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AIP RECEIVES GLOBAL CONGRATULATIONS FOR 50TH ANNIVERSARY

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he World Packaging Organisation congratulates the Australian Institute of Packaging upon reaching a significant milestone - 50 years of serving the Australian packaging community!

Packaging is certainly a strategic tool for business success. Packaging has become a strategic social and economic tool as well. It touches all of humanity every day in multiple ways. Packaging is a complex subject, that brings together virtually all disciplines including science, engineering, art and design, manufacturing, marketing and advertising, and testing. For all its complexity, packaging brings positive impact to the simplest and most basic needs, including safe food, clean water, reliable pharmaceuticals, and effective product protection throughout the supply chain. WPO is dedicated to 'Better Quality of Life Through Better Packaging For More People,' and we are proud to include AIP among our most important and active members. We look forward to so many more years of cooperation and success as we work together to promote the importance of packaging to Australians and to all nations around the world. CONGRATULATIONS! Thomas L Schneider, CPP President World Packaging Organisation

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t IOM3 and the Packaging Society in the United Kingdom we are delighted to join with colleagues at the Australian Institute of Packaging in celebrating its 50th Anniversary. Our long association with the AIP, in our present guise and formally as the UK Institute of Packaging has brought benefits to both our organisations; especially in the field of packaging education. The AIP has shared with us developments in this area over many years as we have both been the standard bearers for enhancing the skills and expertise for the packaging industry in our respective countries. Long may this association continue. Gordon Stewart Director of Education IOM3

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n behalf of the Packaging Council of Singapore I extend my heartiest congratulations to the Australian Institute of Packaging(AIP) in celebrating its 50th Anniversary. AIP's tireless effort in inculcating public awareness of sustainable packaging, as well as fast pace technologies and innovation is highly commendable. AIP's achievements and commitments to its course auger well for many more successful years ahead. Your milestone achievement is high commendable. HAPPY 50TH ANNIVERSARY AIP!! Annabelle Tan Chairman Packaging Council of Singapore

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modern world without packaging – impossible. Packaging is not everything, but everything is nothing without packaging. That means, the vital question remains- What is good packaging? What is really good packaging? To find answers to these questions is very exciting. And believe me: there is not just one answer, there are many! AIP has discovered many of these answers in the last 50 years! Congratulations to the AIP from Austria! Johannes Bergmair President Austria Packaging Institute


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he Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) was founded on the 12th of September 1963 in response to a need for packaging technologists to interact and provide a professional identity for individuals within the packaging industry.

The AIP is the only professional body designed to educate, train and develop packaging technologists and other individuals involved within the packaging industry throughout Australasia.

AIP MISSION STATEMENT

• To serve as an independent professional body of packaging specialists. • To promote professional standards of competency through education and training. • To advance and promote the standing of packaging specialists as a profession. • To serve and establish the confidence of the community in the packaging profession. • To aim towards professional qualifications for all Members. • To uphold professional integrity and ethics within the profession of packaging.

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AIP FOUNDATION MEMBERS

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he AIP was established on the 12th of September 1963 by a key group of foundation members listed below. Without their vision the AIP would not be here 50 years later.

FROM MELBOURNE 1. Noel McLennan 2. Arthur Harris 3. Frederich M. Flentje 4. Edward R. Dann 5. William A. Ross 6. Marcus Heselev 7. Alfred P Lambell FROM NEW SOUTH WALES 1. Leslie Buck 2. Ray Cox 3. E.G Davis 4. A. Hislop 5. G. Jeudwine 6. F.H Ottaway 7. W. Smith 8. J. Trotter

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12th of September 1963 12th of September 1963 12th of September 1963 12th of September 1963 12th of September 1963 12th of September 1963 7th July 1964


AIP NATIONAL PRESIDENTS

CURRENT-2012

2012-2010

2010-2008

Ralph Moyle MAIP

Pierre Pienaar FAIP

Craig Wellman MAIP

2006-2004

2004-2002

George Ganzenmuller Dip.Pkg.Tech.FAIP

Emeritus Professor Harry Lovell, OAM, FAIP

2000-1998

1998-1995

George Ganzenmuller Dip.Pkg.Tech.FAIP

Emeritus Professor Harry Lovell, OAM, FAIP

1995 -1993

1993-1991

1991-1988

Terry Waterson FAIP

Ian Fletcher FAIP

Mark Kerr FAIP

1988-1986

1986-1985

1985-1984

Adrian Henning MAIP

Don Ferguson FAIP (dec)

Noel Turner FAIP (dec)

2008-2006 Llewelyn Stephens FAIP

2002-2000 Jeff Egan MAIP

1983-1981

1981-1979

1979-1976

Gordon Willis

Leslie Wright MAIP

Frank Kassowitz FAIP (dec)

1976-1975

1975-1973

1973-1971

Bruce Deitch MAIP

William Hutton MAIP

Kenneth Alexander FAIP

1971-1968

1968-1966

1966-1963

Les Buck FAIP (dec)

Mackenzie Gregory MAIP

Noel McLennan MAIP (dec) FOUNDATION PRESIDENT

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AIP FOUNDERS AWARD

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he Founders Award was originally named to honour the Foundation Members of the Institute and to recognise their contribution to the development of packaging technology in Australia. The Founders Award shall be given for outstanding performances which in a real way enhances the profession of Packaging Technology. In fifty years the Founders Award has only been presented to six AIP Members for their outstanding, significant and long-standing contribution to packaging technology and the wider packaging industry.

2012 Llewellyn Stephens FAIP

2008 George Ganzenmuller Dip.Pkg.Tech.FAIP

2002 Emeritus Professor Harry Lovell, OAM, FAIP

1987 Frank Kassowitz FAIP (dec)

1985 Peter Acton MAIP

1983 Les Buck FAIP (dec)

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AIP LIFE MEMBERS

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he AIP recognises Members who have contributed to the Institute as a volunteer for a long period of time and who have made a significant impact on the continuing growth and success of the AIP.

2012 Richard Mason FAIP

2010 Michael Halley FAIP

2009 Ian Fletcher FAIP

2008 Emeritus Professor Harry Lovell, OAM, FAIP

2002 Colin Simpson FAIP

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HARRY LOVELL AWARD

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n 2006 the AIP National Board of Directors, acknowledging the important role of education and training, established the Harry Lovell Award in recognition of the commitment and contribution of Emeritus Professor Harry P. Lovell, OAM, FIFST CSC, F.INST PKG CSC, FAIFST, FAIP, to education and training over thirty years in the Institute, and in particular to the Diploma in Packaging Technology. The Harry Lovell Award is presented to graduates of the Diploma in Packaging Technology who have achieved exemplary results in their examinations. This award is not awarded each year and is only presented to outstanding students in packaging technology.

2013 Maria Indrayati Dip.Pkg.Tech.MAIP

2011 Misbah Khan Dip.Pkg.Tech.MAIP

2009 Nina Cleeve-Edwards Dip.Pkg.Tech.MAIP

2007 Sarah Squire Dip.Pkg. Tech.MAIP

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KEN ALEXANDER Dip.Pkg.Tech.MAIP RETIRED

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: I have been a member of the AIP since the 7th of May 1969, when I was employed by Australian Paper Manufacturers in their equipment and trading division, selling their then range of Fibre King machines. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP is an organisation whose members, with their extensive range of knowledge in different aspects of packaging, gave me an understanding and appreciation of this exciting, emerging industry. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: I gained the Diploma in Packaging Technology after attending the second packaging course at the Royal Melbourne Institute opf Technology, with the encouragement of Ken Bailey of Apropack – the Melbourne office of JL Lennard. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: I saw the greatest change in the introduction of the computer age, which enabled the industry to increase the speed, quality and performance of packaging and processing equipment. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Look at packaging with an open mind; be innovative by trying every material and method to move a product ‘from A to Z’. Consider packaging suitable for the ageing population! MY MENTOR WAS: Peter Geoffrey Wright (known as Geoff), who was the senior packaging engineer of APM Limited, and whose encouragement was greatly appreciated. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: I was working with the management of the Waikerie Producers Co-Operative Company, in the layout and design of their citrus packaging line, and then installing and commissioning the equipment – manufactured by RL Windsor and Son of Queensland; in order to achieve an output of 11,000 bushells of packaged fruit per day. Then in 1976, establishing Alexander Packaging Equipment, to design and manufacture smaller – in size semiautomatic carton sealing and packing equipment, which was desired at the time.

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PETER ALLEN FAIP

GENERAL MANAGER TECHNICAL AND FIBRE OPTIMISATION, VISY BOARD

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: August 1982. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP means two things, firstly an Institute which has a group of dedicated followers with a passion for packaging, work and helping the new starters to understand the industry. Secondy is one of Education and Networking. The Technical meetings allow for better understanding, communication, learning’s and also the networking ability which I think is the most valuable part of all. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: An area that has lacked in the past in the industry, but the AIP have been able to develop is the courses and studies which have helped a lot of people, new and old, to progress their education. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The late 90’s saw the beginnings of globalisation coming to Australia. The way businesses moved to react and also change the way products were designed and marketed, packaging included, was significant. Along with the retail environment and the major retailers following of the supply chain models from the UK changed the way of life for the corrugated industry and their customers. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Join the AIP and start to attend meetings, go to the Technical sessions, meet with the other members and learn about the basics of all packaging materials. This will not only allow an opening of the mind, but also set up relationships which will help in business and create some friendships which will last a lifetime. MY MENTOR WAS: There have been a few mentors along the way for me. The most important to me was Richard Pratt. Starting at Visy in 1981 as a tech guy who did not understand the paper industry and corrugated packaging was a challenge! The thing with Visy and Richard was that there was always a better way to do things and there was always a need to eliminate waste. I believe Richard understood the world of supply chains before the words were invented! The need to create, question everything but above all be hands on in the business and the community. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: After thirty plus years with Visy and in the packaging world I still enjoy the industry, the challenges and the people. The most important achievement is to understand that we must be prepared to change. Once we understand this we can create and cause things to change.

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BURT BEAUMONT FAIP

PAST QUEENSLAND COMMITTEE MEMBER, FELLOW SALES MANAGER - AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND, FIBRE KING

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: April 1997. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: Is a chance to meet with industry associates for social and networking opportunities. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: A key factor in the growth and sustainability of the packaging industry. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The changes to the packing format of produce into the returnable plastic crates (RPC’s) and the flow on effect into other grocery categories. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Is to gain the qualifications you think you need and then to gain the experience to place yourself at the top of the list of available packaging technologists and to stay at that position by keeping up-to-date with industry trends and changes in technology. MY MENTOR WAS: Harry Lovell OAM, FAIP. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Are the great friends and contacts I have made over the years.

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FRANK BOVA Dip.Pkg.Tech.FAIP

PACKAGING MANAGER, CORPORATE SERVICES, KIMBERLY-CLARK AUSTRALIA

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: December 1987. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: "The AIP is the premier packaging technology training body in Australia and provides outstanding opportunities for networking with industry colleagues." The AIP embodies the spirit of packaging as a specific profession which adds great value to any organisation involved in the packaging life cycle and supply chain. The AIP means packaging knowledge and know how to me and packaging knowledge allows leverage with all supply chain players to deliver solutions that in the end grow our economy and community. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Critical. The AIP is the life giver of packaging education. I was lucky enough and proud to complete my Diploma in Packaging Technology. Coupled with my Mechanical Engineering Degree I have always felt that everything was possible if was practical and underpinned by a scientific approach. I have learnt that a critical ingredient is respect for all other cross functions and once trust and relationships have been built, my packaging knowledge can be harnessed for the greater good of the team. Packaging education is perpetual since packaging technology constantly evolves. In packaging one must constantly thirst for and chase education. When this will level is attained and when some experience is attained and when people trust is attained one can carry out packaging development to the highest level.

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MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: Over the past twenty-five years there have been many significant changes. Key milestones have included: • The NPC and later APC evolution. • Cost saving drive of the nineties and early 2000’s. • Digital computer to plate prepress technology 2002-2008. • FMCG Manufacturing footprint shift to overseas and applying packaging technology challenges with emerging countries. • Rationalisation of packaging suppliers. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Read, learn, read some more, take a walk onto the factory floor, ask questions, respect and learn from the floor, built 360 degree trust , invest time and energy in the AIP Diploma in Packaging Technology or Certificate in Packaging. Understand that you need to work hard at building packaging profile - your profile-do that by constantly delivering value, constantly find new ways and constantly learn. MY MENTORS WERE: I have had several mentors over my working career. From my first job at Proctor and Gamble I found my managers Tony Coote (Engineering manager) and Peter Stanton (Operations Manager) inspirational. My leading hand fitter Vladimir taught me many packaging equipment lessons and the union delegate George Mosca enhanced my respect for people relationships and developing trust. Training underpinned everything at P@G who was well known for training investment in graduates and learning by being thrown in the deep end.


FRANK BOVA Dip.Pkg.Tech.FAIP Cont'd

PACKAGING MANAGER, CORPORATE SERVICES, KIMBERLY-CLARK AUSTRALIA

I recall completing my Mechanical Engineering Degree studies and then the following week starting work at P@ G and being put in charge of several packaging lines with a fitter and line changeover team reporting to me.

MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Some achievements have been: • Commissioning and fine tuning the design of cosmetics plant clean in Place system at P@G.

Mark Kerr FAIP, my manager at Meadow Lea Foods introduced me to the AIP, he was AIP President at the time. Mark laid out a professional goal focused approach and taught me how to be disciplined and focused on excellence in my job. At Meadow Lea liquid groceries-Smithfield White Wings site Richard Smith FAIP (operations manager) instilled in me statistical process capability knowledge and process improvement excellence.

• Cross functional team member for PET jar replacement for Eta Peanut butter glass jar.

At Steggles, Geoff McGeachie (MD) believed in me beyond packaging. He guided me to take on a business development project with leading customer-Leonard’s Poultry and drive that to a successful outcome. He also inspired me to learn about equipment technology and provided backing to help me complete my AIP Diploma in Packaging Technology.

• Litho laminate retail boxes introduced to KCA-this is now the highest selling nappy packaging format in the Australian market.

During my AIP Diploma studies Professor Harry Lovell OAM, FAIP, provided outstanding guidance and communicated the core essence of the necessity for packaging knowledge excellence. I will forever be grateful to Professor Harry Lovell’s encouragement during my studies. It has always been inspirational for me to read about Professor Harry Lovell’s achievements or to listen to his many industry lectures/speeches or in fact just to meet up with him every now and then at AIP functions.

• All KCA packaging at global minimum weight and coupled with optimised measurable properties and extensive packaging savings each year over thirteen years so far.

And at Kimberly-Clark Australia my managers Ross Hearne (GM corporate Services) and Peter Crowfoot (Former GM corporate services) have constantly backed my packaging vision to build a team to deliver an outstanding value adding packaging service and go after expanding scope to fuel perpetual cost saving, process value adding and prepress project management and overall technical excellence.

• Rolled edge thermoformed plastic trays and leak proof flow wrap packaging introduced to poultry industry. • Extensive Packaging cost saving program delivered with Bain Consultants for all Steggles packaging.

• Technical prepress approach underpinned by numbers introduced to KCA and early industry movers with Digital CTP plate technology.

• Built professional packaging team at KCA. Delivers Graphics project management and packaging design service with on-going cost saving and value added initiatives. • Member of AFGC ECoPP management committee which developed pre-curser guidelines to current Australian Packaging Covenant SPG’s. • Completed AIP Diploma in Packaging Technology and received UK Institute of packaging global award for leading exam result and essay 1997.

Both have also provided excellent leadership development guidance as has KCA in general. Over the past twenty-eight years, I have always worked with outstanding market leading companies and outstanding people. The philosophy of all the companies that I have worked for has been that people are the most important asset and if you invest and trust in them they will fly high for you.

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MAXWELL J BUSHBY FAIP

CHAIRMAN/DIRECTOR, MAXWELL J BUSHBY (CONSULTING) PTY LTD

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: 1971. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP has been an organisation that has given me global exposure to my design capabilities and introduction to fellow members of major organisations. It is the vehicle to put intellectual capacity to persons in the packaging industry. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: I am a fellow of the AIP. I was awarded my fellowship for research into the packaging of dangerous goods. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: When members decided to introduce education and affiliate with other countries. Growth. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Learn the basics of all styles of packaging. MY MENTORS WERE: I did not have a mentor. I wrote my thesis on plastic packaging. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Apart from owning my own business. My pail design won the worldstar award in 1997 which is part of the world packaging organisation. I own numerous world wide patents in design and manufacture of plastic packaging products. I still have licensees paying royalties for my packaging designs in all major packaging countries.

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KEITH CHESSELL FAIP

CONSULTANT, SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING DESIGN

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: I joined the AIP in September 2005. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: "The AIP is the key Australian packaging industry group that provides a standard and focus for developing trained packaging personal." Being a member of the AIP and attending regular technical meeting and conferences has provided excellent networking and keeps you up to date with what is happening in the industry in Australia and Globally. The AIP educational training program and half day workshops provides the packaging industry, packaging technologist, procurement and line personal with short courses, practical training. I have attended four courses and found them very helpful. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: An important part of the development and up skilling of people working in the packaging and manufacturing industry. Especially for the role of Packaging Technologist, who in my experience get co-opted into their roles from manufacturing or engineering or product development. As well as on the job training and gaining packaging experience, the packaging technologist needs to be provided with the technical understanding of packaging. Industry has limited resources to do this effectively and formal educational courses as well as the short courses fill this important gap. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The development of plastics both rigid and flexible materials has revolutionised the formats that products cans be packed and has provided enormous flexibility, reduced materials and costs in packaging development design.

The second area is in the printing processes and the development of Digital technologist - this has dramatically improved the quality and turnaround time, providing Brands the ability to meet consumer demands and improve brand shelf impact. The third area is the rationalisation of the Australian packaging industry, which has changed Australian Food and Grocery manufacturing from Australian to a global supply chain. Other areas of significance changes: Bar Coding, Shelf Ready Packaging and Palletisation standards (Jeff Wright and ASPM pallet charts). MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Enjoy the challenge and the diversity in discovering the world of packaging. Never stop learning and thinking you know it all. Take every opportunity to undertake educational training, visit with suppliers and get involved with the AIP. MY MENTOR WAS: Unfortunately when I started in packaging, it really was a profession. Our packaging Suppliers were my educators (companies like ACI Glass & Plastics, Smorgans, APM). MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Hopefully I contributed something back to the industry over the forty-plus years. It has been a privilege to be part of a leading FMCG company with a vast range of packaging formats in the Food, Grocery, Beverage, Catering, Exporting areas. This has provided the opportunity to develop a wide range of FMCG packaging that set the trend as a market leader in Grocery and Beverage segments. The other privilege has been to mentor, train and developing up to twenty-five packaging personnel, who have gone on to senior management roles and skilled packaging managers throughout the globe.

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IAN FLETCHER FAIP

PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT, PAST NSW CHAIRMAN, LIFE MEMBER

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: August 1975. I was approached by Noel Turner FAIP, to join the NSW branch committee in the late 1970s. My first job was to organise and co-ordinate the IOP Correspondence course when it commenced in the early 80s. Our first graduate was Dean Cooper who won the initial, one off prize of $5000 from AIP to visit Interpack in 1984. I moved from NSW to Victoria in May 1984 shortly before Noel Turner died in office. Don Ferguson, FAIP took over the role of National President. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: Is a body of people who are involved in complex industries that include raw materials, machinery to make and fill packages, the design and promotion of products and on-going education and fellowship. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: The main reason the AIP exists - to assist in educating the future packaging professionals for industry.   MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The development of the 'world wide web' and the electronic means of communication - the size of the world has shrunk! MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: To maintain your networks and try new ideas and concepts.   MY MENTORS WERE: Noel Turner FAIP, Maurie Groves FAIP and Don Ferguson FAIP. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: To remain associated with AIP over these many years.

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GEORGE GANZENMULLER Dip.Pkg.Tech.FAIP PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT (TWICE), PAST QUEENSLAND CHAIRMAN, FOUNDERS AWARDEE, FELLOW, YOUNGEST 25 YEAR AWARDEE. INNOVATION MANAGER, AMCOR FIBRE PACKAGING

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: November 1987. I joined the AIP on the commencement of my Diploma in Packaging Technology way back in the second year of University studies in 1987 on the suggestion of my Dean of Food Technology Professor Harry Lovell OAM, FAIP, way back when I had hair and I was enjoying learning about Food and Packaging Technology. I was also starting a journey into a great industry, meeting new mentors and making new friends. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP is a team of peers that can come together whenever a challenge emerges and through collaboration, the team can create opportunity. As an organisation, the AIP has always been there behind the scenes to educate people interested in packaging and develop skills in the individual that progress the industry as a whole. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Education within the Australian Packaging Industry takes two broad forms. There is a small selection of formal academic based training that the AIP has consistently had a presence in bridging international and local developments as well as more targeted technical training on an industry specific or industry wide front; once again consistently supported by the AIP through conferences, seminars and site visits.

It was great to see the industry come together as one and proactively look for opportunities in the challenges of the times including making packaging safer with tamper evidence and juggling the dynamics of the retail ready packaging maze. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: The packaging industry is as diverse and interesting as the people who work in it. One opportunity; one success can open doors into other areas and new fields that never seemed apparent at the start. My advice is to learn as much as you can, build your foundations and then challenge yourself. The beauty of our industry is that you are never alone; and through teams that the AIP support around the country, you will find help and you will make lifelong friends. MY MENTOR WAS: There have been many kind, extremely intelligent and dynamic people who have helped shaped my time within the packaging industry but the one gentlemen who stands out is my Professor, my advisor on all things to do with the participation of a national board and my friend Harry Lovell OAM, FAIP. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: That is a hard question to answer and I will leave that up to my peers.

MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: My strongest and proudest memories of my time within the AIP have been as National President when the culmination of my team’s efforts enabled the National Conferences to make a comeback in 2000 onwards.

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MAURICE (MAURIE) C. GROVES FAIP PAST NATIONAL SECRETARY RETIRED

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: October 1967. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: Having worked in the industry since 1960 until I actually retired in 2003, I suppose one could say that during my working life the packaging industry meant a great deal to me. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Education is important. I personally completed a two-year Certificate in Packaging through the Sydney Tech which is now known as UTS. I was also the AIP auditor for the Certificate course in 1995. MY MENTORS WERE: My mentors were Geoff Wright (APM) and David Holmes - who was one of the earlier members of the AIP. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: I wrote a number of articles in the late 60’s and 70’s for the Australian Packaging magazine. Topics included the comparison of PVC and acrylic polymers for hot filling of liquid foods, pest infestation of the flexible package and freeze dried foods. I was also awarded the 1970 essay competition for the Australian Packaging Journal Education Award for an essay I wrote entitled ‘Freeze dried foods – the next five years of likely developments.’ I was also the 1986 World Star Packaging Award winner for the Asia Star Award. In the same year I was the winner for the Best Technological Advance in Packaging for ANPAC. The award was for ‘Bake in Box’.

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MICHAEL B HALLEY FAIP VICTORIAN COMMITTEE MEMBER, LIFE MEMBER

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: I have been a member of the AIP since 1970. But I had attended meetings for a couple of years, prior to being allowed to join the Institute. My boss was a committee member with Constitution and Rules as his responsibility, and the executive was very exacting in determining who would be accepted for membership. It was not until through my work I had proven acceptability that my application was submitted. But it did not finish there; applicants had to front up to members of committee and were questioned not only about packaging but etiquette and dress sense. Meetings at the time were held at South Yarra Club where jacket and tie were mandatory at all times. Even whilst eating unless the Club Chairman determined an allowance. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The Institute means many things to me, but above all being a member and on committees has added to my professionalism and knowledge. It was due to my involvement that an opportunity to attend the first international packaging conference convened by the China Packaging Technical Association in 1985 arose. I was invited to present a paper and represented AIP and Australia at that and two subsequent conferences. This involvement encouraged me to travel beyond our borders to study and increase my confrere list. Rather than labour the answer further let me say that enduring friendships and acceptance by one’s peers is really what AIP means to me. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: The initial and continuing reason for AIP to exist! The mission is to foster education.

A quotation I recall is “The value of a real great student is equal to half a dozen grain elevators or a new transcontinental railway,” AIP education courses, over the years, have turned out many great students but in this era of instant access to all manner of experts AIP will need to be even more proactive than in the past. No one knows packaging technology like a professional working day to day in the marketplace and AIP uses those people as educators. Relying on suppliers to provide technical advice is fraught with danger as bias will always win out over the full story. Using the wellknown 'Professor Google' or others is a handy information guide but can you be sure of the efficacy? Education is the only way that an unbiased assessment of a technology or market trends can be delivered and allow industry to produce competitive sustainable packaging and be globally recognised. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: Many changes have occurred in the half century that AIP has been in existence but I consider that the introduction of plastics is arguably high on the ladder of significant changes. My involvement in Packaging commenced in the period when all general freight was regulated and carried by rail. The railways had developed a set of packaging specifications to cater for the hazards of transport and in particular the number of physical handlings necessary. Goods from country Victoria to Brisbane in 1960 were loaded and reloaded minimum of nine times in the rail journey plus those to allow pick-up and delivery. (Standard gauge between Sydney and Melbourne in 1962 reduced the handlings to around seven).

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MICHAEL B HALLEY FAIP LIFE MEMBER

There were ten loss and damage prevention people at the Victorian Railways and similar numbers in other states accessing and developing new types of packaging. We had developed with Gerrard Strapping Systems a number of unitised systems to allow handling by fork lifts. Bricks are still unitised in the same manner, but pallet loads of beer originally secured with top angles and encircling steel straps changed with the introduction of plastic shrink and later stretch wrapping. Many other changes have occurred but containerisation, both for international and domestic transfer of goods above all other packaging industry developments is the game changer. After all, what is the definition of a package? It must protect the goods from the environment and the environment from the goods and a container load rather than many individual packages does that! MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Be conscious that we are now a multi-cultural country and allow latitude for people whose first language is not English. An advertisement many years ago for Renault cars stated 'ask the man who drives one'. This advice is equally applicable to the workplace. Whilst some people are reticent to pass on knowledge most are keen to assist new employees to become part of the team. But as the new kid on the block be a passive listener and be careful not to burst your colleague’s 'prestige balloon'. Private discussion will always win out over public confrontation. But workplaces can become insular so enrolling in AIP education courses and attending monthly technical meetings will expand your horizons and increase your professional knowledge. MY MENTOR WAS: Don Kellond (Victorian AIP President 1974 to 1976) a decorated Commando during WW2, was the head of the Packaging Department at Victorian Railways and has to be my original mentor. Mentoring is a meaningful relationship with another person. There are so many people with whom I have had contact and meaningful relationships over the years that are equally entitled to be called my mentor.

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It would be unfair to ‘name names' as an injustice can occur by omission when attempting to list the people who shaped your life. Each meeting I attend I come away with some snippet of new information so mentoring is alive and well at AIP meetings. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Only Mohammed Ali has claimed to be the greatest! Being elevated to Fellow and then Life Member has to be the crowning glory of one’s involvement in the industry. I would ask your indulgence to bring to notice: • Early involvement with China gave me an insight into the culture of the people through all levels of society. For a number of years beyond the first visit Don Ferguson and I hosted a number of delegations of Chinese packaging people that visited Australia. • At the first Conference a number of packaging experts from all around the world were in attendance. I have since visited many of these people in their home countries and have become lifelong friends. A number, at my behest, came to Sydney at their own expense to present at our home grown International Packaging Conference (September 29 to October 1 1987). • Redrafting the Railways of Australia Code for the Transport of Dangerous Goods that became the Australian Dangerous Goods Code Road and Rail. • Being involved with many changes in transport packaging such as fibreboard boxes for white goods, use of plastic container’s as alternatives to metal drums, approval of wraparound cartons as alternative to regular slotted containers (RSC) with internal dividers. • Aforementioned, development of unitised pallet loads and handling general freight by mechanical means rather than manual stowing. • My decision to decline a damage claim due to the cause being harmonic vibration was upheld by the courts. I learnt about harmonic vibration at a course run by the Institute.


ADRIAN HENNING FAIP PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: 1975. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: It means an organisation always instituting innovative ideas and principles in the future of packaging used in all areas of life and a control over legislation where required. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Paramount for packaging to remain cost effective and innovative utilising materials available and yet to be developed. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The introduction of recyclable packaging and the introduction of laminated plastics. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Have an open mind and accept the impossible as it WILL happen in design and technology. MY MENTOR WAS: Dr.P.G.Wright of APM. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: To be the National President of the AIP for the 1st International Packaging Conference October 1987.

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MICHAEL HUBBERT FAIP CONSULTANT, PACKAGING EXPERTS

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: I joined the AIP in 1979 – can’t quite remember exactly when Derek Hartley press-ganged me into joining the AIP. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: It’s a meeting of like minds, particularly in the area of packaging technology. You can make friends and retain those friendships for life. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Very important for the future of our industry. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: There are two things: 1. The introduction of PET bottles and containers to replace glass; 2. The rapid acceptance of screw caps for wine bottles despite strongly held opinions by 'expert' marketers within the wine industry that the public would never accept any wine bottle closure that wasn’t cork. Probably the plastic cork was the best incentive for wine-makers to move to screw caps. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Get a good grounding in the technology of packaging across all fields – you never know where your career may head. MY MENTOR WAS: I don’t think I ever had a mentor. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Persuading Gadsden (later Southcorp) to establish manufacturing capabilities in retortable plastic containers and (separately) in PET beverage containers – it took about fifteen years to achieve.

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ALAN KENNY FAIP

PAST VICTORIAN CHAIRMAN, FELLOW

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: November 1967. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: It has provided me with a career defining association throughout almost all my working life, gave me a wonderful industry group of peers with which I have learnt so much, encouraged me to guide, teach and mentor others throughout. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: So vitally important. On job training cannot provide any way all that is available through education. Again the experiences in learning and sharing with others cannot be underestimated. When I started the only Education available in Victoria, and I believe in other states was a Certificate course – very much typical of the training courses provided for like Technologists in so many disciplines so it has been of great encouragement to me to see what is now available. There were however in the early 70’s some excellent textbooks which were used as the Packaging Technologists 'Bible'. Probably the best known and used was 'the Packaging Encyclopaedia' published by McGraw Hill in the states. Not sure if that is still available now but in those days it was evolutionary and updated probably every two years. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The advancement in sophisticated structures and laminated materials enhancing shelf life properties, increasing recyclability and sustainability. Likewise the promotion of better management in the material usage, design of packaging to reduce waste and streamline manufacturing and packing line times.

MY MENTORS WERE: I believe I was fortunate enough to have more then one. Keeping in mind the Institute was only a couple of years old when I joined all the members seemed so willing towards in helping develop the skills with others. However Don Collett (my Packaging Boss at Kraft for eighteen years probably moulded me more into why I believed in setting high quality standards). One other who instilled the belief that quality was premium over quantity was my Father, who as an engineer with the army had the same requirements, philosophy and beliefs. Others who I also regarded as Mentors were Don Kellond from Victorian Railways (he was Victorian Chairman in my early years) and was Michael Halley’s boss then, in later times supplier technical representatives from the Corrugated Paperboard, Carton board and Flexible films divisions at Amcor and Visyboard. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Endeavouring and succeeding to improve the quality of the manufactured Packaging materials by setting challenging, achievable but consistent high standards in their manufacture. This was done by close consultation with suppliers’ technical people and their suppliers. In my later work in setting printing quality standards involving using performance measurement and fingerprinting, particularly with the use of analysis tools not normally used for that purpose. I guess I will never forget one new to the industry representative asking his technical people 'why not' and the unacceptable answer to him of “it’s always been done that way”. We need to be prepared to challenge and change.

MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Listen, learn, and actively involve yourself in Industry Associations, forums, events and events where you can share with peers.

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MARK KERR FAIP

R&D PACKAGING MANAGER ANZ, GENERAL MILLS AUSTRALIA PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: I started in the food industry the 1st of April 1982 and joined the AIP later that year. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP has not only given me the opportunity to learn and understand more about packaging but has also allowed me to meet and become friends with a large number of like-minded people. It is the people that have motivated me to maintain a connection with the AIP. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: One of the most important issues that needs to be maintained and developed. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: This industry is dynamic which is always changing which is one of the many reasons I have always been interested in packaging. I am passionate about the sustainability of the packaging industry in Australia. We need to have packaging that is sustainable (as an example from renewable resources) for us to have a sustainable industry. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Build up a network of likeminded people in the industry. A good network will allow you to solve any issue you may encounter. MY MENTORS WERE: I have had many – To name a few: Mike Morgan FAIP, Llew Stephens FAIP, Bruno Madonna. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: I have had the pleasure with working with a large number of people within the industry. I have been lucky to be able to introduce and train new people to the packaging industry; many of these people have stayed, grown and progressed as packaging technologist and managers. I don’t say this is an achievement of mine but it is an area I have derived a great amount of pleasure.

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ANTHONY KITE FAIP

PACKAGING PROJECT ENGINEER - NPP AOA, NESTLE PURINA PET CARE

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: July 1987. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP has been a source of information and education, also good contacts. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Improving, the AIP course is excellent and in general the recognition by industry that packaging is an important area is increasing. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The move to robotics and servo driven technology. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Join the AIP, visit AUSPACK PLUS, always listen to others and consult widely before making a final decision. MY MENTOR WAS: Graham Tatchell. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Automating our packaging operations.

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HARRY LOVELL OAM, FAIP

PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT, PAST NATIONAL EDUCATION COORDINATOR

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: 29 November 1988. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Education in the industry is important but is not confined to packaging technology which is a vocational qualification and a useful adjunct to a professional base, e.g. management, finance, designs etc. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The radical changes and mergers which took place in the late 90’s and the influence of the supermarkets coupled to the focus on waste and waste recovery. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: My advice to those starting in the industry is to look outside the food and pharmaceutical industries to niche areas e.g. mining, dangerous goods, air transport, scientific/measuring instruments MY MENTORS WERE: a) A leader and educator in technology from industry. b) A senior executive (Unilever) who broke new ground in education , changed the 'rules' and became CEO of the Food and Tobacco Industry Training Board –UK. c) A brilliant thinker and head of research and development. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Is up to my peers to judge!

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RICHARD MASON MAIP LIFE MEMBER, NSW COMMITTEE MEMBER

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: 2nd October 1996. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: I value my AIP Membership as it has given me opportunities to learn through Conferences, Seminars and networking with packaging professionals. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Very important and the AIP offers members many opportunities to advance their packaging technological knowledge. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The development of recycling, Light weighting of glass, metal and plastic packaging. The development of biodegradable plastics. The use of robotics. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Gain as much knowledge as possible the AIP offers many opportunities to achieve this. MY MENTOR WAS: The late D.A. (Dixie) Dean B. Pharm., F.P.S.,D.B.A., F.S.S., F.Inst. Pkg U.K. Dixie encouraged me to expand my knowledge in packaging technology. He provided me with many of his papers and booklets he produced for the U.K. Institute of Packaging. Dixie said to me “give me twenty minutes and I will write an article on any packaging medium you care to name”. He was a great mentor and I am deeply indebted to him. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: To be recognised as a packaging professional by the management of my company and my contacts in the industry. The AIP played a large part in this achievement.

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RON MINES FAIP

PAST AIP SECRETARY DIRECTOR, AZMINE PTY. LIMITED

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: December 1987. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: Fraternity. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Almost nonexistent in the industry except for the Diploma and Certificate courses that AIP provides. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: Electronics. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Find a mentor. Join the AIP. MY MENTORS WERE: Frank Kassowicz FAIP, Jim Nash FAIP, Geoff Wright, Barry Millen, Ron Dawson. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Staying in it.

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MIKE MOBBS FAIP RETIRED

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: May 1966 and elected on 27 May 1984 as a Fellow. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP has opened many opportunities and has supported me in my journey through the Packaging Industry. It became a wonderful source of information and development of skills through networking and education. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Critical to the advancement of the Packaging Industry, through innovation, and refinement of design. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The change from Imperial to Metric Measure for Packaging in Australia from 1976 through 1988. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Join the Australian Institute of Packaging and promote yourself through networking with members of the AIP Enroll in the Packaging Courses which are supported by the AIP. MY MENTORS WERE: 1963 – 1969 Edward (Ted) Stephens FAIP. 1969 – 1984 Noel Turner FAIP. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Having a share and direct input into the metrication change of detergent cartons and bottles and the resultant economies of cost reduction for the packaging materials, and for the transport and storage costs through to the consumer.

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RALPH MOYLE MAIP

CURRENT NATIONAL PRESIDENT, PAST QLD CHAIRMAN, PAST VIC CHAIRMAN MANAGING DIRECTOR, PACKAGING SOLUTIONS WITH RALPH MOYLE

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: 15th August 2004. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: There are many answers to this question but the, most powerful is to be member of 'a group of like-minded individuals' acting as volunteers who can maintain and grow a 'not-for-profit' organisation for 50 years and take it to world organisations and be respected for their professionalism and endeavour. I am so proud to be a member of this group of wonderful people. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: The force that drives growth, success and personal fulfilment of all who accept its core need. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: That it does not stop changing. The only constant is change. In Australia (and most of the western world), the influence of the retailers forcing change back through the supply chain is the most significant in the past ten years and this is most clearly demonstrated by the requirements for Shelf Ready Packaging which challenges many of the criteria for sound packaging performance. In the third worlds – the changes due to population increases increase the challenges of protecting food against waste. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Stay alert, stay focused, listen and learn to all those around you. Find a person with passion, drive for packaging, and work with them. MY MENTOR WAS: I have been fortunate to have many. In packaging – George Ganzenmuller FAIP who coerced me into the Queensland branch and provided quality leadership, Llew Stephens FAIP for his always-balanced thoughtful views and dedication, Harry Lovell OAM, FAIP for proving you can be firing on all cylinders at any age. In management, Barry Collet, The Danes at Plumose and Fletcher Jones. In life –my father. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: To have the passion to learn new aspects and influences that packaging can bring to our society.

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JIM NASH Dip.Pkg.Tech.FAIP RETIRED

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: 1970 – 1973 inclusive. Paul Haberland FAIP and I were in the initial Packaging Certificate Course conducted at Sydney Technical College which was tutored by Nick Jones. We would have been student members. I worked overseas until early 1978 when I resumed AIP membership. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP was my entry point in 1970 to the exciting world of packaging allowing me to expand on my science and engineering qualifications. The AIP has always been driven by people of passion and belief in the science and art of functional and sustainable packaging. The AIP is vital to the packaging industry in facilitating links between members and its continuing education role. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: The cost and time pressures on today’s businesses translates often to less internal training of packaging practitioners. So it is up to the self-motivation of individuals to advance their knowledge and skills both within their work environment and from external sources. This is where AIP with its guest speakers, factory visits and training programs along with membership contacts can prove invaluable. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: My earliest work memory in 1960 was the transition from tin cans and glass bottles for shampoos and liquid detergents to plastic bottles (HDPE and PVC). Next came the move from solid fibreboard shippers to corrugated. The increasing automation and speed of packing lines imposed higher performance requirements on packaging. Modular transportation modes and automated, high rise warehousing necessitated more efficient pallet utilisation and improved load stability.

More recently, the growing application of 3D modelling and Finite Element Analysis have refined and reduced the design iterations needed to meet criteria. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: 1. Join AIP. 2. Get to know helpful contacts within your industry. 3. Always look to widen your understanding of packaging related concerns outside your immediate industry. 4. E nrol in AIP courses like the Diploma in Packaging Technology and the Certificate in Packaging. MY MENTOR WAS: Noel Turner FAIP, Packaging Manager at Unilever. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Difficult to pin down. In the ‘80’s worked closely with APM (Dean Cooper and Kevin Lyon (Petrie Mill) ) to finesse cartonboard structures in order to improve performance on high speed (up to 300 cpm) detergent powder packing machines. This tied in with a cost saving move from full size end flaps to two-third flaps sealed using aqueous PVA adhesives which because of their relatively long tack times often resulted in skewing of cartons, poor sealing and as a consequence puffing out of powder. After much work with APM and fine tuning of packing machine settings the process was reliably accomplished. Other Unilever companies around the world tried unsuccessfully to emulate our success. A few years later, timed application of patterned hot melts became available. The hot melt solved the tack time and skewing.

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JOHN NICKLESS MAIP

NATIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGER, INNOVIA FILMS ASIA PACIFIC

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: September 1984. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: Invaluable. It is a great networking opportunity, plus a chance to catch up with current members and past colleagues and associates. More importantly it has enable me to keep up with modern trends and packaging technology. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Paramount to ensure our packaging industry continues to thrive and attract quality individuals. It is also extremely important to ensure our industry keeps up to date as to what is happening both here and overseas. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The major change within the industry is really associated with the merger of many packaging companies and sadly the increasing loss of business to overseas competitors. Initially it was resin, then film, then printed re wind and finally the total import of finished packaged goods. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Ensure you join organisations like the AIP and seek active participation as it is a very good industry. Those that start in the packaging industry tend to stay, which reflects the rewards and good environment in which the packaging industry operates. MY MENTOR WAS: Many, but most of my knowledge was gained from first hand experience. As sales professional I have had the benefit of meeting with all facets of the plastics and packaging industry. I value all the friendships and business partners I have dealt with over my forty years in the plastic and films business. “Companies open doors but people do business.� MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: There are many, however being acknowledged by the AIP for my contribution to the packaging industry is probably one of the highlights. It was totally unexpected. I have always tried to help customers to grow their business and in so doing I have made a wealth of friends. By sharing my experiences and ideas with them I have gained their mutual respect and that has given me a great deal of personal satisfaction. Gaining their trust and whilst assisting them to achieve their own individual and company objectives business goals and objectives has been very rewarding indeed. It is a great industry and one which I am proud to say I am associated with Thank you.

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PIERRE PIENAAR MSc FAIP

PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT, PAST QLD CHAIRMAN, CURRENT EDUCATION COORDINATOR DIRECTOR, PACKTECH SOLUTIONS PTY LTD

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: I joined the AIP in 2003 and became a Fellow in 2005. I am extremely blessed and will be eternally grateful to the Packaging Industry of Australia in being so accepting of me when I first entered their industry in 2001 here in Australia. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP gives me identity in the industry in which I serve. The AIP is dedicated to creating networking and educational opportunities that help packaging professionals like me succeed. The opportunities in meeting opportunities in the industry are endless. My company is reliant on me staying ahead of today's issues, technologies and innovations in packaging. The AIP provides the guidance and the resources that I require to succeed in packaging, which is today and in the future. I am recognised as a dedicated professional member of the packaging profession by my peers. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Paramount to me, not only here within Australia but beyond our borders in the international community. My intention is to promote professional standards of competency through education and training and at the same time to advance and promote the standing of packaging specialists as a profession. As a packaging technology consultant, I frequently hear the cry of recruitment organisations and of industry about the shortage of skilled people in the packaging industry; particularly those with a formal education in packaging. Are you one of these companies who have become frustrated that your designers or your marketing or procurement departments or your production floor or your

sales people do not consider sufficiently the paramount importance that packaging should play regardless of the product it holds? Or, perhaps you have not stopped long enough to consider this importance since your focus is on the quality of the product. It is a rare product than can be separated from its pack when considering the power of packaging to sell a product. The lean experience has resulted in cutting costs throughout the industry in order to survive. Reduced labour costs, introduction of automation and technology, rigorous evaluation of all expenditures in order to maintain productivity and the elimination of poorly performing business lines and products has meant only the best can stay. Are you going to be among the best in your field over this next decade? Whether employer or employee, it may be time to consider investing in your future right now. You may think you are not in the immediate packaging industry and, therefore, cannot benefit from a greater knowledge of this powerful industry. We're all in this industry. Whether we want to recognise it or not. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: Cost is the top factor driving our industry today and the biggest driver of cost is packaging design. More and more emphasis will be placed on designing with the end in mind, be that sustainability, standardisation, rationalisation, food safety, recyclability and the perceived 'greenness' of packaging. For me it all revolves around the actual design of the packaging. So much can be driven at design stage, keeping the end of the life of the package in mind.

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PIERRE PIENAAR MSc FAIP Cont'd

PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT, PAST QLD CHAIRMAN, CURRENT EDUCATION COORDINATOR DIRECTOR, PACKTECH SOLUTIONS PTY LTD

MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Is to become packaging educated. We need to provide people with educational opportunities today, to meet the demands of the workplaces of tomorrow. "Education is for life — it is an investment that cannot be lost, spent or taken away." Distance Learning does require self discipline and the ability to apply oneself constantly to one’s studies, so students must understand this and ensure that they are prepared and able, in terms of self discipline, to accept this challenge. The advantages of distant learning or studying on-line is that one can study when and where you like. People need to have a goal, and be equipped to make it a reality. They need to be able to understand what is available to them, identify their strengths, and then make choices that will lead to a fulfilling and challenging career and result in a happy and productive life. MY MENTORS WAS: And still is Harry Lovell OAM, FAIP, a fine gentleman with a wealth of knowledge and always keen to part with that which he has learnt. No question is a silly question for him, he is gracious, full of wisdom and a beautiful way of sharing his experiences ,information and understanding. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Is being able to give in some small way something back to the industry that has given me so much. I have met such wonderful people all around the world, made friends with whom I could never have imagined ever meeting, have people in all corners of the globe that I can call colleagues and friends. My aim is to serve our industry through education until I am no longer able to do so.

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GREG ROBERTS Dip.Pkg.Tech.FAIP PAST ALBURY WODONGA REGIONAL CHAIRMAN DIRECTOR, 4P TECHNICAL SERVICES

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: I joined the AIP in 1989 on completion of my Diploma in Packaging Technology. I joined as a junior member some years before. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: Four things: • Promotion of our profession and industry, "A chance to help develop the next generation of Packaging Technologists" • A great networking opportunity; • Increasing personal knowledge through technical presentations. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: The key to our success. • The AIP has the major role of educating our Packaging Technologists in Australia, as none of our academic institutions offer suitable courses. • The AIP is continually striving to improve the education programs, and this is the key to our success, as it also brings younger people into our membership. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: • The computer: • Digital art and electronic art approval processes have been an enormous step from the old white board and hand applied black letraset lettering with tracing paper coloured overlay (some of our oldies will remember). • CAD systems, computer driven sample and cutting form manufacture and the accuracy of the work. • Communication systems. With most suppliers some distance from my workplace, the ability to photograph or film a problem, and immediately send it to the supplier’s relevant staff has been a powerful tool, though it doesn’t always result in an instant fix.

From a packaging technology perspective, SAP applications have often been a backward step, as far too much time is spent in front of computers on tedious data loading and management. This time would be much better spent understanding and improving material performance issues, innovating and training/upskilling. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: • Embrace it as a wonderful opportunity, with great employment options and lots of variety. • Be inquisitive; delve into the true causes of problems encountered, and always look for permanent solutions. • Be willing to share your knowledge and up skill your colleagues, as this lets you get on to bigger and better challenges. MY MENTORS WERE: Geoff Wright at Amcor Fibre, the corrugate guru. Geoff was so knowledgeable and passionate about our industry, and so willing to share his knowledge. I had the honour of spending a day with Geoff at Interpack in Germany, and will never forget that. Also Mike Hubbard and Gary Sayer at Wrightcel, and Bill Barling at Amcor taught me a lot about flexibles. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: The honour of representing the AIP as chief judge of the Australian Packaging Design Competition for 3 years in the early 90’s, and the chance to influence our educators and increase the profile of the competition. Also chairing the local Albury Wodonga AIP branch in the early 90’s, shared with the late John Harris, was a wonderful experience.

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COLIN SIMPSON FAIP

VICTORIAN BRANCH CHAIRMAN (TWICE), LIFE MEMBER

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: 1967. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP is a chance to be with and learn from fellow packaging professionals that make long-lasting friends. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Very important. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: Too big to quantify. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Enjoy what you do. MY MENTOR WAS: Too long ago to remember. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: • Victorian Chairman twice. • Time on the National executive. • Distinguished Service Award for Victoria. • Distinguished Service for Australia. • Life Membership.

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JEFFREY SMITH Dip.Pkg.Tech.MAIP CONTRACT PACKAGING SPECIALIST, PATTIES FOODS LTD

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: June 1980. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: A source of professional friends and others promoting the Packaging Profession. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Severely lacking in the industry and often taken on by people who are thrown into the job and learn by the mistakes they make. "On occasion I have been introduced to 'Packaging Technologists' who have no experience and were 'Told' to do the job of packaging technologist." MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The AIP establishing a working relationship with the Packaging Council of Australia. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Do the AIP Diploma in Packaging Technology. It takes time and patience. MY MENTOR WAS: Geoff Mason Jones at Moorabbin TAFE in 1980-1984. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: I have TWO patents against my name, and have devoted my entire working career to the packaging industry. One patent is for the short lived 'Aquavita' bottle by Schweppes. This was cutting edge design that did not need the traditional hot fill cage for the bottle structure. The second patent was for a two part Shelf Ready shipper for cordial. This design is now being promoted by Amcor.

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JOHN STATON Dip.Pkg.Tech.MAIP DIRECTOR, TECHNICAL CONSULTANCY SERVICES

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: April 1970. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: I have fond memories of completing the then Diploma in Packaging Technology course and learning a great deal about packaging technology in my early days in the pharmaceutical industry. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: I attained a Diploma in Packaging Technology (Credit) – and graduated in 1973. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The change to PET from PVC – which solved a lot of issues for product interactions and instability. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: You will be surprised at how complex and technical the packaging industry is. It is always improving through innovation. MY MENTORS WERE: Nick Jones, then Lecturer in the Packaging Diploma at Sydney Technical College. Also, Frank Kassowitz FAIP – Project Officer for packaging area of Standards Australia and a very active AIP member. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Probably when I organised the AIP educational seminars and turned them around from a loss to a profit making activity.

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LLEW STEPHENS FAIP

PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT, PAST VIC CHAIRMAN, FOUNDERS AWARDEE PACKAGING DEVELOPMENT MANAGER, LION

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: January 2002. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: • Increase my knowledge of packaging technology. • Discuss packaging with industry peers in a relaxed environment. • Seek out leaders in different packaging fields that i can then contact if the need arises. • Keep abreast of new technologies. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Vital if we Australian manufactures of packaging and packaged goods are to compete successfully in a global market. Our small population and significant transport dictate that packaging developed in Australia have unique challenges. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The impact plastics has had across the full range of packaging segments. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: You will be surprised at how complex and technical the packaging industry is. It is always improving through innovation.

• Harry Lovell OAM, FAIP – For his ongoing commitment and passion for education and maintenance of industry standards. • All of the presenters at AIP conferences, training sessions and dinners for their willingness to share their experiences. • Michael Grima MAIP - As a packaging designer and for his willingness to understand manufacturing . • A long list of marketers I have worked with for pushing the boundaries of what is possible. • The numerous manufacturing managers and team members I have worked with who were willing to support new ideas. • The packaging suppliers I have worked with who often worked to timelines that were locked in to launch dates rather than 'normal development' timings. • Nerida and Mark Kelton at the AIP National Office for their commitment to the AIP, often under extremely trying circumstances. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: I still rate the challenge of the re-design of the 2Lt Daily Juice bottle to maximise the units per pallet within the pallet height constraint as my biggest success.

MY MENTORS WERE: Many – • John Upstill FAIP and Ian Fletcher FAIP in AIP terms. • Michael Halley FAIP for his willingness to volunteer. Various extremely knowledgeable and passionate industry leaders: • Colin Edbrooke – cap application technology. • Phillip Higgins FAIP – cap technology. • Richard Smith FAIP – passion for the industry across rigids and flexibles. • Alistair Hall for his willingness to offer advice in all aspects of bottle design and manufacture.

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ROBIN TUCKERMAN FAIP CONSULTANT, RT CONSULTING

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: February 7, 1979. In the 70’s I joined Wrightcel, a Courtaulds subsidiary after a number of years working for German multinationals Hoechst AG and Kalle AG, as a representative for their flexible packaging and reprographic businesses in Australasia. On joining Wrightel I was introduced to AIP Member Dereck Hartley, who convinced me to apply for Membership. On April 4, 1979 I proudly accepted my tie and Certificate of Membership at the Toorak Club and much to my surprise found myself on the AIP Committee and the Editor of the fledgling 'AIP Newsletter'. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: A comfortable place where I can meet with kindred souls and share ideas, a glass of wine and a few laughs. The networking opportunities are extremely valuable and the friendships gained priceless. I guess I took the advantages of being a Member of the AIP a bit for granted, but this all changed when I started my own consultancy in 2005. I have been able to use the contacts gained as a result of my more than 30 years involvement in the Institute to make RT Consulting and Pack-Partners successful and respected 'go to' places for people, companies and organisations seeking help with packaging related issues. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: Critical, but so is the need to attract young people, particularly young women, to the industry. Somehow we must communicate to students at the secondary and tertiary levels that the packaging industry is a vibrant, fun and rewarding industry and I would like to see younger members of our industry acting as Packaging Industry Ambassadors at school vocation functions.

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MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: When Richard Pratt (not the late 'Visy Richard Pratt') returned from a visit to the States and opened the first supermarket in Australia in Frankston, Victoria. His 'Safeway' 'self-serve supermarket changed the face of FMCG packaging from one of 'bring-your-own' and 'returnable multi-use' packaging to pre-packed and single use packaged goods‌ and the rest is history! MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Is to listen and learn, by attending AIP Functions, studying for the Diploma in Packaging Technology or Certificate in Packaging and/or attending the Half Day Training Courses. Immerse yourself in the industry by attending packaging related exhibitions such as AUSPACK PLUS and getting on the circulation list of industry magazines such as PKN Packaging News. Social Media is also becoming a valuable source of information regarding new packaging developments both here and overseas. MY MENTORS WERE: I have had many mentors over the years, but the most memorable is my dear friend Professor Emeritus Harry Lovell OAM, FAIP, who helped me over the hurdle of thirty years of (relative) job security to the challenging world of consulting. I also thoroughly enjoyed working with Harry on the Packaging Council of Australia 'The Pack Pack' which is an Education Kit for Primary Schools. I particularly value a hand written spread sheet that Harry put together, listing the history of every packaging medium known to mankind. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: I was being admitted as a Fellow of the Institute in front of several hundred of my peers at the AIP National Conference Dinner on June 15, 2006.


TERRY WATERSON FAIP PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT GENERAL MANAGER, METALPRINT AUSTRALIA

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: June 1985. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: As Packaging Professionals, AIP members share common goals and members have the reputation of sharing issues and problems that transgress corporate lines. The AIP creates accessibility to information share. My personal experiences have always been fruitful and supportive within the AIP. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: More critical today than ever. In the past, packaging education focused on specifications, properties, and suitability of packaging materials for end purpose. Today the packaging professional has also to be prepared for social and political issues of sustainability, recyclability, Life Cycle Analysis, biodegradability. The AIP has excellent training programs available through it membership base. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: That now packaging has grown very large and as a significant industry to our society, it now attracts praise and criticism from the community and social media. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: Society in the 21st century cannot survive without packaging and the challenge for those choosing packaging as their career path is to gain an understanding of the position that packaging has in a commercial sense and as a benefit to society to balance the proper use of resources. There will always be a need for training from an industry perspective importantly the perspective will need to link with the social expectations and challenges. MY MENTOR WAS: Don Ferguson FAIP who never wavered in his efforts to improve and increase the awareness of the AIP and the packaging industry to employers and the community. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: The establishment of a market position for the Cheerpack spouted pouch in Australia and NZ. The Cheerpack is a technology driven pack that has transformed the baby food and yogurt product ranges for consumers. Filling machines integrated with pouches has achieved the hygiene and extended shelf life, lightweight and consumer convenience entirely due to packaging technology.

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CRAIG WELLMAN MAIP

PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT AND PAST NSW CHAIRMAN CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, WELLMAN PACKAGING PTY LTD

I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THE AIP SINCE: It feels like a lifetime but I officially become a member in November 2000. WHAT THE AIP MEANS TO ME: The AIP is a phenomenal organisation creating the space for like-minded professionals to collaborate, mentor and develop relationships that are both professionally and personally rewarding in a field that we are collectively passionate about. EDUCATION IN THE INDUSTRY IS: The basis for a well resourced and sustainable packaging industry derived through excellence and innovation. It is the most valuable asset that we have. MY STRONGEST MEMORY OF SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WITHIN THE PACKAGING INDUSTRY IS: The fundamental shift to carbon footprinting, sustainability and 'green' strategies that pay their way. As one example the PET resin with 25% renewable content coupled with downstream vertical integration of PET bottle making & filling enabling extreme light-weighting of containers and significant line speed improvements. MY ADVICE TO THOSE STARTING IN THE INDUSTRY: "Invest in knowledge – it is the best asset you can get." MY MENTORS WERE: Harry Lovell OAM, FAIP and Llew Stephens FAIP; as they mentored my development from the AIP NSW Executive through to the roles of AIP National President and Vice President before that. MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT IN THE INDUSTRY: Representing the Australian Institute of Packaging as its National President, taking the first steps towards joining the World Packaging Organisation (WPO) and contributing to a significant expansion in the Institute’s training and education portfolio.

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FIFTY YEARS OF EDUCATION

I

n 1954 the first steps towards the recognition of packaging technology as a profession was marked by the founding of the National Packaging Association in Victoria with another Division in New South Wales in early 1958. The association was largely promotional and was essentially a non-technical and nontrade body but it recognised that there was an absence of a cadre of professionally competent technologists the effects of which were being felt by certain sections of the packaging industry. However the National Packaging Association had been responsible for the sponsorship of a vocational course in packaging at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and a number of members were lecturers to the course. As a consequence John Pritchard NSW State Chairman approached Leslie Buck (Australian Sisalcraft) to take up the 'professional' cause and to develop an appropriate response. The Foundation Meeting leading to the establishment of the Australian Institute of Packaging was held on the 6th March 1963 with eleven members from various industrial companies and the CSIRO. Amongst its key aims were 1. To serve as a professional institute. 2. To advance the science and technology of packaging. 3. To establish the confidence of the community in the profession. 4. To encourage the study of packaging technology. Education was perceived as the core activity and the primary role of the Institute. It also indicated that membership would form the backbone of lecturers. In 1964 the Sydney Technical College after lengthy negotiations with the Dept of Technical Education initiated a similar course within the School of General Studies. In 1966 the Queensland Division of the AIP was formed. By 1970 the course in NSW had expanded to a four year Certificate course whilst other states were still engaged in working towards a similar target.

At the same time the AIP enjoyed joint participation with other professional bodies e.g. Australian Society of Dairy Technology, Plastics Institute of Australia and was also a represented on the Packaging Industry Standards Committee of the Standards Association of Australia. In 1972 strong criticism was voiced of the course at Sydney Technical College where it was stated that “courses were not being properly conducted, lack of printed lecture notes, inappropriate text books were cited as contributing to ineffective teaching.” It is important to note that the instruction was provided in the main by permanent staff whose basic expertise was not in the field of packaging. Attention also focussed on an AIP/RMIT course (Certificate of Business Studies Packaging) with the aim of offering the course in various formats across the states. The Packaging Council of Australia had offered Packaging Appreciation courses and the Queensland Division expressed interest in these programs. In 1977 the Packaging Certificate Course at Sydney Technical Course was abandoned but the two year Packaging Appreciation Course was maintained by the School of Management for 'what seemed to be mainly political reasons'. By 1978 it was clear that a more unified approach was necessary and to this end various overseas options were explored. Amongst these was an audio/visual course prepared by the Packaging Association of Canada and the 5-10day Residential courses run by the Institute of Packaging in the U.K. In the period 1979-81 the focus finally centred on the IoP’s Diploma in Packaging Technology offered by Distance Learning. The course had operated in some twenty seven countries over 26 years and had earned a sound reputation. The AIP determined that this would meet the Institutes requirement and an agreement was formulated. This development coincided with the migration to Australia of two IoP members, one of whom had been extensively involved in the IoP’s Residential Programs.

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FIFTY YEARS OF EDUCATION An established tutor had already been associated with TAFE in Melbourne made up the group with a Tutor in each state. Initially the Tutors were employed by the Cambridge Extension College –a reputable college which had a number of distance learning programs.

In the late 90’s the AIP introduced its own Certificate in Packaging which was endorsed by the IoP. In a modified format it served as a program for the Department of Defence until the introduction of the Certificate of Packaging by the PIABC in the United Kingdom.

One of the Tutors resigned in 1987 and a further tutor left in 1992 and neither was replaced.

In 2002 the Packaging Industry Awarding Body Company was formed- a UK Government accredited body responsible for the development of curriculum and accreditation of centres. This process brought a new dimension and standards to the Diploma of Packaging Technology coupled with a new Certificate in Packaging.

In the ensuing years the course gained momentum and the numbers of students grew proportionately. Throughout the 80’s and the 90’s short Residential courses were run very successfully by the AIP attracting full complements of students. At the same established educational institutions started to exercise interest in packaging as a developing area. At the same time packaging as a subject was being extended and given new status within some food technology courses. In 1983 the Queensland Agricultural College had introduced a Graduate Diploma in Packaging supported by industry with an overseas travel scholarship attached. Later following the Dawkins changes to the higher education sector the University for Western Sydney (Hawkesbury) examined the prospects for a B.Sc with packaging as a major but there was little support. Hence in some measure industry’s needs were being addressed. In 1988 Victoria University set up a Masters program in packaging. A notable academic was imported from the USA to ‘kick start’ the program and thirty seven students were enrolled overall. Sadly this fell from grace over several years and only some seven (?) students graduated. Several attempts were made to rejuvenate the program without success and finally in 2009 the university withdrew from packaging education. In 1989 a short course sponsored by the AIP and PCA was run in Melbourne at Moorabin TAFE.

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Tutors required formal accreditation and centres to meet stringent requirements. The course was developed after extensive consultation with industry requirements. In the Distance Learning mode the instructional material has been developed by the Institute of Packaging - The Packaging Society and licensed to the AIP and other accredited centres. The future is assured as we move to greater recognition of the qualifications with the Diploma recognised formally as the benchmark for a Professional Packaging Technologists. The courses are reviewed and updated at regular (3 yr) intervals and are well established. In 2011 new updated programs were introduced. And mark a new phase in the recognition of packaging at a professional level. Written by Emeritus Professor Harry Lovell, OAM, FAIP


An education in packaging 1954

– The National Packaging Association (NPA) in Victoria was founded, followed by the establishment of the NSW division in 1958.

1964

P K. AUG1 0 . P G0 1 3 . p d f

1979-81

– After great determination from the AIP to find a course that met its requirement, it found that the IoP’s Diploma in Packaging Technology offered by distance learning was a solution.

1983

– Eleven members from various industrial companies and the CSIRO held a foundation meeting, which led to the establishment of the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP). The group determined that the AIP would be responsible for serving as a professional institute, help advance the science and technology of packaging, Pa ge 1 3 3 0 / 7 / 1 0 , establish the confidence of the professional community and encourage the study of packaging technology.

1988

– The Victoria University set up a masters program in packaging but due to the lack of interests from students, the university withdrew from packaging education altogether in 2009.

– The Queensland Agricultural College had introduced a Graduate Diploma in Packaging supported by industry with an overseas travel scholarship attached.

1989

1970

– After lengthy negotiations with the Department of Technical Education, the Sydney Technical College initiated a similar packaging vocational course as one that existed at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology within its School of General Studies.

1963

– The packaging course in NSW had expanded to a four-year certificate course while other states were still engaged in working toward a similar target.

1966

1972

– The Queensland division of the AIP was formed.

1 2 : 1 9

Late 90s

– The AIP and Packaging Council of Australia sponsored a short course that ran at Moorabin TAFE, Melbourne.

1977

– The Packaging Certificate Course at Sydney Technical Course was abandoned but the two-year Packaging Appreciation Course was maintained by the School of Management.

– Strong criticism at the Sydney Technical College stated that “courses were not being properly conducted, there was a lack of lecture notes, and inappropriate textbooks were cited as contributing to ineffective teaching.” This resulted in greater attention on offering various formats of the AIP/RMIT Certificate of Business Studies Packaging course across the states.

PM

– The AIP introduced its own Certificate in Packaging, which was endorsed by the IoP.

Harry Lovell takes readers through the history of packaging education.

1978

– It was clear that a unified approach to packaging education was necessary where overseas examples were explored such as an audiovisual course that was prepared by the Packaging Association of Canada and the 5-10 day residential courses run by the UK Institute of Packaging (IoP).

2011

A Diploma in Packaging will be reviewed and updated.

2002

– The establishment of the UK Government accredited body responsible for the development of curriculum and accreditations of centres, Packaging Industry Awarding Body Company, brought new standards to the Diploma of Packaging Technology coupled with a Certificate in Packaging. Tutors were required to have formal accreditation.

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AIP LOGO

T

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he AIP logo was devised by the Foundation Members. It signifies several areas of packaging. It is related to the beehive which signifies perfect engineering and packaging technologies. It was also intended to bear the initials AIP in sequence.


AIP RECEIVES GLOBAL CONGRATULATIONS FOR 50TH ANNIVERSARY

T

he Australian Institute of Packaging celebrates its 50th Anniversary this year and in achieving this milestone is proof that the organisation has provided meaningful support to the Australian Packaging Industry. The World Packaging Organisation (WPO) values the AIP membership and participation in making contributions to the WPO vision of providing better quality of life through better packaging for more people. The AIP is a respected member of WPO and is directly involved in the WPO education initiatives that are currently planned to take place in Africa and South East Asia. Their fifty years of packaging experience will continue to make a major contribution in accelerating the transfer of packaging knowledge and foster the improvement of social upliftment, an important dimension of true sustainability. Keith Pearson Secretary General World Packaging Organisation

T

he African Packaging Organisation admire and salute the great progress the AIP has made in bringing the message and practice of packaging to Australia and the Global Community for the last 50 years. The Packaging knowledge, technology and systems of Packaging that AIP has promoted has led to a better quality of life for Australians. We look forward to learning and acquiring the packaging experience end educational knowledge of the AIP that will assist us to reduce the massive resource and food wastage in Africa and make the continent more globally competitive, grow economically and lead to a better quality of life on the African continent as Africa is now The Rising Continent. There is already considerable collaboration between Australia and Africa under the APO -Africa Packaging training program and we are pleased to be bringing the AIP to share their 50 years of experience in Lagos Nigeria at an up-coming residential packaging training course in September. Joseph Nyongesa President African Packaging Organisation

T

he Australian Packaging and Processing Machinery Association (APPMA) would like to congratulate the Australian Institute of Packaging (AIP) for celebrating their 50th anniversary in 2013. Congratulations and may the AIP bring another 50 years of education to the packaging industry.

Mark Dingley Chairman Australian Packaging and Processing Machinery Association (APPMA)

Celebrating 30 Years

O

n behalf of the Brazilian Packaging Association – ABRE, we would like to congratulate the Australian Institute of Packaging for its 50th birthday and for all its accomplishments during 5 decades of serious work that lead AIP to an international level of recognition. The leadership of an organisation as AIP before its market is key for stimulating continuously better practices for the industry, the understanding of society´s demands, fulfilling new trends on market criteria and fostering the investment on new technologies, materials and processes. In a global business scenario, the leadership of the Australian Institute of Packaging is key to promoting the competitiveness of the national industry, and make it always ready to face a more complex world. Luciana Pellegrino Executive Director ABRE – Brazilian Packaging Association

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AIP 50 year booklet  

As a part of the 50th Anniversary celebrations the AIP is pleased to present a series of interviews with many of our members who have contri...

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