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s p r i n g / s u m m e r 2 0 0 6 • v o l u m e 2 • n u m b e r 2 • w w w. a i r d r i e . c a

AirdrieLIFE THE OFFICIAL GUIDE TO LIFE IN THE CITY OF AIRDRIE

We're building a great city!

Inside this issue: meet some great Airdronians, discover some exciting new communities, learn timely City information and get down to business with our special feature section "AirdrieWORKS".


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cityLIVING

AirdrieLIFE

Volume 2 • Number 2 PUBLISHER EDITOR PRODUCTION MANAGER LISTINGS CO-ORDINDATOR

FROG INC Sherry Shaw-Froggatt Kim Williams Renee Doucette

CONTRIBUTORS

Alan Tennant Beverly Cardinal beverlycardinalphotography.com For editorial inquiries: email: airdrielife@shaw.ca For advertising inquiries: email: airdrielife@shaw.ca

Welcome to Airdrie

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ur community is truly a great place to live, work, and play. Airdrie provides a family-friendly atmosphere fostering active lifestyles, community spirit, and opportunity. The pages of AirdrieLIFE will introduce or reintroduce you to all our community has to offer – from a solid educational system to a thriving economy and from outdoor parks and shopping to the people themselves, I am confident you will find everything you need in AirdrieLIFE! I take great comfort in the fact tha t as Airdrie grows and changes with the times; it actually manages to stay the same. A small town feel and an environment that encourages active and everyday family life are two of our biggest assets. Nevertheless, Airdrie is quickly developing as a r egional hub and a place of significant economic prospect. Located along one of the most recognized corridors in the nation,Airdrie’s growth and successes come as no real surprise. It is with great excitement that I look forward to the next steps in this community’s journey. Finally, it is with great enthusiasm I encourage you to get out and enjoy the amenities and events in our City. Whether it is the Airdrie Professional Rodeo or an afternoon in Nose Creek Park, there is never a dull moment here and I would like to take this opportunity to invite you to enjoy AirdrieLIFE.

Linda Bruce Mayor City of Airdrie

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City Contacts: Kent Rupert Tara Richards 403-948-8800 Printing: Calgary Colorpress

AirdrieLIFE is published twice per year by Frog Inc in conjunction with the City of Airdrie Economic Development Department. 35,000 copies of AirdrieLIFE are distributed each spring and fall to homes in Airdrie and surrounding communities. AirdrieLIFE can be viewed online at www.airdrie.ca Additional copies are available at Airdrie City Hall 400 Main Street Airdrie, Alberta The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertisement and all representations of warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertiser and not of the publisher. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, in all or in part, without the written permission of the publisher.


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Music Man

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Brian Ashman brings music to life for all ages

Now We’re Cooking

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A sneak peek into the show home kitchens of Airdrie

Feeling the Glow

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The Vandermeers make volunteering a family affair

Knock, knock

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Block Parents in Airdrie aim for safe streets

Neighbourhood Watch

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Our exclusive community profiles with the latest real estate numbers

Good Sports

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Airdrie’s sports teams a part of history

Summer Events Calendar

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A long list of events to fill your summer

Grounds for Learning

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A poetic ode to a blooming project

Table of

Contents

City Map

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A handy guide to our City

Homework Helper

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The 2006 school boundaries – learn more

More than 8 Seconds of Fun

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The Airdrie Pro Rodeo is coming to town!

About the cover: Four spunky kindergarten students braved a chilly day to pretend it was summer. They had a blast "building a new home in Airdrie," thanks to the helpful staff at Airdrie Totem. On our cover from the left; Tashawn Makuyana, Ebun Adineran, Chase Cardinal and Melissa Frederick. Shot on location by the talented Beverly Cardinal at Airdrie Totem.

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City Stuff You Need to Know City Hall & Recycling News Airdrie Transit New Service Routes Community Gardens and Horticultural Contests Support Services – contact list East Lake Wellness Centre Pool Schedule Sports Organizations Service and Hobby Clubs

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AirdrieWORKS

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An inside look at the economics of Airdrie. Stats, success stories and more.

That Proud Feeling… Our editor gets the last word

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At nineteen, Brian Ashman (middle) was the cool drummer of a band called 1812. Check out the groovy sideburns!

AirdrieLIFE is…music to his ears

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hen Brian Ashman moved to Airdrie in 1980, he had n o idea twenty - six years later he’d be sharing his passion for music with a second generation of students who on their scheduled day and time, arrive guitar in hand, eager for a jam session with their favorite teacher. At the time, Brian had long given up the grueling road life that was demanded of bands and had settled into family life with his wife Marilyn and newborn son. Airdrie beckoned when the chance to build his own home on a unique co-operative land venture in what is now Big Springs, meant Brian could be involved in the design and construction of his home. He chose a b i-level plan echoing his childhood home with a dis tinct pitched roof. Under this roof grew a business making Brian a household name for hundreds of Airdrie families. As a laid back former rock band drummer, Brian had seen and done it all and knew the rock and roll lifestyle was not his calling. He discovered very early that teaching others to share in the joy of learning to play guitar, drums and keyboard were way more gratifying than having his name in lights.

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And truth be told, playing in a ban d didn’t pay the b ills, so Brian worked in music stores during the day – selling instruments to the average and not so average Joe. Brian met many major recording artists who were in town to perform (turns out they all love to search out the local guitar shops). Joe Walsh of the Eagles, Muddy Waters, Nazareth are just a few of the names Brian mentions. And he had a k nack for connecting local performers up who were looking for band mates. He started teaching full time in Airdrie building a growing list of students, and not just young teens hoping to be the next Jimmy Hendrix. Along the way Brian has helped hundreds of adults realize a life long dream to hold a guitar and release their inner rock star.“They say rock and roll keeps you young and its working so far,” he chuckles,“but you know, I teach a lot of adults and they come to me sort of thinking ‘it’s too late for me’ and I tell them ‘ it’s never too late’.” Word of mouth gave Brian two thumbs up for his personal approach, affable style and philosophy of “learn to play the kind of music you love most and the learning comes naturally.”His roster of students grew and soon he was seeing the sons and daughters of former students on his doorstep, eager to make music. Today, Brian teaches up to 12 hours a day and never tires of it. He is an encouraging and supportive instructor, seeing himself in his students.“I was never a natural musician, I had to work like a dog to do it. So I have more patience with people because I realize what it took for me.” His teaching style is about connecting with each student at his or her own level. “I try and bond with each student – if you don’t connect, you can’t keep their interest. This should be the least stressful half hour in their day.” He loves all types of music, which bodes well for his wide-ranging student profiles. One minute he’s riffing classic AC/DC on his favorite electric guitar, the next, strumming a classic Van Morrison tune. An hour later finds him pounding out the drumb eat of the latest Green Day song. Of course every 10-year-old with an electric guitar learns the Spiderman theme song – it’s all about having fun. He still gets calls from old band mates asking him to come down and jam or just take one more road trip, but Brian is content to inspire the future one student at a time.“You’ve got to have a passion in life or else you will spend your end of days in a rocking chair staring at the television,” Brian says,“What better life can you have than doing something that you love?”

Brian makes music meaningful for all ages

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Everything and the kitchen sink… A sneak peak inside the designer kitchens in Airdrie’s newest show homes.

Clockwise from top: white on white in the Beattie Victoria III in Cooper’s Crossing, granite island in the Vesta Chilcotin in Park Place Estates, slate back splash and stainless steel in the Homes By Avi Princeton in Cooper’s Crossing, rich stain enhances cabinets in the Trico Capri, extra detailing in the Trico Carlton (both Trico homes in Morningside)

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AirdrieLIFE is… loving it! Residents gave Airdrie a 96 percent rating for quality of life and an 83 percent rating for quality of services in the annual Citizen Satisfaction Survey.

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his year’s survey was conducted by telephone between January 9 and January 18, 2006 The percentage of‘good’ and ‘very good’ responses for the core questions were consistent with last year and rated as follows: - Quality of life – 96 percent (up 3 percent) - Value for tax dollar – 69 percent (up 4 percent) - Management of community growth and development – 53 percent (up 3 percent) - Quality of services – 83 percent (up 4 percent) The statement:“Overall, I consider my community a safe place to live” generated a positive response of 97 percent, a two percent increase from last year. The overall Citizen Satisfaction Index remained the same as last year at 3.8 (out of a possible 5.0).

All about us

Beam me up Homes in Meadowbrook have the highest internet access at 81.4% of dwellings.

Playing house Total dwellings in 2005 Number of new dwellings in 2005

9799 608

Big Springs really is big - over 3200 people live in the Big Springs subdivision. The smallest community is Sunridge with only 324 residents.

Working for a living 58.29% of Airdrie residents over 15 work full time. Money makes the world go round - 21.6 percent have an income over $80,000 (2003 figure).

Here are some interesting statistics taken from the 2005 c ensus. Use them to start a conversation while sitting on the sidelines at your kid’s next soccer game.

2005 population 27,069 5.71 percent growth from 2004.

We’ve got that youthful feeling… 92.1% of Airdrie ‘s population is under 65 years old. 30.3 percent is under 19 years old. 61.8 percent is between the ages of 19 - 64 years old. Do the math - the median age group is 40 - 44 years.

His and hers Females out number males in age groups 25 - 34, 40 - 49 and over 65. Males outnumber females in all neighbourhoods except: Downtown, Edgewater, Jensen, Pointe Of View (Mackenzie Pointe) Ridgegate Willowbrook and Woodside.

The prognosis is great 81.9 percent of dwellings that responded have a family doctor 54.2 percent of these dwellings that responded have a family doctor in Airdrie. volume 2 • spring/summer 2006 •

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The Volunteering Vandermeers; Greg, Karen, Brian, Breanna and Brayden.

AirdrieLIFE is… feeling the (volunteer) glow

“It’s Karen… still feeling the glow, call me back!” That’s how Karen Vandermeer would sign off her phone calls last December. It was an upbeat reminder of just how enthused Karen and her w hole family are when it comes to the Airdrie Festival of Lights. The Vandermeers are poster people for the spirit of volunteerism making Airdrie so refreshing to people who arrive here from larger centres. The whole family has the glow – Greg, Karen, Brian (16), Breanna (12) and Brayden (8) all bundle up and head out to Nose Creek Park from mid-November to the end of December each season to bring the Festival of Lights to life. It started innocently enough as Brian was in Scouts who are active volunteers at the Festival. Soon Karen found herself tagging along and lending a hand. Today she is one of the most dedicated members of the Volunteer Management team. Then Greg stepped up. He loves to manage the parking lot (a thankless job when it’s 30 below), discovered the fun o f train driving and most recently became an Assistant CEO (you guessed it - “Chief Elf on Duty”). Brian has become a Festival jack of all trades, helping whenever and wherever he’s needed. Breanna, the family’s social butterfly, discovered that being a “floater” keeps her out and about and visiting with guests. Brayden is the youngest mascot (and just the right size) for the Festival beaver costume and you’ve never seen a happier kid. “He loves hugging and shaking the han ds of the seniors on the buses,” Karen says with pride.

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“Why do we do this?” Karen reflects,“The wonder and the amazement of the Festival. Seeing the visitors come in and watching them smile and “oohh and ahhhh” in wonder at the lights and the people who make it happen. It keeps my family coming back and the pride we feel is just unbelievable and it makes our hearts grow.”

This year, the Vandermeers were honoured with the Softley Award the Festival’s prestigious award for volunteers. Instead of celebrating their “win”, Karen and Greg are both thinking of the Festival as a whole, how far it has come in ten years and what exciting changes could happen ten years down the road.

The Festival has b rought joy even into the sadde st part of the Vandermeer collective heart.

“I can just see it growing as long as we have the pride and everyone continues to contribute different ideas. This is a big part of our lives, it may just be for those weeks but it’s a big part of Airdrie and just always makes us feel wonderful,” Karen says.

“During the 2004 S teven’s Run (an ann ual event where the F estival hosts a s pecial family from the Ch ildren’s Hospital) we were short a train driver and Greg volunteered. He got to spend the evening with a special little girl and her family. We went home that night and talked and cried because we had lost a daughter years before. It was as if she had come back for that one night and Greg felt like he got to take Brandy (who would have been nine) on her own special train ride.” Steven’s Run has become so special to the Vandemeers that not even an abscessed tooth and 300 kilometres could keep them away. (The family was visiting relatives in Edmonton when the Steven’s Run was given the go ahead last year). They rushed back, Greg in pain, but refusing to take the painkillers just so he c ould drive the train for the honoured guests. Greg ended up having emergency dental work early the next morning.

“We want the Festival to grow. But that means growing our volunteer base too. I encourage people who are reading this to come out just once to volunteer one night at the Festival. Try it out and see the fun you can have as a famil y, knowing where your kids are and sharing with them something so wonderful. That’s what this is all about. I want my kids to know it’s better to give than to receive.” Brayden is already following mom’s advice, marching right onto each bus and letting every senior citizen give him a hug. He was smiling under his costume. In fact, he was glowing.

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Sheila Bunz educates youngsters about Block Parent.

AirdrieLIFE is ...making a difference one home at a time here is a B lock Parent sign on one in four houses in Airdrie. Unfortunately, that’s not the reality, it’s just the wishful thinking of Airdrie Block Parent co-ordinator Sheila Bunz. She’s only been on the job since last September, but Sheila is fiercely committed to making sure Airdrie is a safe place for all ages.

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Sheila says. And its true –in a Block Parent approved home all family members over the age of 12 have to be screened by the RCMP.“If you are new to a community take the time to walk with your kids around your neighbourhood. Find the Block Parent homes, make a map an d label it. It’s peace of mind for everyone.”

That 1 in 4 ratio is the ideal setting to provide children, teens, even seniors with the security of knowing help is a knock away.“Being a Block Parent doesn’t mean you have to be home 24/7 to help.“If you have one hour a week where you can place that sign in your window – that’s an hour where someone can feel more secure walking down your street,” Sheila says.

While the home registrations are disappointing, there are only 199 currently registered, Sheila is en couraged by the la test development in Airdrie. Businesses can now become Business Block Parents and two local businesses have already stepped up to become involved. For Magic Mountain Daycare director Bev Hanowski, it just made sense, “It’s a natural for us – e very child regardless of age needs a safe haven and since we are so close to the Tri-schools, it just makes sense for us to make ourselves available to kids in need.”

“Block Parent signs are only to be placed in view when you are available. You may be home but it’s your dinner hour or you are entertaining or having family time. The sign is a signal that you are free to offer assistance,” Sheila says. And who needs assistance? A child who got off at the wrong bus stop and doesn’t know the way home, a teenager who feels bullied and needs to call ho me and arrange for a ride o r a senior who while out for a stroll is scared by a large dog. “Today’s kids are brought up not to talk to s trangers, but we try and educate them in the classroom that Block Parents are safe strangers,”

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An added benefit to the bus inesses is tha t Block Parents screens all employees through the RCMP (only businesses with eight or fewer employees can apply).“Our screening process is very strict,” Sheila says. More signs mean less crime in your community. This a fact proven by the Block Parent program nation wide. Contact Airdrie Block Parents for more information at 948-0111.


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communityPROFILES

Community Profiles Spring 2006

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ow is Airdrie growing! If you read the very first Community Profiles back in the fall o f 2004, which are exclusive to AirdrieLIFE magazine, you would have found a much shorter section. New communities are popping up faster than weeds in your lawn. But thankfully, the developers and builders choosing to invest in Airdrie are providing us with the quality of life we have come to expect. More walking paths, more green space, innovative architecture and gorgeous floor plans - who wouldn’t want to check out our newest communities. But our established areas are just as attractive thanks to mature trees, warm neighbours and access to amenities.Whatever your home choice, peruse these latest offerings and make note of the average house and condo prices. Note: we are still a better value than Calgary.The average residential sale price in January climbed to a yet another record high of $304,560. Meanwhile in Airdrie the average sale price climbed slightly to around $233,000.

®

Average condo and house prices are based on average MLS sale prices between January 1, 2006, and March 12, 2006, and were provided by Alan Tennant of RE/MAX Rocky View.

Airdrie Meadows Airdrie Meadows is a w alker’s haven. Centrally located on Airdrie’s west side, it’s a short walk to downtown, the malls, schools, Kinsmen Splash Park, Plainsmen Arena, the Library and more. Average condo price (no sales) Average house price $202,180

Bayside Bayside is one of Airdrie’s most innovative new areas, thanks to an exciting blend of upscale single family homes and condos and future commercial development. Plus it’s close to the n ew Rocky View School Division offices and future elementary school. Average condo price (no sales) Average house price $328,937

Bayside West

WATER - It's more than prevalent at Bayside Estates; it's a way of life. Nearly 80 percent of all homes having private water access and nearly 50 percent of all homes have the ca pability of installing private boat docks. Six kilometres of waterways will be linked by walking and bike paths. This latest phase of Bayside will open later this year. www.baysideairdrie.com

Big Springs

Big Springs is Airdrie’s most affordable neighbourhood, with a combination of starter homes in your choice of condo or townhouse style condos, single and double wide manufactured homes and single family homes. Average condo price $101,475 Average house price $195,389

Canals

The Canals is a w ater lovers dream! Peaceful blue canals wind their way for six kilometres and flows into a f ive acre lake. From starter homes and condos to so me of Airdrie’s most spectacular executive homes, this is an area with lots to offer. Average condo price $198,279 Average house price $281,022

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communityPROFILES Canals North The buzz about the Canals N orth is “suite” thanks to the i nnovate studio suite show home parade showing future residents an exciting home building option to i nclude a c ondo suite above a detac hed garage. The area features a country cottage living architectural theme with wrap around verandas and attractive column detailing. Homeowners will enjoy the six kilometres of canals flowing into a five acre lake. www.canalsnorthairdrie.com

Cooper’s Crossing Take a walk through Cooper’s Crossing and you’ll quickly realize why this is one of Airdrie’s most desired neighbourhoods. A welldesigned and beautifully landscaped six-kilometre pathway system connects every corner of this hillside development. The homes and condos are in higher price range with the newest phase offering some of Airdrie’s most exclusive housing options. Average condo price $214,900 Average house price $373,829

Estates of Cooper’s Crossing ... Airdrie's most prestigious address is now available. Estate homes on lots up to 74 feet wide and waterfront lots were just released in Phase II. The show home parade features walk-out lots backing onto a beautiful six acre water feature. Phase 12 is also now available, as an exclusive phase where all homesites will have direct park access. These larger lots will allow for triple garages. www.cooperscrossing.ca

Downtown This is Airdrie’s central business district but many people call th is area of Airdrie home and several exciting new projects are going to increase the population base. Railtown is an exciting new residential and commercial development just west of Main Street, noteworthy for being a living-working-shopping destination and the first buildings in the city of six stories in height. www.airdrierailtown.ca

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communityPROFILES Edgewater

Jensen Heights

Living in Edgewater combines the advantages of being within walking distance to schools and shopping and being wrapped around some of Airdrie’s best green space. Many homes are situated overlooking Nose Creek Park, a year round gem, but especially beautiful in December during the Airdrie Festival of Lights.

The Jensen family lent their name to one of Airdrie’s first sub-divisions and it still maintains a strong family feel. Thanks to being next door to the Tri-Schools (all three levels of public schools) this has long been a sought after area to live. Homes range from rental apartments to executive homes in Jensen Heights, there’s something for everyone.

Average house price $215,967

Average condo price $180,000 Average house price $229,000

Fairways Fairways, on the golf course, of course! Quiet, low traffic streets meander around the west end of Woodside Golf course, creating easy access to a wide range of homes from affordable condos right up to some very exclusive homes on the golf course. Average condo price $225,500 Average house price $314,343

Kings Heights Airdrie’s largest and most significant master planned community is now rising at King’s Heights. Five builders are providing unparalleled housing choices. Amenities include an extensive pathway system and tree lined boulevards. Proximity to destination shopping and commercial facilities at the emerging Kingsview Business Centre makes King’s Heights a desirable location. Single family “castles” from $200,000 and town homes from $150,000. Show home parade opens this May. www.kingsheights.ca

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communityPROFILES Luxstone Park Estates

Morningside

Luxstone Park Estates is home to several distinct areas and home ownership choices. Westpointe (a new phase opens this summer) and Park Place Estates with Airdrie’s first “wide lot”style community offers excellent single family homes. The town home lifestyle shows lots of potential from the sold out urban loft concept of Parkside to the n ew Park Place Court town homes– watch for further phases in the fall. All of these homes are nestled around a ca refully landscaped nature park with water pond, soccer field and children's playground.

Wake up to Morningside, a brand new development in the established community of Cooper’s Crossing. With natural beauty, higher elevated lands and east facing slopes, Morningside is a j ewel nestled in the desirable south west quadrant of Airdrie. When finished, Morningside will have 450 single family homes and two multi-family sites on 112 acres. With ten single family show homes in three home parades, Morningside is sure to have a home suitable for all buyers.

www.luxstonepark.com

Luxstone Landing Celebrate the na tural surroundings and amenities that abound in Luxstone Landing. Single family homes are selling fast thanks to parklands, trails, and easy access to the n earby canal and open spaces that connect homesites. School sites are safely and conveniently accessible and shopping is close at hand. Take a bike ride, have a picnic lunch or read by the pond without leaving the neighborhood. www.luxstonelanding.com Luxstone prices reflect both Luxstone Estates and Luxstone Landing: Average condo price $142,838 Average house price $275,250

Mackenzie Pointe Mackenzie Pointe is a h igh-density community of condos with easy access to downtown and commuting to work make easy thanks to the access to 8th Avenue. Iron Horse Park is right next door. Average condo price $142,838* *Prices in Mackenzie Pointe are part of the Luxstone statistics.

Meadowbrook Meadowbrook residents enjoy a quiet setting in the south east corner of Airdrie. The pathways lead to a large central park with a play structure and connects to Meadowbrook Middle School. It’s all single family homes and they range from 1980s construction to late 2000. Many families have started in the original Meadowbrook and moved up to the newer area – they must feel at home. Average house price $274,143

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Park space and pathways are plentiful in this stunning community while state-of-the art playground equipment overlooks an exp ansive water pond. Schools of all levels in Airdrie are only minutes from Morningside while a wealth of shopping is within walking distance. www.morningsideairdrie.com.

Ridgegate Many people have moved into Ridgegate and settled in. It’s a compact area with low traffic streets winding around the n orth end of Nose Creek Park. It’s an easy walk to schools, the library and shopping – who would want to leave? Average house price $223,000

Sagewood If you are looking for something family friendly, then Sagewood is for you. One of Airdrie’s most talked about areas and for good reason! It was nominated as c ommunity of the year in the I ndustry SAM Awards.This is a very well designed place for young and young at heart to call home. Eight new showhomes just opened. Average condo price $153,600 Average house price $289,100 www.sagewood.ca


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communityPROFILES Silver Creek

Sunridge

There’s lots of excitement at the n orth end of Airdrie. Residents of Silver Creek enjoy condo living and a v ariety of single family home options such as coach houses (legal suites as part of the rear garages), starter homes and upscale homes backing onto the green space.

Families who call Sunridge home may be small in number but certainly large in their affection for this centrally located compact area. It’s close to Fletcher Park, the Tri-Schools and connects to the b ike path network.

Average condo price $187,000 Average house price $255,173

Average house price $256,500

Stonegate Stonegate is also at the north end of Airdrie and has become very popular with young families thanks to the quiet, curving streets and play structures. Plus, it’s home to so me condos and attached homes that blend in very nicely.

The Village (Old Town) Old Town is the m ost commonly used name for the original Airdrie town proper. In addition to being centrally located, residents enjoy living close to the“Tri-Schools”, the Plainsmen Arena and splash park and having the largest lots in town. Average house price $203,760

Average condo price $175,480 Average house price $264,000

Thorburn Summerhill Overlooking the fountains in Nose Creek is something the residents of Summerhill really enjoy, especially in the winter when skating on the creek is very popular. Plus, this area is home to A.E. Bowers Elementary School and is next door to the Nose Creek Valley Museum. Average house price $170,679

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You’ll find a single family home in almost every price range in this part of town and no duplexes or condos.There’s lots of green space and easy access to sc hools, the twin arena and the R ecreation and Wellness Centre. No wonder this is such a popular neighbourhood. Average house price $305,040


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communityPROFILES Waterstone

Woodside

One of Airdrie’s not so well kept secrets is Waterstone. Tucked away just south of Summerhill this very popular neighbourhood is home to some of Airdrie’s finest homes backing onto Nose Creek. It’s very well designed and features lots of green space throughout. Drive through and watch for kids playing.

Golf course living in Woodside is something special and it’s just as special for those r esidents of Woodside who don’t back onto the go lf course! With many parks and easy winding streets it’s easy to see the attraction. Woodside is also home to many great options in senior and adult housing.

Average house price $281,500

Average condo price $192,000 Average house price $288,672

Willowbrook Willowbrook, as its name indicates, enjoys being next to Nose Creek. From higher end homes backing onto the green space to condos and attached homes Willowbrook is a great place to call home. Average condo price $200,500 Average house price $248,500

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Nose Creek Valley Museum

AirdrieLIFE… has a sporting history

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port is unquestionably an important element of life in Airdrie. One only needs to go to the Twin or Plainsmen Arenas on a winter holiday or drive by one of the many soccer fields any spring evening to witness this. Yet, where did this phenomenon, sport, come from? How long has it been important to Airdronians? When and where was it played in the past, and by whom?

Sport in the early years tended to be disorganized in nature, often dictated by the weather at any time of year. Poor conditions made travel difficult and outdoor facilities unbearable for players and spectators alike. As Airdrie grew, sports became more organized. It all began in 1944, when the Airdrie Curling Club was formed. After a year of outdoor curling and a very successful bonspiel, it was time to modernize. The result in 1945, was the opening of Airdrie’s first indoor sporting facility, a curling rink. No longer would weather dictate when, where, or for how long a game could be played. Not only did the rink benefit Airdrie’s curlers, but it benefited hockey players as well. Although the hockey rink itself was outside, the dressing rooms were not, giving a slight amount of comfort to the players. Following the growth and success of the Airdrie Curling Club, other organizations representing other sports arose, and with them cam e new facilities including improved baseball diamonds, and eventually the Plainsmen Arena. David Mahalek Curator, Nose Creek Valley Museum

Sport was present in the region before Airdrie was incorporated as a village in 1909. Baseball, curling, hockey, and tennis are just a few of the sports brought to the a rea by settlers from eastern Canada an d the United States.A group of Ontario settlers are credited with the birth of hockey in Airdrie. They arrived in 1907, with their hockey equipment and an understanding of the rules of the game, and within two years the games were regularly featured in the local newspaper.

Nose Creek Valley Museum

In “The Airdrie News” of 1908 and 1909 sports were mentioned frequently, including hockey matches, baseball games, and a general“sports days”. The front page placement of these articles demonstrates the importance of sports to members of the community.These events were community bonding experiences; they brought rural residents into Airdrie where they could socialize with other members of the community. Men and women took part as spectators and competitors. Airdrie women enjoyed particular success in baseball, tennis, curling, and track and field events as w ere part of sports day. As is the case to day, in Airdrie’s early years, sport was a sour ce of community pride. Competitions between Airdrie clubs and teams and surrounding towns such as C rossfield and Didsbury were common. On the l ine were bragging rights and the pride of the entire community. volume 2 • spring/summer 2006 •

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AirdrieLIFE is eventFULL!!

As Airdrie grows, so does the fun. Here is a sneak peek at what’s in store for your summer.

May 24

Airdrie Emergency Services Open House at the Main Fire Hall. Check out all the gizmos and gadgets these real life super heroes use every day. 27 Hey kids! Learn proper bike handling skills at the Airdrie Bike Festival. Call Municipal Enforcement for more info: 948-8892. 27 & 28 The Airdrie Dance Academy Follies 2006 at Bert Church Live Theatre. Over 400 dancers take the stage in three performances.

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Come wear a bib and eat lobster at the Airdrie Rotary Club Lobster Boil. The Star Baton Dance Club hosts the Sunshine Cup Baton Competition. Fore a good cause the Annual Easter Seals Charity Golf Tournament sponsored by Century 21 Castlewood Agencies is on at the Woodside Golf Course. Airdrie Edge Gymnastics Year End Awards Banquet. Rodeo season begins with the Rodeo Fashion Show at Towerlane Mall. The Star Baton Dance Club year end performance at the Bert Church Live Theatre (June 17 & 18). Pancakes go great with cowboy hats – chow down at the Rodeo pancake breakfast at Towerlane Mall 9:00-11:00 am. Then come ready to dance to Cody Bilben at the Rodeo Kick-Off Party at Twister’z Lounge. Airdrie’s BMX Association hosts the 2006 CCA Western National Series at the BMX tracks. School’s out and the Airdrie Pro Rodeo begins (June 28 - July 2) with Tough Enough to Wear Pink Day, in support of breast cancer then the Rodeo action continues for four more “thrill a second” days.

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Canada Day – Airdrie loves Canada Day –we start early with the Kinsmen Breakfast at Towerlane Mall then park our full tummies on the sidewalks for the fun of the annual Canada Day Parade. We run off to the Rodeo to catch some of the action including the crowning of Miss Rodeo and a concert with Johnny Read, or stay in town to watch 2500 golf balls tumble out of a cement truck in Nose Creek Park for the Airdrie Family Services “Roll to the Hole” contest. (Call 945-3900 to buy tickets!) Meet up at the Airdrie EMS barbeque and then head off to Nose Creek Park for Canada Night in the Park and the awesome fireworks display. Did we mention we love Canada Day? Come to a unique Cowboy church service at 9:00 am then stay for the Ranch Hand Competition where 4 member teams compete in penning, doctoring, sorting, loading and branding then say yahoo! As the rodeo wraps up for another year – did you know this is the 4th largest Pro Rodeo in Canada? Come Golf Fore the Cure, a ladies only open in support of breast cancer, shot gun start at 1:30pm at Woodside. To Broadway and Back Summer Camp for musical theatre kids begins at Bert Church Live Theatre. To register call 946-4590 All aboard! The Iron Horse Park is a re-creation in miniature of the railway pioneer days in the Canadian West. Today, the park is hosting Steam Extravaganza with engines visiting from all over Western Canada and the USA. The Park is open every Sunday until October 29th. Come ride the miniature train for only a twoonie. Rock till You Drop musical theatre is on! Performances on the 20th Bert Church Live Theatre. Airdrie Ladies Fastball is hosting the 2006 Ladies Provincial Playoffs. Bring the sunscreen and come out to Chinook Winds Ballpark.

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Holiday! Relax on your deck with your new cedar furniture from the Nose Creek Valley Museum – It’s all handmade cedar furniture made by retired farmers as a fundraiser for the Nose Creek Valley Museum. Do you like hot rods and cool cars? Come to Nose Creek Park for the Show N’ Shine “Doing it on the Grass”. Join the Calgary Police Rodeo Association for their 24th Annual Rodeo and Barn Dance at the Airdrie Rodeo Grounds featuring amateur contestants from all over the police community throughout Canada. In addition to the rodeo, this family-orientated event includes a Children's Carnival. www.calgarypolicerodeo.com Who does business on the golf course? Who doesn’t! It’s the 5th Annual Chamber of Commerce Golf Classic at Woodside.

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Visit www.airdrie.ca/arts for The Bert Church Live Theatre’s 2005 – 2006 performing arts season. Calling all men to come out to Woodside in support of The Bethany Care Centre. It’s the Woodside Men’s Open. Shot gun start at 8:00 am both today and the 3rd. Kids head back to school at Airdrie Public Schools. Moms cry, rejoice, collapse on the sofa. It’s the Rotary Clubs Soap Box Derby Day!!!!! Terry Fox Run Have you signed the family up for fall activities? Studies show that kids who are involved in sports make healthier lifestyle choices as adults – see page 51 for contacts and get active!

Looking ahead… October: Fire Prevention Week, Small Business Week, November: Moonlite Madness, Airdrie Festival of Lights, Santa Claus Parade December: New Years at Nose Creek Park

Got an event to list in the fall issue of AirdrieLIFE? Email us at airdrielife@shaw.ca no later than September 1, 2006, and we’ll post it!!!

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AirdrieLIFE… is blooming with community spirit

Ladybug ladybug don’t fly away home We’ve found a great place for your family to roam

So now Edwards is home to a very special bug She’s a fixture each May all the kids give her a hug

Its called Grounds for Learning it was a millenium dream Ecole Edwards School council came up with a scheme

Mrs Ladybug ushers in spring with a chat And every young student wears a ladybug hat

Bring back the nature to the school grounds A gardening project within the Tri-school bounds

They have lots of activities from games to fun crafts The children learn plenty and share a few laughs

They planned and they plotted (no pun intended) They came to the classrooms teachers and parents befriended

There’s a special quilt raffle a perennial exchange and sale the grown ups can learn how to arrange plants in pails

The students saw potential they made models and schemed Families were surveyed the cooperation was a dream

Phase one is complete there’s more planting to come More designing, more plotting for George Mac’s turn in the sun

So many businesses stepped up to the plate The project just bloomed the support was so great

The parents, the students the teachers and the Division All shared the same goal, the same wonderful vision

From seedlings to gravel to bobcats and levers Even boulders were brought to build a great amphitheatre

Naturalized surroundings for all students to share An outdoor classroom for learning shows how a community cares

They started the digging in May of 2001 So many turned out for a day in the sun

The kids share the pride in the gardens it shows They can point to a tree and say “I help it grow!”

They dug and they watered they planted and hoed They got good and muddy their efforts really showed

The Ladybug Festival takes place May 23-26th a t Ecole Edwards. Shrub pre-orders are being taken the w eek of May 15-19th. A Day in the Garden - featuring a p erennial exchange and sale takes place June 3rd. A container garden workshop is available to those that preregister. If you are interested in joining the Grounds For Learning Society and to le arn more about all o f the above (pre-orders and registrations) please contact Sandy Guindon at 948-6286.

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Then a funny thing happened the following spring The school grounds were inundated with little red things Thousands of ladybugs arrived to partake in the flora and fauna that the kids helped create It only seemed natural to create an annual event The Ladybug Festival and home notes were sent


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www.airdrie.ca

CITY OF AIRDRIE

400 Main St. SE

Airdrie, Alberta T4B 3C3


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advertisingFEATURE

E

very so often an ide a comes along making others think “why didn’t I think of that?” That is exactly what is happening when prospective buyers check out the s how home parade in Canals North, Airdrie. Here style, innovation, master craftsmanship and astute land management have created a p arade of show homes unlike any other in Airdrie. The Canals North is designed to recreate a kinder, gentler world – the cottage country of our youth. Inviting verandas, wider lots, cottage style finishes, extensive pathways, generous park space and to the s ix kilometres of meandering canal s ystem giving the Canals their namesake.

Home Buyers Suite on Canals North

It’s almost as though the Canals N orth is more like the vacation residence you were always waiting to retire to, but you can own now with all the conveniences the City of Airdrie has to offer. The “suite deal” is the m ost talked about project Genesis Land Development Corp has created yet says Aman Sidhu, Marketing Coordinator. Many lots are designed to accommodate three car garages on the back half with the option to build a suite with separate title above.This space as demonstrated by the three builders, Cordwell, Vanity Homes and Swiatek, shows how appealing the suite concept is, perfect for the home office, a convenient place for grandparents to live or a revenue generating opportunity. The homes that front these suites will take your breath away. Each builder has cr eated a ti meless masterpiece of living space. The Cordwell “Aurora” for example takes the “we can’t do tha t” mentality and shifts it to “let’s find a way.” The main floor alone wows with a full cultured stone wall embracing the fireplace, a one of a kind “floating”staircase and a tempered glass raised eating bar. There are three other move up show homes with front garages in the show home parade by Crestview, Douglas and Point Grey Homes. Each home offers a myriad of choices from finishes to floorplan options, while tying into the cottage feel of the Canals North. The Canals North phase five opened in late February to an overwhelming reception. Hundred of buyers came out on the f irst weekend, prompting a land rush on available lots.“We were very gratified by the welcome,” Aman says.“It shows our research and work is paying off and we are providing buyers what they want.” Genesis has major plans for the remaining lands and two future phases will open this year. For more information visit www.canalsnorthairdrie.com.

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SUITE PLANS: The studio suites of Swiatek top and Cordwell show how versatile the space can be.


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FROM TOP LEFT: The Vanity Homes grand staircase makes a stunning entrance. The show home parade is drawing record crowds. The Crestview take on the open kitchen really cooks. The cultured stone fireplace of the Cordwell Aurora. volume 2 • spring/summer 2006 •

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AirdrieLIFE is… learning to grow

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o you’ve decided where to build your dream home in Airdrie or maybe you’ve made an offer on that gem acr oss town. Does that affect where your children attend school? Simple answer – yes.

“Call us and provide the address of your home and we will be able to g ive you a de finite answer on which school your child will attend,” says John Wheatley of the Rocky View School Division Planning Department.“Some of the areas are quite obvious like King’s Heights and the e ast side schools. The attendance boundaries have required a restructuring due to Airdrie’s fast paced growth.“Airdrie is undergoing phenomenal growth in terms of our school populations. When you are adding about 400 new homes a year to the city, that potential is 250 students per year that you have to accommodate,“ says Rocky View School Trustee Don Thomas.“Rather than planning on a year by year basis, we decided to look at the long term situation for each school.” But it’s not as simple as dr awing a ci rcle around a school. Some of the schools already have issues with overcrowding and there are special programs such as French Immersion and Ralph McCall’s longer school calendar to consider. There are currently close to 5000 students that need to be accommodated at nine schools in Airdrie. While the growing pains will be felt for the next few years, the good news is space is on the way.The West Elementary school in Bayside opens in November 2006. Muriel Clayton expansions and construction of the replacement for Ecole Edwards Elementary will be complete in November.

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cityLIVING If all government funding is approved, expect to see a n ew middle school (grades 5 – 8) i n Sagewood for the 2008-09 sc hool year and a future high school west of Cooper’s Crossing is tentative for 2011. The maps on these two pages indicate which schools your child will attend for the 2006/07 school year. For more information on the attendance boundaries, or for larger versions of the maps, contact John Wheatley at 250-1504 or go directly to the website: www.rockyview.ab.ca The Ecole Francophone Airdrie School moves to their new location in September on the corner of 8th Street and Big Spring Hill Road. For more information: efairdrie@ atrium.ca. or call 948-6995. For information on Catholic schools in Airdrie: www.cssd.ab.ca.

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AirdrieLIFE is… busting out of the chutes!

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f you’ve never experienced the thrills and spills of rodeo, the Airdrie Pro Rodeo is the place to test out your boots and let loose your first “yeehaw” even before the Calgary Stampede has dusted off their chutes.

From June 28 – July 2, 2006, rodeo enthusiasts can expect to see some of the most competitive breathtaking action at Canada’s 4th la rgest rodeo, with over 400 entrants competing for a purse valued at $60,000. The beauty of the Airdrie Pro Rodeo is tha t it won’t drain your wallet and as Rodeo Association President elect Rob Brietzke says,“if you could get any closer to the action, you’d have to enter.” Sit in the right spot and you might get a clump of dirt (or worse) kicked up at you by an ornery bull. Tickets are so reasonable, it’s worth bringing a few friends along.

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What started as a centennial project in 1967, has grown into a 100 percent volunteer run professional rodeo attracting the top names in the fields for bareback and saddle bronc riding, bull riding, calf roping, barrel racing and more.

For a real taste of the ranching lifestyle, watch the Ranch Hand competition. It’s the every day work ranch hands do but in a competitive environment.

The Airdrie Pro Rodeo is always a step ahead and they were one of the “We have some very prominent rodeo figures involved including Jim first to bring “Tough Enough to Wear Pink” to the Canadian rodeo circuit. All contestants and visitors on opening night are Dunn who was just inducted into the Rodeo Hall of encouraged to wear pink in support of breast cancer Fame,” says Brenda Moon, the outgoing President. awareness. “It’s a gr atifying sight to see e veryone in “Our committee is dedicated to preserving the western heritage of Airdrie. It is unbelievable how many “If you could get any pink,” Brenda says. There are even prizes for spectators who show up in the pink. solid cowboys and cowgirls we have in our area. It’s wonderful.” closer to the action, Sponsors are the lifeblood of the Rodeo and the you’d have to enter.” Rodeo provides plenty of opportunities for sponsors The ranching community and the agricultural comand large groups to enjoy themselves with BBQ parmunity are behind us 100%,” says Brenda, “but we’d ties and sheltered tents and VIP seating. “So many of love to see more city folk come out for a true western our sponsors have been with us since we started out. experience.” It’s a short drive just west of town and a We are very grateful for all of their support,” Brenda says. free shuttle service runs from Towerlane Mall each day. You don’t have to own a cowboy hat to take in the fun.It’s a family friendly day, with great food and fun for all ages. “Last year we started a junior rodeo event, we’ve had mutton busting for years, but last year we did a calf scramble where we tie a ribb on on a calf ’s tail and the first kid to bring back the ribbon gets a prize,” says Rob. “We also did our first wild pony race last year and that was a big hit with everyone.”

July 1st is an e specially busy day for the Association. They are also responsible for the Canada D ay Parade in Airdrie. There is an af ternoon rodeo performance and concert, featuring Johnny Reid. Nightly entertainment encourages spectators to stay and attracts those eager to two step and compare buckles with real cowboys. For more information and ticket sales www.airdrieprorodeo.com.

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AirdrieLIFE is… at your service City Hall

AirdrieLIFE… is recycling

Renovations to City Hall are complete. The building, which was once a grocery store, now has two complete floors which include Council Chambers, the Office of the Mayor, the Office of the City Manager, meeting rooms, staff office space, and the reception area. Friendly and professional Customer Service personnel are on hand to deal with any inquiries or questions you may have.

The City of Airdrie is committed to w aste reduction and innovative waste and recycling management. The Airdrie Recycle Depot provides an ou tlet for residents to dr op off their recyclables.

Customer Service Hours: 8:30 am to 4:30 pm

Recycle Depot Summer Hours: May 1 – September 30 Wednesday 9 am – 8 p m Thursday 9 am – 8 pm Friday 9 am – 8 pm Saturday 9 am – 5 pm Sunday 9 am – 5 pm

Payments: • Taxes • Ambulance • Garbage Tags

• Utilities • Dog Licenses

Services: • Economic Development • Planning and Development • Building Permits • Community Services

Council Meetings City Council meetings occur on the first and third Monday of each month. Meetings are open to the public and ar e called to order at 7:00 pm in Council Chambers. If a scheduled meeting falls on a holiday, the meeting is held on the Tuesday of the same week.

Airdrie City Hall is located at: 400 Main Street SE, Airdrie, AB T4B 3C3 403-948-8800

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Recycle Depot Holiday Hours: Friday April 14th, 2006 CLOSED for Good Friday Sunday April 16th, 2006 CLOSED for Easter Saturday July 1, 2006 CLOSED for Canada Day

The Recycle Depot accepts the following recyclables: • White office paper • Mixed coloured paper & magazines • Newspaper • Cardboard & boxboard • Coloured & clear glass • Household metal • Plastic milk jugs • Cardboard milk cartons • Phone books • Aerosol cans • Used oil/containers

AirdrieLIFE • spring/summer 2006 • volume 2

• Used antifreeze/containers • Propane tanks • Electronic waste (TV’s and Computers) • Cell phones • Rechargeable batteries • Vehicle batteries • Used oil filters • Used clothing

The Recycle Depot does not accept the following items: • Styrofoam • Waxed cardboard • Tires • Wood • Tree branches • Sod • Drywall • Selected Plastics The Recycle Depot started to ac cept select household plastic in April, 2006. In particular, the Depot will be accepting certain types of plastic jugs such as deter gent containers and condiment bottles. Check the bottom of plastic products for the number in the middle o f the Recycle Logo to know if it will be accepted at the Depot. Initially, #1s, #2s, and #5s will be collected.


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AirdrieLIFE is…two (green) thumbs up! Community Garden

Landscape Awards Program

Do not let lac k of space deter y ou from gardening! The Airdrie Horticultural Society (AHS) s ponsors a C ommunity Gardening project where you can rent a 6x1.5 m (20’ x 5’) plot. Quality soil and water are available with full s un conditions in a sec ured area. The Community Garden is located at the southwest corner of Monklands Soccer Park and r uns from May to Octob er. Registration and information contact Tyler Brabury at 912-0559/ tylerbrabury@smarttech.com.

What gardener does not enjoy showing the fruits of their labour to an interested audience and receiving constructive feedback? This summer, consider entering the C ity of Airdrie’s Landscape Awards program, administered by the Airdrie Horticultural Society. A trained group of judges will evaluate design, plant material, interest, and other factors in several categories such as: - Complete yard - Curb appeal - Container garden - Perennial garden - Rock garden - Vegetable garden - Water garden - Youth garden - Newly established yard - Commercial/institutional landscaping

Airdrie Horticultural Society Do you enjoy gardening and want to m eet others who share your passion? Whether you are a novice or expert, the Airdrie Horticultural Society (AHS) would love to have you join! The society meets monthly at 7:00 pm on the third Wednesday at the Alberta Agricultural Building located on 909 Irricana Road in Airdrie. For the months of July and August there are no regular meetings, instead we have weekly tours of our member’s gardens.

Entry forms are available from May - July at the Airdrie Public Library. For information www.airdrie.ca or call Connie at 948-0727.

For more information www.airdriehortsociety.com or contact Alison at 948-9950.

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AirdrieLIFE is… enhanced with support • Airdrie Food Bank provides short-term food assistance to residents of Airdrie and outlying communities. www.airdriefoodbank.com or 912-8500

• FREE Coffee socials for families raising children with disabilities: Includes childcare, music therapy and information sessions. Fourth Thursday of each month, 6:00 – 8:00 pm. To register: 948-0263

• Airdrie Meals on Wheels provides regular nourishing meals to help people to remain healthy and independent in the comfort of their own homes 815-1400

• Parent Mediation & Family Support for families raising children with disabilities: Helps parents by listening to needs, providing information and helping parents navigate the systems. 921-6954

• Airdrie & District Victim Assistance provides support and information for victims of crime and tragedy. www.airdrievictimassistance.com or 948-3468

• Family Support for Children with Disabilities (FSCD) Aide Support Program: Provides services to families in the Calgary and North Rocky View (Airdrie and Cochrane) region, who have been approved by FSCD for Family Support and/or Child Focused Services. 921-6954

• Airdrie Family Services Counseling Program prevents personal and family breakdown, enhances the abilities of individuals and families to constructively manage their lives and enriches the quality of family life. www.airdriefamilyservices.ca or 945-3900 • Rocky View School Division Family School Liaison Program provides social support services to children and families in Airdrie by working with school staff and community agencies. www.rockyview.ab.ca or 219-6257 • Airdrie Family Services Family Resource Program supports families towards the goal of optimum family functioning www.airdriefamilyservices.ca or 945-3900 • Airdrie Boys & Girls Club offers safe and accessible social, educational and recreational programs for youth. www.abgc.8m.com or 948-3331 • R. J. Hawkey Breakfast Program cares for students who have needs for personal, social and/or nutritional support outside their homes on school day mornings. 948-3939 • Airdrie Family Services Out of School Care Program decreases the number of Airdrie children left unsupervised by helping families in financial need who are working, attending educational institutions, or who have special needs. www.airdriefamilyservices.ca or 945-3900 • Alberta Mentor Foundation for Youth (AMFY) helps junior and senior high school students achieve their full potential through supportive in-school mentoring relations. www.amfy.org or 945-2535 • Airdrie Seniors Outreach Program enables seniors to remain healthy and engaged in the community by linking seniors, information and resources. www.airdrieseniors.com or 316-9955

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• Parent Link Centre: Airdrie Family Services and the North Rocky View Community Resource Centre have collaborated in the opening of a new Airdrie & Area Parent Link Centre. The services and programs are intended to promote family wellness and provide support for families of young children, helping them to connect with the appropriate resources to meet their needs. 948-0263 or 945-3900 • A-CHAMP Program: The Cardiovascular Health Awareness and Management Program (A-CHAMP) is a free community-based program made available to all senior community residents over the age of 65 and offers opportunities for enhanced multiple blood pressure monitoring and health promotion activities around cardiovascular disease and stroke. Sessions are run in local pharmacies. For information contact Jennifer at 948-6463

THE SOCIAL CIRCLE Distress Centre 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 266-1605 AADAC – Alberta Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission: 912-3306 Airdrie Mental Health: 948-3878 Bethany Care Centre Airdrie: 948-6022 Calgary Rocky View Child & Family Service: 912-4758 Closer to Home: 948-9776 Credit Counselling Services of Alberta: 265-2201 North Rocky View Community Resource Centre: 948-0263 Rocky View Adult Literacy Program: 948-6556


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Airdrie Family Services roll out another great event

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irdrie Family Services moved into their new offices in April and the staff is busier than ever especially now that they’ve kicked off their second annual fundraiser “Roll to the Hole.” The brain child of family counselor Bernie Moen, Roll to the Hole is an imaginative way to raise funds to ensure programming at Airdrie Family Services keeps running.“With the move to our new location, these funds raised from this event will be even more important than e ver, “says AFS Director Penny Freeman. A ticket gets you a sam e numbered golf ball that spins with 2749 other golf balls inside a Burnco cement truck, “Yes, we’ve tested it!” says Bernie. You can catch the fun and actually see an d hear (it sound like a to rnado,) the balls roll out and see who wins the $2500 vacation voucher if you come down to Nose Creek Park July 1st between 1 and 3 pm.

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SummerSCHEDULE

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East Lake Recreation & Wellness Centre

Ph: (403) 948 - 8804 website: www.airdrie.ca Summer 2006 Schedule - effective July 2 - August 31, 2006 CUSTOMER SERVICE- call 948 - 8804 ext. 550

MONDAY 5:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

TUESDAY 5:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 5:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

5:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

5:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

5:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

THURSDAY 5:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

FRIDAY 5:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

FITNESS CENTRE- call 948 - 8804 ext. 517 5:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

5:30 a.m. - 10 p.m.

SATURDAY 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.

SUNDAY 7 a.m. - 9 p.m.

7 a.m. - 9 p.m.

7 a.m. - 9 p.m.

CHILDCARE

8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Prebooking of child care is required - call 948 - 8804 ext. 512 8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. 8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. 8:30 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

8:45 a.m. - 11:45 p.m.

AQUATIC & AEROBIC DROP-IN FITNESS CLASSES

NO CLASSES: JULY 1, AUGUST 5 AND 7 (DUE TO HOLIDAY WEEKENDS) TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

MONDAY

8:00 - 8:45 a.m. 9:15 - 10:15 a.m.

SUNDAY

Deep Water Running Aquafit

Variety

Aquafit

Circuit

Aquafit

10:20 - 11 a.m.

Variety

Fit Over Fifty

11:15a.m. - 12 p.m. Older Adult Aquafit

Older Adult Aquafit

12 - 1 p.m.

Older Adult Aquafit

Spinning Wheels

12:15 - 1 p.m.

Deep Water Running

Deep Water Running

6:15 - 7 p.m.

Deep Water Running

Deep Water Running

Cardio Chaos

Tae Box

6:30 - 7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY

6:45 - 7:45 p.m. 8 - 8:45 p.m.

Deep Water Running

Butt’s & Gutts

Boot Camp Circuit

Deep Water Running

Deep Water Running

PLEASE NOTE: Children under the age of seven are required to be accompanied by a responsible person 16 years of age or older . Further, to ensure safety, the child is to be within arms reach of the responsible person at all times they are in the aquatic area. Patrons are required to take a cleansing shower prior to entering any of the aquatic bodies of water, steam room or before making use of the w ater slide. MONDAY Open Public Swim

TUESDAY

AQUATIC HOURS - SUMMER 2005 WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

1 - 5 p.m.

1 - 5 p.m.

1 - 5 p.m.

1 - 5 p.m.

7 - 9:30 p.m.

7 - 9:30 p.m.

7 - 9:30 p.m.

7 - 9:30 p.m.

Teens Only Swim Parent & Tot Swim Family Swim Lane Swim

FRIDAY

1 - 8 p.m.

SATURDAY 1 - 8:30 p.m.

SUNDAY 1 - 8:30 p.m.

8 - 9:30 p.m. 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

5 - 7 p.m.

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

5 - 7 p.m.

5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. 5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m 5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m 5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m 5:30 a.m. - 8 p.m.

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

9 a.m. - 1 p.m.

7 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.

7 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Hot Tub, Steam Room

5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. 5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. 5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. 5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. 5:30 a.m. - 8 p.m.

7 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.

7 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Tot Pool

5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. 5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. 5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. 5:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. 5:30 a.m. - 8 p.m.

7 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.

7 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Parent and tot swim is open to parents with childern six years of age or younger only . Floatation device's may be used during any Public and/or F amily Swim Times 1:00pm-8:30pm Gymnasium Schedule available at the Centre or www.airdrie.ca Note: Schedules subject to change, please call 948-8804 for information

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cityLIVING

AirdrieLIFE is active!

Badminton Club Chris Gardner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-6642

Whatever your recreational pursuits, Airdrie is sure to have an organized group for you to join.

Flying Tiger Martial Arts Academy Andrew Erickson . . . . . . . . . . . . .945-0800 cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .651-2828

Sports Groups Airdrie BMX Association Bonnie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-0919 Glen Edwards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202-1888 www.airdriebmx.com Airdrie Bowling Club Youth/Adult/Senior Leagues 805 East Lake Blvd, Airdrie AB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-3404 fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-4685 Airdrie Curling Club 275 Jensen Drive NE, Airdrie, AB, T4B 2B8 Booking Information: Gary Ritchie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-7100 Club/Pro Shop: . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-7100 Concession: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-0602 Airdrie & District Recreation Complex . . . . . . . . . . .948-4242 www.airdrieagsociety.com Airdrie Chinook Winds Baseball Association Dennis Driscoll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-7387 Airdrie Dance Academy 291070 Yankee Valley Road Susan Laing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-5530 www.airdriedance.ca Airdrie Edge Gymnastics Club Twin Arena Complex, Airdrie, AB www.airdrieedge.com . . . . . . . . .948-7769 Airdrie Judo Club Paul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .592-0918 Airdrie Ju-Jitsu Daniel Verzotti . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239-9467 cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-0621 www.members.shaw.ca/goshindo Airdrie Ladies Fastball League P.O. Box 5314, Airdrie AB, T4B 2T9 Linda Raymond . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-4699 Airdrie Little League Box 3885, Airdrie, AB, T4B 2B9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-0684 www.airdrielittleleague.com

Airdrie Minor Basketball Harvey Neumiller . . . . . . . . . . . .948-7514 www.intouchsystems.net/intouch/amba Airdrie Minor Hockey Association . . . . . . . . . .912-2680 www.airdrieminorhockey.ca Airdrie Mixed Industrial Slo-Pitch Rick Campos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-5900 Airdrie Ringette Association Box 3086, Airdrie, AB, T4B 2B4 Charles Wardell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-4660 www.airdrieringette.com

Goshindo Karate/ Airdrie J.K.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .239-9467 cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .607-0621 email: dverzotti@shaw.ca www.members.shaw.ca/goshindo Horizon Taekwon-Do . .912-6TKD (853) Aron Johnston email: horizontkd@shaw.ca Imeson Highland Dancers Head Instructor: Jessica Imeson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .701-0726 email: jessicai@pfscalgary.com

Airdrie Skating Club Plainsmen Arena, Airdrie, AB Coach, Joanne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .945-2421 Richelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-0331 www.airdrieskatingclub.com

Kensho Karate Club 16 C East Lake Green N.E.Airdrie,AB T4A 2J2 Head Instructor: Ian Scully . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-1903 email: kensho@shaw.ca www.members.shaw.ca/kensho

Airdrie Soccer Association www.airdriesoccer.com . . . . . . . .948-6260

Mall Walkers Walking Club . .948-7819

Airdrie Softball . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-5071 Airdrie Storm Football . . . . . . . .912-0070 www.eteamz.com/airstorm Airdrie Tae Kwon Do Airdrie Tae Boxing Academy of Champions 536 - 2nd Avenue, Airdrie, AB, T4B 2C2 Everald Wright, Master Instructor Level #3, 5th Dan Black Belt email: airdrietkdandkb@shaw.ca Airdrie Thunder Junior Hockey Club 80 Waterstone Cres, Airdrie, AB, T4B 2E5 Frank McEvoy, President & General Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-7511 fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-1762 www.airdriethunder.com Airdrie Volleyball Club Jim Kramer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-3367

Nose Creek Swim Association (Airdrie Competitive Swim Club) mail: NCSA, Beddington Postal Outlet, Box 51002, Calgary, AB T3K 3V9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208-5353 fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208-5355 http://members.shaw.ca/ncsaswim/ Old Timers Hockey . . . . . . . . . . .948-5108 Star Baton & Dance Company Mandy Yip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-9999 email: mandy@starbaton.com www.starbaton.com Rockyview Lacross Association .932-7940 www.rockyviewlacrosse.com Woodside Golf Club . . . . . . . . . .686-4653 www.woodsidegc.com Synchro Stars Club Arlene Mayor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-1969

Airdrie Yoga Studio . . . . . . . . . . .945-1825 www.airdrieyoga.com volume 2 • spring/summer 2006 •

AirdrieLIFE

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AirdrieLIFE is involved Airdrie residents take great pride in their community involvement – and it’s a great way to meet people and make life long friends. Service Organizations

#88 Royal Air Cadet Squadron A/Captain Carol Hartwick . . . .880-3253

Kinsmen Club Don Scottman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-6519 Knights of Columbus Mike Perri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-5160

Airdrie Rodeo Ranch Association Box 3663, Airdrie, Alberta, T4B 2B8 Clint McLeod or Sylvia Kerr . . .948-0512 www.airdrieprorodeo.net

#3016 Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps Commanding Officer . . . . . . . . . .710-7363

Lioness Club Cobi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 948-3253

Airdrie Boys and Girls Club . .948-3331 www.abgc.8m.com

Lions Club Dan Mckinnon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-5447

Airdrie Chamber of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-4412 www.airdriechamber.ab.ca

Optimist Club Bill Hope . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-5207 www.optimist.org

Airdrie & District Special Olympics Box 5024, Airdrie Kim Nicolas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .912-7842

Rotary Club Dave Macdonald . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-1516 www.airdrierotary.org

Airdrie Girl Guides Barb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226-0814

Royal Canadian Legion . . . . . . .948-3000

Airdrie Mentor Foundation for Youth Leanne Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .945-2535

Hobby and Leisure Airdrie & District Art Council .948-2153

Running Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-4800

Airdrie Scouts 1st Lora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-7938 2nd Bert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-5016 4th . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-5243 6th Bea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-3719 email: Chinook@scouts.ca

Airdrie Artists Guild . . . . . . . . . .948-3253

Toastmasters Joseph Schluter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .946-5553

Airdrie Breakfast Club Bonnie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-2121 Alberta 4-H Rob Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-8501 www.info@4h.ab.ca Ducks Unlimited Keith Wilson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .863-4363 Friends of the Library . . . . . . . . .948-2778

Airdrie Community Choir Eileen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-2118 Airdrie Drag Racing Team 197 Acacia Drive, Airdrie, AB, T4B 1G6 Harry Svingen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-2962 Ed Dyck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-3074 Rod Havens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-7214 e-mail: heritageref@telus.net Airdrie Horticultural Society Allison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-9950 Airdrie Little Theatre Jaime Hair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-6289 cell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .606-8702

Junior Forest Wardens . . . . . . . .237-1652 www.airdriejfw.ca

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AirdrieLIFE • spring/summer 2006 • volume 2

Alberta Model Engineering Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-2380 Bert Church . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .948-2153 www.airdrie.ca/arts Modellers Aircraft Society . . . .948-4145 Northern Trails Riding Club . .220-1624 Nose Creek Historical Society .948-6287 Pegasus Pony Club . . . . . . . . . . . .948-2271 Revolver & Pistol Club . . . . . . . .608-0783 Rockyview Ramblers Square Dance Club . . . . . . . . . . .948-4181

Windy Ridge Riders . . . . . . . . . . .948-3936 Woodside Seniors Club . . . . . . .948-4088


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w w w. a i r d r i e . c a

AirdrieWORKS

THE OFFICIAL GUIDE TO STARTING AND GROWING YOUR BUSINESS IN THE CITY OF AIRDRIE

Success starts here.

Inside this issue: Economic Development information, detailed land use map and much more


AirdrieWORKS

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Table of Welcome to Airdrie

Economically Speaking

56

Growth Figures

57

The City of Airdrie has seen many changes over the past number of years in the commercial and industrial sectors. In 2004, the City saw $84 million in development and in 2005 the n umber jumped to $187 M illion. As people discover what Airdrie has to o ffer, more and more families and industry are looking to Airdrie as a preferred choice to live and do business.

Assesment and Taxation Comparisions

58

The Winning Edge - Airdrie has it

59

Business in Airdrie continues to grow at a staggering rate with over 300 new business licenses in 2005. This includes many local businesses expanding and growing and a number of multinational companies entering the marketplace. The local Chamber of Commerce has seen a record number of new members and has added a number of new programs and services.With over 75% percent of our residents new to the city over the past 10 years, Airdrie’s work force also continues to diversify and grow.

Keeping Up With the Jones

60

The Chamber Works

61

City Industrial Land Map

62

Local Success Stories

63

T

he Department of Economic Development would like to welcome you to the City of Airdrie. If you are a new resident or opening a business in Airdrie, we know you will enjoy our AirdrieLIFE magazine and AirdrieWORKS special section.

Residential growth in Airdrie is o n the m ove. In 2005, we saw 1269 n ew homes/condos built in Airdrie, up from 566 i n 2004. New residents can choose from diverse housing from starter homes for the first time buyer or the executive home for larger family. A number of condo projects are seeing an influx of 20 something’s moving to the city.The 2006 building season shows no sign of slowing down with a record number of housing starts and commercial and industrial development making it an exciting time for Airdrie. We hope you enjoy AirdrieLIFE /WORKS to keep up on news in Airdrie. If you wish to be informed on a monthly basis, sign-up for our e-newsletter at www.airdrie.ca. With growth comes change and the City of Airdrie is working to ensure proper and responsible growth management to sec ure a he althy future for Airdrie residents and businesses. If you have any questions or would like to start a business please call or send us an email.

Kent Rupert Economic Development Manager Email: kent.rupert@airdrie.ca • Phone: 403.948.8844 Ext. 738

54

Contents

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AirdrieWORKS

AirdrieLIFE_vol2_num2

AirdrieWORKS… through responsible growth

D

riving around the city of Airdrie you will notice it has kept pace if not passed the p rovincial standards for economic growth and expansion.

2005 brought the upgrading of the two interchanges, many new residential neighbourhoods and the introduction of both multinational retailers and many new small businesses to the lo cal economy. Reports of unprecedented years of growth in the housing market have been reported in both the Airdrie and Calgary media for months.The Calgary Real Estate Board reported that the average price single family home in Airdrie rose by almost $33,000 in 2005 from 2004. The City of Airdrie Building Inspections Department issued over 700 more residential building permits than last year. As approvals came into place in the new commercial and industrial parks in the north and south sections of the city, dirt began to move and Airdrie entered into a major effort to attract new business with great success. All three new commercial areas including Sierra Springs, Kings Heights and Gateway Park have been very successful in selling lots for a variety of retail, services and industrial developments. But is it all about building more buildings or attracting bigger stores?

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AirdrieLIFE • spring/summer 2006 • volume 2

Is economic development purely measured by increasing the square footage of commercial and industrial space in Airdrie? Not necessarily. Growth in the number of new businesses is definitely one indicator of economic prosperity. By raising the non-residential property assessment takes the burden off of the residential taxes to pay for infrastructure, management and services of the City. Airdrie currently has an 85% residential and 15% n on-residential property assessment. The goal is to move to a 60% and 40% assessment split, to create a more sustainable fiscal situation for the City. There is however another side of the equation that looks at the quality of the development such as job cr eation, income levels, housing costs and the impact on the environment. This year the City adopted a new perspective on growth outlined in a do cument called “A Principled Approach to Growth”. Three main principles are presented that will help guide future plans for the City of Airdrie: environmental responsibility; social balance and financial prudence. These principles are rooted in the concepts of smart growth, sustainability and building healthy communities. Part of this will be the de velopment of a new Sustainable Prosperity Plan in 2006 that will assess the foundation of the Airdrie economy and identify key areas of economic development that will strengthen the long term sustainability of the community.


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he City of Airdrie kept pace with the growth of the Calgary Region in 2005, capitalizing on the strength of the provincial economy. Approximately 37,500 full-time jobs were created in Alberta in 2005 and the unemployment rate in the Calgary Region decreased by 1.1 percent to 3.9 p ercent. This is reflected in an unprecedented year of new projects in residential, commercial/industrial and business development in Airdrie.

Airdrie’s Growth Indicator

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Housing Starts (units)

121

229

211

298

859

566

+ 293

Commercial/Industrial Starts (units)

23

24

17

11

75

84

-9

MLS Residential Sales (units) 156

229

195

166

746

682

+ 64

New Business Licenses (#)

96

102

68

341

262

+ 79

$30,331,310

$130,891,505

$227,379

$214,400

$1,011,440

$30,070,871

Residential Building Construction Value ($) MLS Residential Average Price ($) Commercial/Industrial Construction Value ($)

75 $34,080,038 $200,138 $3,055,274

$25,065,079 $41,415,079 $213,425

$216,658

$23,511,368 $2,492,789

2005 2004 2004 to 2005 Annual Totals Annual Totals Change

AirdrieWORKS

AirdrieWORKS because of growth…

$63,464,943 + $67,426,562 $181,432

+ $32,968

$19,635,807 + $10,435,064

Commercial Growth Expanding commercial and industrial development lead to a $10 million increase in commercial and industrial construction values in 2005. There were 341 new business licenses issued in 2005 for a total of 1689 active licenses. Three major sectors dominate the Airdrie economy 1. construction 2. professional and personal services 3. wholesale and retail trade.

There are approximately 220 retailers licensed in Airdrie. New commercial developments in the northwest and southwest quadrants of Airdrie have attracted national retailers to the community, continually diversifying the scale of retail services.The downtown core has seen both growth and interest of new business.

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AirdrieWORKS… by comparison Assessment and Taxation Comparisons 2005 Non-Residential Comparisons A comparison has been undertaken to show the assessment & taxation comparisons of non-residential properties between Airdrie, Calgary and Cochrane.The comparisons are for both industrial and commercial properties.The property details used for comparison purposes are not specific to any particular site. Airdrie Property Tax Rate: 16.76215

Calgary Property Tax Rate: 20.6278

Airdrie Business Tax Rate: (Airdrie does not have a Business Tax)

Calgary Business Tax Rate: 8.77

Industrial Property Example: 2.5 Acre Site, 40,000 Sq. Ft. Warehouse, 5,000 Sq. Ft. Office Assessment & Taxation Property Assessment Property Taxes Business Assessment Business Taxes Total Taxes

Airdrie $ 2,595,000 $ 43,498 $ 43,498

Calgary $ 2,900,000 $ 59,821 $ 295,000 $ 2,587 $ 62,408

Calgary’s total taxes are 43.47% higher than taxes in Airdrie.

Commercial Property Example: 2.00- 3.00 Acre Site, 28,000 Sq. Ft. Average Quality Retail Assessment & Taxation Property Assessment Property Taxes Business Assessment Business Taxes Total Taxes

Airdrie $ 3,080,000 $ 51,627 $ 51,627

Calgary $ 3,220,000 $ 66,422 $ 336,000 $ 2,947 $ 69,369

Calgary’s total taxes are 34.37% higher than taxes in Airdrie. Airdrie has a definite tax advantage over Calgary. 2006 Tax Rates will be set in late April.

Business Licenses 2006 Regulated under Bylaw 52/2005 – Business License Bylaw requires an annual Business License to conduct business in the City of Airdrie. Category of Business Resident Non-resident Less than 72 hours or 3 days cumulative Transfer of License to New Owner

License Fee $100 $200 $50 $20

Business Licenses can be obtained at the Cashiers Desk at City Hall, 400 Main St SE, between 8:30 am and 4:30 pm Monday to Friday.

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Big achievements by small businesses are being recognized in Airdrie. Each year during Small Business Week in October, an awards banquet is held and the most outstanding members of the small business community are honored. Three awards are up for grabs including the Winning Edge, the Eco-Edge, and the Family First Awards.

The Winning Edge Award: Annually, the partners of the Airdrie Business Resource Centre seek out one small business from the community that possesses the winning edge. The Winning Edge Award is presented to a small business that has dem onstrated overall outstanding achievement. It honors significant financial and business achievements, service excellence, and ongoing community participation. Clearly, these criteria paint the picture of an admirable and successful operation. Although financial performance is i mportant, the Winning Edge Award represents more than business success. A key aspect is active community participation and engagement. Recipients of the award tend to demonstrate initiative in community projects and a sincere desire to improve the City. Another important factor is excellence in customer service. For the most part, nominations are made by clients and the community atlarge so an exceptional front-line staff is essential. Any member of the community can nominate a business they feel is deserving of the Winning Edge Award. Nominations can also b e made by other businesses. Finalists are interviewed by a se lection committee in or der to determine who has the s harpest “winning edge”. Eligible companies must have less than 50 employees, operate in the City, and possess a current City of Airdrie Business License.

The Eco Edge Award: The Eco Edge Award acknowledges a business enhancing the community by having a strong and unique commitment to the environment. It was created in 2002, and is p resented by the Airdrie Environmental Advisory Board. The award jives with the community’s long-standing commitment to a he althy environment. Sarah Noble, City of Airdrie Environmental Services Team Leader points out the accolade is intended for an ordinary business, doing something extraordinary with a “green focus”. The award promotes the idea of going above and beyond the normal course of business for the purpose of benefiting the environment.

Past winners include 2002 Armstrong Gardening & Landscaping 2003 Eaton/Cutler-Hammer Canada 2004 McKee Homes Ltd. and Time To Play Preschool. 2005 Airdrie Canvas Inc.

AirdrieWORKS

Airdrie businesses have the edge

The Family First Award The Family First Award recognizes businesses for their familyfriendly practices. Airdrie Family Services presents the award to local business operators who have strived toward maintaining family-oriented initiatives. The first recipients in 2005 w ere: Advance Distribution, Airdrie Chrysler Jeep, Airdrie City View, Airdrie Co-op, Airdrie Eye Care Centre, Airdrie Trailer Sales, Blockbuster Video, Cam Clark Ford, Condillo Foods, Dairy Queen, Good Life Foods, McDonalds, Page & Turners, Rustic Ranch Furniture, Scrapbook Station, Sign Concepts, and Smitty’s.

The Winning Edge Award originated in 1998, past recipients have been: • 1998 – M&M Meat Shop • 1999 – Smart Automotive • 2000 – Zytech Building Systems • 2001 – Five Star Communications • 2002 – Airdrie Windshield & Glass • 2003 – Advance Distribution (Here’s the Scoop) • 2004 – Rainbow Salvage & Demolition Ltd. • 2005 – Sully Boardsports “The goal has al ways been that the Winning Edge Award provides something for small businesses in Airdrie to strive toward. Over the last number of years we have noticed more excitement and hype around the awards, with the dinner being sold out year after year, as well as the recognition and prestige that go along with being nominated and winning,” says Kent Rupert of the City’s Economic Development Department.

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Al and Lois Jones share the love with daughter Dana and mascot Alioops (“filling in” for son Stephen).

AirdrieWORKS is… keeping up with the Jones Giving back is the key to success for local entrepreneurs

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here is no other place in the world more receptive to the s pirit of supporting community based business than the City of Airdrie. That’s the opinion of Lois and Al Jones, owners of ADvance Distribution and Here’s The Scoop. Back in 1996, postal rates rose dramatically and the Jones realized a gap existed for local flyer distribution that was affordable and targeted 100% of the households. Since the advent of super boxes, most homes didn’t even have a traditional mailbox and what flyers were delivered were thrown on doorsteps and left to the elements. Al and Lois realized that no one had thought of a very simple solution: deliver flyers in a plastic bag that can hang conveniently on the doorknob. This became the unique selling point of Advance Distribution and advertisers loved it.“This made it possible to distribute anything from flyers and pamphlets to product samples and catalogues under any weather condition,” Al explains. Three short years later, they began to brainstorm on the concept of a cooperative flyer that several advertisers could share in the costs. But would residents want to read what was basically a “weekend shopper” flyer? Local news was well covered, so Al and Lois brainstormed in their spare moments on what to do to enhan ce the shopper idea. Then September 11 was burned into the collective memories of a generation. Al recalls the media was full of stories of fear, anger and pain.“No one smiled. No one laughed. People stopped making eye contact with each other, it was a distressing time,” Al says. And then one day shortly after, Lois knew she’d found the

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On that Friday "Here's the Sc oop" was born. The couple worked feverishly on the concept of a newsletter that had absolutely no news in it. They would fill their "No News" newsletter with heart-warming stories, jokes and community events.“It was time for people to heal, smile and laugh again,” Lois says. While Lois worked on design and concept, Al sought the advice of successful business people in the community. "We were very fortunate to have such wonderful people give us advice when we started out,” Al says.“When speaking about the start up of Here’s the Scoop, we always pay tribute to Dick Buchanan at Air Alta Insurance, Salim with Five Star Movies, Sandy Stoward with Royal Lepage and Marlene Weaver from Interiors by Marlene.” Al and Lois refer to them as the “Fab Four” since they have supported the publication since the f irst issue hit the s treets November 1st, 2001. The couple is also quick to acknowledge the tremendous support of the local Chamber of Commerce, and the thousands of readers who embraced the publication. "Sue McGinley of M&M Meats, once told me that the key to her success was that she never forgot those that made her successful. I've always admired how Sue runs her business and the way she gives so generously back to the community. So I took those words to heart,”Al says. Al and Lois donate 15 percent of their earnings towards sponsorships and donations to lo cal non-profit organizations and events. That strategy won the couple, the City of Airdrie's most prestigious business recognition, the Winning Edge Award in 2003. Al’s impromptu thank you speech came right from the he art. His closing words, "I don't know if we will ever be able to give back to this community as much as they have given to us...but we aspire to…" still rings true in his mind three years later. Today, ADvance Distribution and "Here's the Sc oop" continue to grow expanding to the s urrounding communities of Crossfield, Irricanna, Beiseker and Carstairs. The Scoop is free locally but readers subscribe from as far away as Australia, Britain and South Africa. A company mascot (Alioops) and community event cruiser ha ve been added to their promotional portfolio and they continue to support as many community events as they have time for.

Local Chamber WORKS for members The Airdrie Chamber of Commerce is proudly growing with Airdrie. The growth in memberships along with the introduction of new networking and sponsorship opportunities provides an environment allowing the membership to meet and expand their business contacts. Members benefit from both the business contacts they make and the friends they make along the way. The Chamber is affiliated with the Alberta Chambers of Commerce, offering credit card discounts, gas discounts, courier discounts and special benefit packages for small businesses.

AirdrieWORKS

answer.“Al walked into the kitchen on a Friday afternoon and I looked him in the eye and said ‘it’s time’.”

Marketing tools include sponsorship packages, business-to-business trade shows, newsletter advertising, membership directory and the annual Home & Garden Fair. This consumer show is the largest event in the Airdrie area bringing consumers and businesses together. “Our Member-to-Member Discount Program will be launched this spring promoting our members to actively support each other,” says Chamber Manager Lorna Hunt. “A key benefit for our members is our enhanced website presence. Members receive a free listing in the membership directory including a link to their website. On our website you can learn about Chamber projects, locate a member, view membership benefits and upcoming events.” The Airdrie Chamber of Commerce is committed to promote, represent and enhance the interests of Airdrie’s business community. For more info go to www.airdriechamber.ab.ca or call 948-4412.

Learn more: www.heresthescoop.ca. Back issues can be read online on Airdrie's community website www.airdrieonline.com. Submissions for stories, jokes, recipes or events can be emailed to heresthescoop@shaw.ca or by calling 948-5529. volume 2 • spring/summer 2006 •

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Contact the City of Airdrie Economic Development for more information at 948-8844.

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successSTORIES

Corey Wine, owner of Sign Concepts (right) jokes around with employee Steve King.

Airdrie is WORKING for these local businesses If Corey Wine wanted to, he could use the l ine “what’s your sign?” because he’d be drumming up business for his highly successful business, Sign Concepts. Since 2000 he’s been the supplier of choice for businesses in the Airdrie area looking to stand out with vehicle graphics, outdoor signage and banners. The growth in sales has been steadily climbing ever since (doubling each year over last) and this spring Corey took the big step and moved his business out of his home and into a stand-alone shop in the East Lake Industrial Park. And he jo kes – he dou bled his number of employees by hiring Steve King . He attributes his success to “knowledge, expertise and charisma. He’s also an expert at self promotion acknowledging he handed out business cards only for a short time back in 2000. “Clever advertising, that’s my secret, ads that grab the readers attention and keeping it fresh and memorable.”

Airdrie Canvas may only be celebrating two years in business, but owner Tom Barker has over 35 years of experience in an industry he says requires passion and an ability to adapt to client needs.“We manufacture for the trucking and construction industry, as well as the boat and camping industry,” he says by way of explaining the thousands of metres of canvas rolled up in his warehouse. He came to the rescue of the Festival of Lights this past winter donating tarps meeting safety regulations and he even stayed to hang them on the coldest night of the year. Going that extra mile comes naturally to Tom and even something as trivial as using up scraps of canvas from a boat tarp project and making the boat owner a duffle bag at no extra charge is just how he does business. Sue Methuen, owner of Prairie Sun Creations Inc., a web design company, was nominated for the 2005 RBC Canadian Women Entrepreneur Awards. “I had three amazing women helping me prepare the lengthy applicavolume 2 • spring/summer 2006 •

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successSTORIES tion form. The journey of discovery for me was remarkable. I had to step out of my comfort zone to do all this and by doing so the benefits far exceeded the efforts. Winning the award would have been nice… but in the end wasn’t as important as the p rocess,” she says. Brenda Moon, Branch Manager at the Airdrie RBC nominated Sue in the “Momentum” category. Maybe she should be nominated again. Her business has tripled in the last year and now includes a team of specialists who work with small to m edium sized business, non-profit groups and the oil and gas industry. Renae Gibson and Angela Scully know what women want and as a result their …ahem…cups are running over. The two entrebraneurs opened Hot Mama’s Lingerie and in less than 12 months expanded three times. April marked their biggest move yet to an 1100 square foot shop (next door to the Sally Ann) Bay 3 125 Main Street. Andrew and Nikki Engelleder have recently opened their second business in less than a year. They opened Mezzanine Hair Studio where Andrew cuts up a storm and now supervises several stylists and Nikki is up and running their newest venture Mezzanine Spa – an exciting new spa that promises to pamper from head to toe. Keep an eye on this busy husband and wife team, they’ve got even bigger plans Airdrie! Sal and Anna Maria Monna celebrated 25 y ears in the r estaurant

“I WENT TO BDC AND CASHED IN ON SOME REALLY INNOVATIVE THINKING.” At BDC, we understand that every entrepreneur has a distinctive vision of his or her business future, along with a unique plan to ensure it. That's why we offer financing and consulting solutions specially tailored to fit your needs, along with the tools and know-how

to help you reach your objectives. Whether it's real estate or equipment financing or additional working capital to support your business' growth strategy, we never forget that solutions should be built around you, the entrepreneur. Calgary North Branch 100, 1935 32 Avenue NE Calgary, AB T2E 7C8 (403) 292-5590 1 888 INFO-BDC Visit us at www.bdc.ca

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business with one heck of a party at Bella Italia. Their restaurant is so popular with Airdronians, reservations are a must. Sal is focused on giving back to the comm unity. He is coordinating a golf tournament for August to support a future women’s shelter in Airdrie. For details call 948-0039. Rob Ing has gaming up his sleeve. A successful videographer and producer, Rob believes traditional video and motion graphics are becoming inseparable in any top quality production. He is currently collaborating with another local entrepreneur to create a DVD trivia game. Rob Ing Productions specializes in educational, training, promotional and other corporate video p roductions. You can f ind him at www.robingproductions.ca Giovanni and Karen Macagnino arrived in Airdrie in March (you’ll remember them from the Fall 2005 feature; Letters from the UK) Immigrating from Great Britain to give their young daughter Amity a better life, both Karen and Giovanni are eager to set down roots in Airdrie. Karen is opening the Airdrie Academy of Ballet operating out of the Airdrie Yoga Studio and Giovanni is using his gregarious personality to pursue a career in sales. Kudos the staff at the Holiday Inn Express Airdrie – they not only made the Macagnino’s move to Canada e asier they made them feel right at home until they moved into their house. Little Amity was


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treated like royalty – staff bought her gifts, offered to baby sit and as Giovanni says “the staff and management went over and above any expectations we could have had.“

business to newcomers by calling 948-2589. The Airdrie Women in S mall Business Association (AWSBA) unites women operating businesses in Airdrie and surrounding areas. Established in 2004, the goal of the association is to provide an opportunity for women to support women in business.

“That’s the way we treat all g uests,” says Renae Holmes, Senior Guest Services Agent,“we want everyone to have the best experience possible while staying with us.”The hotel has been hosting a growing roster of newcomers from all over the world. Some guests call the hotel home for up to three months until their permanent accommodations are ready. The Holiday Inn Express Airdrie has 79 rooms and is approaching their one year anniversary in Airdrie.

Forty members strong, AWSBA meets once a month to promote the exchange of ideas and business skills. Members come from varied backgrounds and represent a broad range of businesses, including home party, home based, retail, and consulting companies.

New Business? Welcome Wagon has go t your number! The Business and Professional Welcome Wagon is a di vision of Welcome Wagon Ltd. New owner/managers or professionals are welcomed into the Airdrie business community by Welcome Wagon representatives Marjorie Rockburn and Stephanie Valance with gifts from participating companies and tons of community information.

If you would like to be a part of this dynamic organization, consider attending the next monthly meeting. AWSBA meets on the third Monday of each month at the Airdrie Co-op Community Meeting Room. If you are interested in learning more about this exciting organization, please contact Joan Bell at 912-7502 o r www.airdriewomen.ca.

This is a great business to business resource for companies looking to attract work and or contacts from new business arrivals. Marjorie claims it’s the best job in the world – giving gifts and asking nothing in return.

Got news about your business? Get it to us no later than September 5th for the fall issue of AirdrieLIFE. AirdrieLIFE@shaw.ca

Get on the wagon and have Marjorie or Stephanie introduce your

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cityLIVING

AirdrieLIFE is… mine!

I

am writing my editorial in the middle of proofing the finished pages you now are holding. It’s a very special moment when you hold in your own hands the fruits of your labors, when finally after months of sales calls, interviews, meetings, story follow ups, lunches (thanks Renee), a thousand phone calls and a thousand more hours in front of my computer, that I get m y first glimpse at how it all finally comes together (thanks Kim). This has sort of been my impression of Airdrie these past few months, new intersections are now in full operation and we go “ah, now I see what all the construction hassle was for,” new subdivisions and shopping centres have sprung to life, and if its any indication of the crowds I had to get through to take photos at the show homes (do you realize there are over 30 of them?), we are indeed a very desirable place to live. What gratifies me the most is re-reading the stories and being reminded again at just how many amazing people live here. I’m not talking about our Olympic athletes and recording stars – we’ve got those and we’re darn proud of ‘em, yes, but the ordinary every day people who make life here something special for others. This was my focus this issue and I hope you enjoy learning about some of the people “in your neighbourhood.” Oprah has a great theme this year “what have you done today to make you feel proud?” I’d like to steal it because I think the people we interviewed this issue should all feel proud. And I’m proud to share these stories with you. Now I turn the que stion to you – what have you done today to make you feel proud? Are you our next feature? Enjoy the summer months Airdrie!

Sherry Shaw-Froggatt

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s p r i n g / s u m m e r 2 0 0 6 • v o l u m e 2 • n u m b e r 2 • w w w. a i r d r i e . c a

AirdrieLIFE THE OFFICIAL GUIDE TO LIFE IN THE CITY OF AIRDRIE

We're building a great city!

Inside this issue: meet some great Airdronians, discover some exciting new communities, learn timely City information and get down to business with our special feature section "AirdrieWORKS".

Profile for airdrielife magazine

airdrielife spring 2006  

airdrielife spring 2006