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LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AWARDS QUEENSLAND 2021


Image (front cover): Andrew Watson / Munro Martin Parklands, Cairns - Andrew Prowse Landscape Architect Pty Ltd Image (this page): Hillbrook Anglican Schoo / Hillbrook Anglican School Campus Redevelopment - Vee Design


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AWARDS QUEENSLAND 2021

4 Message from the Queensland President

8 The Jury 9

5 Partners

6 Australian Institute of Landscape Architects (AILA)

Jury Chair Report

13 The 2021 Queensland Awards 13 Presidents Award 14 Civic Landscape 22

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Community Contribution

About the Landscape

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Architecture Awards

Cultural Heritage

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Awards Levels

Gardens 38 Health and Education Landscape 50 Infrastructure 60 Land management 68 Landscape planning 78 Parks and Open Space 94 Play Spaces 108 Research, Policy and Communications

116 Small projects 126 Tourism 136 Urban design 148 People's Choice

151 Acknowledgements


MESSAGE FROM THE QUEENSLAND PRESIDENT

This year we have received 81 entries, a record number of entries again for Queensland showing the strength of our profession amidst a global pandemic. We thank all the entrants who took the time to submit. We are thrilled to announce seven Awards of Excellence, 21 Landscape Architecture Awards and 5 Regional Achievement Awards across 13 categories. As well as the State President's Award, and the new People's Choice Award. Congratulations to all the winners recognised in this year's program. The last 12 months have seen an increasing spotlight on the quality and quantity of our public realm.  Cities around the world have been re-assessing the allocation of public space in response to changing use patterns necessitated by Covid-19. Many of the projects showcased in our awards programme this year 4

show the lead role that Landscape Architects have in designing these places for people and the broad scope of the work we do is on display.

It is also important to note that AILA Queensland is currently reflecting on the AILA Reconciliation Action Plan.  We are seeing more projects working with our First Nations community, and as part of our reflection we realise the need for a First Nations voice on our jury in future awards programs to guide respectful and culturally appropriate conversations – both as an organization and in the context of the project work our members do. Thank you to our 2021 Jury for taking the time to review all the project entries and deciding the winners for this year’s awards – and particular thanks to Lauren Newton for stepping in as Jury chair at the last minute, replacing Candy Rosmarin who was conflicted out.   We would also like to thank AILA’s Corporate Partners for making the Awards program possible.

David Uhlmann AILA Queensland President

Finally, this will be my last awards event as chapter president, however I am committed to the Qld Executive for the foreseeable future. I thank all Queensland members and firms for the support I have received in the last four years, and the continued strong support of our awards programme. Our AILA Awards categories, which have been refined in recent years, really do help us celebrate and reward the diversity of work created by talented landscape architects across Australia, and make our clients proud of their  investment in the better world created by landscape architects!


PARTNERS NATIONAL PARTNERS

Supporting Corporate Partner

Supporting Corporate Partner

Supporting Corporate Partner

Supporting Corporate Partner

Supporting Corporate Partner

Supporting Corporate Partner

QUEENSLAND PARTNERS

QLD Principal State

Awards Category Partner

QLD Major Partner

QLD Supporting State


ABOUT THE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AWARDS

The AILA Landscape Architecture Awards program provides a key vehicle for the promotion of the achievements and work of landscape architects in Australia. The Awards process is an opportunity for public and peer recognition of landscape architect’s work, and demonstrates to industry, business, government and the wider community the positive impact the profession has on Australian lives through the planning and design of the built and natural environments. The AILA Landscape Architecture Awards program has two stages: the first is a Chapter program and the second is the National program. In 2021, QLD, WA, SA, NSW, VIC & ACT will be presenting an Awards program, with the winners at Chapter level proceeding to the National Awards. Awards Categories Health and Education Landscape Civic Landscape Parks and Open Space Play Spaces Infrastructure Cultural Heritage Land Management Tourism Urban Design Landscape Planning Research, Policy and Communications Community Contribution Small Projects Gardens Regional Achievement Award Additional Awards Categories Presidents Award People's Choice Award

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AWARDS LEVELS

Award of Excellence The first and highest Award in each Category is the Award of Excellence. The Award is given to the work judged to be the most significant for the advancement of landscape architecture in each Category. There is only one winner of the Award in each Category in any year. The Jury is not obligated to make an Award of Excellence in a category. Landscape Architecture Award The second tier is the Landscape Architecture Award. This is a work of excellence demonstrating consummate skill that contributes to the advancement of landscape architecture. Projects given an Award are the best projects in each Category that have not won the Award of Excellence. More than one Award may be given in a Category. Regional Achievement Award This is a cross category award given in recognition of landscape architecture that has made a significant difference to improving the healthy communities and/or built and natural environments of regional Australia. The award is given at a chapter level only.


THE JURY QUEENSLAND JURY

Lauren Newton AILA Jury Chair

Debra Bela News Corp

Jim Carless AILA

Sophie Fossey AILA

Michael Lavery AIA QLD President

Julia McCann Karl Langer Award Winner

Paul Morris AILA

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JURY CHAIR REPORT JURY CHAIR REPORT LAUREN NEWTON AILA LAUREN NEWTON AILA

OurOur world continues world continues to adapt to the ‘new‘new to adapt to the normal’ as together we we normal’ as together navigate ourour wayway through navigate through thethe COVID-19 global COVID-19 global pandemic. pandemic.

for the as together we we Architects are doing partour part foroutdoors, the outdoors, as together Architects areour doing are drawn to ourto local and and to leadto the conversation. With With are drawn ourparks local parks lead the conversation. streets to exercise, to connect, or our on connection with thewith the streets to exercise, to connect, or focus on focus our connection simply to getto some fresh air. outdoors, play through discovery, simply get some fresh air. outdoors, play through discovery, engaging with community, to engaging with community, to This year’ Jurysloved to seeto the sustainable place-based Thissyear’ Jury loved see the deliverdeliver sustainable place-based opportunities and connections solutions for future opportunities and connections designdesign solutions for future Queensland Landscape Architects to come. Queensland Landscape Architectsgenerations generations to come. are generating around the are generating around the In this past year, we’ve In this past year, we’ve state and how our collective It has been an honour and state and how our collective It has been an honour and experienced lockdowns, where experienced lockdowns, where imaginations are shaping a bright professional highlight to be imaginations are shaping a bright professional highlight to be communities have had to quickly communities have had to quickly and healthy future. appointed as this years QLD and healthy future. appointed as this years QLD mobilise and people have had to mobilise and people have had to Chapter Jury Chair and I can not adapt to periods of isolation, not Chapter Jury Chair and I can not adapt to periods of isolation, not We champion quality design thank my fellow jurors enough, just from their local communities We champion quality design thank my fellow jurors enough, for public open spaces, enable Debra Bela, Sophie Fossey, Paul just from their local communities but from their interstate and for public open spaces, enable Debra Bela, Sophie Fossey, Paul connected and stronger Morris, Michael Lavery, Jim but from their interstate and international families. This connected and stronger Morris, Michael Lavery, Jim communities and advocate Carless, and Julia McCann for international families. This alteration to daily life has made us communities and advocate Carless, and Julia McCann for for greater environmental making the process engaging, alteration to daily life has made us all think about our personal values, for greater making theabove process stewardship. Ourenvironmental collective professional and all engaging, all think about our personal values, those we love, how we live, and the stewardship. Our collective professional and above all passion and experiences allow else memorable and fun. As those we love, how we live, and the places we enjoy visiting. passion and experiences allow else memorable and fun. As us to focus on collaborating nominated Jurors, I am proud to places we enjoy visiting. us to focus on collaborating I amand proud to with clients, consultant say wenominated upheld our Jurors, obligations In true ‘Queenslanders’ spirit, we with clients, consultant say we upheld obligations and teams, communities and our responsibilities to theour AILA, and In true ‘Queenslanders’ spirit, we are embracing the difficulties we teams, communities and our responsibilities to the AILA, and First Nations, respecting our I confirm that any jury members embracing the difficulties we faceare together, by re-connecting First Nations, respecting our I confirm that any jury members connection to country, and to who had a conflict of interest on face together, by re-connecting with our neighbours, discovering connection to country, and to who had awere conflict of interest on deliver holistic design outcomes. any submission recused/ with our neighbours, discovering places in our own backyard and deliver holisticplaces designthat outcomes. removed anyfrom submission were in recused/ Inspired by creating deliberations that places in our own backyard and remaining optimistic for a better Inspired by creating places that category. removed from deliberations in that consider the broader environment, remaining optimistic for a better tomorrow. consider the broader environment, category. Queensland Landscape Architects tomorrow. Queensland Landscape are striving to deliver strategicArchitectsOn behalf of the Jury, I would like As Landscape Architects over are strivingthat to deliver strategic design solutions influence the On behalf of the to extend our thanks to Jury, all ourI would like this As past 12 months,Architects we have over Landscape overall community lifestyle. congratulations design solutions that influence theentrants to and extend our thanks to all our beenthis reminded about past 12first-hand months, we have to the well deserving award overall community lifestyle. entrants and congratulations the undeniable importance of about been reminded first-hand As a profession it is evident, winners us through tofor theinspiring well deserving award our green open space, by seeing of the undeniable importance from As thisayear’ s 81 entries across exceptional design. profession it is evident, winners for inspiring us through our community’ s appreciation our green open space, by seeing 14 categories, that Landscape from this year’s 81 entries across exceptional design. our community’s appreciation 14 categories, that Landscape


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Image: Hillbrook Anglican Schoo / Hillbrook Anglican School Campus Redevelopment - Vee Design


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PRESIDENTS AWARD Recipient Details recipient Malcolm Middleton state award 2021 AILA QLD State President's Award

The State President may offer awards to individuals or organisations to recognise the special contribution by that person or body to Landscape Architecture, the Built Environment and/or Urban Design and/or for a high level of contribution to the profession and AILA. The President’s Award provides an opportunity for professional recognition of contribution and achievement, separate to the projects submitted in the core categories. During his time as the Queensland State Government Architect, Malcolm has been a strong advocate in promoting the value that landscape architects bring to good urban design outcomes. Malcolm has been involved in design review panels, awards programmes, and instrumental in commissioning significant Urban Design projects and strategy documents, including QDesign and the award winning “The Green Grid: Inner City Brisbane Study” by Lat27.   Malcolm is a long-standing supporter of AILA Queensland, having been a regular speaker, panellist and Awards Jury member for AILA. 

Image: Malcolm Middleton / 2021 AILA QLD State President's Award recipient

The State Presidents’ award is given on the eve of Malcolm stepping down as State Government Architect, in recognition of his dedication to improving urban design and public realm outcomes through a genuine cross-disciplinary approach to city design – one which highly values the role of landscape architecture.


CIVIC LANDSCAPE Sponsored by:


Projects in this category are constructed urban landscape projects that are public in nature and capture and contribute to the culture and amenity of the urban environment.

Image: Scott Burrows / Fish Lane Town Square - RPS


Queensland Award of Excellence Winner Fish Lane Town Square RPS Aria Property Group Turrbal

Image: Scott Burrows

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A once undesirable and derelict concrete underpass in the inner city has become a thriving, subtropical and safe urban parkland realm in this exemplary example of a civic and urban transformation.

Project Details project Fish Lane Town Square entrant practice RPS first nations Turrbal client Aria Property Group state award 2021 AILA QLD Award of Excellence for Civic Landscape

Fish Lane Town Square’s transformation is a demonstration of what is possible when forgotten, derelict urban spaces are transformed into meaningful public assets centred on a narrative of place that respects the site’s history, culture and ecologies while also embracing new overlays of contemporary stories. Through a series of purposeful interventions which now includes Fish Lane Town Square, championed by RPS on behalf of Aria Property Group, Fish Lane delivers a highly curated,

Image: Scott Burrows

unexpected, urban experience celebrating and respecting the site’s history, culture and ecologies while embracing Brisbane's unique lifestyle as an outdoor city. Fish Lane Town Square is the result of a detailed urban design process that commenced in 2017, where Aria Property Group and RPS undertook a visionary scheme to develop an urban park under the Railway Overpass. Collaborative discussions with Brisbane City Council, Queensland Rail and interested stakeholders ensured the purposeful evolution of the landscape, resulting in the delivery of an inspired and vibrant public experience. The journey entailed providing resolution to often conflicting guidelines and policies between the stakeholders with the end purpose of the delivery an inclusive, resilient, public space offering to the community. The successful outcome from the visionary landscape masterplan was to turn the private concrete carpark into 1500sqm of public space that would be leased to ARIA Property on a 99-year lease from Queensland Rail.


Image: Scott Burrows

Clean, lush, interesting, whimsical and balanced, the landscape approach to Fish Lane celebrates our subtropical climate and sets a new benchmark for adaptive reuse, innovation and tactical urbanism for many of the 'lost spaces' throughout our rapidly developing suburbs and within our CBD.

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The designers' vision returns the subtropical rainforest to this once negative space, where it flourishes harmoniously with core infrastructure and delivers an attractive, vibrant and shared public destination which redefines opportunities for valuable public life, discovery, and the reactivation of a revitalised culture.

Fish Lane Town Square is an excellent example of a landscape that has resulted from private and public interests partnering to deliver an outstanding piece of public infrastructure that benefits the wider Brisbane community, while encouraging and fostering business opportunities for local retailers. With the predicted forecast of South Brisbane’s population to increase by 312.5 percent in the next 20 years, public infrastructure becomes invaluable to the community. Fish Lane Town Square demonstrates how Landscape Architects can recreate and revitalise forgotten spaces into leafy, thriving, and viable public spaces that enhance quality of life for the wider community, restore lost landscapes and expand the accessibility for social interaction.

Image: Scott Burrows

Image: Scott Burrows


CIVIC LANDSCAPE NOMINEES

Indooroopilly State School 6FC

Indooroopilly State School 6FC

Birtinya Town Centre West Precinct

Image: Scott Burrows

Image: Christopher Jones

Image: AECOM

Riverside Green at South Bank Parklands supports the needs of Brisbane’s growing population by providing a new open space at the heart of the city. With an expansive events lawn, lush rainforest, subtropical pavilion and a series of outdoor spaces, the design re-imagines the former Riverside Restaurants as a world-class public space. Connecting visitors to the heart of the Parklands and the river, Riverside Green continues South Bank’s legacy as the people’s place, creating a unique destination that celebrates the life lived outdoors.

Riverline is the new bike and pedestrian pathway precinct designed by CUSP, as part of the upgrade of the Bicentennial Bikeway. Riverline is a strong, linear corridor that links with the city’s overall active transport network. It successfully addresses riparian, ecological sensitivity, and the site’s important historical factors and ongoing indigenous custodianship. The design is a robust and resilient response to climate change, through intensive site analysis, research, productive collaboration with key partners and through integrating vital elements, such as WSUD. It provides clear cultural and social benefits to cyclists, pedestrian, students, visitors and CBD residents.

AECOM was engaged by Stockland to undertake landscape design, superintendence and construction administration of the Birtinya Town Centre West streetscape and public works (external works). The AECOM designed streetscape and public works were tasked with expressing the language of the shopping centre into the public realm environs to ensure an attractive, legible, and welcoming doorstep is always presented to arriving patrons. With strong tethers to community values, activities, and everyday life, the Town Centre has already begun to transform into a vibrant destination as surrounding community of Birtinya continues to evolve and grow.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Hassell

entrant practice CUSP (Qld) Pty Ltd

entrant practice AECOM Landscape

first nations Turrbal & Jagera

first nation Yuggera

client South Bank Corporation

client Destination Brisbane Consortium

Architecture first nation Gubbi Gubbi client Stockland

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Ipswich CBD Redevelopment: Nicholas St Precinct & Tulmur Place

Picnic in springwood PARK

Image: Buchan

Image: David Clarke

Tulmur Place and Nicholas Street is the visionary new heart of the revitalised Ipswich CBD, one of Australia’s fastest-growing regional centres. The design of Nicholas Street (previously a mall) and Tulmur Place (a former shopping centre) has sparked an important conversation around the changing role of modern regional centres and how to better adapt these locations to celebrate South East Queensland’s sub-tropical environment and lifestyle. Thoughtful place– making initiatives, coupled with forward– thinking design approaches have resulted in a striking entertainment and civic hub that is embraced by locals and visitors, and offers an enduring sense of place.

Through the key decision to look forward to the place where roads become the future parks, to how we prioritise and acknowledege local, to how we celebrate community this project sets about to create a place for the people of Springwood that encourages the growth of small business. This forward-looking approach to urban placemaking contributes to the discourse on the future of the road and the current recognition of the importance of green space in the time of Covid. Springwood represents a vision for the new place, a new way of being, a place that is driven by a community.

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Vee Design

entrant practice Logan City Council

first nation Jagera, Yuggera and Ugarapul

first nation Jagera

client Ipswich City Council

client Logan City Council


COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION

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Projects in this category included constructed projects or strategies delivered either: As a pro bono service (or significantly reduced fee) to the community, or, have positively impacted a disadvantaged individual or group of users who wouldn’t normally have access to design expertise.

Image: Archipelago / Poona Community Infrastructure Plan - Fraser Coast Regional Council and Archipelago


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Poona Community Infrastructure Plan Fraser Coast Regional Council and Archipelago Fraser Coast Regional Council Badtjala

Image: Archipelago

This plan is a step toward authentically shaping place and stimulating ownership and stewardship in a coastal town that is working to support tourism as well as its own local community. The results of this service demonstrates a positive and collaborative methodology. 24


Though the site analysis is somewhat simplified, the designers have been attentive to the local context and tailored the actionable priorities to those conditions. The jury felt there was room to improve where expansion infrastructure over ecological values was concerned, however the work produced was appropriate and well delivered for the community. It would be great to see it implemented. Project Details project Poona Community Infrastructure Plan entrant practice Fraser Coast Regional Council and Archipelago first nations Badtjala client Fraser Coast Regional Council state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Community Contribution

The Poona Community Infrastructure Plan is a practical community resource developed by Fraser Coast Regional Council and Archipelago to pragmatically guide infrastructure planning for a permanent community of 481 residents that swells to many thousands each holiday season and every long weekend. Noteworthy for its bespoke practicality, the Infrastructure Plan sets in place a capital expenditure plan for both hard and soft community infrastructure. Fundamentally the project evidences the grass roots

Image: Archipelago

practicality of landscape architects and their unparallel ability to be parallel advocates - both stewards of the natural environment and champions of sensitive change for people in special places. Working closely with Fraser Coast Regional Council (FCRC) and the Poona Community Progress Association (PCPA), the Poona Community Infrastructure Plan (PCIP) led by Archipelago delivered a provocation document that sought to encourage the community to help shape their environment while creating a tool that would prompt Council, stakeholder and community engagement when planning and delivering community infrastructure for the Poona community.

Image: Archipelago


CULTURAL HERITAGE NOMINEES

Spear Lily Park

Image: Saunders Havill

Ecco Ripley is a master planned, 5 Green Star estate located in the western corridor at Ripley, Ipswich. The latest precinct is bordered by Bundamba Creek and contains approximately 10 hectares of open space.

Project Details entrant practice Saunders Havill Group first nations Yuggera client Sekisui House Australia

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Projects in this category are constructed projects or strategies that demonstrate the restoration, conservation, enhancement, maintenance, or adaptive reuse of culturally significant sites.

Image: SEKISUI HOUSE / Spear Lily Park - Saunders Havill Group


GARDENS Sponsored by:

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Projects in this category include constructed private and public gardens that contribute to the role and understanding of the garden in contemporary society and culture.

Image: Yan Chen / Lucent - Form Landscape Architects


Queensland Award of Excellence Winner Lucent Form Landscape Architects Cavcorp Yuggera

Image: Yan Chen

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This garden project benchmarks the new Australian dream by presenting a comfortable, attractive, functional and amenity filled alternative to the suburbs. The clever connections, ground level activation and deep planting methodology of Lucent paints it as a building that breathes, and a model for future city living.

Project Details project Lucent entrant practice Form Landscape Architects first nations Yuggera client Cavcorp state award 2021 AILA QLD Award of

Lucent is a contemporary mixed use multi residential tower that embraces and celebrates the subtropical landscape and lifestyle of Brisbane City and its people.

Excellence for Gardens

Multi-level gardens, green roofs and trellises seamlessly blend with the architectural layers and ground level retail interface, while a world leading rooftop recreation facility overlooks the Brisbane CBD and surrounding city scape. This is a development that sets the benchmark for the Brisbane City Council's Buildings that Breathe Guidelines, from broad urban

design moves, through to the finest grain of landscape detail. Form Landscape Architects were engaged at the outset of the design process for this multi residential apartment development collaborating with a client that has a passion for landscape and contemporary design and a consultant team open to the genuine integration of landscape into a cohesive “green” building response. With a strategy of not only embracing but exceeding the Local Authorities Buildings that Breathe Guidelines the team set about interrogating the design to explore extensive opportunities for sustainable and engaging landscape layers over multiple levels in the building while responding to the inner-city urban context and the sites prevailing climatic conditions. A key objective was to provide an activated ground plane dominated by planting and not planter walls, resulting in the majority of gardens finishing flush with adjacent pedestrian pavements.

Image: Yan Chen


Image: Frederick Jones

This garden project benchmarks the new Australian dream by presenting a comfortable, attractive, functional and amenity filled alternative to the suburbs. The clever connections, ground level activation and deep planting methodology of Lucent paints it as a building that breathes, and a model for future city living.

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Lucent is an exemplary demonstration of a housing typology that is instrumental in reaching sustainable development goals. Medium and high density living is a crucial tool in reducing urban sprawl, resource consumption and vehicular emissions.

In addition to this was to provide a world class communal recreational rooftop for the residents of the building that celebrates our subtropical climate and outdoor lifestyle. Lucent successfully celebrates Queensland's subtropical climate and lifestyle and has already received numerous industry awards for Urban Design and Architecture. The design has been carefully composed capturing breezes through spaces, allowing sunlight to penetrate into the ground level retail areas and pathways, providing shade from hot afternoon sun, and harvesting stormwater for garden irrigation reuse.

Image: Yan Chen

In addition to this, the development has become an icon of Brisbane's healthy lifestyle. Recently receiving the inaugural Lord Mayors Brisbane Buildings that Breath Architecture prize has only confirmed the successful collaboration of a team and client with common vision and a desire to deliver a project that is an asset not only to its residents but the greater Brisbane community. Image: Frederick Jones


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Riverbank House Wilson Architects Yuggera

Image: Alex Chomicx

The Riverbank House leads the narrative of rediscovering the Australian backyard and spatialises an admirable ideology of cohabitation culture. The juxtaposition between vegetation that is manicured and controlled, and that which is unconstrained and autonomous, creates a dichotomous relationship which cleverly intensifies its opposing condition’s experience. 34


Though working with challenging site conditions, Wilson Architects have increased the local ecosystem services of habitation, biodiversity, and pollination. The restorative methodology of this project demonstrates a leadership in contemporary gardens and small lot living.

Project Details project Riverbank House entrant practice Wilson Architects first nations Yuggera state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Gardens

The Riverbank House, created for a Brisbane family brings together a place for its owners and the natural environment to co-exist. The home straddles two landscapes: to the south a riverbank escarpment resplendent with mature figs and eucalypts, and a curated ‘wild’ courtyard to the north. The unencumbered views to the north and south are ‘borrowed’ into the garden settings which envelop the home. Occupation of the site is a partnership with the client and the environment, a respect for an ancient landscape, and a wilful act

Image: Alex Chomicx

of conservation practice, resulting in a place for reflection, creation, recreation and regrowth. The principal idea for the house was to leverage an existing and rare 80 year old riverbank landscape as well as unencumbered northern views and make it their primary lived experience. The landscape architects’ role throughout the project was one of collaboration. The design development was a consistent engagement with architect, client and landscape architect - the dialogue being ‘how we could leverage the site to the maximum effect’? The resulting idea worked closely with this relationship of house to garden.

Image: Alex Chomicx


GARDENS NOMINEES

Magnoli

Image: Chris Howell

Magnoli is a premium residential apartment development located just meters from Palm Beach coastline on the southern Gold Coast. The development features two boutique apartment buildings with cascading gardens on each level, six terrace homes, and a café/ dining area overlooking a large community park and playground. The resident’s communal amenities include a resort-style pool, dining and lounge room, barbecue areas and extensive landscaped gardens.

Project Details entrant practice Form Landscape Architects first nations Bundjalung client Sunland Group

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Image: Yan Chen / Lucent - Form Landscape Architects


HEALTH AND EDUCATION LANDSCAPE Sponsored by:

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Projects in this category are constructed landscape projects in and surrounding institutional spaces including educational, health or aged care facilities. Projects in this category demonstrate how the design contributes to the usability and operation of the facility and the wellbeing of the user.

Image: Hillbrook Anglican Schoo / Hillbrook Anglican School Campus Redevelopment - Vee Design


Queensland Award of Excellence Winner Hillbrook Anglican School Campus Redevelopment Vee Design Hillbrook Anglican School Turrbal

Image: Hillbrook Anglican School

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The renewal of this educational campus environment delivers a genuine sense of school belonging and wellbeing, with an intuitive use of form, function and sensibility to guide a set of core values: dare to dream, informality with dignity, there is a place for me here, and in balance we grow.

Project Details project Hillbrook Anglican School Campus Redevelopment entrant practice Vee Design first nations Turrbal client Hillbrook Anglican School state award 2021 AILA QLD Award of Excellence for Health and Education Landscape

The Hillbrook Anglican School Campus Redevelopment is a reimagining of landscape for places of learning. The entrance and courtyard design for this Enoggera–based school is an example of how the built environment can effectively nourish a supportive and inclusive culture and physically allow for an innovative approach to learning. The completed landscape design for Hillbrook creates a welcoming entrance that strikes pride and ownership among the students, staff and broader community.

The series of courtyard spaces offers scope for both the everyday social and the ceremonial, and fosters the restorative connection with nature within a school. Hillbrook was established in 1987 by educators who sought to offer young people a supportive and inclusive environment, one that inspired its students. The school always has and always will be much more than its built environment. Yet, the buildings and landscaped grounds are an integral player in setting the necessary tone. It’s this setting that creates the all– important backdrop for a place of learning and growth. A key element driving the design of the landscape entry was to honour the Hillbrook Foundation Tree. A salient symbol for the school, the Foundation Tree was first planted in 1986, when Hillbrook opened for enrolments. Much planning was dedicated to its relocation. In 2018, driven primarily by Vee, the tree was moved to temporary housing for 12 months.

Image: Hillbrook Anglican School


Image: Hillbrook Anglican School

Considerable effort, leadership and refinement by the designers has delivered a refreshed and balanced outdoor atmosphere through the series of courtyard spaces. The integration of quality and contemporary landscape treatments and materiality, respond exceptionally to a series of complex site constraints and school values, revealing a celebrated and comfortable learning environment, in balance with the schools past and foundation for the future.

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Blended opportunities focus on encouraging inclusion, socialising, retreat, and performance, breathing new life and injecting pride into the heart of the campus.

It was then proudly reinstated at the entrance, acting as a powerful reminder of the schools founding value of ‘in balance we grow’. One of the site’s biggest constraints provided one of the design’s greatest opportunities. The multiple level changes to building entries and exits allowed for the deployment of terracing and levels. This helped establish a variety of spaces suitable for both informal and ceremonial amphitheatre seating. Concrete landscape walls also offered a consistent visual thread and helped define terraces for planting and outdoor classrooms.

Image: Hillbrook Anglican School

The design houses numerous artworks that were commissioned for the space, including artworks by students. Each piece required thoughtfully integration into the space. The art now creates key vistas including “Dhirridhirri” (Gamillaraay language for Willy Wagtail) by Aboriginal artist Laurie Nilsen. This sculpture sits in the reflection pond greeting all, and represents the five connected walaay or tribal groups that are Hillbrook’s school houses. Image: Hillbrook Anglican School


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Surgical, Treatment and Rehabilitation Service (STARS) and Public Realm, Herston Quarter Hassell Australian Unity Turrbal, Jagera & Yuggera

Image: Scott Burrows

The jury applauds the generous, rich and valuable contribution these delivered landscape environments have made in the promotion of healing qualities, wellbeing and recovery for patients at Queensland's new 'digital ready' hospital. The jury recognises the valuable guidance of core therapeutic principles and biophilic qualities to significantly outweigh hard, undesirable outlooks, while appropriately demonstrating respect and restraint to prioritise patient connections to the outdoors through dynamic and dramatic landscape environments which are 44


soulful, sophisticated, and sensitively integrated within the built form surrounds and courtyards. Designers have demonstrated excellent design resolution and complex integration of lush, interwoven landscapes which were exceptionally and intelligently delivered to assist with tackling challenging and severe site and grade separation, support movement, sightlines and wayfinding. The design was also highly respectful to the existing character and amenity of adjoining heritage buildings within the Herston Health Precinct.

Project Details project Surgical, Treatment and Rehabilitation Service (STARS) and Public Realm, Herston Quarter entrant practice Hassell first nations Turrbal, Jagera & Yuggera client Australian Unity state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Health and Education Landscape

Image: Scott Burrows

The Surgical, Treatment and Rehabilitation Service (STARS) is the first building completed as part of Australian Unity’s $1.1 billion Herston Quarter redevelopment. In a new model of care for Queensland, STARS is providing specialist rehabilitation, elective surgery, endoscopy and outpatient services through Metro North Hospital and Health Service. The design of STARS promotes wellness and recovery for patients, and creates a welcoming, attractive environment for staff and new talent.

The design offers a unique connection to nature where patients, visitor and staff have access to lush landscapes and a vibrant public realm. Herston Quarter will be a vibrant, connected, mixed-use community that supports a wide range of uses including healthcare, commercial, residential and student accommodation. Part of the globally prestigious Herston Health Precinct, Herston Quarter is contributing to the delivery of world class health, education and research facilities.

Image: Scott Burrows


HEALTH AND EDUCATION LANDSCAPE NOMINEES

Halcyon Greens

University of Queensland Gatton Campus Heart & Entry

Bardon State School

Image: David Scassola

Image: Mogul Media

Image: Place Design Group

Halcyon Greens is Australia’s first over 50s Golf and lifestyle Community. Encircled by nature reserves, wetlands and a 18 hole championship golf course created a unique island like setting. The master planned community serves to enhance all aspects of health and wellbeing during retirement living with a supportive landscape that seamlessly integrates from its surrounds in and around the built form. Opportunities for recreation, social interaction and a connection to the outdoors has been promoted with green links. Livistona palms have been strategically positioned to signify key nodal points to maximise community interaction and establish a unique sense of place.

The University of Queensland Gatton Campus has grown to be a key part of the UQ legacy and continues to grow, providing critical research and education in the environmental and animal husbandry fields. Lat27 were engaged to develop and implement a design for the campus arrival precinct and central spine with a vision to strengthen the connections between the historic and contemporary fabric; enhance the sense of arrival to the campus and create an activated and enhanced heart. The built outcome has delivered a green heart that unifies the campus around an activated place of outdoor learning and social gathering.

Place Design Group’s landscape-led design for the Bardon State School Entry Landscape, portrays a series of multi – functional, interconnected, organic shaped platforms that resolve significant topography and pedestrian and bicycle access issues; provide safe, covered areas for student drop-off/pick-up; and sensitively integrate multiple cultural layers into a dedicated ceremonial space. Inspired by the School logo, the campus landscape character and the environs of Mt Coot-tha that form the school backdrop, the design is revealed through larger scale and fine-grained hardscape details and a native plant palette, to showcase the school arrival and reinforce its ethos “learning and growing”.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice The Landscape Group Pty Ltd

entrant practice Lat27

entrant practice Place Design Group

first nations Yugambeh

first nations Yuggera Ugarapul (Yugara),

first nations Yuggera

client Halcyon

Jagera People & Western Wakka Wakka client University of Queensland

client Bardon State School, Queensland

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Department of Education


Indooroopilly State School 6FC

James Cook University Central Plaza

West End State School Courtyard

Image: Christopher Frederick Jones

Image: Andrew Rankin

Image: Jase Images

This project whilst small in scale offered a unique opportunity to integrate function and form. The site has multiple level changes and is constrained on all sides by built form with entrances in each corner of the courtyard. Shade and shadow have the potential to dominate the ground plane. Accessible paths and walkways intersect the site and delineate platforms and outdoor learning spaces. Reflecting the accessibility, connection and recreation goals of the client as well as responding to the built form we were able to create a series of interconnected platforms and spaces for students to recreate, learn and relax.

James Cook University’s Central Plaza is nestled in a distinct and well-established landscape with existing eucalypt trees providing a striking backdrop to the dramatic architectural pavilion. The new landscape of the Central Plaza anchors the existing, new, and future campus developments to provide a legible and cohesive place to learn, work, visit and relax in.

This courtyard design integrates a round hole in a square peg. This transformation has activated the space into a vibrant place for students to play, connect and gather. It has been adopted and named by the school as ‘Dirram Yani’ meaning ‘Meeting Place, and has become the heart of the school, humming with activity. The circular design elegantly addresses the Heritage Building and provides a clear wayfinding axial through the school. This area is now used for multiple functions and has been ranked by the students as their favourite space.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice O2LA

entrant practice RPS

entrant practice Dunn and Moran Landscape

first nations Yuggera

first nations Bindal & Wulgurukaba

Architects

client Moreton Bay Regional Council (MBRC)

client James Cook Plaza

first nations Mianjin client Department of Education


HEALTH AND EDUCATION LANDSCAPE NOMINEES

The Nest Early Education Centre of Education

Trinity Lutheran College Senior Learning Precinct

Image: Tony Phillips

Image: Rix Ryan Qld

The Nest represents a nurturing space for children to feel safe and secure - the building blocks of confidence and adventure. As a lead member of the Australian Childcare Alliance, our client emphasised the importance of outdoor education and access to nature, aligning to the centre’s Reggio Emilia pedagogy. The 140-place centre features a large outdoor podium slab, which was crafted into an outdoor learning oasis and showcases The Nest centrepiece, an innovative high-tech structure constructed from a range of sensory materials. This play space reimagines how a naturally inspired play environment can exist within modern construction.

Realised as part of a long-term campus masterplan prepared by Burling Brown, the site area is located deep within the campus on an elevated position and is the connecting landscape for the college’s resource centre, specialist hospitality study areas and middle school gathering spaces. Inspiration for the design was to use the constructed landscape as ‘vehicle’ to mirror the aspirations of a teaching environment promoting learning, passion and inspiration and ultimately, seeking to have broader impact in the global community. The organic patterns of water and ‘ripple effect’ with radiating waves from a central position were used to illustrate this.

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Wearthy

entrant practice Burling Brown Architects

first nations Yugambeh

first nations Bundjalung

client The Nest Early Education Centre of

client Trinity Lutheran College

Excellence

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Image: Hillbrook Anglican Schoo / Hillbrook Anglican School Campus Redevelopment - Vee Design


INFRASTRUCTURE Sponsored by:

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Projects in this category are constructed landscape infrastructure projects, landscape strategies or works associated with civil infrastructure that demonstrates the successful integration of landscape values and which contribute to a future sustainability.

Image: Christopher Frederick Jones / Kingsford Smith Drive Upgrade Project - Lat27


Queensland Award of Excellence Winner Kingsford Smith Drive Upgrade Project Lat27 Brisbane City Council Yugara, Yugarapul & Turrbal

Image: Lat27

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A transformative Infrastructure project for Brisbane and a celebration of the River City. Hard meets soft infrastructure in this wonderful example of designers and key stakeholders working together for the best possible outcome for everyone.

Project Details project Kingsford Smith Drive Upgrade Project entrant practice Lat27 first nations Yugara, Yugarapul & Turrbal client Brisbane City Council state award 2021 AILA QLD Award of Excellence for Infrastructure

The Kingsford Smith Drive upgrade involved widening the existing road from four to six lanes between Theodore Street, Eagle Farm and Cooksley Street at Hamilton to provide increased road capacity.

with a multi-functional plaza linking Racecourse Road to the Citycat stop. This critical upgrade has created a new subtropical entry boulevard into the city with the Brisbane River as its centrepiece.

Significantly, the project has delivered improved pedestrian and cycle facilities with the addition of a new Riverwalk between Newstead House and Northshore Hamilton.

Transport infrastructure significantly influences the character and liveability of our cities.

Two new landscaped public spaces have also been created at Cameron Rocks Reserve and Bretts Wharf

Achieving positive design outcomes for major transport projects is often challenging due to spatial, technical, and budget constraints. The widening of Kingsford Smith Drive and the public realm benefits that have been achieved, demonstrates the role that Landscape Architects and Urban Designers can play through effective collaboration with clients and other professionals to drive innovative city-shaping outcomes for these types of projects. The key aim for the project was to provide increased road capacity through road widening between

Image: Christopher Frederick Jones


Image: Lat27

Brisbane has for many years marketed itself as the River City despite the water’s edge being extensively flanked by motorways. This work demonstrates a step in the right direction of reclaiming the shared community asset that is the river with no net loss of canopy coverage. The provision and promotion of active transit is commendable, and the designers have included amenity in the form of micro parks, bikeways and respite stops at every opportunity. The level of access to the water is truly a riverside rarity.

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By engaging artists and introducing local iconographies around the site, the space is further grounded into and reflective of the context. The use of art to display history across the site is well done.

Theodore Street, Eagle Farm and Cooksley Street, Hamilton. Brisbane City Council always considered the upgrade to be a critical project for the identity and economy of the city. As such, the quality of the urban and landscape design outcomes became highest order objectives for the project: This was not just another road project. The integration of public artwork and interpretive signage to reinforce the cultural and historical significance of the precinct is a key strategic outcome. Ground plane artworks, the ‘Women’s Journey’ by Judy Watson have been installed along the Riverwalk to commemorate the female convicts who were jailed near Hamilton and to celebrate Lores Bonney’s achievements.

Image: Christopher Frederick Jones

Image: Christopher Frederick Jones

These iconographies are complemented by images of indigenous river edge flora etched and stained into the concrete. Dramatic artwork beacons and urban wayfinders, Kenji Uranishi’s colourful ‘Magnificent Flying Machine’ sculptures also line the Riverwalk.


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner HOTA Green Bridge City of Gold Coast and Archipelago with Cusp City of Gold Coast Bundjalung

Image: Archipelago

The HOTA Green Bridge is critical infrastructure beautifully delivered, showing leadership and vision combined with form and functionality. The promotion of pedestrian corridors is a positive step in active and sustainable transit trends, to which this green bridge contributes, with hardscape infrastructure taking the focus in the design. 56


A collaborative outcome and realisation was demonstrated from early design with great leadership and recognition from the design team. A great defining, vibrant precinct which artfully links the central Gold Coast Suburbs and HOTA Precinct. Outstanding work by the original designers and the D & C landscape Architects to maintain the vision from HOTA and the Master Plan. Project Details project HOTA Green Bridge entrant practice City of Gold Coast and Archipelago with Cusp first nations Bundjalung client City of Gold Coast state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Infrastructure

The Home of the Arts (HOTA) Green Bridge joyfully expresses the seamless unification of form and function achieved when a progressive client in the City of Gold Coast engages a design led collaboration of landscape architecture, architecture, art, engineering, and construction professionals. The Green Bridge design has been intimately inspired by the sitewide voronoi design language and the Gold Coast’s intimate relationship with water. The bridge arrangement equitably accommodates river traffic,

Image: City of Gold Coast

cyclists and pedestrians whilst choreographing an array of stunning cityscape, river, lake and HOTA views and sensitively weaving a suite of engaging places into the local urban fabric. This bridge is a locally transformative infrastructure project that unlocks direct pedestrian and cycle access between Chevron Island and the Home of the Arts across the Nerang River through to Surfers Paradise. The bridge is the second phase of the ARM Architecture Topotek1 authored HOTA Masterplan to be delivered with the Gallery under construction and the Outdoor Stage delivered in 2017.

Image: Archipelago


INFRASTRUCTURE NOMINEES

Queens Wharf Riverline Phase 1

WEINAM CREEK CARPARK

The Mill Streetscape

Image: Christopher Jones

Image: Francois Vienne

Image: Francois Vienne

Riverline is the new bike and pedestrian pathway precinct designed by CUSP, as part of the upgrade of the Bicentennial Bikeway. Waterline Park is the new active recreation zone under the REX. Once an unsafe, impenetrable barrier between the river and the CBD, it is now a series of recreational ‘landscape rooms’ with exercise opportunities. These ‘rooms’ are now safe, have lush sub-tropical planting, and are highly utilised. In addition to specifying a diverse palette of hardy, foliage plants, CUSP implemented WSUD raingardens to absorb and store stormwater from what was once non-porous bitumen and paving.

Weinam Creek services vehicular ferry and passenger ferry services between the mainland and the Southern Moreton Bay Islands. As such one of the existing dominate land uses adjacent to the ferry terminal is carparking. With the re-imagining of the site through the PDA, RIC recognised early that if they were to redevelop the shoreline with a high level of amenity then a significant consolidated carpark would be required. The intent for the carpark design was to provide carparking, shade, coastal amenity, connection to the waterway corridor through rehabilitation works, WSUD and a safe environment for travellers.

The Mill Stage 1 is a high-amenity urban streetscape that creates an inviting public realm for the community. The design encompasses a flexible approach to the urban fabric by creating opportunities for future embellishment and innovations while still providing a high amenity for the early phases of the development. The entry boulevard includes enhanced streetscape treatments to signify ‘arrival’ at this new urban centre whilst encouraging spaces for gathering. The streetscapes ‘continuous green canopy’ success is due to strategic collaborative planning of green and grey assets, placing emphasis on above-ground amenity while incorporating requirements for below-ground infrastructure.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice CUSP (Qld) Pty Ltd

entrant practice O2LA

entrant practice O2LA

first nations Yuggera

first nations Quandamooka

first nations Kabi Kabi, Jinibara & Turrbal

client Destination Brisbane Consortium

client Redland Investment Corporation (RIC)

Traditional Custodians client Moreton Bay Regional Council (MBRC)

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Queensland Country Bank Stadium

Slacks Track 2

Wynnum Road Stage 1

Image: Andrew Rankin

Image: Johnny

Image: Blackbox

RPS, undertook the full landscape architectural design process for the external works of this 25,000 seat capacity stadium in North Queensland. QCBS was funded by Australia’s first city deal under agreement between Local, State and Federal governments. RPS, in collaboration with Cox Architecture, Counterpoint and ARUP, were instrumental in ensuring the project has delivered on its aspiration to revitalise former railway yards and enhance the city’s capacity to host major sporting, entertainment and cultural events. The external works provides vibrant shaded community plaza spaces that enable new pedestrian and cycle linkages between Townsville’s CBD and south.

The route between Moss Street and Compton Road forms a vital link in the cycle network between Brisbane and the Gold Coast, through Logan City. The project recognises a need for this large urban gesture to position Logan between two major centres. The location of the path along Slacks Creek required a well thoughtout design that negotiated major site constraints. The branding acknowledges the environmental value of Slacks Creek, recognising that the path is more than just a route through, contributing to valuable open space for the community. The branding create an easily legible space for a variety of uses.

The Wynnum Road Stage 1 upgrade project, completed in April 2020, provides vastly improved vehicle and community movements along this busy corridor between the city and eastern suburbs of Brisbane. In addition to the usual hardscape delivered in an urban infrastructure project, landscape elements were prioritised including: careful consideration of heritage in the repositioning of established fig trees; the planting of mature specimens to improve amenity and provide screening for residents; and numerous urban embellishments designed to increase the visual and physical amenity for pedestrians and cyclists, motorists and the local community.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice RPS

entrant practice Logan City Council

entrant practice Brisbane City Council - City

first nations Bindal & Wulgurukaba

first nations Jagara, Yugambeh

client Stadiums Queensland

client Logan city Council

Projects Office first nations Turrbal, Yugara-Yugarapul, Jagera client TPO, Brisbane City Council - Louis Baumann


LAND MANAGEMENT

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Projects in this category are constructed projects or strategies for the restoration, conservation or management of significant landscapes that demonstrate a tangible physical outcome. The project may recognise and reconcile the natural and cultural values of communities and the landscape in which they are placed.

Image: Ellendale / Ellendale - Place Design Group


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Ellendale Place Design Group Cedar Woods Property Limited Yuggera Turrbal

Image: Ellendale

Ellendale is a collaborative and committed piece of subdivision land management which is understood in the context of an ongoing process of rehabilitation. The project reuses and enhances existing vegetation, creating new green links and increasing the potential for diversity by encouraging new fauna and flora. In the process, it boosts the 62


value of the retained patches of ecosystem. The regular maintenance by both the design team and contractor demonstrate a commitment to maintaining long term environmental health. A number of features further illustrate the designers’ ecological priority, these include the vegetation linkages, glider poles and the under road crossing. Despite the rigid structure of the subdivision layout, Project Details project Ellendale entrant practice Place Design Group first nations Yuggera Turrbal client Cedar Woods Property Limited state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Land Management

Place Design Group’s site-led landscape design for Ellendale, a peri-urban subdivision, retains steep topography and supplements existing vegetation with rehabilitation works to achieve 91 hectares of natural areas and open space with the highest ecological value to enhance local biodiversity and provide long term habitat, encouraging fauna movement. Rehabilitation works included revegetation planting, translocation of significant plant species from development areas into rehabilitation areas, seed

Image: Ellendale

propagation from site, and fauna infrastructure such as nesting boxes, gliders poles and fauna underpasses to create additional habitat and fauna movement pathways. Ellendale is a peri-urban subdivision that demonstrates how the principals of sustainable land management can be incorporated early in the urban design process to recognise and reconcile the site’s natural bushland values with those of its community. From concept through to construction, Ellendale’s 91 hectares of rehabilitation works and recreation space demonstrate how best practice design thinking combined with design leadership delivers results measured by enhanced wildlife habitat linkages and maintained local biodiversity.

Image: Ellendale


Queensland Regional Achievement Award Winner North Queensland Townsville Botanic Gardens Masterplan 2020-2030 Tract City of Townsville Bindal & Wulgurukaba

Image: Tract

The Townsville Botanic Gardens Masterplan addresses the needs and direction of the city with a close attention to detail. Community collaboration was undertaken with an excellent authenticity and diligence, resulting in robust outcomes which allow residents to feel heard and respected. 64


Tract has identified opportunities for regional growth with precision and has presented a strategy that celebrates local culture as richly as it welcomes visitors.

Project Details project Townsville Botanic Gardens Masterplan 2020-2030 entrant practice Tract first nations Bindal & Wulgurukaba client City of Townsville state award 2021 AILA QLD Regional Achievement Award for North Queensland

The Townsville Botanic Gardens consists of three distinct and treasured public gardens that celebrate the regions unique history, diverse landscape and tropical character.

years to ensure they become a collective destination and a resilient Community Facility for visitors and locals to enjoy and prosper from for years to come.

The purpose of the Townsville Botanic Masterplan 2020 – 2030 is to provide direction for the future development of Queens Gardens, Anderson Gardens and the Palmetum.

These Botanic Gardens are valued and visited differently, with each significant landscape presenting varying contexts; cultural, natural and community values; history; design influences and landscape features.

The masterplan is intended to identify the necessary renewal, upgrade and new development works required over the next 10

Queens Gardens is heritage listed and traditionally designed with British colonial influence in the tropical areas of the world. Anderson Gardens has a strong emphasis towards a comprehensive regional flora collection and holding events for the region.

Image: Tract

Image: Tract


LAND MANAGEMENT NOMINEES

Wetland and Bioretention Basin Rehabilitation, Upper Coomera

Aura Business Park WSUD

Bokarina Beach Wetland

Image: SLR Consulting

Image: AECOM

Image: AECOM

The Upper Coomera wetland rehabilitation and bio-basin works is the final stage of the greater Upper Coomera stormwater management plan that connects with Oaky Creek upstream and helps to mitigate stormwater impacts leading from Coomera City Centre shopping centre. The existing eroded creek bed required significant works such as re-profiling and armouring to the upper banks and was subsequently rehabilitated with regeneration techniques including the planting of native and endemic species, incorporating the works into the surrounding landscape.

AECOM and DesignFlow were engaged by Stockland to design and oversee construction of the Aura Business Park Water Sensitive Urban Design. The Aura Business Park WSUD system incorporates 7 open channel drains, 2 wetland holding basins and 15 large-scale bioretention basins. The Aura Business Park WSUD systems function to capture all runoff from within the business park. The provision of this system protects the Bells Creek catchment, including the downstream Pumicestone Passage from the excess silt and sediment accumulation generated by the business park.

AECOM was engaged by Stockland to undertake landscape design and oversee construction of the Bokarina Beach residential community including rehabilitation, management and extension of a coastal wetland area located behind the dunes on the fringe of a vibrant parkland. AECOM’s landscape architects and environmental scientists worked collaboratively to undertake detailed planting and access design, develop a translocation methodology for salvaged wetland habitat, oversee construction and monitor establishment of a consolidated wetland environment. The resulting landscape has improved the quality of the existing wetland, provided greater habitat connectivity, enhanced amenity, and established a means of connecting people to local environmental

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice SLR Consulting Australia Pty

entrant practice AECOM and DesignFlow

entrant practice AECOM Landscape

Ltd

first nations Gubbi Gubbi

first nations Yugambeh

client Stockland

Architecture first nations Gubbi Gubbi client Stockland

client Lewani Springs Resort Pty. Ltd.

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Image: Place Design Group / Ellendale - Place Design Group


LANDSCAPE PLANNING

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Projects in this category are constructed or strategic projects and include strategic design and guiding policy documents and visual assessments for urban development, residential and planned communities, local community and rural or regional planning.

Image: Deicke Richards / Southport Spit Masterplan - Aspect Studios


Queensland Award of Excellence Winner Southport Spit Masterplan Aspect Studios Department of State Development, Manufacturing, Infrastructure and Planning Bundjalung

Image: John Gaskell Planning Consultants

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The Southport Spit Masterplan sets a clear direction for the 201-hectare Spit, balancing tourism, recreation, environment, and cultural heritage and unlocking the potential for 1800 new jobs, 800 new short-term accommodation rooms, a new Aboriginal Cultural Centre, and the protection and improvement of over 138 hectares of public greenspace.

Project Details project Southport Spit Masterplan entrant practice Aspect Studios first nations Bundjalung client Department of State Development, Manufacturing, Infrastructure and Planning state award 2021 AILA QLD Award of Excellence for Landscape Planning

The master plan delivers a cohesive blueprint for The Spit’s future, built on a foundation of inclusiveness, collaboration and consensus between stakeholders and the community. The plan sets a clear direction for the 201 hectare Spit, balancing tourism, recreation, environment and cultural heritage. This master plan will unlock potential for 1800 new jobs, 800 new short-term accommodation rooms, a new Aboriginal Cultural Centre and the protection and improvement of over 138 hectares

Image: John Gaskell Planning Consultants

of public greenspace. The project outcomes reflect strong leadership, good governance, high levels of community engagement and design collaboration, along with excellence in planning and urban design practice. The Spit is one of the Gold Coast’s most significant community assets and represents an immense opportunity not only in its own right but also as a key place in the City of Gold Coast and South East Queensland region. The Spit Master Plan aims to deliver on following integrated


Image: John Gaskell Planning Consultants

The jury commends the landscape architects for preparing a blueprint for The Spit’s future, built on a foundation of inclusiveness, collaboration, and consensus between stakeholders and the community. The project outcomes reflect strong leadership, good governance, high levels of community engagement, and design collaboration, along with excellence in planning and urban design practice.

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This project is a credit to a professional, collaborative and integrated design team, stakeholders, participants, and client groups, including both the Gold Coast City Council and the state government.

planning and design outcomes which entail all aspects of sustainability, ‘green, blue and gold’. Big picture strategies around six themes address contemporary social and cultural issues and prioritise sustainable use and development to enhance the ecological health of The Spit. Economic strategies focus on long-term viability and the agglomeration of economic activities to generate jobs and sustain a vibrant village centre.

Image: John Gaskell Planning Consultants

Alternative ways to move around and get to The Spit are promoted, along with active transport modes. The master plan presents a cohesive blueprint for the future of The Spit with an appropriate amount of flexibility for specific projects and proposals to evolve and be developed, within this framework, over time.

Image: John Gaskell Planning Consultants


Queensland Regional Achievement Award Winner Gold Coast Southport Spit Masterplan Aspect Studios Department of State Development, Manufacturing, Infrastructure and Planning Bundjalung

Image: John Gaskell Planning Consultants

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Project Details project Southport Spit Masterplan entrant practice Aspect Studios first nations Bundjalung client Department of State Development, Manufacturing, Infrastructure and Planning state award 2021 AILA QLD Regional Achievement Award for the Gold Coast

The Southport Spit Masterplan serves as an exemplar for sustainable development goals, community partnership, active transit, resilient growth and cultural competency. Of particular note are the practices around community consultation, which followed strategies that were transparent and patient, creating a safe space for many voices. By addressing the process of consultation without the overlay of preconceived ideas, the much needed trust missing from previous attempts at master planning this contested site, has been earned. This project is a credit to the professional, collaborative and integrated design team, the stakeholders, the participants, and the client groups including both the Gold Coast City Council and the state government.

Image: Deicke Richards


LANDSCAPE PLANNING NOMINEES

Cabbage Tree Creek

Image: John Murray

CUSP was commissioned by the Moreton Bay Regional Council (MBRC) to develop a Structure Plan for the Cabbage Tree Creek Corridor (CTC), the spine of the recreational network for the Hills District in NW Brisbane. CUSP undertook site analysis and a condition assessment of recreational infrastructure, to inform the targeted upgrade of the CTC recreational network and allow MBRC to select priority projects for funding and delivery. Broad recommendations include improving connectivity within the Corridor and to surrounding suburbs; improving the quality of the path network, signage and wayfinding; and making key land acquisitions to strengthen recreational and habitat linkages.

Project Details entrant practice CUSP (Qld) Pty Ltd with

Moreton Bay Regional Council first nations Yuggera client Moreton Bay Regional Council

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Image: Deicke Richards / Southport Spit Masterplan - Aspect Studios


PARKS AND OPEN SPACE Sponsored by:

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Projects in this category are constructed public parks and open space, or strategic open space projects that balance the demand for recreation, culture and the environment.

Image: Andrew Watson / Munro Martin Parklands, Cairns - Andrew Prowse Landscape Architect Pty Ltd


Queensland Award of Excellence Winner Munro Martin Parklands, Cairns Andrew Prowse Landscape Architect Pty Ltd (since merged with LA3 Landscape Architects) Cairns Regional Council, Cairns Qld

Image: Andrew Watson

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A world class outdoor cultural place, this regional parkland increases cultural and social amenity in Cairns to a commendable extent. The space is largely unprogrammed, allowing it to offer different opportunities when the stage is empty.

Project Details project Munro Martin Parklands, Cairns entrant practice Andrew Prowse Landscape Architect Pty Ltd (since merged with LA3 Landscape Architects) first nations Gimuy-walubarra yidi client Cairns Regional Council, Cairns Qld state award 2021 AILA QLD Award of Excellence for Parks and Open Space

Munro Martin Parklands is part of the Cairns Performing Arts Precinct revitalising two aging CBD sites to increase the city's capacity to host performing arts. The outdated Civic Centre replaced, and a 3,000-audience amphitheatre integrated into the largely underutilised park opposite. To encourage park usage a tropical vines and foliage theme was developed. Steel pergolas displaying spectacular flowering vines

cross pathways creating covered walks, the stage emerging from a gigantic trellis framing a high gabion wall backdrop. The park now is a vital part of Cairns' cultural life and a destination for locals and visitors admiring the changing floral spectacle. Munro Martin Parklands is the latest rejuvenation of Cairns Regional Council’s oldest gazetted reserve dating back to the 1880’s when named Norman Park. The next five decades saw the park used for major sporting events, circuses and, during WWII an Army Reserve camp. In the 1950’s the park underwent a major refurbishment when it was renamed Munro Martin Park after two philanthropic half-sisters who left a legacy to beautify the northern half of the park. This unique informal atmosphere of the outdoor setting transcends into a new experience of the performing arts and events in Cairns. Munro Martin Parkland

Image: Andrew Watson


Image: Cairns Regional Council

A fantastic redevelopment of an existing undervalued site, through the increase of vegetation, and in particular, pollen plants, local fauna species are offered sustenance and habitat. This has greater effects of encouraging stewardship and a sense of environmental responsibility in residents.

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Thoughtful and unusual plant selections create an outdoor atmosphere of intrigue and curiosity through the overarching vine structures. While the staging and theatre components, clearly deliver on acoustic and performance qualities.

event days are attended by a broad range of community members including young families and elders that would otherwise be unlikely to attend events like a ballet or symphonic orchestra performance within a theatre. The venue has been enthusiastically received by artists and management. After a 2018 performance in the park the Royal Ballet of London pronounced it the best outdoor venue they had performed at worldwide, despite some rain showers during the show. The park has become a vital part of Cairns' cultural and festival life with concerts ranging from Opera to Rock and Blues and events such as ANZAC Day along with locals and visitors just strolling through the park and admiring the changing floral spectacle.

Image: Cairns Regional Council

The vine pergolas and trellis provided an opportunity to explore and promote the use of vines in urban greening. Cairns Council encourages and mandates vertical greening in the CBD and the vine covered park structures are an exemplary demonstration of what can be achieved at varying scales. Image: Andrew Watson


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Gladstone East Shores Auckland Point Urbis Pty Ltd Gladstone Ports Corporation Gureng Gureng

Image: Urbis

By turning a decommissioned, industrial port site into a green community asset, this parkland celebrates the cultural industry of the people of Gladstone while gently shifting its focus to the city's 'greatest physical asset, its waterfront'. The project has sustainability at its core, and shows leadership in the repurposing of the land into an enriched and enlivened meeting place, while paying homage to the extractive mining of which the community is proud. 84


This parkland is interesting and playful and demonstrates successful integration into the social and cultural context of Gladstone. The presence and use of familiar and relatable industrial Port qualities is exemplary and the inclusion of these sitespecific structural elements is thoughtful and well executed. As the nation slowly transitions to more responsible resource management and energy creation, this project offers a steppingstone in shifting community priorities, gently guiding local values towards deindustrialisation and decommodification of critical environmental resources. Project Details project Gladstone East Shores Auckland Point entrant practice Urbis Pty Ltd first nations Gureng Gureng client Gladstone Ports Corporation state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Parks and Open Space

The Gladstone East Shores, Auckland Point, represents a once in a generation opportunity to deliver a world-class waterfront for Queensland’s most significant Port city.

community and offer residents and visitors to Gladstone, giving them the opportunity to engage with each other, the city’s history, as well as its greatest physical asset, its waterfront.

Urbis led a multi-disciplinary team to re-imagine the future of its waterfront and extension of their current parklands, through master planning, design and delivery.

The project brought over 300 jobs to the region and devoted much of the project budget to the local economy.

Once privatised industrial land, Gladstone Ports Corporation had the foresight and generosity to deliver a publicly accessible waterfront parkland to benefit the

The parkland has made the city more viable for it’s younger demographics and provided a platform for civic discussion and interaction, ensuring a lively social forum for Gladstone’s future. This project that has innovated, tested, and pushed the boundaries of what landscape architects can achieve.

Image: William Debois

Image: William Debois


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Riverside Green – South Bank Parklands Hassell South Bank Corporation Turrbal & Jagera

Image: Scott Burrows

This parkland design offers a culturally rich, place-based and amenity packed design to support the growth and densification of Brisbane city and is a beautiful revitalization within the much loved South Bank Parklands. There is a broad variety of active and passive spaces to support all kinds of user opportunities. The design outcomes are aesthetically sophisticated and integrated into their context. 86


Sightlines and user focus has been drawn to the river and soft landscape as stated by the designers, allowing natural assets to be celebrated and shared. The built form is climate responsive, employing passive architecture efficiently. As a place for all, there is high regard for scale and diversity of passive vs active spaces, with shade and options for all demographics, ensuring this is an enduring renewed cultural precinct. Great delivery on new urban furniture, fresh, natural and reflective of the figs which populate the South Bank precinct. Project Details project Riverside Green – South Bank Parklands entrant practice Hassell first nations Turrbal & Jagera client South Bank Corporation state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Parks and Open Space

Riverside Green at South Bank Parklands supports the needs of Brisbane’s growing population by providing a new open space at the heart of the city. With an expansive events lawn, lush rainforest, subtropical pavilion and a series of outdoor spaces, the design re-imagines the former Riverside Restaurants as a world-class public space. Connecting visitors to the heart of the Parklands and the river, Riverside Green continues South Bank’s legacy as the people’s place, creating a unique destination that celebrates the life lived outdoors.

Accelerating inner-city growth is placing increasing pressure on the Brisbane’s parks, public spaces and civic amenities. The decision to replace the damaged Riverside Restaurants with an expansive, free, publicly accessible open space, is a significant civic outcome that supports the growing leisure and recreation needs of a rapidly growing population. Riverside Green establishes a vibrant destination that enhances the high-quality relaxing ‘atmosphere’ of South Bank. The project delivers 6816sqm of world-class designed open space for the precinct’s approximately 14 million annual visitors.

Image: Scott Burrows

Image: Scott Burrows


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Warril Parkland Place Design Group Oxley Creek Transformation Pty Ltd Yuggera Ugarapul

Image: Raven at Odds

The Oxley Creek Transformation project has developed a number of environmental, cultural and economic benefits for the local community. The development appears to have been done with efforts authentically geared towards ecological restoration, cultural recognition and community activation. The play opportunities are largely unprescribed, allowing users to interpret recreation freely and make their own decisions. 88


Additionally, through locating higher impact human land uses on degraded areas and protecting others of high ecological value, an attention to sustainable outcomes is demonstrated. Materials chosen in the design are reflective of past use and robust in nature while nature based play is intertwined in the protected setting. The discovery trail appears to have been the result of engagement with the First Nations community with the representation of their practices, culture and spirituality a considered way to honour and acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the land. Project Details project Warril Parkland entrant practice Place Design Group first nations Yuggera Ugarapul client Oxley Creek Transformation Pty Ltd state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Parks and Open Space

Warril Parkland is the first priority project delivered as part of the Oxley Creek Transformation Master Plan. The parkland sets the benchmark for all future open space projects, revitalising the Oxley Creek corridor from the Brisbane River to Larapinta into a world class green, lifestyle and leisure destination. With a strong connection to its surrounding natural landscape, the nature-based adventure parkland has been designed to repair a bushland site damaged by past sandmining activity, and to create a place that challenges

Image: Raven at Odds

and engages children and adults alike, enticing them outdoors with the promise of creating their own adventure quest. The integration of inclusive opportunities was also key to the design, with a variety of experiences which can either be enjoyed by wheelchair users directly, or at a minimum, will enable wheelchairs to get close to an area of activity so that users can get close to the action. The design of the picnic tables allows wheelchairs to be placed alongside the seating. Another specific inclusion is the water play map table, which allows a wheelchair to push beneath so that users can operate the hand pump and engage with the sand and water play.

Image: Raven at Odds


Queensland Regional Achievement Award Winner Central Queensland Gladstone East Shores Auckland Point Urbis Pty Ltd Gladstone Ports Corporation Gureng Gureng

Image: William Debois

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Project Details project Gladstone East Shores Auckland Point entrant practice Urbis Pty Ltd first nations Gureng Gureng client Gladstone Ports Corporation state award 2021 AILA QLD Regional Achievement Award of Central Queensland

The incredible value of this open space parkland project to the region and the community of Gladstone cannot be understated.

meaningful open space destination, fully enriched and overflowing with connections to Gladstone’s resourceful past, present and future.

Anchored by its rich industrial and Port operations history, the revitalisation of the decommissioned Port precinct into a vibrant, celebrated and culturally significant parklands has empowered a

The jury felt that the transformation qualities, reuse of materiality and character connections were tasteful, innovative and respectful, reflecting community values and the proud industry livelihood of the region. The jury also felt that the designers exceeded expectations and extended their efforts to ensure all materials, suppliers and trades were locally sourced. This delivered a significant contribution to the local and regional economy which resulted in the creation of over 300 local jobs.

Image: William Debois


PARKS AND OPEN SPACE NOMINEES

Queens Wharf Riverline Phase 1

Spinnaker Park

Bokarina Beach Parkland

Image: Christopher Jones

Image: Richard Walker

Image: AECOM

Riverline is the new bike and pedestrian pathway precinct designed by CUSP, as part of the upgrade of the Bicentennial Bikeway. The Mangrove Walk is a 450 m long pedestrian-only walkway that pushes out into the river. By designing divergent pathways, CUSP resolved potential pedestrian and cyclist conflict. Spaced at regular intervals along the Walk are a series of landings and lookouts, with amazing views up and down the river. Waterline Park is new recreation zone located on former carparks under the REX. It is reimagined by CUSP as series of dynamic, recreational ‘landscape rooms’ that ‘celebrate’ their riverside location.

Spinnaker Park, designed by CUSP, is the centerpiece of Newport’s open space network. The park overlooks Newport Lake and hosts a wide range of recreational experiences, including a large, multi-element inclusive playground; a central, open space for passive and active recreation; public art and an interactive zero depth water feature. The park drew strongly on nautical and marine theming, clearly evident in the eleven-metre Spinnaker play tower and site-specific public art. Equitable access and inclusive play was one of the key design objectives to ensure the park was open and appealing to all members of the community.

AECOM was engaged by Stockland to undertake landscape design and oversee construction of the Bokarina Beach residential community including a 7ha network of open space. The primary corridor in this network is a central parkland divided into two areas, the Village Park and Lake Park. This parkland plays and important role in establishing the relaxed coastal identity of a new community and creating a vibrant beachside destination in the regional context. A range of spaces have been designed to establish hubs of activity and social connection, enhance the bond between community and natural assets, and support a healthy active lifestyle.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice CUSP (Qld) Pty Ltd

entrant practice CUSP (Qld) Pty Ltd

entrant practice AECOM Landscape

first nations Yuggera

first nations Gubbi Gubbi

client Destination Brisbane Consortium

client Stockland Development Pty Ltd

Architecture first nations Gubbi Gubbi client Stockland

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Carvers Reach Estate

The Mill Regional Parkland

Image: Saunders Havill

Image: ANGUS MARTIN

Delivered by Golden Gate Property, in conjunction with Saunders Havill Group, Carver’s Reach is a 55-hectare master planned community situated within the heart of the fast-growing area of Park Ridge. With almost one third of the land devoted to open spaces, parkland and biodiversity areas, Carver’s Reach has created a healthy community life, fostering social interaction and promoting physical activity, while delivering a diverse and affordable housing product.

The Mill Parklands provides a regional attraction for the Moreton Bay Region and early recreational and open space amenity for the new Sunshine Coast University Campus at Petrie. It is the first stage in a larger significant open space which will support the expansion of the new university campus and the new urban and residential areas of The Mill precinct. The park design endeavours to draw-in users to connect to the site’s history and natural amenity and embraces future innovation through its use of smart technologies and flexible planning and design responses.

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Saunders Havill Group

entrant practice O2LA

first nations Yugambeh

first nations Kabi Kabi, Jinibara & Turrbal

client Golden Gate Property Group

Traditional Custodians client Moreton Bay Regional Council (MBRC)


PLAY SPACES Sponsored by:

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Projects in this category are constructed play spaces or strategies which promote the notion of active play and embraces the temporal elements of the active play space.

Image: Yan Chen / The Magic Forrest of Bradbury Park - Form Landscape Architects


Queensland Award of Excellence Winner The Magic Forest of Bradbury Park Form Landscape Architects and Brisbane City Council Brisbane City Council Yuggera

Image: Yan Chen

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The Magic Forest of Bradbury Park is one of those rare projects where; aspiration, the quality of the idea, the design, detail and the level of craft all complement each other. This is a sensitive and lyrical project which ventures away from the playground archetype to offer users intrigue, freedom, and delight.

Project Details project The Magic Forest of Bradbury Park entrant practice Form Landscape Architects and Brisbane City Council first nations Yuggera client Brisbane City Council state award 2021 AILA QLD Award of Excellence for Play Spaces

A nature play space constructed within an existing grove of mature Melaleuca and Waterhousia trees, The Magic Forest of Bradbury Park offers a source of intrigue and delight for all who enter. Natural features of the site informed a mythical narrative including Rivers of Gold, a Valley of Giants and a Guardian’s Throne, and the subsequent subtle placement of various sculptural trinkets and carved elements. By providing subtle cues rather than prescribed play opportunities, children are able

to create infinite interpretations of the narrative and engage in the ‘choose your own adventure’ play experience for hours at a time. The Magic Forest of Bradbury Park is an imaginative children’s nature play space located in the northern Brisbane suburb of Kedron. The space has been sensitively constructed within an existing grove of mature trees and offers an infinite source of adventure for children in the local and broader community. The play space is specifically focused on children between the ages of 2-8, however intrigue and delight can be found by all who enter. Natural attributes of the site have been harnessed as opportunities for sensitive and resourceful design. The retention of all existing trees resulted in a fully shaded play space from opening day. Furthermore, the cost and visual incongruence of shade sails was avoided all together.

Image: Yan Chen


Image: Yan Chen

The construction evidences a respect for the local ecology with the use of recycled materials and waterwise plants as well as the retention of all existing trees. The project engaged local artists to provide play elements, ensuring ethical labour practices and supporting the local economy as well as an underfunded industry.

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The largely unprogrammed nature of the forest allows for multiple interpretations, a diversity of use and a variety of experiences. This space offers an intergenerational experience of recreation and play and in so doing assists in creating a bond between children of different ages as well as between carer and child.

All overland flow paths were also retained and incorporated into the play narrative. Doing so added play value without altering the hydraulic functioning of the site. The Magic Forest of Bradbury Park is a significant contribution to the local and broader community. An unintentional biproduct of the space has been the creation of ‘instagram-able’ family moments which encourage intergenerational play and social networking amongst local residents. It is a successful demonstration of nature and imaginative play. By providing subtle cues rather than prescribed play opportunities, children are able to create infinite interpretations of the play narrative. Ultimately this results in an authentic, endless play experience.

Image: Yan Chen

Image: Yan Chen

The space has been incorporated into the local kindergarten’s program and offers young families within proximity a comfortable, safe and stimulating option for nature play. The project also serves as a prelude to future exciting embellishments planned for Bradbury Park


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Bradbury Park Scooter Track Form Landscape Architects and Brisbane City Council Brisbane City Council Yuggera

Image: Yan Chen

Skate parks are often a contested and exclusionary space, but the Bradbury Park Scooter Track breaks open the skate park typology with a deceptively simple but sophisticated design suitable for multiple ages and abilities. The park combines strict geometries, geomorphologies and existing mature trees to create a surprisingly variable play space. 100


A lane combining various obstacles sits in contrast with the ability to cruise indefinitely beside it. This variety is further enhanced by the ability to move between intersecting loop tracks. This combination enables free play and constant variety. Clever use of mounds and the geometry of the layout allow room for the skater culture of peer review and space for parents to supervise younger visitors without crowding their development. Waterwise and endemic species are an acknowledgement of the local climate and compliment this new community asset.

Project Details project Bradbury Park Scooter Track entrant practice Form Landscape Architects and Brisbane City Council first nations Yuggera client Brisbane City Council state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Play Spaces

The Bradbury Park Scooter Track is a hybrid facility for all ages, combining elements of a pump track, skate park and junior learnto-ride track. The track offers riders a two-way infinity loop path punctuated with 20 obstacles. Working with the gentle crossfall of the land removed the need for walls and batters, allowing the track to sit naturally within the existing context of the park and retain significant trees. Obstacles were strategically

Image: Yan Chen

positioned in accordance with their compatibility with speed and gradient. Extensive consideration was given to placement to ensure that obstacles were practically executable, fun and safe. The track focusses on learner and pre-teen riders, however there is also significant challenge for the more experienced. While specifically designed for use with scooters, the course does accommodate a variety of wheeled craft such as skateboards, rollerblades and bikes.

Image: Yan Chen


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Kawana Waters State College Prep Play Space Greenedge Design Kawana Waters State College Gubbi Gubbi

Image: Cameron Murchison

Bespoke timber play structures that work with the concept of risky play are central to this play space which has been developed in consultation with staff and students. This is play in a natural setting and a space that gets back to basics in the way children enjoy recreation including the opportunity to swing, climb and jump. Contrasting quiet spaces and experiential elements are also incorporated. Where activity is encouraged it is designed to stimulate creativity and naturally develop known physical weaknesses in children of this age group. 102


Rich, intelligently incorporated recycled timber imbued with a sense of discovery and movement resides throughout. This award also commends the design team's continued engagement with the construction team and fabricators throughout the project to deliver a well executed project. A post occupancy evaluation has been undertaken adding further value to this work by making it a piece of research to be reflected in future projects.

Project Details project Kawana Waters State College Prep Play Space entrant practice Greenedge Design first nations Gubbi Gubbi client Kawana Waters State College state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Play Spaces

This natural play space with bespoke design timber play structures was conceived through engagement with the school teachers and students. There is a sense of wonder exploring the pebble creek or hand pumping water as well as adventure by climbing the fallen tree or scaling the unique timber play obstacle course sited amongst the shady grove of mature trees. Additional pedagogical influences were introduced including 100 colour pebbles (10 of each colour)

mortared into the creekbed which provides arithmetic learning. The play space is successful with the broader community who visit the farmers markets held at the school every weekend. The new play space design replaces an existing aging steel tube play structure and an open lawn area that was poorly draining. Greenedge Design developed concept ideas that reflected both a natural theme and a twist of maritime nature which included the boat moored to a deck and a red buoy that will include a bell and light. This play space offers great value for money for the College and in turn through the investment in local and regional suppliers, contractors and designers is a win:win.

Image: Cameron Murchison

Image: Cameron Murchison


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Little Roo's Playground - Whitfield State School Landplan Landscape Architecture Whitfield State School Gimuy-walubarra Yidinji

Image: Andrew Watson

The Little Roo’s Playground builds on a short story created by the Whitfield State School teachers to assist children transition from preschool into Prep. The narrative is brought to life with the creation of a series of play experiences featuring little Roo’s new friends, each character based on animals found in North Queensland. 104


The outcome functions beyond the basic purpose of a playground, providing prompts for lessons on the natural environment, relationships, resilience and fostering environmental stewardship in later life. The space itself is a beautifully crafted set of natural play structures which incorporate sensory and tactile experiences. Connected through the storytelling, independent play assists the process of education through the child’s experience and imagination. This project provides inspiration for others to consider celebrating their own stories and values through the development of bespoke play space. Project Details project Little Roo's Playground - Whitfield State School entrant practice Landplan Landscape Architecture first nations Gimuy-walubarra Yidinji client Whitfield State School state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Play Spaces

The school approached Landplan to assist with the creation of a playground that lived up to Little Roo’s dream. Landplan built on the work of the teachers by integrating the narrative into the play experience. The playground has become the next instalment of Roo’s story. The design team picked up on the idea of all the new friends that Roo would meet and brought the characters to life, with each character based on a native animal found in Far North Queensland.

Image: Andrew Watson

The outcome has resulted in a space that functions beyond the basic purpose of a playground, by providing prompts for lessons on the natural environment, relationships, resilience and fostering an environmental stewardship for later life. An extensive consultation process was undertaken, engaging the school community and the data gathered was fed into the design process. The design team collaborated with the Prep teachers to garner valuable feedback on the importance of ‘open ended play.

Image: Andrew Watson


PLAY SPACES NOMINEES

Flagstone Water Play Park

Bokarina Beach Playground

Aura, Island Park

Image: Jad Sylla

Image: AECOM

Image: RAO

Championing the evolution of play spaces in Queensland is the Flagstone Water Play Park located in an emerging population growth area in the south west suburbs of Brisbane. The Flagstone waterpark is a regionally significant playground destination and a source of pride to the residents of the Flagstone development. The Flagstone Water Play Park features a zero-depth watercourse with water jets, water blasters, bubblers and pop-jets that meander through two large raintrees with dumping buckets. The source of the watercourse is an iconic central ten-metre high internally climbable raintree that dumps copious amounts of water onto unsuspecting users.

Bokarina Beach Playground is an integral part of its setting within Bokarina Village Park, contributing to making this park a vibrant destination as a community gathering place. Inspired by the undulating landscape of the dunes, the playscape introduces landform and elevation via a series of structures and mounds designed to engage and thrill. A balance has been struck between achieving a bespoke architectural outcome while creating an inclusive play space that is engaging, offering play value to various ages and abilities.

This unique play space is an oasis of fun, a lost paradise reminiscent of the Moreton Bay islands, enabling children to imagine they are on a deserted island. With a mixture of bespoke and proprietary elements, the ‘islands’ alternate between steep rubber surfaces for scrambling, punctuated with red angular boulders and lush edges planted with subtropical trees, palms and understorey plants. Not only is this play space designed to have an impact from opening, but to develop over time by including Moreton Bay Figs and Cotton Trees that will transform the space over the years.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Urbis Pty Ltd

entrant practice AECOM Landscape

entrant practice Place Design Group

first nations Yuggera

Architecture with Eureka Landscapes first nations Gubbi Gubbi client Stockland

first nations Gubbi Gubbi

client PEET Limited

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client Stockland Development


Springwood Early Education Centre

The Nest Early Education Centre of Excellence

Image: Tony Phillips

Image: Tony Phillipsv

Springwood Early Education Centre’s outdoor environment promotes an educationally rich natural play space that prioritises the development of the children. The project supports the three pillars of sustainable practices; social (belonging, supported, respectful, community), environmental (positive interaction with natural elements and the world) and economic (utilising resources optimally including financial). The project's pedagogical approach to design promotes risky play and the integration of ecology within the play environment. The sitespecific design promotes engagement with the existing tree canopies and holistically the environment aims to challenge children’s perception and spatial awareness.

The Nest represents a nurturing space for children to feel safe and secure - the building blocks of confidence and adventure. As a lead member of the Australian Childcare Alliance, our client emphasised the importance of outdoor education and access to nature, aligning to the centre’s Reggio Emilia pedagogy. The 140-place centre features a large outdoor podium slab, which was crafted into an outdoor learning oasis and showcases The Nest centrepiece, an innovative high-tech structure constructed from a range of sensory materials. This play space reimagines how a naturally inspired play environment can exist within modern construction.

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Wearthy

entrant practice Wearthy

first nations Yugambeh

first nations Yugambeh

client Queensland Childcare Services

client The Nest Early Education Centre of

Excellence


RESEARCH, POLICY AND COMMUNICATIONS

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Projects in this category include published works in research and or practice that extend the knowledge base and advocacy of landscape architecture.

Image: Chris Boulton / Is There a Better Approach to Providing Urban Greenspace? - The CityGreen Lab Pty Ltd


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Guide to Green Building Elements Lat27 for Brisbane City Council - City Planning and Economic Development Branch Brisbane City Council - City Planning and Economic Development Branch Yugara, Yugarapul People & Turrbal People

Image: Lat27

This document will be a robust development asset for improving the quality and functionality of green roofs, green walls, and terrace planters when published. The Jury commends both the Client, BCC, and the landscape architects, Lat27, for strongly advocating for the use and importance of these landscape structures throughout the city, detailing their positive contribution to the heat island effect, habitat, biodiversity, and the social and mental benefits of biophilia. 110


There is an impressive level of specificity in the outlines for the installation, operation, maintenance, risks, benefits, and costs of green building elements. An excellent degree of detail around loading limits, irrigation, growing media, and fire risks are evidence of extensive quantitative field research and experimentation.

Project Details project Guide to Green Building Elements entrant practice Lat27 for Brisbane City Council - City Planning and Economic Development Branch first nations Yugara, Yugarapul People & Turrbal People client Brisbane City Council - City Planning and Economic Development Branch state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Research, Policy and Communications

The report includes summaries of technical standards, guidelines and regulation relative to green building elements as typologies of systems for the integration of vegetation on built form including; extensive green roofs, green facades (trellis systems), terrace planters and green walls. Development trends since 2014 have seen a greater use of green building elements. This report also provides a review of existing relevant provisions in various parts of City Plan and identifies opportunities for change, having regard to technical, operational and compliance issues associated with, delivery, performance, maintenance, irrigation, and longevity of green building elements. At the time of engagement, the Strategic Planning Section, City Planning & Economic Development Branch of BCC was considering amendments to Brisbane City Plan 2014 (City Plan) to encourage developments to provide rooftop gardens consistent with ‘Brisbane’s Future Blueprint’ (BFB) Principle to: Protect and create greenspace.

The proposal to encourage new developments to include rooftop gardens was accompanied by the desire to progress and expand current outcomes of green building elements. Throughout the process we underpinned the importance of Landscape Architecture as a key influence of the values and image of Brisbane. Lat27 supported the BCC notion that these forms of landscape have most often been considered purely for their aesthetic value. Through correlating influences on these elements, we furthermore discussed and emphasised the more recent appreciation of the value of these elements for other capacities such as; microclimatic adjustment to heat island effect, habitat and biodiversity, and provision of social and mental benefits through biophilic connection.


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Is There a Better Approach to Providing Urban Greenspace? The CityGreen Lab Pty Ltd Cities Research Institute, Griffith University Australia: Yuggera, Turrbal, Yugarabul, Jagera & Yugambeh; Canada: Semiahmoo, Katzie, Kwikwetlem, Kwantlen, Qayqayt & Tsawwassen

Image: Chris Boulton

In the current times of a global pandemic, inner-city Green Open Space is more important than ever. The jury commends The CityGreen Lab for its empirically led Doctoral research that critically examines the challenges cities face in providing adequate greenspace to support urban populations, focusing on municipal government.

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This research thesis contributes to the collective landscape architecture knowledge bank around best practice urban greenspace development and is to be commended for also being presented to industry audiences locally and globally. The communication, methodology, and considerations that were looked at are broadly transferable, communicating to designers, decision-makers, and scholars alike. This project outlines the drivers, constraints, and governing forces that impact greenspace with detail.

Project Details project Is There a Better Approach to Providing Urban Greenspace? entrant practice The CityGreen Lab Pty Ltd first nations Australia: Yuggera, Turrbal, Yugarabul, Jagera & Yugambeh; Canada: Semiahmoo, Katzie, Kwikwetlem, Kwantlen, Qayqayt & Tsawwassen client Cities Research Institute, Griffith University state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Research, Policy and Communications

This empirically led Doctoral research critically examines the challenges for cities in providing adequate greenspace to support urban populations, focusing on municipal government. It extends the knowledge base of landscape architecture (greenspace provision) mobilising findings from a systematic quantitative literature review, and qualitative data from two case studies from Australia and Canada. This research delivers new principles for improved approaches for urban greenspace

Image: Chris Boulton

provision, and conceptual models illustrating how various factors shape urban greenspace provision. Results have been widely disseminated with multiple publications in international academic planning journals, and conference proceedings, presented to industry audiences locally and globally. This research contributes to new knowledge to support sustainable cities – economically, socially, and environmentally - through urban greenspace provision; an essential component for healthy, inclusive and sustainable cities.

Image: Chris Boulton


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner The Australian Main Street in a Post-COVID-19 World – A Local Response Urbis Pty Ltd Urbis - Public Realm Advocacy & Thought Leadership Not applicable

Image: Urbis

With this project, Urbis demonstrates the value of our profession and good design at a time when there is a premium value on public space. The Local Main Streets booklet and social media content has been prepared for Australian communities, local councils, and decision-makers. It provides an engaging guide and an aspirational community asset for a post-COVID world. The fact that this is an internal initiative demonstrates a commitment to continually evolving the practice standards of landscape architecture in Queensland. 114


The ‘kit of parts’ approach is simple yet effective and allows city shapers to envision the strategies in their jurisdictions. The “enthusiasm for Australians to fall back in love with their locale” as stated by the designers is a fitting observation and a cultural value that can be leveraged for more active, sustainable, and engaged communities.

Project Details project The Australian Main Street in a PostCOVID-19 World – A Local Response entrant practice Urbis Pty Ltd first nations Not applicable client Urbis - Public Realm Advocacy & Thought Leadership state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Research, Policy and Communications

The global pandemic fast-tracked an inevitable shift from cardominated cities to people-centric spaces and places. As many cities globally responded with ‘how-to guides’ for transforming now-abandoned urban spaces where activity was, we recognised an opportunity to advocate for good public spaces using our existing community assets. We prepared the Local Main Streets booklet and social media content for Australian communities, local councils and

decision-makers. We saw it as an opportunity to demonstrate the value of our profession and good design - at a time when there was a premium value on public space as access to it everywhere was prohibitive. Identifying ways for communities to quickly implement actions to change their local space meant ideas needed to be low-cost, flexible and portable. The most low-impact idea was a temporary activation of spaces through low-cost design and landscape elements, such as painting bike lanes, pot plants as activation elements or temporary medians. We could reclaim on-street parking spaces for outdoor dining, bicycle parking or gathering

Image: Urbis

Image: Urbis


SMALL PROJECTS Sponsored by:

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Projects in this category include those considered to be ‘small’ in terms of size or budget. Projects are recognised that have been constrained by size or budget restrictions, but have achieved a level of invention and creativity beyond these constraints.

Image: Archipelago / The Mill Interim Activation - Moreton Bay Regional Council and Archipelago


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner The Mill Interim Activation Moreton Bay Regional Council and Archipelago Moreton Bay Regional Council Yuggera

Image: Archipelago

With just 13 weeks from design inception to delivery of the completed construction, The Mill Interim Activation project visually showcases landscape architecture's ability to deliver an exceptional and engaging urban landscape from a large blank canvas with a limited budget and even more limited design and construction times. The project scope was to provide an interim activation landscape to support the opening of the USC campus. 118


The jury commends the forward-thinking of landscape architects to design site components that can be relocated and reused, exhibiting responsible resource management. The creative, well imagined, vibrant, linear, and functional place that has been created for students and visitors within the time constraints of this project are astonishing. Furthermore, this project demonstrates the poetic and pragmatic collaboration, collective ingenuity, passion, and can-do attitude of MBRC, the landscape architects, the building, civil and landscape contractors, the structural engineer, and furniture designer to deliver a stunningly cohesive and creative place. Project Details project The Mill Interim Activation entrant practice Moreton Bay Regional Council and Archipelago first nations Yuggera client Moreton Bay Regional Council state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Small Projects

The Mill Interim Activation visually showcases Landscape Architecture's ability to step in and deliver an exceptional and engaging urban landscape from a large blank canvas with a limited budget and even more limited design and construction time. This landscape achieves a level of quality and richness belying the limited resources. Designing and constructing a vibrant linear and functional place for students and visitors within three months, the poetic and pragmatic collaboration between

Image: Archipelago

the building, civil and landscape contractors together with the structural engineer, furniture designer and landscape architects delivers a stunningly cohesive and creative place. The Mill Moreton Bay is a major regeneration project breathing new life and bringing new education, commercial, workplace and recreational opportunities to Petrie and the broader Moreton Bay Region. Featuring a foundation University of Sunshine Coast Building as the major inception site anchor, the Mill represents a major investment by Moreton Bay Council, the Federal and State Governments in the education and technological future of the region.

Image: Archipelago


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner The Magic Forest of Bradbury Park Form Landscape Architects and Brisbane City Council Brisbane City Council Yuggera

Image: Yan Chen

Rivers of Gold, a Valley of Giants, and a Guardian’s Throne are part of the mythical narrative of The Magic Forest of Bradbury Park, offering a source of intrigue and delight for all who enter. Natural site features inform the narrative, along with the subtle placement of various sculptural trinkets and carved elements from local artists.

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By providing subtle cues rather than prescribed play opportunities, children are able to create infinite interpretations of the narrative and engage in the ‘choose your own adventure’ play experience for hours at a time, in a way that assists in creating bonds between children and adults of all ages. The jury commends the landscape architects for their imaginative design solutions and sensitive construction methods, which show evidence of respect for the local ecology with the use of recycled materials and waterwise plants, allowing a nature play space to be constructed within an existing grove of mature Melaleuca and Waterhousia trees. Project Details project The Magic Forest of Bradbury Park entrant practice Form Landscape Architects and Brisbane City Council first nations Yuggera client Brisbane City Council state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Small Projects

Image: Yan Chen

Image: Yan Chen


SMALL PROJECTS NOMINEES

Harmony Space, Gold Coast Health and Knowledge Precinct

Logan Gardens Water Park

Roma Street Parklands Allee Bridge Hostile Vehicle Mitigation

Image: Lat27

Image: Eye in the Sky Imagesv

Image: Francois Viennev

Sitting in a soft landscape context with the sculptural whisper seats at the centre The Harmony Space is a place of quiet communication. Representing sonic harmony, the whisper seats direct sound waves to a focal point above a hexagonal seat which amplify the whispers coming from the opposite seat. The result is the ability for two people to quietly communicate with each other over a long distance without digital assistance. Whispered words of welcome from around the world are etched into the surface of the space between the seats to welcome people of all cultures to this special place.

Spread over several hectares of landscaped parklands in Logan Central, Logan Gardens is a green oasis amid an otherwise bustling region. Set amongst a Eucalypt forest backdrop within the Logan Gardens regional parkland, the design of the Water Play Park embraces the multiculturalism of Brisbane’s South-East suburb. The site for the Logan Gardens waterpark is adjacent to the existing adventure playground, with Council’s intent for the Water Park to add to the variety of passive and recreational play activities available to enhance the Gardens and its connection to surrounding community.

Roma Street Parklands (RSP) is one of the preeminent parkland spaces in Brisbane. It is host to many large scale and popular events. With the rising concerns globally around security of patrons during large scale events, RSP identified a requirement for Hostile Vehicle Migitigation (HVM) within the parkland. Intense research into existing and proposed underground infrastructure was required in order to accommodate a seamless high amenity landscape. The resultant solution is an integrated line of landscape elements that appear to be a simple part of the landscape fabric of Roma Street Parklands.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Lat27 worked with the

entrant practice Urbis Pty Ltd

entrant practice O2LA

Queensland Government, City of Gold Coast and TLCC first nations Yugambeh client Economic Development Queensland, Department of State Development, Tourism and Innovation

first nations Yuggera

first nations Yuggera

client Logan City Council

client City Parkland Services Pty Ltd

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Portside Wharf 'Coral and Seagrass' Artwork

Pine Rivers State High School Yarning Circle

Springwood Early Education Centre

Image: Mark Crenitch

Image: Debbie Turner

Image: Tony Phillips

This small Portside artwork draws inspiration from both scientific community’s advocacy for water quality and AILA’s guiding principles of valuing, sustaining and experiencing landscape. Scientists intimately understand the links between land health, downstream riverwater quality and the health of Moreton Bay. Our riverfront response employs wharf art, telling the scientific story of land and aquatic degradation and restoration, whilst gently raising community awareness. We believe environmental stewardship can be engaging without political confrontation. A subtle, subversive coral and seagrass artwork connects the physical and metaphysical challenge of restoring Moreton Bay’s health. Its’ story offers remorse and hope.

Yarning circles are often viewed as a place for Aboriginal people. However, after working with the school and their local Indigenous elders, this Yarning circle at Pine Rivers State High School was designed with the intent to be an inclusive space for all. The design was based on the Fibonacci Spiral, its form is found throughout nature. It provided infinite cascades of possibilities and similarities that aligned with the intended outcome and its formation gave the Yarning ‘Circle’ a unique shape and character. It has become a favourite place to connect as equals, share stories and learn from each other.

Springwood Early Education Centre’s outdoor environment promotes an educationally rich natural play space that prioritises the development of the children. The project supports the three pillars of sustainable practices; social (belonging, supported, respectful, community), environmental (positive interaction with natural elements and the world) and economic (utilising resources optimally including financial). The project's pedagogical approach to design promotes risky play and the integration of ecology within the play environment. The sitespecific design promotes engagement with the existing tree canopies and holistically the environment aims to challenge children’s perception and spatial awareness.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Dunn + Moran Landscape

entrant practice Dunn and Moran Landscape

entrant practice Wearthy

Architects

Architects

first nations Yugambeh

first nations Mianjin

first nations Turrbal - Meanjin

client Queensland Childcare Services

client Brookfield Residential Properties

client Pine Rivers State High School


SMALL PROJECTS NOMINEES

Main Street Boulevard Stage 5

All Hallows School Magnolia Place

Red Shade

Image: Kylie Harber

Image: Alanna McTiernan Photography

Image: Henrika Purwodihardjo

The ‘greening’ of Main Street, Kangaroo Point is a major focus for Brisbane City Council as part of its Greener Suburbs program, increasing shade and amenity throughout the city. A small yet prominent traffic island lacking in visual appeal was identified as Stage 5 of the Main Street Boulevard project and became an opportunity for Council to demonstrate best practice landscape architecture through visual amenity, legibility, activation and cultural heritage preservation. Main Street Boulevard Stage 5 delivered a memorable landscape that welcomes visitors to our city, blends new elements with existing geological features and is admired by the local community.

All Hallows’ School Magnolia Place provides a beautiful, contemplative Memorial Garden for the students and All Hallows' School community to meet, gather and most importantly enjoy being in. The garden contains colourful planting palette, speaks to the heritage Convent of the Sisters of Mercy, provides water elements, mosaics, memorial plaques, ceremonial bowls, flowers, an infinity pathway, seating for groups with pergola.Our thoughtful design approach created a beautiful quiet space of remembrance and reflection, providing a long-lasting tribute to students who passed away while they were pupils at the school.

The new Logan Gardens waterpark opened with great fanfare and excitement. Designed by Urbis and reflecting the Wembley link project, the park was an instant success. Within a few days it became apparent that there was insufficient shade. The Parks branch were tasked with providing shade to the new "caterpillar row" of seats. A simple,sensitive and affordable solution, respectful to the waterpark, the new shade structures fulfills the project requirements and were developed in consultation with the team at Street and Garden Australia

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Brisbane City Council - City

entrant practice Aspect Studios

entrant practice Logan City Council

Projects Office first nations Turrbal, Yugara-Yugarapul, Jagera client Brisbane City Council Asset Services

first nations Yuggera

first nations Jagera, Yuggerah

client All Hallows School

client Logan city Council

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Image: Yan Chen / The Magic Forrest of Bradbury Park - Form Landscape Architects


TOURISM

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Projects in this category are constructed or strategic projects that demonstrate excellence in landscape design and demonstrate a tangible contribution to tourism, either nationally or in the local region that significantly enhances the profile of the area.

Image: Christopher Fredrick Jones / The Australian Stockmans Hall of Fame - O2LA


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Elderslie Street Winton RPS Winton Shire Council Koa Country

Image: SGF FLORIAN GROEHN

Elderslie Street Winton is an excellent example of rural streetscape rejuvenation. RPS has successfully increased local amenity, pedestrian activation, event capacity and did so with a design language that is strongly place based. The project is reflective of the regional ecology, culture, values and history, resulting in a landscape that has a defined personality. 128


Each design feature, from seating, to shade, and play, contribute to building the town’s character and communicating its story, yet each has been executed with a refined palette that allows room to breathe. The result is a landscape that can expand to host a festival of multiple thousands of people, and also contract to invite casual daily interactions between neighbours.

Project Details project Elderslie Street Winton entrant practice RPS first nations Koa Country client Winton Shire Council state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Tourism

Elderslie Street sets a scene for a stage play of outback life. It is place for celebrations as well as for the everyday.

local people making the effort to share the strength and resilience of Winton as an authentic outback experience.

It is a place to relax and welcome visitors, to show them a good time.

Elderslie Street has become a place for tourists to learn, for locals to gather and for all to share their stories, the re-invigoration of the main street which is the heart of the community.

The street was refurbished by Winton Shire Council in 2019 to showcase Winton’s history, to bring locals together, and to celebrate the authentic characters for which Winton is renowned. Situated within a rugged yet beautiful outback landscape, the refurbished street is the result of

Image: SGF FLORIAN GROEHN

It has developed into a built representation of the small town’s willingness to welcome guests and communicate the towns stories with the characteristic pride and humour of outback Australia and has seen tourists who once passed through town stop, explore the town and leave with new stories of their own to share.

Image:RPS Tim Connor


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner AUSTRALIAN STOCKMAN'S HALL OF FAME O2LA Australian Stockman’s Hall of Fame Iningai

Image: Christopher Fredrick Jones

This project presents a striking and authentically Australian revitalisation of an important tourism site. The landscape’s character is robustly grounded in the local culture, ecology and history, as evidenced through the 02LA’s choice of materiality, form and species. 130


The design has been commendably guided by climate, making the local identity fully realised and instantly discernible throughout the space. This project is a great example of adaptive reuse and staying true to a culturally significant spatial personality.

Project Details project AUSTRALIAN STOCKMAN'S HALL OF FAME entrant practice O2LA first nations Iningai client Australian Stockman’s Hall of Fame state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Tourism

The Australian Stockman’s Hall of Fame is one of Australia’s most well-known and iconic tourist destinations in Australia. Set amongst the rugged, yet vibrant rural landscape and community of Longreach, we thought it was vital that the landscape works for this project be reflective of the iconic themes that Australians and International visitors have come to associate with the Outback. Respecting the existing iconic built form was important to the client as was re-enforcing

Image: Christopher Fredrick Jones

the concept of the ‘Australian Billabong’. Natural earth toned materials and reflections of the sunrise and sunset inspired the design colours and material choices. This project was largely one of renewal. ASHOF was built in the late 1980’s and was a main tourist attraction for the outback. Over the last thirty years the outback Queensland tourist industry has expanded enormously, especially during COVID. Respecting the existing iconic built form was the most important and clearly communicated goal of the client. In conjunction to that goal was the desire to re-enforce the concept of the ‘Australian Billabong’ and to adapt the existing facilities for the current and future visitor needs.

Image: Christopher Fredrick Jones


Queensland Regional Achievement Award Winner Central Queensland Eromanga Township CUSP (QLD) Pty Ltd Quilpie Shire Council and Eromanga Natural History Museum Wangkumara

Image: CUSP

The jury commends the Quilpie Shire Council for commissioning a landscape architect to develop Eromanga’s Masterplan based on the vision for Eromanga to be a tourism flagship destination. The landscape architect's approach to addressing the town’s overall identity and dilapidated amenities was one of collaboration with the local community. 132


The community responded very positively to the consultation process; it was given a ‘voice’ to express its short- and long-term issues, including flooding vulnerability, and few activities for the young. Drawing inspiration from the local perspective, CUSP provided well-considered and clearly articulated opportunities and constraints mapping, which identified a number of core strategies and highlighted potential staged projects. Overall the masterplan will ensure a more cohesive community and promote an increase in tourist attraction qualities, providing opportunities for growth and economic drivers, showcasing Eromanga as a tourism flagship destination. Project Details project Eromanga Township entrant practice CUSP (QLD) Pty Ltd first nations Wangkumara client Quilpie Shire Council and Eromanga Natural History Museum state award 2021 AILA QLD Regional Achievement Award for Central Queensland

In 2020, Quilpie Shire Council commissioned CUSP to develop Eromanga’s Masterplan, to address the town’s overall identity and dilapidated amenities. The Council also required Eromanga to be a tourism flagship destination, based on its dinosaur fossils and history. In February 2020, CUSP was commissioned by Quilpie Shire Council to develop a Masterplan for Eromanga. CUSP’s brief was to identify strategies and devise projects to

Image: CUSP

create a stronger, more cohesive community and provide Quilpie Shire with a tourism flagship destination. In response, specific strategies for the community in CUSP’s comprehensive Masterplan include improving public amenities, such as the public swimming pool, tennis courts and public toilets, and improving the conditions and amenities of the Town Hall Park and Eromanga Sports Ground. Upgrades to the Memorial Garden, public carparks, bike paths and all footpaths are also included in the Masterplan, particularly with links to significant areas beyond the township, such as the tourist destination of the Eromanga Museum; the historic cemetery and the Showgrounds.

Image: CUSP


TOURISM NOMINEES

Airlie Beach Foreshore

Image: Photographer

The Airlie Beach Foreshore is an important and well-loved space for both tourists and locals. The green spaces and walkways offer beautiful bay and island views, whilst regularly hosting markets, and festivals. Improvements included a new market site, performance stage, shelters, an amphitheatre, a new three-metre-wide footpath along the beachfront, and an adventure playground. The revitalisation of the foreshore commenced in the wake of extensive damage created by Cyclone Debbie in 2017. In addition to rectification works, the project was designed to deliver economic benefit to the region by building upon the appeal of the Whitsundays as a tourism destination.

Project Details entrant practice Urbis Pty Ltd first nations Giya client Whitsunday Regional Council

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Image: SGF FLORIAN GROEHN / Elderslie Street Winton - RPS


URBAN DESIGN Sponsored by:

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Projects in this category are constructed or strategic projects that demonstrate how the design, construction management and built outcome contributes to the wellbeing of the urban setting through the improvement of social interaction, economic activity, liveability, accessibility and safety.

Image: Carl Street Urban Common / Brisbane City Council - City Projects Office


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Caloundra Main Street Urban Revitalisation Sunshine Coast Council Kabi Kabi

Image: Andrew Maccoll

This main street revitalisation responds to the obvious need to rejuvenate and reinvigorate the local economy and is a timely response to the swelling populations throughout Caloundra. Preservation of the iconic figs was dealt with appropriately and successfully and are the obvious true heroes of this reenergised precinct. 138


The increase in street greening, as well as the provision of respite areas, night activation and furniture represent a step in the right direction of activating pedestrian space, creating unique off-street destinations, and reclaiming space from vehicles. The development of “Australia’s first Business Continuity Guide” demonstrates that the designers listened to the communities’ concerns around the project and addressed them in a real way. Project Details project Caloundra Main Street Urban Revitalisation entrant practice Sunshine Coast Council first nations Kabi Kabi client Sunshine Coast Council state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Urban Design

Sunshine Coast Council (SCC) has transformed a declining regional main street into a vibrant and liveable community space through the Caloundra Main Street Urban Revitalisation Project. The project became Australia’s first smart city streetscape demonstration and testing facility, showcasing the latest smart city technologies. SCC Design and Placemaking Services designed and delivered the four stage project valued at over $12 million.

The new vibrant and colourful streetscape was combined with a creative placemaking program that resulted in a community embracing innovation and activation, with an increased sense of identity and selfdetermination. Sunshine Coast Council’s (SCC) Design and Placemaking Services were tasked with the challange to revitalise this street, our approach was to take the community and organisation on a journey to reimagine the high street experience through a holistic placemaking framework. An integrated design approach was central to the process and the streetscape upgrade was seen as the catalyst to address the street’s lack of identity and vitality.

Image: Andrew Maccoll

Image: Andrew Maccoll


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Carl Street Urban Common Brisbane City Council - City Projects Office Brisbane City Council - Natural Environment, Water and Sustainability (NEWS) Branch Turrbal, Yugara-Yugarapul, Jagera

Image: MICHELLE GONSAL

Carl Street Urban Common is a valuable new asset for a growing city. Designers were faced with an area surrounded by high density living, struggling for break out space, and frequented by diverse user groups, and they have delivered an urban park offering a diverse range of opportunities, reflective of its community. 140


The space is activated yet offers quality unprogrammed space, catering to the needs of residents, hospital workers, patients, workers, and commuters.The use of public art is a meaningful tool in bringing together this community. This space is now expressively “inscribed with spatial memories yet has the capacity to nurture and foster new ones”. Urban activation for the community is well considered and well delivered on this site.

Project Details project Carl Street Urban Common entrant practice Brisbane City Council - City Projects Office first nations Turrbal, Yugara-Yugarapul, Jagera client Brisbane City Council - Natural Environment, Water and Sustainability (NEWS) Branch state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Urban Design

Brisbane City Council opened Carl Street Urban Common, an urban recreational green space in the inner-city suburb of Woolloongabba, in late 2020. Located opposite the Buranda Village shopping centre and within walking distance of the Princess Alexandra Hospital and the Eastern Busway, the new park provides the local community in this fast-evolving urban area with a recreational space to enjoy the outdoors. Serving as a hub for Woolloongabba’s diverse

Image: MICHELLE GONSAL

community, Carl Street Urban Common offers a range of amenities including green, shady spots to meet with family and friends and areas designed for fitness activities. Carl Street Urban Common is a successful example of vision put into practice—the vision of a new kind of liveability which embraces green spaces as an urban backyard, of a new way for parks to function in our cities, and the vision of a space which is inscribed with spatial memories yet has the capacity to nurture and foster new ones.

Image: MICHELLE GONSAL


Queensland Landscape Architecture Award Winner Logan Central Civic and Community Precinct Plan Logan City Council and Archipelago Logan City Council Yuggera

Image: Archipelago

This precinct plan provides a strategy for the growth of Logan in line with the designer's stated priority to deliver 'people and place focused urban design outcomes”. The masterplan conducts a study of exemplar civic precinct features which provides the users with a perfect opportunity to explore and investigate the uniqueness of Logan with designs and packages of works that will evolve as the community grows. It's focus on sustainability has the potential to make a significant impact on the central Logan community into the future. 142


This project demonstrates a clear vision and moves to establish a collective framework and strategies to lead this precinct into the future. It ensures that the project can be delivered regardless of timing or funding constraints; a simple yet highly effective communication tool for facilitating next steps and staged delivery.

Project Details project Logan Central Civic and Community Precinct Plan entrant practice Logan City Council and Archipelago first nations Yuggera client Logan City Council state award 2021 AILA QLD Landscape Architecture Award for Urban Design

Image: Archipelago

Home to more than 327,000 people from 217 cultures and with 50% of residents aged below 30, Logan is a vibrant and youthful cultural melting pot craving a civic heart to bring people together. The Logan Central Civic and Community Precinct Plan is a key urban design instrument providing strategic “real” directions guiding the Precinct on how to stitch together 40 hectares of parkland, civic administration, public services, sporting and entertainment venues into a cohesive, community engaging, safe, and economically active

destination. The Plan is fundamentally a place based framework from which LCC can progressively unlock the full precinct potential. The Logan Central Civic and Community Precinct Plan exemplifies the outstanding urban design outcomes that can be achieved when the client, stakeholders, community and design team collectively and consistently collaborate through all project phases with a unified mindset of “what will focus community energy into this precinct”.

Image: Archipelago


Queensland Regional Achievement Award Winner Sunshine Coast Caloundra Main Street Urban Revitalisation Sunshine Coast Council Kabi Kabi

Image: Andrew Maccoll

Australia's first smart city streetscape has transformed a declining regional main street into a re-energised precinct on the Sunshine Coast, establishing a point of difference between it and other new urban centres and supporting a region under increased pressure from population growth. Bulcock Street was established more than 100 years ago and this main street revitalisation, in collaboration with the local community, is a timely initiative to restore economic currency to the precinct, while preserving the heart of the city, with residents continuing to hold a strong 144


allegiance to the street which is known for its iconic fig tree plantings. Community consultation in this project, particularly the participation of school students in the project will aid in community ownership and stewardships over the street in years to come. The placemaking and activation events that continue along the new main street are evidence of the success of this project and designers should be proud.

Project Details project Caloundra Main Street Urban Revitalisation entrant practice Sunshine Coast Council first nations Kabi Kabi client Sunshine Coast Council state award 2021 AILA QLD Regional Achievement Award for the Sunshine Coast

Sunshine Coast Council (SCC) has transformed a declining regional main street into a vibrant and liveable community space through the Caloundra Main Street Urban Revitalisation Project. The project became Australia’s first smart city streetscape demonstration and testing facility, showcasing the latest smart city technologies. SCC Design and Placemaking Services designed and delivered the four stage project valued at over $12 million.

The new vibrant and colourful streetscape was combined with a creative placemaking program that resulted in a community embracing innovation and activation, with an increased sense of identity and selfdetermination. Sunshine Coast Council’s (SCC) Design and Placemaking Services were tasked with the challange to revitalise this street, our approach was to take the community and organisation on a journey to reimagine the high street experience through a holistic placemaking framework. An integrated design approach was central to the process and the streetscape upgrade was seen as the catalyst to address the street’s lack of identity and vitality.

Image: Andrew Maccoll

Image: Andrew Maccoll


URBAN DESIGN NOMINEES

Kingsford Smith Drive Upgrade Project

City Reach Master Plan

Beenleigh Streetscape Master Plan

Image: Lat27

Image: Urbis

Image: Lat27

The Kingsford Smith Drive upgrade involved widening the existing road from four to six lanes between Theodore Street at Eagle Farm and Cooksley Street, Hamilton to provide increased road capacity. Significantly, the project has delivered improved pedestrian and cycle facilities with the addition of a new Riverwalk between Newstead House and Northshore Hamilton. Two new landscaped public spaces have also been created at Cameron Rocks Reserve and Bretts Wharf with a multi-functional plaza linking Racecourse Road to the CityCat stop. This critical upgrade has created a new subtropical entry boulevard into the city with the Brisbane River as it’s centrepiece.

The City Reach Waterfront is one of Brisbane's best-loved and most iconic places, with an appealing waterfront location, contemporary architecture, and captivating history. The lack of an overall vision has led to several issues experienced at the waterfront today. The City Reach Waterfront Master Plan covers the full waterfront area extending from the City Botanic Gardens to Howard Smith Wharves and establishes a clear and aspirational vision for this critical part of the city.

The Beenleigh Streetscape Masterplan provides a user friendly framework for Council and developers to facilitate the economic and social upliftment for the Beenleigh CBD and support the creation of a place that is embraced by locals and is attractive to visitors by increasing and highlighting opportunities for seating, increased footpaths, zones for outdoor dining, night lighting, activation, creativity and public art, and building place character through the use of a consistent visual character palette as a wayfinding & placemaking device to enhance public realm comfort, reduce urban heat and enhance biodiversity through increasing natural shade through unique and diverse planting character.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Lat27

entrant practice Brisbane City Council & Urbis

entrant practice Lat27

first nations Yugara, Yugarapul People &

Pty Ltd

first nations Yugambeh Mibin People,

Turrbal client Brisbane City Council

first nations Yuggera

Gugingin Clan client Logan City Council

client Brisbane City Council – Urban Renewal

Brisbane

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Home of the Arts - Green Bridge

Sunnybank Village Precinct Project

University of Queensland, Gatton Entry Hub

Image: City of Gold Coast

Image: Brisbane City Council

Image: O2LA

In addition to the new Gallery and Outdoor Stage, the Home of the Arts (HOTA) Green Bridge is the third phase of the masterplan to be implemented for the Gold Coast Cultural Precinct, an innovative and unique development that integrates landscape, art and culture. The bridge connects the northern edge of the precinct to the adjacent Chevron Island and famous Surfers Paradise, via the Nerang River, as a pedestrian and cyclist only access link.

Our city’s neighbourhoods are unique destinations where people meet, socialise, shop and conduct business. Local centres are key social, environmental, and economic lynchpins for communities and precinct liveability; as recently highlighted during the impacts of the 2020 pandemic. Guided by Council’s Design-led City – a design strategy for Brisbane, the Village Precinct Project program (VPP), addresses social, environmental and economic opportunities, revitalising suburban neighbourhood centres, and supporting local businesses and communities across Brisbane. The Sunnybank VPP’s tailored community engagement and placemaking focus provided fertile ground, creating distinctive, meaningful subtropical spaces with improved amenity, reflecting this

The UQ Gatton Campus Hub Master Plan transforms the northern section of the primary university spine into an engaging campus community hub. It reimagines the ‘campus heart’ as a place which fosters connection and life on campus, such as outdoor learning, gathering and recreational opportunities. It also reconnects to, and celebrates the historic foundation precinct to the south.

Project Details

Project Details

Project Details

entrant practice Archipelago with CUSP (Qld)

entrant practice Brisbane City Council

entrant practice O2LA

Pty Ltd

first nations Turrbal, Ugarapul, Yugarapul &

first nations Jagera Gurrangnam

first nations Bundjalung

Jagera client Brisbane City Council

client University of Queensland, Gatton

client City of Gold Coast

Campus


PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARD The Nest Early Education Centre of Excellence Wearthy Yugambeh

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Image: Tony Phillips / The Nest Early Education Centre of Excellence - Wearthy


Project Details project The Nest Early Education Centre of Excellence entrant practice Wearthy first nations Yugambeh client The Nest Early Education Centre of Excellence state award 2021 AILA QLD People's Choice Award

The Nest represents a nurturing space for children to feel safe and secure - the building blocks of confidence and adventure. As a lead member of the Australian Childcare Alliance, our client emphasised the importance of outdoor education and access to nature, aligning to the centre’s Reggio Emilia pedagogy. The 140-place centre features a large outdoor podium slab, which was crafted into an outdoor learning oasis and showcases The

Image: Tony Phillips

Nest centrepiece, an innovative high-tech structure constructed from a range of sensory materials. This play space reimagines how a naturally inspired play environment can exist within modern construction. The entire project at the Nest Early Education Centre of Excellence consisted of four areas: the large outdoor podium or main playground, babies’ and toddlers playground at ground level, street planting and bio-retention basin.

Image: Tony Phillips


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TALK TO US ABOUT YOUR NEXT PROJECT Call 1300 787 401 www.plantmark.com.au


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AWARDS QUEENSLAND 2021

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS AILA would like to thank our partners, all the entrants and those who joined our awards evening. AILA Queensland David Uhlmann, Chapter President Tessa Leggo, Secretary Queensland Executive Committee AILA Awards Jury Lauren Newton Debra Bela Jim Carless Sophie Fossey Paul Morris Michael Lavery Julia McCann AILA QLD Melanie West, QLD Chapter Manager Kaye Hall, National IT & Digital Comms Lead | QLD Admin & Events Coordinator Rewatch the 2021 Awards:  https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=A-t68Z31kBc&t=6s View the 2021 Winners Gallery:  https://aila.awardsplatform. com/gallery/qyzgXNwL


THE 2021 QUEENSLAND AWARDS

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Image: Andrew Watson / Munro Martin Parklands, Cairns - Andrew Prowse Landscape Architect Pty Ltd


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AWARDS QUEENSLAND 2021

Image: Yan Chen / Lucent - Form Landscape Architects

Profile for AILA-National

2021 QLD Landscape Architecture Awards Magazine  

2021 QLD Landscape Architecture Awards Magazine  

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