELA | PHOTOS BY SERGEI BELSKI

W

ith school, friends and extracurricular activities, teenagers have a lot on their plates, but Volunteer Airdrie’s LEAD program is helping teach youth the importance of leadership and community involvement. LEAD, which stands for Leadership, Empowerment, Achieving a Difference, started in early 2017 after the organization realized Airdrie younger residents were looking for ways to become more involved. “We talked to youth about how hard it was for them to be involved in the community and to be accepted in our city,” says Melanie Taylor, executive di-

114

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

rector of Volunteer Airdrie. “We all know the stigma of being a youth today; that they’re always on their phones and they’re all selfish, it’s all just about them – and it’s really not true.” The LEAD program provides training both in class and through volunteering. In the 20 hours of classroom training, participants learn leadership, problem solving and communication skills. “It is in a classroom, but it is not a classroom-style training,” “We really have them reflect and think; we talk about really tough subjects and there’s some emotion in the room.”


The students have a chance to listen to various speakers talk about their organizations and the important role of volunteers. At the end of the program, each student is required to give a one- to two-minute speech about their experiences. In 2017, 45 students ages 12 to 18 completed four sessions of the LEAD program, contributing more than 900 volunteer hours. Though Taylor says many of the participants are ‘volun-told’ to come, by the end, they are always amazed at how much the program has impacted them. Volunteer Airdrie chair Dave Maffitt says program graduates have shown dramatic improvements in conflict management, problem solving, planning and organizing. Though LEAD participants are only required to do 20 hours of volunteering to graduate, he says many of the students continue to volunteer after they finish the program. One 15-year-old LEAD graduate says: “It didn’t make sense to me why people volunteered because I didn’t understand why people work for free. But the volunteering I did opened my eyes and became the best part of the program.” According to Volunteer Airdrie board member Dorothy May, LEAD youth have been involved with a variety of local community programs and events, such as Airdrie Food Bank, community beautification projects, Airdrie Festival of Lights, Genesis Place summer camps, AirdrieFEST, Unmask Mental Health, AIRscares and more. LEAD students have been a huge help, says Carolyn Geertsen, volunteer co-ordinator with Airdrie Food Bank. “The kids did amazing. They are always a good group to have and very eager to help.” The program’s future looks bright. “We now have a partnership agreement in place with RVS to use W.H. Croxford as our facility for the LEAD classroom sessions,” says Maffitt. “There has been a lot of interest from people wanting to help as facilitators and we now have a pool of about 8-10 trained facilitators who volunteer their time over the 11-week-long program, including tagging along for many of the group volunteering practicum sessions.” “In a time where it seems a lot of relationship are virtual, there is something magical in facilitating youth to engage in fun activities that involve socializing and problem solving through interactive activities,” adds May. life To find out more about how to register for LEAD, visit vounteerairdrie.ca; to inquire about becoming a program facilitator, contact dorothy.may@volunteerairdrie.ca

We asked one of the LEAD participants to share her experience with airdrielife: Last spring, I had the opportunity to attend a new program called LEAD. The free program is designed to teach youth leadership and co-operative skills. It spans over two months, with weekly sessions for two hours, teaching teenagers to become our next community leaders. Classes focus on different things each time, with diversity and conflict management just to name a few. The type of knowledge I learned about leadership is extremely useful to the average person to really help them stand out. After the first class, I thought what we would be taught were things like “how to make new friends” or “how to think of a good icebreaker.” What I got instead was so much more. I learned about leadership that I will be able to use in my future. When I arrived for the second class, I was surprised at how many people came back to the second session. This had really caught on. I thank the leaders for this as they made the sessions fun, relatable and educational. There was also the volunteering component. Part of being able to graduate from the program was volunteering for 20 hours over the two months. What used to be a rare pastime has now turned into a fantastic hobby. Thanks to LEAD, my love of volunteering has come back up again. Lastly, something that made my experience was the people. Meeting other kids from different schools was really cool. And now, we’re exchanging phone numbers and contacting each other on social media. These are people I thought I never would connect with, but now I have thanks to LEAD. This was one of the most incredible experiences I’ve ever had, and I wouldn’t change it for the world. Thank you Volunteer Airdrie LEAD program leaders! – Madeline Belle, age 14, Grade 8

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielif e.com

115


C I T Y L I F E | A I R D R I E L I F E C E L E B R AT E S

An AWESOME celebration of

AIRDRIE KIDS PHOTOS BY KRISTY REIMER

116

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


I

t was, simply put, an awesome night when airdrielife hosted the firstever Awesome Airdrie Kids Awards celebration with all 11 recipients and their families at The Woods Restaurant in late January. The room was boisterous and colourful thanks to the excited kids, the Avenue Cakery cupcakes and the bright-orange-and-purple theme found in the balloons, T-shirts, certificates and table toppers. Everyone enjoyed a kid-friendly build-your-own-taco bar before publisher Sherry Shaw-Froggatt introduced each recipient to the appreciative crowd of more than 70 and announced the charity to which each kid chose to have airdrielife make a $50 donation. The recipients (and their chosen charity) are: Gracie Brade (WE Charity); Riley Knapp (SPCA); Chelan Lees (Operation Smile); Tanisha Halverson (Alberta Children’s Hospital); Alex Gahagan (Airdrie Animal Shelter); Alyssa Besselt (Canadian Cancer Society); Rachel Engen (Airdrie Food Bank); Aiden Schell (Tails To Tell Animal Rescue); Maya Nisbet (Calgary Humane Society), Noah Carroll (Operation Smile); and Alexis Cyron (The Ellie Tims Project, Storybook Theatre). Nominators were also present, including teachers and coaches. École Edwards principal Peter Fultz shared the sentiments of all in attendance. “What a great program, a great way to recognize these kids. We are

already thinking about the kids we want to nominate for the 2018 awards.” With smiles all around, Shaw-Froggatt felt this was the most rewarding experience of her publishing career. “This night just made my year. To see and feel the joy in this room, from a program we created, just reiterates that we are doing the right thing.” Shaw-Froggatt credits the whole idea to good friend Nic Lacoursiere who, when discussing the already established Amazing Airdrie Women Awards (see page 119) with her, suggested airdrielife start a program to recognize inspiring kids. From there it became a program to recognize youth ages six to 14 who are role models for their generation. “We look for kids who demonstrate determination, spirit, compassion, growth and leadership,” says Shaw-Froggatt. “Our 11 recipients each had a great story from different backgrounds and experiences but one thing they all shared was compassion. This above all makes them heroes in my eyes, and they set the bar very high for the next round of nominations.” life

Nominations for the 2018 Awesome Airdrie Kids Awards are now open on airdrielife.com

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielif e.com

117


& presents the

8 Annual th

Amazing Airdrie Women Awards Prosecco Reception | Gourmet Lunch | Live Entertainment | Awards | Door Prizes | Swag Bags

FRIDAY MAY 11 | 11:30 AM T H E W O O D S R E S TA U R A N T

The

TICKETS $50 Tickets on Sale April 6

woodsidegc.com/store

BIGGEST

celebration of women in Airdrie! McKee Amazing Leadership TD Amazing Promise Pureform Amazing Courage Pharmasave Amazing Heart Cream Bath & Body Amazing Determination Davis Chevrolet presents Ally Lane Comic performer, writer and entrepreneur authour of The Chem-Ho.

Exclusive Airdrie PREMIERE of the 100 Nasty Women Project by artist Veronica Funk.

is pleased to make a $5 donation for every ticket sold to Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation.


2017 Amazing Airdrie Women

A a

w 2018

AMAZING COURAGE

STORY BY DAWN SMITH | PHOTOS BY KRISTY REIMER

W

elcome to our eighth annual Pharmasave airdrielife Amazing Airdrie Women! This feature is one of our most treasured editorial pieces every year and as you can tell by the extraordinary photograph by Kirsty Reimer that graces our foldout cover, it was truly one for the books creatively as well. (To learn more about how we created this join us on airdrielife.com) With the 31 amazing women featured here, we have now brought you more than 200 women’s stories since we started this recognition program in 2011. Every year people ask me “aren’t you going to run out of women to interview?” My answer is a resounding “hell no!” This city is graced with an abundance of passion, compassion, strength and promise as is so evident on these pages. Please read about each of our nominees and then take a moment to cast your vote online at airdrielife.com. We will announce the finalists in all categories (except Amazing Courage) April 6 and the recipients May 11 at our annual awards luncheon. Our immense gratitude to our sponsors for making this program happen every year: The Store Upstairs/ Pharmasave on Centre; Davis Chevrolet; Pureform Radiology; McKee Homes; TD Bank and Cream Bath & Body. Sherry Shaw-Froggatt, publisher

Victoria-Lynn Scattergood’s courage and determination are an example to others. She is now a successful entrepreneur with a bright future, but life wasn’t always this easy for the 20something Airdrian. When Scattergood was about 15, she began struggling with anxiety and depression, which progressed to the point where sometimes she couldn’t get out of bed or leave her parent’s basement. This difficult stage persisted for five years, but slowly, with the help of her best friend and mom, as well as her doctor, Scattergood began to overcome her mental health issues. She got the final motivation she needed when she got her dog Keetha, who Scattergood trained to be her service dog. After working with her own dog, Scattergood found a career path. “I saw a need in Airdrie, and I wanted to fill that need,” she says. “I thought, what better way to give back to the [animals] that have helped me so much.” Now Scattergood’s dog-walking business, Wild Tails, is a success, keeping her busy and motivating her to continue to overcome her anxiety and depression, which she admits she is still learning to manage. Scattergood’s mom, Jacqueline Scattergood, couldn’t be prouder of her daughter. “[She demonstrates to] those around her that determination, strength and courage to overcome her obstacles are an asset to her growth,” says Jacqueline, noting her daughter encourages others to grow in the same way.

AMAZING DETERMINATION

Veronica Boccinfuso doesn’t let her children stop her from pursuing her dream of owning a family business. In fact, the mom of a three-year-old son and five-month-old daughter embraces the challenge of balancing family, entrepreneurship and volunteerism. “I have been an entrepreneur since a very young age, [and] I knew I always [wanted] to be a stay-at-home mom, so we created something that fits our lifestyle,” says Boccinfuso of the home inspection company she runs with her husband Adam. Armed with a business degree, Veronica tackles all the behind-the-scenes tasks required for the business, including marketing, bookkeeping and maintaining a website, and she still finds time to volunteer on the Better Business Bureau board of directors and network with other local business owners. Adam does the inspections and helps out at home as much as possible. He is awed by his wife’s growth in all areas of her life since becoming a mom and opening the business and impressed by her ability to balance motherhood and business ownership. “She is a fantastic mom, [and] I couldn’t ask for a better partner in business and in my life,” he says. “She 100 per cent achieves whatever she puts her mind to.”

Life hasn’t always been easy for Veronique Dewilde, but she has never let that stop her from going above and beyond in her job as a financial planner. She immigrated to Canada from Belgium 18 years ago and worked hard as a single mom. But when she first arrived, Dewilde found it difficult to find unbiased tax advice. She became determined to educate herself in this and other financial areas, which eventually led to her becoming a financial advisor. Dewilde gained financial independence and now offers free tax advice to families because she “likes helping the average person.” But her giving nature doesn’t stop there. Dewilde recently took on the challenge of helping the Short family, all four of whom suffer from serious health problems. She is on a mission to obtain a wheelchair-accessible van for the family to help their son gain independence, hopes to raise $5,000 to help the family become debt free, and is also setting up a disability savings plan to ensure their son has financial independence as an adult. Tammy Short is grateful: “Veronique has helped us in ways I never thought possible, and I will be forever grateful for her hard work and compassion.” Dewilde is humble about her contributions. “Once you make a difference in someone’s life, that has a ripple effect,” she says.

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielif e.com

119


2017 Amazing Airdrie Women Personal grief hasn’t stopped Kara Fulton from achieving her longtime dream. Rather, the passing of her father motivated the Airdrie mom to quit her full-time job to open Thumbprint Craft Beer Market, the first store of its kind in Western Canada. “When you lose someone, it reminds you that life is short and you need to be happy,” she says. “We all deserve to be happy and do something we are passionate about.” Janine Hartsook, Fulton’s friend, nominated her for an Amazing Determination Award because she was so impressed with her friend’s passion. “Her innovative determination and her decision to go with her gut and support local breweries was just really inspiring,” says Hartsook of Fulton. “Being a mom and an entrepreneur … [and] having the guts to do it alone, that is huge.” Despite opening Thumbprint in the midst of an economic downturn, Fulton says her business is off to a great start. Her advice to other would-be entrepreneurs is to enjoy life and be passionate about what you do. “If you are passionate about something, you can make it work,” says Fulton.

Co-owner of PUSH Cycling Studio, Janine Hartsook has shown amazing determination over the past two and a half years since starting her business. Balancing her career as a dental hygienist, her new business venture, and family hasn’t been easy but, according to her friend and client Kara Fulton, Hartsook has done it with grace. “Janine is always positive, outgoing and determined,” says Fulton, who notes Hartsook is an inspiration. “She works extremely hard and is selfless as well – she always puts everyone else first.” Although now a single mom with a busy work and teaching schedule, Hartsook remains determined to give the best of herself in all she does. That commitment hasn’t gone unnoticed: Hartsook and her business partner, Tammy Block, won the Emerging Business Award at the 2016 Airdrie Business Awards. Hartsook also exhibits confidence and

120

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

optimism and has a unique ability to encourage others to be strong as well. “Know that you can [face challenges],” she says. “You just have to not be so hard on yourself and let yourself adjust. Give yourself some room to breathe.”

Preet Nijjar thrives on making others feel beautiful and confident. The owner of Studio 150 Makeup & Esthetics, Nijjar has worked tirelessly for the past five years to make her business successful. It wasn’t easy, especially because when she started her business in 2014, Nijjar’s children were just two and six months old. But giving up wasn’t an option for Nijjar. “I knew my kids and my clients were watching, and I didn’t want to just give up,” says Nijjar. Her hard work seems to have paid off. Today, Nijjar attracts clientele from all over the region and is very busy with her regular clientele and about 30 weddings a year. Her work has appeared in Calgary Bride magazine twice. According to her husband Raj Nijjar, Preet is a wonderful mother, entrepreneur and community volunteer who has shown amazing determination since starting her business. Preet is humble about her achievements, attributing much of her success to her family and the community in which she has lived for seven years. “The support I have received from this community is amazing,” says Preet. “My clients have become like family.”

Nicole Proseilo is passionate about Airdrie. This nominee has lived in the community for more than 15 years and contributed hundreds of volunteer hours to such organizations as the Nose Creek Valley Museum. Laurie Harvey, curator at the museum, is enthusiastic in her support of Proseilo, calling her an invaluable volunteer. “[Proseilo] is a trustworthy, enthusiastic and passionate volunteer,” said Harvey. “Nicole’s desire to make her community a better place is something to emulate.”

A competitive skater for more than a decade, Proseilo now coaches at Airdrie Skating Club. She is also very active on the Airdrie political scene, volunteering for local federal and provincial candidates. She also sought election for Airdrie city council in the fall 2017 election. Although she didn’t win, Proseilo maintains a strong love for her community and a desire to see Airdrie mature, especially in the area of arts and culture, which she believes contributes to a city’s “soul.” “It’s really important to give back to the community that helped me reach my goals and helped make me who I am,” says Proseilo.

AMAZING LEADERSHIP

Lisa Darlene Ammirati is dedicated to being a leader when it comes to music. The piano teacher recently opened Skyline Music in Airdrie after owning a Calgary-based studio for a decade. Ammirati has a degree in both music and education and has been a piano teacher for 20 years. She is committed to a child-centred style of teaching. “Students are our No. 1 focus,” she says. “We believe in teaching any ability, and, if a child isn’t succeeding, we change; we don’t expect them to.” Ammirati says the toughest part of her career has been expanding into Airdrie, but she is committed to building integrity and respect within the community. Despite the challenges, Ammirati is committed to her vision of making her Airdrie studio a warm and welcoming place, not only for her students, but also for her staff of teachers. She encourages other women to be fearless in the pursuit of their dreams. “Never lose your vision,” she advises. “[Also be aware] that you can’t be perfect at every part of business … you need support.” Sheila Shareski, who works alongside Ammirati, admires the musician’s leadership and courage. “I’ve seen [Ammirati] grow and develop as an outstanding music educator, entrepreneur, boss and friend,” says Shareski. “I think [she is] a great role model for others.”


Alisa Jones may not be a high-powered executive, but she is a leader, nonetheless. The neonatal nurse with more than 30 years of experience seeks to inspire women to be their best every day, regardless of their role. “Women can be leaders wherever they are,” says Jones, explaining for her, being a leader means remaining behind the scenes cheering on others. Jones’ passion for inspiring women in leadership began 10 years ago when she enrolled in Called to Lead, a two-year leadership development program. She is now teaching other women what she has learned as a facilitator with the organization. But she is also a leader in her workplace, and finds it fulfilling to see others – especially younger women – get over their insecurities to find success in whatever situation they find themselves. Her husband, Dan Jones, calls his wife an amazing, high-capacity leader. For Alisa, mentoring others is a way of life. “I am trying to live out my values by helping others learn,” she says. “Investing in people is intrinsic to who I am.”

Dr. Mindy Gautama is passionate about relationship building between patients and health care staff. A family physician who has practiced in Airdrie for 17 years, Gautama enjoys looking after her patients at numerous stages in their lives. She also sits on the board of the Highland Primary Care Network, an organization with 68 doctors serving 68,000 patients in the region that is responsible for numerous health promotion programs and clinics, including maternity, chronic pain and women’s health. “I am very passionate about primary care and the importance of having a family doctor,” says Gautama. The mother of three teenagers is also one of eight general practice delegates at the Alberta Medical Association (AMA). In that role, Gautama represents family physicians and helps set up policies for the AMA and medicine in general. Sara Chamberlain says Gautama is a kind, caring and competent family physician

who gives back not only to the medical community, but to local organizations, including local sports teams and schools, as well. Chamberlain calls Gautama “one of many unsung heroes in the health profession.”

Naomi Keane, who owns Airdrie’s Oranj Fitness alongside her dad Warren Keane, comes by her entrepreneurial spirit naturally, with both of her parents being entrepreneurs. This spirit, coupled with her love of group fitness, motivated Keane to start a company offering outdoor boot camp in Victoria, B.C., nine years ago that grew from offering one to 117 classes per week. Buoyed by this experience, Keane opened Oranj Fitness in September 2016, and is getting ready to open a second location, in Calgary’s Kensington neighbourhood. Keane attributes her success to the welcoming atmosphere, for both staff and clients, she works to create for her business. “I pride myself on relationships,” she says of her success. “I love community, love connecting with people.” Shannon Hamel, who works alongside Keane, says her boss is captivating, visionary, inspiring and generous. Hamel explains Keane is also passionate about giving back to the community by hosting regular charity events for organizations such as Quinn’s Legacy, Airdrie Food Bank and the Canadian Cancer Society. Keane says she wants her business to be integral to the community. “My business plan includes giving back to the community we live in,” she says. She advises other women who are considering starting their own business to be creative and think outside the box. “If it is what you want, you can’t take no for an answer,” she says. “Don’t let roadblocks get in your way.”

Marie Lauer knows that great leadership requires integrity and action. That’s why you won’t see her compromising her values while working tirelessly to improve the community through her numerous volunteer commitments. Lauer began volunteering at 17 and,

when she moved to Airdrie, found it a great way to integrate into the community. Her sharp mind and kind heart meant Lauer was asked to take on numerous leadership roles in such organizations as Airdrie Food Bank, the Primary Care Network, the Prairie Mountain Health Advisory Council and Airdrie Angels. Most recently, Lauer ran for the position of mayor in Airdrie because she felt it was better to act than complain when she questioned the direction city council was taking. Lauer is humble about her leadership skills. “It’s just a matter of stepping (up) to offer the services and skills you have to make the world a better place,” she says. Michelle Carre of Airdrie Angels is impressed by Lauer’s commitment to action. “[Lauer] is a tireless volunteer who has given of her time, mind and heart to many different organizations,” she says. “When an opportunity presents itself to make an improvement, she runs with it.”

Megan Lockhart thrives on seeing other women succeed. Lockhart is the CEO of Hello Life Academy, a 12-month program created in 2016 to equip women with everything they need to start a successful business. The mother of two is passionate about business coaching because she believes every woman should create her own sense of freedom. “Something amazing happens when a woman discovers she has all the power within her to create the life she wants,” says Lockhart. “I love it when women discover that they are truly amazing.” Megan Condie calls Lockhart “one of the most passionate, encouraging and inspiring women I know,” explaining Lockhart’s passion is to help women live a life of freedom. Lockhart says women should be excited about their creativity and encourages them to pursue the life they want despite their fears. “Be excited about that spark inside you,” she says. “It found you and you found it for a reason.”

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielif e.com

121


2017 Amazing Airdrie Women Airdrie business owner Wendy Bates-Wiebe believes leadership is about giving back. The owner of The Hair Lounge, Bates-Wiebe is known for her business acumen, having won prestigious Business Edge Awards in both the Family Friendly and Eco Friendly categories. But the longtime Airdrian is also a key member of several organizations and has sat on the board of directors for the Boys and Girls Club of Airdrie and the Rotary Club of Airdrie. She is also a mentor to other business owners as part of the 2017 SMARTstart program. Bates-Wiebe is also heavily involved in fundraising for local charities including Carter’s Quest, Airdrie Food Bank, the Boys and Girls Club, and the Airdrie Health Foundation. She has raised thousands in the past nine years she has been in business. This nominee loves giving back. “I grew up in inner-city Calgary, so there was no sense of community, and that is what I was always looking for,” she says. “It feels good to be part of a community.” Local business owner Jacqui Jepson is impressed by Bates-Wiebe’s efforts. “I am in awe daily by how [Bates-Wiebe] runs a successful business and still has time to donate in every way she can,” says Jepson. “She is truly an amazing leader in showing that her gifts can help others.”

Kerri Williams is an intuitive leader who inspires others by learning what motivates them. As the director of operations for Dental Choice, Williams is responsible for 16 offices, including the Airdrie location. It’s a busy job, but Williams loves being a manager who is able to bring out the best in her employees. “I look for people’s strengths; find out what people are really interested in doing more of,” says Williams. According to former co-worker Angela Wong, Williams is also passionate about giving back to the community. Williams spearheaded Dental Choice’s partnership with Free2BMe, a University of Alberta program that gives youth ages four to 19 with physical, sensory or developmental impairments the opportunity to be physically active.

122

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Williams says partnering with the program was a no-brainer. “It’s kids being kids,” she says. “It’s inspiring. I love to see kids smile and be happy.” Williams also encourages her Airdrie staff to get behind local campaigns. Her team has championed numerous local organizations, including the food bank, Soap for Hope and POWER.

AMAZING HEART

Airdrie’s Jodie Amsing seems to have boundless energy. The mother of two children, ages 11 and seven, not only works full time, but she also spends her evenings taking her kids to sporting practices and games. Amsing also volunteers many hours as treasurer of the Airdrie Ringette Board Association as well as treasurer for her son’s hockey team. She says it can be a challenge to maintain her schedule, but insists it is worthwhile, saying her hockey and ringette communities are like family. “Everything is scheduled, but it is worth it,” says Amsing. “If no one volunteered, the kids couldn’t play.” She manages her busy schedule mostly only on her own, as her husband David Amsing works away about 22 days a month. David is so impressed with how hard his wife works for her family and community. “Her schedule is five nights a week with volunteer work and running the kids around,” he says. “She is the hardest-working Airdrie mother out there, and words truly cannot describe the size of her heart.”

For Charlotte Blackwell, financial success isn’t as important as fulfillment through helping others. That’s why the mother of three, ages 11 to 17, chose not to go back to her job as a pediatric nurse when her third, and final, child started school about nine years ago. Instead, she began volunteering at her children’s schools in a variety of positions, including in the resource room and even as a lunch supervisor. Her love of working with the kids moti-

vated Blackwell to change careers, and she became a special needs assistant – helping kids with physical and mental disabilities reach their highest potential – in local middle schools. Today, Blackwell is taking a break from that career to volunteer her time once again. She is currently on Volunteer Airdrie’s board of directors and enjoys many opportunities to give back to the community, in which she has lived with her family for the past decade. “I like helping other people and feeling like I make a difference,” says Blackwell. “It’s not about the money, it’s about being happy.”

Crystal Boys is tireless in her quest to bring a women’s and children’s shelter to Airdrie. About two and a half years ago, Boys witnessed a man abusing a young woman in broad daylight and knew she had to do something. The incident moved Boys greatly, bringing back traumatic memories of the abusive relationship she and her then-infant daughter escaped from, with just the clothes on their backs, 20 years ago. After spending time healing in women’s shelters, Boys eventually flourished and is now happily married. But Boys never forgot the impact the women’s shelters had on her and her daughter, and wanted to bring those services to local women to allow those fleeing domestic violence to do so in their community. Thus, Boys founded Airdrie P.O.W.E.R. alongside several other like-minded women, and found her passion. “I struggled my whole adult life with what I should do … until P.O.W.E.R., and then I knew. This is what I am supposed to do,” says Boys. The not-for-profit organization is now fundraising for a shelter, and Boys dreams of eradicating domestic violence from Airdrie through education and preventative programs. Alina Novacut says Boys is a humble, modest and determined person. “I have been amazed with the commitment, passion and work [Boys] has invested,” she says. “I have all the admiration and respect for what Crystal believes in and fights for.”


Dr. Heather Cowie offers a lot more than just eye care. The optometrist and co-owner of Airdrie Family Eye Doctors is passionate about using her talents and resources to make the world a better place. Since taking over the business in 2013, Cowie and her team have put on numerous fundraisers, raising thousands of dollars for Airdrians in need, benefitting locals like the Owchar family, whose wife and mother Kelly died of breast cancer two months after giving birth to twins. “There are a lot of people in our community that have been dealt bad cards … and you have to help them,” says Cowie of her efforts. According to Emily Hewitt, who works alongside Cowie, it’s not uncommon for the doctor to provide free products for patients in need. But Cowie doesn’t just give to locals; her belief that vision is a right, rather than a privilege, has compelled her to make frequent international trips to countries like Guatemala, where she provides vision care to those who can’t afford it. “There is nothing more powerful than being the person who puts a pair of glasses on someone who has never had them,” says the mother of two, who is now setting up a sustainable vision care program in Guatemala, with the goal of enabling locals in that country to provide care to their own residents.

Heather Doyle is committed to helping local seniors and people with disabilities find value in their life. The mother and grandmother, who has been working with individuals with disabilities for 15 years, recently opened Loving Hands Partners in Care, a local business that provides programs, such as craft sessions and music and pet therapy, for seniors and adult disabled Airdrians. Doyle’s mission is to give that demographic a place to connect, belong and find value, and she is committed to doing so, even if it requires personal sacrifice. To finance her business, Doyle works doing respite care on the weekends. “I don’t believe I will ever get rich from this … but I hope I will have made a difference in people’s lives,” says Doyle, who came up

with the idea for her business after watching her own mother thrive in her home after being institutionalized for 40 years. Doyle’s husband Ian is in awe of his wife’s passion for giving back through her many acts of kindness. “Loving Hands still runs at a loss, [and] half the individuals visiting the centre attend free. She will never turn anyone away,” he says. “This is a passion for Heather; the endless hours she spends planning and preparing [prove] she has an amazing heart.”

The year 2015 was a tough one for Kimberley Ford, but rather than giving up, the mother of five used the life-altering experiences as motivation to follow her passion and give back. That year included her husband being laid off from work; Ford being diagnosed with a heart condition; a traumatic car accident; and health complications for extended family. The tumultuous year left Ford with post-traumatic stress disorder and in physical therapy, so she turned to a lifelong love of cooking for therapy. “I decided to change my life … and make it worthwhile,” she says, explaining she started surprising neighbours with dinners and lunch that often included a mason jar of homemade soup, Ford’s specialty. The practice grew and eventually Ford was nicknamed the “Souper Lady.” She is known for her surprise lunches, which she has provided for local businesses, schools and service providers, and for her volunteer catering, including providing free lunch for more than 220 seniors and adults with disabilities at a recent event. “It makes me feel amazing,” says Ford of her efforts. “I always practice paying it forward because I know life is too short.” Rodney Ford is amazed by his wife, saying, “she is exceptionally gifted when it comes to cooking, giving and compassion for others.”

Nicole Jones’s amazing heart compels her to live an extraordinary life of service in developing countries. The 2008 Bert Church High School valedictorian recently spent three years helping families become self-reliant in South Africa as part of a community development NGO. Her work involved cultivating relationships and teaching single mothers alternative farming methods to help them escape reliance on government support for their families of up to 15 people. Now back in Airdrie, Jones is working with Evangelical Missionary Church of Canada (EMCC) World Partners, liaising with corporations, churches and individuals to help change the cycle of dependency on charity that exists in some parts of the world. Jones’s passion for international work began when she was just 14, while on a service trip to Colombia. “That profoundly changed my world view,” she says of the experience, explaining that when she arrived home she became involved in charity work. As her passion grew, Jones realized she could pursue a career of service to others. Jones remains committed to that goal. In fact, she and her fiancé plan to work abroad in community development. Jones explains that she believes everyone is connected, and are all responsible for one another’s well-being. “Life isn’t just about ourselves; if you have the knowledge and passion … you are obligated to share it and improve the lives of others,” she says.

Samantha Laycock is committed to brightening the lives of Airdrie moms one by one. The owner of BeYOUtiful Box, which provides monthly subscription boxes to women to promote self love, has touched the lives of many by leaving little packages on the cars of random moms around Airdrie as a way of spreading sunshine. She and her children, ages 10, six and one, also do random acts of kindness such as leaving candy canes on vehicles in parking lots and taking snacks to Airdrie firefighters, RCMP members and staff at Urgent Care. Laycock is motivated by the grateful smiles and positive feedback she receives.

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

123


2017 Amazing Airdrie Women She is also passionate about teaching her children that their kindness can make a difference in people’s lives, even those they may not know. “We all need a smile,” says Laycock. “We all have those very rough days when nothing goes right. It is nice to know that you can make [people] happy and give back to your community with simple acts.” Ashton Bennett is impressed by Laycock’s ongoing dedication to reaching out the community. “[Laycock] has experienced personal trauma in her life, and, instead of letting it define her, she has chosen to use it to help others who may have suffered the same things,” says Bennett.

Caroline Marie McKaySiguenza knows how to balance a busy schedule. Not only is McKay-Siguenza the mother of four children, ages two to nine, she also owns Loyalty Pet Services, a local dog grooming business. McKay-Siguenza’s days consist of rising early and getting her special needs child to the bus before heading back home to prepare her other two school-aged children for the day. After caring for her toddler, McKay-Siguenza is ready to start her work as a groomer. It’s a busy schedule, but the busy mom knows that the balancing act is what is best for her family. “I like being able to stay at home with my kids, and I have been a dog lover since I was little,” she says. According to her husband Carlos, Caroline also finds time to give back to the community through donations of gift baskets, filled with pet treats and toys, to local fundraising events. The Airdrie mom also spent thousands of hours volunteering at a wildlife reserve near Kelowna, where she used to live. Carlos is impressed with his wife. “[She] is a hard worker and the best mom and wife anyone can ask for,” he says.

124

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

Pam Smith is a tireless volunteer with seemingly boundless energy. The busy mother of three spends her days working full time and her evenings volunteering. Not only is she is a member of the parent’s council at her daughters’ school and an active volunteer and member of the parent’s committee at Ambition Performing Arts dance studio, she is also available to help whomever needs a hand. “Pam is mom number two to anyone who needs a ride, needs a hug or just needs a high-five and a laugh,” says Alana Cyron. “Pam is one of the most selfless people I know; she is so dedicated and so giving.” Smith’s volunteer career started when she was just 17, when she became a leader in Girl Guides, a position that ignited her passion for helping kids. It’s an area of focus to which Smith always comes back. Her passion recently inspired her to seek a volunteer position with Dreams Take Flight, a role she is hoping to take on in 2018. Although Smith admits her schedule is crazy at times, she says it is worth it. “As much as [volunteering] takes up my time, I absolutely love it,” she says. “I love seeing the smiles on kids’ faces…. I enjoy making people’s lives easier.”

It doesn’t matter how busy Amanda Tozser gets, she always has time to give back. The artist, student, mom of four and business owner of Amandamazing Art can be seen regularly volunteering her time and face painting skills at charity events in and around Airdrie. Despite volunteering for multiple local charities and events, including the Airdrie Boys and Girls Club, Airdrie Food Bank, the Zombie Walk, Airdrie Health Foundation, ARTember, the Alberta Children’s Hospital, Foothills Academy and teaching stage makeup in local schools, Tozser downplays her contributions. “I just do it because it is my city,” says Tozser. “It’s not a big deal; it is just what I do.” But Susan Dunstan, who has seen firsthand the impact that Tozser has had on the children she works with, can’t say enough about Tozser, whom she describes as selfless.

“She is so giving of her time, and always with a smile and gracious personality,” says Dunstan of Tozser. “Amanda brings happiness to those big and small whom her humanity and compassionate nature touches. She is a bright star of Airdrie, and should be recognized for her artistic talent and (the) selfless giving of her time to brighten and enhance the day or cause of others.”

Airdrie’s Kendra Varga-Reichelt knows one doesn’t have to be wealthy to make a difference. The hardworking, busy mom runs three local businesses, but still manages to find time to give back to the community through her volunteer and fundraising efforts. She encourages others to find ways to be involved in charity work by example. For example, she recently created 40 ‘healing bracelets,’ raising $800 to give to a mom who had lost her son. She has also donated her time to train local unemployed dads, who can’t afford the cost of the course, in first aid to help them get back to work. “I want to show my daughter you can give back to the community, even though you might not be able to financially,” says Varga-Reichelt. Varga-Reichelt recently started Airdrie Food Collective, which focuses on creating breakfast hampers with recipes that help recipients create healthy meals, after volunteering at the Airdrie Food Bank. She attributes her passion for helping others to her experience being in, and escaping from, an abusive relationship. Samantha Laycock is impressed by Varga-Reichelt’s giving spirit. “She goes out of her way to help anyone that needs it,” says Laycock of VargaReichelt. “She gives and gives and gives.”


AMAZING PROMISE

Kate Dekker, 17, isn’t afraid to get her hands dirty. The Grade 12 Star Academy online student spends a good portion of her free time volunteering with Torchlight Theatre, and is a willing worker. “When Torchlight Theatre first opened [its] doors, Kaitryn asked me if there was something she could do to help,” says Chelsea Restall, artistic director for Torchlight. “Since then she has been volunteering on every project Torchlight Theatre has done…. She still loves to volunteer no matter how unglamorous the task is.” Dekker’s involvement, which ranges from set changes to assisting actors with requests backstage during performances, stems from her love of community and her passion for the arts – and especially theatre. “The first time I worked backstage, I fell in love with it,” says Dekker. “I like the energy, and it is also really fun meeting other people and seeing the actors and how they take on their roles.” Dekker’s passion is also giving direction to her life. “I have been thinking about going to Rosebud [Theatre] and taking a program,” she says. “It is still up in the air, but I would like to keep theatre involved in my life somehow.”

Living a creative lifestyle comes naturally for budding seamstress and designer Katherine Funk. The 18-year-old, who graduated from Airdrie’s George McDougall in June 2017, is the daughter of local artist Veronica Funk and says she was encouraged to embrace creativity early on. Funk’s passion for sewing began when she was just seven. She began by creating dolls and doll clothing and progressed to sewing historically-inspired clothing for herself when she was in junior high. In Grade 12, she drafted a pattern and sewed a multi-layered dress and undergarments inspired by 1700s fashion. Since then Funk has completed a 1950s diner dress for the television pilot The Highway Patrolman; sewed a dress – featuring coloured lights representing sleep patterns – that appeared on the runway at Calgary’s

MakeFashion event; and started her own historical clothing blog. Funk has received several awards for her work, including the 2017 Karin Simpson Memorial Scholarship for Creativity and the Qualico Youth Artist award at the 2017 TD Airdrie Mayor’s Night of the Arts. Funk plans to turn her artistic passion into a career and recently enrolled in costume cutting and construction in fashion at the Calgary campus of Olds College. Funk’s future looks bright. She says she “would love to go into costume design, or … design my own clothing line.” Vintage inspired, of course.

Madeleine McKee, 14, has a promising future. The singer and actor already has a number of productions under her belt, performed at a number of venues including the Airdrie Film Festival and through Torchlight Theatre. “My mother and father are very musical and artistic, so I grew up in that environment,” says McKee, who attends W.H. Croxford High School. “I just love the experience of becoming a different person onstage.” McKee loves the stage so much that she is already planning to pursue drama at a post-secondary institute. Her ultimate goal would be to appear on Broadway or in a large, innovative production. McKee’s passion for the stage doesn’t prevent her from volunteering behind the scenes, according to Torchlight Theatre’s Chelsea Restall. “[McKee] has such a hunger and passion for the arts,” says Restall. “Maddie is eager to learn anything to do with the art of theatre and is quick to offer herself as a volunteer. This is sometimes rare when working with artists, they sometimes don’t see the “glamour” they want from performing so they never volunteer for backstage.”

Despite being just 20, Caitlin Taylor has logged hundreds of hours of local volunteer time. The 2015 St. Martin de Porres High School graduate began her volunteer career in middle school and increased her commitment in senior high after a personal battle with anxiety and depression that began in Grade 10. She found giving back to the community was a big part in helping her manage her struggles. “Volunteerism can be a fun getaway,” says Taylor, who is a third-year university student pursuing a degree in education. “It gives you a break from the stressful realities of life.” The added benefits of making new friends, acquiring new skills and enabling others in her community to enjoy life keep Taylor excited about being involved. The student can often be found behind the scenes, whether it’s in her role as an event manager for Volunteer Airdrie, working at a local parade or picking up garbage during a highway cleanup. Her work hasn’t gone unnoticed. David Maffitt of Volunteer Airdrie says Taylor is “a passionate, personable, creative, highly intelligent and enthusiastic person” who is great to work with. “I sincerely believe we have just seen the beginning of what promises to be an extraordinary life of service to others,” says Maffitt of Taylor.

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

125


C I T Y L I F E | R U R A L R O OTS

Rhonda and Wayne Hanson pictured with their daughter Katelyn, who manages and runs the Your Local Ranch website and online store; son Travis, the family herdsman; and Katelyn’s children Jaxson and Olivia. Son Wyatt (not pictured) is the family business advisor.

Your Local Ranch: a true family affair STORY AND PHOTOS BY CAT NANTEL

126

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018


2018 Amazing Airdrie Women

A a

w 2018

PHASE 1

PHASE 4

RECEIVE $10,000 OFF ALL REMAINING SINGLE FAMILY LOTS

NEW POND & GREENSPACE BACKING LOTS AVAILABLE

Limited opportunities remaining

Read about them on page

119

Vote online at airdrielife.com Attend the awards luncheon May 11

OPEN FOR VIEWING

SINGLE FAMILY FRONT DRIVE HOMES STARTING FROM THE

Visit our Single Family Front Drive Sales Centre 604 Midtown Place SW, Airdrie

THE BETTER WAY TO BUILD.

435’S

$

*

Railway Gate SW

Ironhorse Park

N

Midtown Crossing SW Paired + Street Town Sales Centre

Midtown Gate SW Midtown St SW Midtown Place SW

Front Drive Sales Centre

Midtown Parkway SW

2 DESIGNER SHOWHOMES

Midtown Blvd SW

31 nominees

8th Street SW

Meet our

“I believe that if I can give the consumer confidence in the food they have chosen to put in their bodies, it’s worthwhile”

Midtown Drive SW Yankee Valley Blvd. SW

Future Showhomes

For more information, contact Karen at 403-536-2312 or email midtown@shanehomes.com

Showhome Hours: Mon - Thurs: 2-8 pm • Sat, Sun & Hol: 12-5 pm info@shanehomes.com shanehomes.com #betterwaytobuild *Price includes house, lot & GST. Subject to change without notice.

S P R I N G 2018

|

airdrielife.com

127


C I T Y L I F E | R U R A L R O OTS

S

ince 1909, six generations of the Hanson family have raised cattle in Alberta. Today, Wayne Hanson and his family continue the business, branding their cattle with the same Bell L their ancestors did. The Hanson family now owns close to 3,000 acres of land in southern Alberta, most of which is used to graze their 200 head of commercial cattle. In 1975, they purchased land north of Airdrie off of Township Road 274 and Range Road 13. Wayne and his wife Rhonda call this beautiful land home and it’s where they raised their family. It’s also where the cattle are born and where the steers are corralled once they get close to their market weight of 1,300 pounds. As of April 2017, this land has also become home to their new business venture, Your Local Ranch, a physical and online store through which they sell their beef directly to Airdrie and Calgary consumers. “We used to sell purebred cattle that we sold primarily to the U.S.,” explains Wayne. “Over time, we found that we wanted to have better control of the beef we were raising and better control of the final product.” Inspired by his son Wyatt’s university thesis on the vertical integration of the beef industry, Your Local Ranch was created. Vertical integration occurs when one company controls two or more stages of production that would normally be done by two separate companies. In the case of beef for example, a producer would typically raise a calf. It would then be sold to a feedlot which would then sell it to an abattoir. Alternatively, a beef wholesaler would receive boxes of beef parts and prepare the beef for resale without having bred or raised the animal itself. Thanks to Your Local Ranch, Wayne, Rhonda and the entire Hanson family can control all stages of their beef production. “We breed, raise and fatten our cattle,” explains Wayne. “Then when it has reached the ideal weight, we drive it to the abattoir. Four days later, it is picked up and delivered to our butcher where it dry-ages for 21 days. Then, we go back to the butcher and we help him cut the meat, grind the ground beef and package the cuts. After that, we either deliver the beef directly to a restaurant such as Hayloft or the Damit Amit food truck, or we bring it to our store or the farmers market where clients come and pick it up.” An advantage to Hanson’s vertically integrated beef production model? Traceability. On every package of beef at Your Local Ranch, there is a bar code. That bar code is associated with a unique livestock number. “When the client buys a steak, I know exactly which steer that steak came from, what cow and sire he came from, his health history and how much he weighed when he went to market,” explains Wayne. “Some folks in the indus-

128

airdrielife.com

|

S P R I N G 2018

try think that this level of detail isn’t necessary. I believe that if I can give the consumer confidence in the food they have chosen to put in their bodies, it’s worthwhile.” Traceability doesn’t stop there. Your Local Ranch guarantees that their ground beef contains the meat of only one animal. Ground beef purchased at a supermarket contains much more than that. A few years ago, a leading fast food chain indicated that batches of their minced beef can be made up from the beef of more than 100 cattle. Of course, there’s more to Your Local Ranch than just traceability. Flavour of the beef keeps customers coming back for more. “Our cattle are pasture-fed for most of their lives,” says Wayne. “We feed and move them on horses to reduce our carbon footprint and reduce the stress on the cattle. Our cattle are handled with respect and dignity throughout their lives. They are quiet from start to finish.”

Your Local Ranch also dry-ages its meat for 21 days. During the “dry-aging” process, beef is hung in a cooler allowing the muscle fibres to decontract, excess moisture to evaporate and the enzymes in the beef to break down muscle tissue. The result is a tender, flavourful cut of beef that will make your mouth water. By raising cattle and selling beef directly to consumers, Your Local Ranch is providing a tasty local product that consumers can have confidence buying. But more than this, Your Local Ranch’s physical store allows consumers to learn about where their food comes from. A visit to their farm to pick up beef allows the consumer to meet the people and animals behind the steak on their plate. It’s not every day that consumers can be reminded of the labour and passion that goes into the food that we eat. A trip to Your Local Ranch to pick up your beef can do just that. life

The 2018 Amazing Airdrie Women nominees, from left: Lisa Darlene Ammirati, Nicole Proseilo, Jody Amsing, Kendra Varga-Reichelt, Alisa Jones, Nicole Jones, Caroline Marie McKay-Siguenza, Marie Lauer, Katherine Funk, Crystal Boys, Janine Hartsook, Wendy Bates-Wiebe, Kate Dekker, Naomi Keane, Victoria-Lynn Scattergood, Heather Doyle, Kerri Williams, Megan Lockhart, Caitlin Taylor, Veronique Dewilde, Pam Smith, Dr. Heather Cowie, Kimberley Ford, Charlotte Blackwell, Madeleine McKee, Dr. Mindy Gautama, Samantha Laycock, Veronica Boccinfuso, Preet Nijjar, Amanda Tozser and Kara Fulton. See full story on page 119.


SPRING 2018

8th Annual

AMAZING AIRDRIE WOMEN ARTS

Celebration

Airdrie’s First

BREWERY

She shoots, she scores!

Midget Elite Hockey

airdrielife.com

8”


SPRING SUMMER COLLECTION 2018

THE STORE UPSTAIRS Airdrie’s Local Developer for 30 Years!

STOREUPSTAIRS.CA 209 CENTRE AVE SW AIRDRIE

airdrielife spring 2018  

Celebrating the good life in Airdrie, Alberta

airdrielife spring 2018  

Celebrating the good life in Airdrie, Alberta