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Volume 15 • Number 6 •

June-July 2020


Deirdre Stoker Vaillancourt, REALTOR®

803.640.4591

Aiken, South Carolina — Southern Charm and Equestrian Sport 1309 SOUTH BOUNDARY AIKEN, SC 29801

• Toy Cottage • 2 BR 2 BA • $360,000

MLS # 110747

• Brick Cottage, Fully Renovated in 2006 • Circular Driveway

• Original Hitchcock Ceilings & Beautiful Hardwood Floors

900 HORSE CREEK RD BEECH ISLAND, SC 29842

• Just Hope Farm • 46 Acres • 2 Barn Apt with 2BR 1BA each

1064 GRAND PRIX DR

MLS # 110202

• Designated Jumper Arena (125x250) • Dressage Arena (80x220) • Wash, Feed, Utility, Tack Rm Stalls • Center Aisle Barn with 11 Oversized Stalls (14x14) • Riders Lounge • $865,000

MLS # 103839

• Distinguished Farm • 2 BR 2.5 BA • 4 Paddocks • $690,000 • 8 Stall Courtyard Barn • Gated Community • Fox Hollow Equestrian • 30 Miles of Trail • 3 Rings

LOT 9 & 19 PALOMA LN MLS # 111970

• New Bridge Polo & Country Club, 9 1.89 ac, 19 23.41 ac • Exceptional Home & Barn Sites Available • Mature, Mixed Hardwoods & Grass Pasture Land • Field One Frontage • Total 25.49 Acres • $600,000

525 LAURENS ST

MLS # 97065

• Historic Hitchcock Stables • 8.5 Acres • 27 Large Stalls • Adjacent to the 2100 Acre Hitchcock Woods • 8 Lg Paddocks • 2 Carriage Sheds, Bunk House • $2,300,000

785 GRACE AVE

MLS # 71716

• 4BR 3BA Residence • Cozy 1BR 1BA Guest Cottage • 3 Barns; 20 Stalls, 20 Paddocks • 2 Grass Training Fields • Easy Access to The Hitchcock Woods • Frontage to Clay Rds • 10 Prime Acres in The Historic Horse District• $3,100,000

348 MARION STREET SE MLS # 110759

• Marion Place Downtown Aiken • New Heat & Air Unit • 3 BR 3 Full BA • Fenced in Yard • Off Street Parking • $320,000

COLBERT BRIDGE RD

MLS # 111361

• 2 Semi Wooded Lots with Colbert Bridge Frontage • Great Homesites or 40.19 Acre Private Sporting Estate • Mixed Rolling & Level Terrain of Hardwoods & Grass Pasture • Direct Access to Bridle Creek Equestrian • $334,050

www.AikenSCProperties.com 2

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SuzyHaslup_TAH_Sept2019.qxp_Layout 1 4/5/20 5:46 PM Page 1

MONTMORENCI HORSE FARM $799,000 Accredited Land Consultant An Accredited Land Consultant, Suzy achieved the title of Leading Sales Agent in 2013, 2015 & 2016. Her 2018 & 2019 achievements include Meybohm’s “Best of the Best” & President’s Club, as well as 2018 & 2019 RLI APEX award for top producing land real estate agents. Sligo Rose Farm, a turn key 27 A property with history of income from guest house, barn apartment & stables. Hardiplank 5 BR/3.5 BA house w/fireplace, pine floors, granite counters, new deck & 2 car garage. Updated 1 BR/1.5 BA guesthouse with garage. 8 stall barn with 12 x 12 matted stalls, wash stall, tack room with laundry & half bath, feed room & efficiency apartment. 5 grass paddocks & run-in. 13 A of trails, salt water pool with new liner & pool house.

KATYDID FARM

$1.1 MILLION

WOOD’S END WAY

$648,000

BUTTON DOWN FARM $699,000

REDUCED Home to one of the few international driving competitions in N.A. this farm is suitable for any equestrian. Property has over 112 A w/hay fields, pastures, 2 center aisle barns (18 stalls), 5 run-in sheds, equipment shed & hay barn. Stickbuilt home w/3 BR/2 BA, hardwood floors & fireplace. Additional contiguous 105 A with trails available.

OLD HnD BARN

$529,000

Ride into the Hitchcock Woods from your new construction light filled 3 BR/3.5 BA custom hardiplank home with 3 stall barn, wash stall, tack room, storage & fenced turnout on 3.51 A with the ability to purchase more land. Wood floors, high ceilings, gas fireplace & chef’s kitchen with granite counters. Available to rent.

FOX HOLLOW

$749,900

Bridle Creek farm has hardiplank 3 BR /2 BA home on 12.48 A completely fenced w/no climb wire & top board, 4 paddocks, large turnout field, 4 stall barn w/tack-room, feed room, wash stall, in/out stalls & fabulous 80X200 irrigated synthetic footing dressage ring.Extensive community trails, new jump & dressage ring & recreation center.

COKER SPRINGS

$649,900

REDUCED

Aiken’s Horse District property w/20 stalls, indoor wash stall, 2 tack rooms, feed room, 6 irrigated board fenced paddocks & nice owners 2 BR/2.5 BA upstairs apartments w/downstairs office/kitchen or efficiency apartment w/full bath. Access to Aiken Training Track for thoroughbreds, hack to the polo fields, jump ring & Hitchcock Woods for the fox hunters, eventers or polo ponies.

Forever Young Farm in gated Fox Hollow w/green features & use of sustainable products.Open floor plan, gourmet kitchen w/quartzite, gas stove, pantry, dry bar, 10’ & 12’ceilings, marble foyer, office, 2 screened porches, geothermal heating/ cooling system, bamboo flooring, surround sound wifi equipment & garages for 3 cars. 4 stall barn w/tack room & storage, 8.16 A & access to 30 miles of trails, 3 rings & cross country course.

Flutterby Acre Farm is steps away from Hitchcock Woods for you, your horses and dogs! Renovated circa 1932 5 BR/3 BA cedar shake home on 1 acre w/paddocks & 4 stall barn. Random width tobacco barn heart pine floors downstairs with 9’ & 10’ ceilings, deep baseboards, fireplaces, upstairs with huge bonus/ studio with built ins & 3 additional bedrooms. Screened porch & kitchen lead to large stamped concrete patio w/waterfall feature. Prime location.

www.AikenHorseRealty.com (803) 215-0153 • suzy.haslup@gmail.com June-July 2020

The Aiken Horse

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WELCOME TO THE SOUTH

YOU’VE ALWAYS DREAMED OF...

finehomesofaiken.com

ROCKING HORSE FARM 19.5-acre horse farm with a Southern Living residence in Pacific Northwest styling. Magnificent 2-story great room is the centerpiece of this brilliant open floor plan. Vintage interior doors. Energy efficient home w/fiberglass exterior. Reclaimed heart pine floors & art deco tile. Master suite with walk-in shower. Two barns w/5 stalls, tack room, wash area, & hay storage. Many more amenities. Property can be subdivided. Private equestrian community near Aiken w/riding trails, dressage ring, & jump field. $765,000

SOLD

SOLD

THE BALCONY is the most prestigious equestrian estate in Aiken, a comfortable showplace in the heart of Aiken’s “Winter Colony.” Close to all equestrian venues, the 5.85-acre compound is a peaceful sanctuary within tall masonry walls. The elegant slate-roofed residence shows refined craftsmanship in every detail. Stately formal rooms. 6 ensuite bedrooms w/fireplaces. Kitchen, laundry, & utilities are all updated. Exquisite gardens & lawns. 20-stall stable, 3-BR cottage, swimming pool, large paddocks. $2,450,000

SWALLOW DIP is a splendid historic Aiken residence on .78-acre in downtown Aiken. The property is just 1 block to The Willcox Inn, the Aiken Public Library, two blocks to the lovely trails of the 2200-acre Hitchcock Woods, & a 5 minute walk to downtown. The historic estate consists of a main residence, a swimming pool, gardens, and a pool-guest house. The 1-story residence has 2904 sq.ft. of living space: living room, library, 3 en suite bedrooms, formal dining room, & large contemporary eat-in kitchen with pantry. $595,000

DIBBLE ROAD Stately 1-story contemporary in Highland Park on landscaped 1-acre lot. Great value for the size and condition. Circular driveway, superb chef’s kitchen, private patio, & granite fireplace surround in living room. Home music system. Extra-large master suite with double vanity and separate shower and tub. Absolutely brilliant floor plan. Subzero refrigerator, Miele convection oven, Thermador gas range w/grill insert, Samsung washer and dryer (gas), plus refrigerator and range in garage for garage apartment. $575,000

HORSE PARK COTTAGE Beautifully renovated BEAUMONT COTTAGE: Former home of beloved classic close to Millbrook Elementary, Kennedy dad on “Leave It To Beaver” is lovingly brought up Middle, South Aiken High, and Aiken Horse Park. to the 21st-century w/polished wood floors, three 4 bedrooms w/3 elegant modern baths. Mother-in- updated bathrooms, new carpet in the master law suite (or guest room) is the east wing of house. suite, two fireplaces, & HUGE laundry room & Large eat-in kitchen has stone counter-tops and pantry! Split bedroom plan. New in 2020: irrigation contemporary appliances. Living room has wood system, ductwork, patio, refinished floors, carpet, floors, picture window, & gas-log fireplace. Large landscaping, attic stairs, & kitchen appliances. master suite with magnificent private bath & walk-in Built-in shelves in living room, laundry room, & den. closet. Attractive landscaping plus a large fenced Lots of storage. Large rooms. Kitchen has granite back yard with a storage building or workshop. 2018: counter tops, new appliances, tile backsplash, new new 30-year roof and new flashing, new chimney cabinets & pass-thru to den. Circular drive. Super caps, and extensive bathroom updates. Paved neighborhood between Fresh Market & Willcox Inn. driveway with carport.. Quiet safe neighborhood Dogs will enjoy the large fenced back yard. Listing with shopping, parks, & dining just blocks away.Theagent co-owner. $419,000 finestisfarms in Aiken, South Carolina. $219,000

SNIPES POND is a 4028 sf renovated historic plantation home on 46 acres of beautiful rolling farm land. The top-quality renovation by skilled craftsmen from Reynolds Co. offers modern amenities such as a granite kitchen island, French country sink, walkin closets, ceiling fans, & security system. multiple porches on both floors, and handsome wood floors. The 46.31 acres are ideal for farming, horses, other recreation or quiet enjoyment. Additional acreage available. $699,900

Call 803-640-0123 for estates, farms, homes & land.

KELLER WILLIAMS AIKEN PARTNERS

803 / 640 / 0123

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June-July 2020


Aiken’s Newest Equestrian-Friendly Community Anderson Farms is a residential community minutes from downtown Aiken, SC that boasts upscale living in a beautifully pastoral setting, uniquely connecting its residents to its natural and idyllic surroundings. Here, neighbors are connected by their passion for balanced lifestyles, and often share in gardening, farming, community events and more. Anderson Farms has committed itself to providing these opportunities for property owners by offering an array of conveniences including nature, walking and riding trails, a community garden, a community chicken coop, an equestrian riding and workout ring, a pond with dock access and so much more. COMMUNITY AMENITIES

PUT DOWN ROOTS AT AN D E R S O N FAR M S Contact the team at Anderson Farms to learn more about the wellness-first lifestyle that sets our community apart.

803-620-1685 • AFAikenSC.com

June-July 2020

The Aiken Horse

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SECTION 8 14 20 22

The New Normal Grand Prix Jumping News and Notes Horses & The Law

1

Our cover features Daniel Geitner winning the $25,000 Marshall & Sterling Grand Prix at the Aiken Summer Classic aboard November Hill’s Vesta de Lavardin. Photography by Pam Gleason

SECTION 32 34 36 40 44 48

2

Secret Lives: My Tyme Remaking Mustangs Ask the Judge Aiken Polo Spring 2020 Eco-Equestrian The Caribbean Connection

Constitution Cup action at Aiken Polo Club. Trevor Niznik goes for goal while Jack Whitman follows up. Marcos Onetto and Randy Rizor defend. Photography by Pam Gleason

`

SECTION

“Smoochie” a Thoroughbred colt owned by Kathy and Ron Madden. Photography by Pam Gleason

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55 62 66 69 76 77 78

3

Foals of 2020 Remembering Thomas Hitchcock Full Gallop & The Vista Calendar Directory of Services Classifieds Index of Advertisers

June-July 2020


June-July 2020

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

P.O. Box 332 • Montmorenci, SC 29839-0332 • 803.643.9960 • TheAikenHorse.com • TheAikenHorse@gmail.com Time Dated Material • Periodicals • Volume 15 • Number 6

I

t has certainly been a strange spring here in Aiken. It’s a bit of a cliché to call these times “uncertain” but the word seems apt. The COVID-19 pandemic and associated shutdown have been major disruptors, eliminating most of our spring season and threatening local businesses in and out of our horse world. During the shutdown, no one knew how bad things were going to get, either in terms of the virus itself, or in terms of economic pain. Now that things are opening back up, no one really knows what will happen. Will we go back to life as usual? Will we have a massive second wave of infections? Will our economy recover? No one can be certain. In the first section of our paper, you will find an article about the new normal at Aiken equestrian events – things are the same in some ways, but there many changes, too. We also have another column from the attorney Jim Ritchie about legal matters related to horse owning. If you have a stable, either public or private, he suggests that this is a good time to update legal documents and agreements, including adding new language to waivers that includes references to respiratory viruses. This seems like a sensible precaution “in these uncertain times.” (See? I said it again.) Our second section has several interesting stories, including one about the partnership between Aiken Equine Rescue and Caribbean Thoroughbred

June-July 2020

Aftercare Inc., which has brought a number of retired racehorses from Puerto Rico to Aiken. In this section you will also meet My Tyme, a semi-retired 25-yearold dressage horse who is the subject of our Secret Lives article, as well as Sawyer, a young mustang who is winning awards and accolades on a national level, less than a year after she was brought in from the wild in the American West. In our third section, we have our fourth annual spotlight on foals born in Aiken this year. One thing that we love about doing this feature is the opportunity to meet and photograph so many fantastic baby horses, and there were a few of them this year that we definitely would have liked to take home. Finally, we have another installment of our Remembering Aiken’s Horsemen series. Our subject is Thomas Hitchcock, Sr., one of the main founders of the Aiken Winter Colony in the first half of the 20th century, and a fascinating and talented horseman who left gifts to the Aiken community that we continue to enjoy today. We hope you like this slightly delayed issue of The Aiken Horse. We decided to give ourselves a few extra weeks to put the paper together so that we would have the opportunity to get out and photograph some equestrian events, which just started back up in midMay. Our August issue will be out a little later too, so that this one can circulate for a full eight weeks. We expect to back on our usual schedule by October. We can only hope that our world will be relatively normal by that time too. Enjoy your horses and stay safe and healthy.

The Aiken Horse EDITOR & PUBLISHER Pam Gleason

ART DIRECTOR Gary Knoll

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jean Berko Gleason

LAYOUT & DESIGN Gary Knoll

PHOTOGRAPHERS Pam Gleason Gary Knoll

ADVERTISING

803.643.9960 editor@theaikenhorse.com

Going Out Of Town? Don’t miss future issues of The Aiken Horse. We will send you a one year subscription (6 issues) for $24.00. Send check or CC # & your mailing address: P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 Or sign up on the web at www.TheAikenHorse. com All contents Copyright 2020 The Aiken Horse

Pam Gleason Editor & Publisher

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

The Aiken Horse Policies: The opinions expressed herein are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publishers, editors, or the policies of The Aiken Horse, LLC. The Aiken Horse is owned by The Aiken Horse, LLC.

The Aiken Horse

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The New Normal Equestrian Events Adapt By Pam Gleason

W

hen the country shut down in March 2020 to try to limit the spread of the novel corona virus that causes COVID-19, equestrian events were brought to a screeching halt. Horses still needed to be exercised and cared for, of course. But shows and other events were suddenly canceled. In some places, horse owners who kept their charges at commercial stables were prevented from visiting them, and some riders in hard-hit areas opted not to mount up at all, reasoning that they should not engage in any risky activity that might land them in the hospital, where resources ought to be reserved for those affected by the virus. By May, however, restrictions in many states were relaxed, and horse

Spectators are not welcome at the 2020 Aiken Summer Classic.

events slowly re-emerged. Organizers had to negotiate two separate sets of safety precautions: those imposed by their state and local governments and those promulgated by the governing bodies of their particular sports. They also had to take into account the level of risk that horsemen in their areas were willing to assume. If there was a horse show, would anyone come? How worried were local horsemen about the virus? There was the additional difficulty of constantly changing rules and standards, both from local authorities and from the regulating bodies. Often, the rules provided by both of these were unclear. For instance, when the United States Equestrian Federation shut down recognized shows until June 1, did this mean they also did not want anyone to have a schooling show? When the United States Polo Association said that all “club events” should be suspended until May 15, did this include practice games or just tournaments? Once shows started up again, what did “no spectators” mean? That no one could come to a show at all?

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What about family members, such as a child’s mother? Who exactly is a spectator? The USEF published guidelines, but even those were ambiguous in places. All of Aiken’s horse events were canceled through the month of April in compliance with state and local restrictions as well as prohibitions by the USEF and USPA. Event organizers, distressed by the loss of their spring shows and tournaments, stayed ready to start up again at a moment’s notice. As soon as it was possible to do so, several of them welcomed equestrian competitors back to their grounds. There were even a few schooling competitions and polo practices out in the county in early May, before South Carolina had rescinded its State of Emergency. These were not events that would have gone against the state’s prohibition on large gatherings and they came after such things as the opening of restaurants to outdoor dining. But they did stay relatively low key and under the radar, trying not to attract too much attention from people who might have disapproved. Events within city limits started up again the weekend of May 15. That was when the United States Polo Association lifted its ban on polo activities, and it coincided with South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster’s lifting of many more business restrictions in the state. Aiken Polo Club’s first Sunday game of the spring season on May 16 featured games in the Player’s Cup 4-goal, and attracted many spectators, who were advised to practice social distancing from their tailgating spots on the sidelines. As the first time most Aikenites had been out in months, polo was a very popular place to be, and there was something of a party atmosphere despite everything. It was a beautiful spring day, and there was a sense of normalcy that had been lacking for many months. Other horse events followed: a PSJ schooling show at Highfields Event Center; a hunter/jumper show, a schooling dressage show and an Eventing Academy schooling weekend at Stable View; a schooling horse trials at Full Gallop and a combined test at The Vista. There were more polo tournaments at Aiken, Wagener and New Bridge Polo Clubs, including a National Youth Tournament qualifier at Aiken Polo that brought in young competitors from out of state. None of these happenings experienced any lack of interest among Aiken’s horsemen, though some were definitely smaller than they would be in normal years. Polo tournaments, in fact, drew a healthy amount of competition. One reason was that the USPA created a COVID-19 relief package for its clubs which included offering $2,500 in prize money to the winners of a club’s first two tournaments of the year. The incentive worked wonders at all three clubs. The USPA also gave grants to clubs that lost money due to the shutdown, and provided assistance to players and professionals who needed help feeding their horses. On June 1, the USEF’s ban on competitions was lifted. The first recognized competition in Aiken was the Summer Classic, a hunter/ jumper show at the Aiken Horse Park, followed by a recognized dressage show at Stable View. The June calendar also includes a recognized horse trials at Full Gallop and the Summer Horse Trials at Stable View on June 19, with levels from Beginner Novice through Advanced. But are things back to normal? Not exactly. Both the USEF and the USPA have published guidelines for safe practices and social distancing at horse events. Riding horses in the vicinity of other people is generally considered to be relatively safe when it comes to transmission of respiratory viruses – horses, after all, often insist on enforcing their own strict social distancing guidelines. However, socializing at a horse show, getting close to and touching other people and using shared equipment definitely poses risks. To minimize these risks, many things have been altered or adjusted. For instance, the days of going into a horse show

June-July 2020


office are over, at least for the duration of the pandemic. Online entries and credit card payments are now the norm, and competitors can pick up their numbers at a drive through station. Dressage scribes no longer sit next to judges in their cars. Now the scribe and the judge communicate electronically from separate cars. Stable View, which held its first COVID-19 era schooling events in mid May, has been a leader in safety precautions here in Aiken. Even at their schooling events, they have followed all the USEF guidelines, which include taking the temperatures of all their staff every day with a remote thermometer. They have employed a slew of nurses to take the temperatures of all competitors and their support staffs as they enter the facility. Anyone with a temperature of 99.5 or above is sent to a medical doctor on the grounds. Masks, which have been shown to slow the spread of the virus as much as 97%, are required equipment for anyone not on a horse, and this has been enforced. “Horse people can’t resist these things; they can’t resist the masks because it is the governing body of their own sport that has required them,” says Barry Olliff, who owns and runs Stable View along with his wife Cyndy. “We have to insist, or else we are meant to remove them from the property.”

“I think the City of Aiken has probably benefitted from this,” says Bob. “But it all really comes down to common sense. If everybody uses common sense and stays their distance from everybody else, no hugging or shaking hands, we can make it work. We all want these shows to continue, and the only way they are going to continue is if everybody can keep this momentum going of social distancing and masks.” “I think in the horse industry, people realize how important it is to follow the rules that are being set out for us,” says Deirdre Vaillancourt, an Aiken based realtor and competitor whose husband, Michel, is a course designer who has worked at the Tryon International Equestrian Center as well as the Aiken Horse Park since the COVID era began. “Because otherwise, if we fail to do that, then nobody will have a job. I think most people will recognize this.” But in the horse world, perhaps even more than outside it, safety recommendations rarely have anywhere near the same clout as safety requirements. In Aiken this spring, in places where there were no strict rules, very few COVID-related changes were in evidence. At polo, masks could only be seen where they were required by the USPA, such as when grooms brought an umpire his horse. Otherwise, players and fans socialized and interacted as though COVID-19 was happening on

Face coverings required: local horsewomen Dini Jones and Sharer Dale

Stable View’s entries for their June horse trial have more than doubled from last year, going from 120 in 2019 to 287 in 2020. Part of this is due to the fact that they have the upper levels at this event where they did not last year; part is likely due to there having been no spring eventing season to speak of, coupled with a lower number of horse trials running this summer. “The majority view in the eventing world seems to be, we’ve got to get back up and running and we’ve got to do our business,” says Barry. “People are prepared to take a degree of risk as long as the people around them are acting responsibly.” At the Aiken Summer Classic, masks have also been required for the staff and for anyone who might come within six feet of someone else, following USEF regulations. Bob Bell, who owns the Classic Company and runs the show, says that people have been good about complying, although a few have needed an occasional reminder. Physical distancing has also been enforced, with rules such as limitations on the number of people permitted in the stable area: a difficult task since there are over 500 horses entered at the show. Spectators have been barred, and exhibitors have been encouraged to leave as soon as their classes are over.

June-July 2020

another planet. At various small schooling shows in the county, there was not a mask to be seen, even on officials. Where precautions were not mandatory, they were generally not taken. This kind of attitude with regard to COVID-19 precautions can be compared to the use of safety helmets in the horse world. Helmets that actually could protect a rider’s head in case of a fall were available and recommended for many years. But for decades, very few people actually wore them, preferring fashionable headwear in the dressage arena, the show ring and even on the cross country course. It was only when safety helmets became mandatory for competition that they were widely adopted by riders, both in and out of a competitive space. Just as with helmets, in the absence of strict rules, enforced both by the governing bodies of the sport and by the local facilities that put on our shows, events and tournaments, horsemen are unlikely to alter their behavior very much, COVID-19 or not. With luck, the equestrian community will remain largely unaffected by the virus itself, which has so far made few inroads in any equestrian community. Horsemen will just have to hope that it stays this way.

The Aiken Horse

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June-July 2020


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Boatwright Plantation

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- 8 , 7 2 4 S Q F T / 6 B E D S / 4 . 5 B AT H R O O M S - S I T UAT E D 3 1 + A C R E S - R E C L A I M E D B R I C K PAT I O & P O O L - 2 2 S TA L L S & B R O O D M A R E B A R N W I T H 4 O V E R S I Z E D S TA L L S W I T H RU N O U T S

Laurel Ridge Circle

HOUNDSLAKE/PENINSULA $495,000 - 3 , 4 2 0 S Q. F T / 4 B E D / 4 B AT H - MASTER ON THE MAIN

June-July 2020

- 4 , 2 0 0 S Q F T. / 4 B E D S / 3 F U L L B AT H S - S I T UAT E D O N 1 7 7 LU S H A C R E S - HISTORIC MANTELS & MOLDINGS - S M O K E H O U S E & O Y S T E R S HA C K - H U N T I N G , R E C R E AT I O N & T I M B E R T R A C T S

Sorrell Red KINGS RIDGE $635,000

- 2 , 7 5 0 S Q. F T / 3 B E D / 2 . 5 B AT H - WA L K I N C L O S E T & P R I VAT E D E C K

Pendula Court

D E O DA R P L A N TAT I O N $227,500

- 1 , 5 6 6 S Q. F T / 3 B E D / 2 B AT H - H I S & H E R WA L K - I N C L O S E T S

The Aiken Horse

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Marshall & Sterling Grand Prix at the Aiken Summer Classic, Bruce’s Field

Photography by Pam Gleason


Now Available

Offered through New Bridge Realty

Contact Raza Kazmi, 888-4NB-POLO, info@newbridgepolo.com

12-Stall Barn on 10.55 Acres

Fall 2020 Polo Season Schedule 8 Goal USPA National President’s Cup September 15-October 3 USPA Association Cup October 7-25 USPA Masters Cup (Single Elimination) October 28-November 1 12 Goal USPA Northrup Knox Cup® September 10-27

Karna Farm: $550,000 Spectacular Views of New Bridge Fields 4 & 5 (marked in orange on map below) Rare opportunity to own a turnkey polo farm with ride in and out ability through private gate to Polo Field 4. Karna Farm is built on 10.55 acres and consists of a Heider-built, spacious, 12-stall enclosed barn with 16-foot aisleway. Indoor, heated wash rack as well as large exterior wash rack. Two bedroom, one bath attached apartment, temperature contolled tack room, feed room with roll up door provides easy access for deliveries. Detached and insultated steel storage building for equipment and hay. Brick barbecue patio or Argentine asado is the perfect place for gatherings. Entire parcel is high and dry for maximum usability.

Cleared and Fenced Lots on Fields 4 & 5 Horse Friendly Homesites Located on Fields 4 & 5 (marked in purple in map to left) Cleared and fenced lots perfectly suited for home, barn, and pasture. Start building your dream farm today. Sizes range from 4.0 to 5.61 acres. Prices range from $128,000 to $174,000. Some lots can be combined with additional adjacent acreage. Lots are located in a quiet corner of New Bridge, yet still provide quick access to all amenities.

11.3 Acres in Prime Location

Paloma Lane Farm: $199,000 Superb Location

11.3-acres is perimeter-fenced with a well and electricity. Conveniently located within walking distance of the clubhouse, pool and clay tennis court. Fields 1 & 3 and the exercise track are just a short hack away.

#newbridgelife newbridgepolo.com

Photo courtesy Shelly Marshall Schmidt

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USPA National Copper Cup® September 30-October 18 USPA Bronze Trophy® October 21-November 1

About New Bridge (visit newbridgepolo.com or call 1-888-4NB-POLO) New Bridge is an 860-acre gated equestrian community nestled among rolling pasture lands on New Bridge Road just 15 minutes from downtown Aiken, South Carolina. Born from the excitement, intensity and tradition of polo, New Bridge is the home of New Bridge Polo & Country Club and of Aiken Youth Polo. It embraces equestrians of all disciplines as well as those who simply love the outdoors, with all sharing the essential joy of a life that celebrates horses, people and land - in a place that connects them. Residents enjoy an array of equestrian amenities including five meticulously groomed polo fields, stick and ball areas, an exercise track, polo arena, riding trails, all-weather GGT dressage and jumping arenas, miles of groomed roads made for riding and The Stables, our full-care, premier 24-stall boarding facility. A swimming pool with lounge area, a clay tennis court, and an Argentinian colonial-style Clubhouse with restaurant/bar (open spring and fall), balcony, porch, and outdoor spaces round out the perfect setting for everyone from families to empty nesters, casual riders to competitive athletes, and those simply seeking solace from a busy world. The New Bridge world is one where all can revel in the luxury of leisure, the excitement of sport, the abiding beauty of horse country, and the deep connections of a close-knit community. New Bridge: room to play; room to ride; room to live, all in a place you will want to call home.

June-July 2020


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TOM MURRAY

626.644.3008

WELCOME TO AIKEN, SOUTH CAROLINA 23 Years of Real Estate Experience

Tom was named a Top 10 Realtor for 8 years in Pasadena, CA where he was also awarded the Historic Achievement Award for his renovations. He has successfully brokered hundreds of homes and has personally built 5 horse farms. With this background, Tom understands, first hand, the special needs of equestrian properties. Tom is a resident of Aiken’s Three Runs Plantation where he is a gold medal dressage trainer and 5­star rider.

TOM MURRAY REALTOR®

626.644.3008 www.tommurray­realtor.com tommurraydressage@gmail.com

www.CarolinaHorseProperties.com

333 PARK AVENUE SW . AIKEN, SOUTH CAROLINA 29801

June-July 2020

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142+ ACRE RANCH in EDGEFIELD, SC

TURNKEY For tHe EQUESTRIAN in BRIDLE CREEK

25 MooreS road | $3.1 Million

1050 clear creek court | $1.4595 Million

tHe Sanctuary - 12.7 ACRE eQueStrian oaSiS

PARADISE FARM - MULTI-DISCIPLINE TRAINING FACILITY

big tree FarM - Polo Field, arena & PaSture

185 gadwall lane | $947,500

4069 wagener road | $998,055

490 big tree road | $777,000

HISTORIC HOME & STABLE in HORSE DISTRICT

8.64 acreS, 8-Stall center-aiSle barn, great turnout, StePS to HorSe Park renovated HoMe & gueSt HouSe, 6 br & 4½ batHS, Saltwater gunite Pool

1354 audubon | $2.845 Million

4-Stall Stable w/waSH rack, Fenced PaSture, trail acceSS PoSSible gorgeouS 3 br, 3 1/2 batH HoMe, FabulouS kitcHen, Saltwater Pool, garage

10-Stall Morton Stable, PeriMeter Fencing, PaSture in tiFton 85 berMuda 3 cuStoM HoMeS, 1500 SF entertainMent area, gueSt aPartMent

two barnS, 18 StallS, 109 acreS, 3 all-weatHer arenaS 2-Story, 4 br HoMe; eaSy acceSS location cloSe to town

9 Stall Stable, arena w/ProFeSSional Footing, Fenced PaddockS, 14 ac. deSigner built-in 2009, 4 br 3.5 batH. 3 br reSidence above barn.

58+ acreS, 15-Stall center aiSle barn w/tack & Feed rooMS 2 br, 2 batH living QuarterS, SeParate oFFice, 3+ car garage/workSHoP

65 ACRES w/ FISHING POND & SWIMMING POND

FAIRHAVEN - GORGEOUS, PRIVATE 9.97 ACRES

SERENITY FOUND on 50 ACRES in PEACH COUNTRY

3618 wagener road | $725,000

148 wire road | $625,000

15 reynoldS drive | now $585,000

SPaciouS 4 br rancH HoMe w/ good boneS; gardenS & MaJeStic oakS SuPerb locale cloSe to eQueStrian venueS & 10-15 MinuteS to town

run-in SHed w/Storage/Feed rooM, 4 PaStureS, level Field 4 bedrooM, 4 1/2 batH HoMe, JuSt 5 MinuteS to town

SPaniSH inSPired HoMe witH unForgettable viewS & aMbiance Stunning oak-lined drive, indoor Pool, 18 acre Pond & boatHouSe

FOXCHASE EQUESTRIAN on HITCHCOCK WOODS

HatcHaway HouSe & barn on 19 acreS

Private 48+ acre FarM witH 2 HoMeS & barn

12 cozier court | now $435,000

1758 HatcHaway bridge road | now $469,000

1048 woodland drive | now $494,700

2-Stall barn w/tack rooM, direct trail acceSS, coMMunity arena 4 bedrooM, 3 1/2 batH HoMe, Patio & deck, low Hoa, SuPer locale

4-Stall barn, Fenced Paddock witH run-in, eStabliSHed PaSture HiStoric 4 br, 2 batH HoMe, Pond, 2-car detacHed garage

7-Stall, center-aiSle barn, Fenced PaSture, graSS JuMP Field 3 br, 2 ba HoMe, Hobby building, Mobile w/incoMe Potential

Horse Ready Land for Sale lane’S end in HoPeland FarMS - 5+ acreS - $175,000

lewiS lane ParcelS witH trail acceSS

HatcHaway bridge road - 11 acreS in PaSture now $129,000

6+ acreS w/Pond on old dibble - now $130,000

10 acreS on day road near new bridge Polo - $90,000

11 Fenced acreS – HigH Flat FarM $212,800

angela road - 12+ acreS Partially cleared now $75,000

Cissie Sullivan

3.5 acreS w/Pond viewS - now $77,900

8 acreS in bridle creek eQueStrian - now $142,500

tod’S Hill - 19 acreS w/Pond & Partially Fenced - $235,000 47+ acreS at 229 Fox Pond road - now $187,000 new Holland road - 19 acreS $66,500 & 20+ acreS $72,450 133+ irrigated, tiFton Hay Producing FieldS, 2 PondS - $995,000

Tracey Turner

803-998-0198 | SullivanTurnerTeam.com June-July 2020

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News & Notes By Pam Gleason

Geitner’s Good Day

Daniel Geitner must have felt pretty confident going into the jump off for the $25,000 Marshall & Sterling Grand Prix at the Aiken Summer Classic on June 13. Of the eight horses that had qualified for the second round, Daniel was riding four of them. Two were even his own horses. Plus, it was his birthday. Daniel Geitner is one of Aiken’s most successful and prolific hunter/ jumper riders and trainers, and it is never a surprise to see him in a jump off with multiple mounts. With the number of talented horses in his stable, not to mention his extremely busy showing schedule, it is more unusual when he is not in serious contention for the biggest trophies. According to the database maintained by Horseshowsonline.com, he had a total of 74 entries over the course of the five day show, making him one of the busiest riders out there. From a spectator’s perspective, the course did not look especially difficult. The jumps themselves did not appear to be especially imposing. What was tricky, however was the track. It was set by Aiken’s own international course designer Michel Vaillancourt, and he is especially adept at asking horses and riders challenging questions that require a quick-thinking rider and a well-trained, athletic horse. The Grand Prix, and the jump off in particular, featured two things that caused some horses to come up a rail short. One was an occasional airy jump, with ample space between the rails that gave it a fragile appearance. The other was that the track wound through the ring with several sharp rollback turns. These asked the horses the question: can you shift your weight onto your haunches and make a balanced turn, then quickly rocket forward and jump again? They asked the rider something else: just how fast and sharp can you make this turn without getting into trouble? How much angle can you put on a fence? The jump off started innocently enough, with an inviting combination. To get to fence three, however, horses and riders had to make a tight turn to the left and jump a fence that was at a 270 degree angle from that first combination. Most riders reasoned that the best way to make up ground and save precious seconds was to make the approach to this fence at a severe angle so that the horse only had to turn 180 degrees rather than 270, and could then proceed straight to the next sharp right hand turn. Geitner, the trailblazer, tried this with his first mount, and dropped a rail. Other riders had the same problem: clear rounds looked like they were going to be rare. But by the time Geitner got to his third mount, the beautiful black Vesta de Lavardin owned by November Hill, he had an excellent handle on how to navigate the course, and completed a clear round in 34.04 seconds. This put him firmly in first place and the catbird’s seat. There were only two horses left to go, and he was riding one of them. The next horse and rider pair, Grant Seger on Catogi, also went clear,

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but with a more careful round and a time of 35.327 for a second place effort. Geitner went next and last aboard Oak Ledge Farm’s brilliant grey Fazous. Daniel had only himself to beat, and no one could say he didn’t try, fairly flying around the course. But Fazous hit a rail for four faults and fourth place, leaving Vesta de Lavardin the champion, with Catogi the reserve. In the end, Daniel placed first, third, fourth and eighth and picked up checks totaling $13,500. Not a bad birthday.

Mike Keogh to Hall of Fame

Mike Keogh, who has trained racehorses at the Aiken Training Track every winter since the early 1990s, was inducted into the Canadian Racing Hall of Fame this April. Born in England to a family of horsemen, Mike’s original goal was to become a jockey. When he grew too tall, he set his sights on training instead and apprenticed under Ron Smyth at Clear Height Stables on Epsom Downs. In 1977, Keogh emigrated to Canada where his sister was already living. There he worked under top Canadian trainers until 1993 when he was hired to be the private trainer for Gus Schickedanz, a Lithuanian-born businessman with a passion for horses. Schickedanz, who died last June, had a farm near Ontario and a winter home and farm in Aiken. He was a familiar sight at the Aiken Training Track, especially at the Aiken Trials where his horses often ran and won. In 1993, Keogh started to train the first of many champions for his new boss: Langfuhr, a three-time Grade 1 winner who became the Canadian Champion Sprint Horse in 1996. Langfuhr retired to stud in 1997 after an injury and became a legendary sire. His progeny included Wando (also trained by Keogh), who won the Canadian Triple Crown and was named the Canadian Horse of the Year in 2003. Langfuhr went on to be the leading sire in North America by number of winners in 2005. In addition to Wando, Keogh also conditioned Woodcarver, who won the Queen’s Plate in 1999. As an assistant to the Hall of Fame Trainer Roger Attfield, with whom he worked before he went to the Schickedanz stable, he also handled Play the King, a multiple graded stakes winner who will also be inducted into the Hall of Fame this year. Langfuhr and Wando were inducted into the hall in 2004 and 2014 respectively, and Schickedanz was inducted in 2009. Keogh, who continues to train in Aiken during the winters, has conditioned horses that have won in excess of $21.5 million.

Summer Horse Care

Summer is here and it is about to get hot. Until about a decade ago, most of Aiken’s equestrian happenings shut down during the summer months since so many in Aiken’s horse population used to flee South Carolina, staying away at least from Memorial Day to Labor Day. This is not the case anymore. Aiken’s competitive horse community is now year round, and we have recognized as well as schooling shows for various disciplines throughout June, July and August. Summer is definitely a quieter time, which makes it good for schooling green horses – if you have any young ones that have extra energy that can make them difficult, a little heat can even be your friend. For those unaccustomed to riding in our hot and humid months, it is always good to bear a few things in mind. The first is that horses, with a relatively low surface to mass ratio, are better adapted to cold than to heat: if you feel too hot, it is likely your horse does, too. Keeping your horse cool and hydrated is paramount. This means ensuring that fresh drinking water is always available and using modern scientific methods of cooling. These are methods like those you might see in an endurance race: hosing or sponging with cold water, even ice water, and immediately scraping off the excess. On a humid day, a film of water left on a horse’s coat can heat up rapidly, encasing him in a hot blanket that will delay his cooling. Walking, or better yet, fans, are a good idea, since air flow will help speed up the cooling process. Another thing to remember is that the typical Aiken summer day

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starts out very pleasant, with temperatures in the 70s and 80s in the morning, rapidly climbing into the 90s by midday. Because the air tends to be humid, the atmosphere often continues to heat up until the sun goes down, meaning that the hours around sunset can be just as hot as afternoons. Riding in the early morning, when it is often beautiful, is the best way to enjoy the summer. Afternoon heat also tends to bring thunderstorms, which can be quite intense. Consider installing lightning rods on your house, barn, run-in sheds and even the favorite trees in your horse’s paddock if you don’t already have them. Horses living through a Southern summer are also susceptible to a number of troubles that are rare in northern climes. One of these things is anhidrosis, which is an acquired, and often temporary, compromised ability to sweat. Anhidrosis is fairly widespread anywhere that the temperatures and humidity are high for a sustained period of time. The condition is not well understood in the veterinary community, but it is thought to be caused by the horse’s effectively “wearing out” his cooling mechanism. Horses lose approximately 70% of their excess body heat through sweating, so any deficit has the potential to be a serious veterinary emergency. The first signs are usually an increased respiratory rate and failure to cool out after exercise, and can progress to complete, or almost complete, lack of sweating, leading to a dry horse panting in his turnout while his pasture mates are drenched but relatively comfortable. There are no scientifically proven cures for anhidrosis beyond moving a horse to a cooler climate. However, there are various supplements available that are formulated to get a horse sweating again, and many horse owners, and even veterinarians, swear that they work wonders. These supplements come in different formulations, so if one does not work for your horse, try another. Until an anhidrotic horse is sweating again, it is safest to keep him in a stall in front of a fan during the day and to hose and scrape him frequently on very hot days when his temperature and respiration rate climb. Another summer ill in our heat and humidity is pasture associated heaves, the old fashioned term for recurrent airway obstruction (RAO). Mild symptoms are coughing and exercise intolerance; severe symptoms include life-threatening respiratory distress. Most horsemen associate heaves with dusty or moldy hay and with keeping a horse stalled, especially during the winter. Pasture associated heaves, however, is caused by an allergic reaction to a weed, mold or pollen in the pasture and it is exacerbated by heat and humidity. If you have a horse with RAO, the first thing to do is to move him to a stall or to a dry lot, where he will not be so exposed to whatever is irritating his lungs. Often simply removing a horse from pasture will make the condition go away. If this does not work, your veterinarian might prescribe antihistamines, corticosteroids, or bronchodilators, which are likely to provide relief for your horse, though they will often mean that you cannot compete in most disciplines because of medication restrictions. If your horse does develop RAO, it is important to remember that allergic episodes can be triggered by small exposures to whatever the offending substance is. After a few days in the stall, a horse might look and sound perfectly normal, but is likely to have an immediate relapse if you feel sorry for him and let him out to graze. Summer heaves is a condition that affects individual susceptible horses and is not thought to be strongly correlated with management practices: you can have a pasture full of horses happily grazing, and one coughing and struggling for air. However, mowing and maintaining pastures is generally recommended to lessen the pollen load and minimize weeds. Experts advise people with affected horses to treat them right away, whether by removing them from the pasture or treating them medically. This can help prevent permanent scarring and damage to the lungs and keep clinical signs from getting worse.

June-July 2020

Grayson Brown, 1942-2020

Dr. Grayson Brown, 78, who played polo at Aiken Polo Club since 1980, died on May 8. Born in Kingstree, SC, Grayson was a lifelong animal lover who studied veterinary medicine at the University of Georgia. After his graduation in 1966, he co-founded the National Hills Animal Hospital in 1970, and in 1975 opened the Martinez Animal Hospital along with Dr. James Wilkes. He ran this practice for 45 years, and was known for his skill as a veterinarian, and especially for his compassion and desire to help animals and their people. Grayson loved horses and he loved to compete. On the polo field he

Eddy Martinez remembers Dr. Grayson Brown, With Nancy Leopard Brown and Frank Mullins

was known for his indomitable spirit and especially for his fast horses: Grayson was addicted to speed. Usually playing the number 4 “back” position, he considered it his mission to chase down anyone on the opposite team that was going for goal, whether they seemed likely to hit the ball or not. His determined defensive playing and his accurate nearside back shot helped his teams to the trophy tables many times. In addition to playing polo, Grayson also used to enjoy lancing, a sport he learned from his father and grandfather: he rode in his first lancing tournament at age 14 and competed in Aiken in the 1970s when the Aiken Spring Steeplechase included a lancing demonstration as an added attraction. After David Widener, then the president of Aiken Polo Club, introduced him to polo in 1980, he traded his lance for a mallet and his lancing horses became polo ponies. Grayson continued to play at Aiken Polo Club until quite recently and his competitive spirit never left him. Although he was always fierce on the field, he was also always a gentleman both on and off the pitch. On Sunday, June 7, there was an informal memorial for Dr. Brown at Aiken Polo Club following the 3 o’clock game. Grayson’s widow, Nancy Leopard Brown, was on hand, as were many members of his family. Aiken players from the 1980s also came, and many spoke about Grayson’s legacy as a player, a veterinarian and a friend. In addition to Nancy, he also left his three sons, six grandchildren and two brothers.

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Horses and the Law Put Your Affairs in Order By Jim Ritchie

“Yay, we made it!” said my awaking young son to his mom after spending a stormy night in a spooky old lowcountry house. He was relieved that nothing came for them in the night and he was ready to get going. That is how many folks feel now about the last three months of pandemic and quarantine. Our equestrian world is resuming action on many fronts and that is a very good thing. As you reset and re-emerge, this is an excellent time to review and update your equine legal affairs, including your contracts, releases and employee agreements. Yes, I know, this sounds like as much fun as deep cleaning the wash stall. But, just like the neglected wash stall, if you ignore it, you know a serious problem is likely to arise. And, once your review is done, your legal matters will be in order and you will feel much better. When I work with clients on these projects, we like to approach them from a holistic perspective. We review the nature of their equinerelated business or avocation, discuss the types of interactions they have with the public, employees, vendors, government, partners and others to get a full picture. Then we build an integrated plan to make sure their assets are protected, their agreements are up to date with any changes in the law, their insurance policies meet their needs and their operations are in compliance. These issues apply to nearly all horse owners, commercial barns, equestrian professionals, nonprofit organizations and event organizers. As you consider your own equine legal audit, here are some key points to consider: • Asset Protection. Have you set up the ownership of your property or business in a way that protects your personal assets from attack by creditors or injured parties who may sue you? By forming a limited liability company or corporation, you can protect your business and your personal assets and you may also obtain certain tax advantages. • Liability Protection. Think about your boarding agreements, releases, waivers and transportation agreements – or the absence of these. Having written agreements for all of these situations is essential. If properly prepared, these documents can truly protect you from liability exposure. They should be updated regularly as times and the law change. For example, in light of COVID-19, we recommend adding language that addresses the spread of communicable diseases and viruses. If you fail to have good agreements and something goes wrong, you are completely vulnerable to claims and lawsuits. • Liability protection terms should also be incorporated into transaction agreements when you buy, sell, lease or train a horse. Allocating responsibility in these transactions is important to make sure all parties understand their risks and legal duties. In the absence of such provisions, expensive and messy battles often ensue when there is a dispute. Not only is that a potentially expensive legal problem, it can also mean public relations trouble for your business and a serious operations distraction. • Warning Signs. When was the last time you inspected your posted warning signs? Are they in the right locations? Do they meet current law? Warning signs are a valuable and completely affordable tool to help protect you from liability. However, they do not make you bullet-proof. There are exceptions to the warning sign liability protections that you need to consider so that you can

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make a plan to close those gaps successfully. An experienced equine law attorney can review situations and scenarios that you need to recognize so you can address potential problems. Because warning signs do not provide complete protection, you need to add a layer of good insurance to cover you. There are a variety of policies that insure real estate, businesses and individuals and there are substantial differences in their coverages. Be sure to review what your insurance needs are and if you have the right policy in place. One question that often arises is whether a homeowners’ policy will cover a person who is injured while riding the owner’s horse. If the person was a boarder or paying for a lesson on the horse, there may not be coverage. Good insurance will pay for itself many times over and many insurers who work in the equestrian area will provide guidance and consulting free of charge to help you find the right polices. • Boarding Agreements and Barn Rules. Yes, it is time to dust off that agreement that you prepared years ago and get it updated. Think of all the issues you have had with problem boarders because you did not have good remedies spelled out in the boarding agreement. You can fix that. What about the times a boarded horse needed emergency vet treatment and you could not reach the owner? You and the owner can take some of the stress out of that situation by putting a plan in the boarding agreement. How are you handling liability issues, feeds and supplements, trailering to shows, access to the barn, arena or trails in your boarding documents? These are just a few of the many extra issues that you can and should address in an effective boarding agreement. Do you have written barn rules? A good set of barn rules will establish expectations and support courteous practices with boarders and the public. Barn rules usually address practical matters and safety issues. They should be objective and enforceable. Ideally, you should incorporate your barn rules into your boarding agreement so that if there is a serious or repetitive violation of the rules, you can take action against the boarder to remove the horse. • Employment and Immigration Issues. Finding and keeping talented and reliable staff is essential to the success of every business. It can be especially challenging for the equestrian community. As a result, some employers are, shall we say, casual, in their employment policies. While that practice may be tempting, it is usually a recipe for disaster. Taking basic steps to assure compliance with state and federal laws can save you time and money and protect you from civil and criminal actions. In addition, many equestrian businesses and event organizers have significant interaction with young people. When you work with children under the age of 18, additional staff and volunteer background checks and compliance with programs such as Safe Sport may be needed. • Contracts and Leases. Not all of the people who provide services for an equestrian business are employees. When you have a trainer, farrier, massage therapist or other professional providing services at your facility or at your direction, you need a plan to handle those situations. If the trainer is based on the property or travels there regularly, you need a written independent contractor agreement or employment agreement in place that sets out the duties, responsibilities, compensation and liability terms. This will protect you and the trainer. For farriers and other regular service providers, you may want to have them sign your liability waiver – especially if they are treating horses from multiple owners. Also consider situations where you lease equipment or property to others. These agreements need to be in writing. A written lease is enforceable between the parties and provides a record of the arrangement in the event that one of the original parties passes away or is no longer involved in the transaction. Clients are sometimes shocked when seemingly simple hand-shake deals produce surprisingly different understandings of the agreement

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when a problem arises. Don’t let that happen to you! A thorough legal audit should review all of your existing contracts and identify business relationships and deals not currently covered by written agreements that may merit action. • Equestrian Organizations and Associations. The South Carolina equestrian community is filled with active nonprofit organizations. They operate rescues, competitions in all disciplines, hunts, pony clubs and the like. Nearly all are governed by a volunteer board of directors and most have few, if any, employees. Regardless of their size or mission, they encounter significant legal issues. In addition to regular business and employment law issues, a nonprofit corporation must comply with the state’s Nonprofit Corporations Act. The Act sets forth strict requirements for governance, operations and financial accountability. In return for operating under those rules, it grants board members personal liability protection when dealing with the public. Nonprofit corporations must maintain statutorily-compliant bylaws, fiscal procedures, tax filings and membership structures. All of these documents and procedures should be reviewed and updated regularly to protect the organization and facilitate its successful operation. If the documents do not comply with the Act or if the leaders fail to follow the organization’s bylaws and other governing documents, the organization’s liability protection may be lost and the individual board members may be exposed to personal liability for claims against the organization. In addition, by failing to adhere to the Act’s requirements, the organization’s charter can be revoked by the Secretary of State. If you are a board member of a nonprofit corporation, you have a fiduciary duty to the organization and that duty includes making sure its operations, bylaws, meetings, membership program and asset management comply with the Act. A fiduciary duty is a special relationship that requires a high standard of care. If the

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board breaches that duty, board members become personally liable for claims and lawsuits by injured parties. When you think of the risks assumed by some nonprofits, this is no small matter. To address this challenge, I again recommend layering protection: make sure you have up-to-date governing documents and procedures that comply with the Act, and purchase public liability insurance and Directors and Officers liability insurance. By using strong internal documents and adding insurance protections, your organization will be better able to meet its mission and encourage talented volunteers to actively serve. If the nonprofit is not incorporated, it is known as an “unincorporated association.” An unincorporated association does not have the formal operating requirements of a nonprofit corporation, but its members do not have the same liability protections either. If the unincorporated association has any assets or if it sponsors or produces any public events, the members are potentially taking substantial personal risk. Given the litigious environment surrounding sports and recreation, incorporating the association to protect its members and foster its growth is usually recommended. I hope you will use this moment of reset to take a look at your business, nonprofit organization or personal equine law related matters to see if a legal audit or an update of your agreements is in order. I am confident you will be glad when you have done it. Then you can move on to that wash stall. Jim Ritchie is head of Ritchie & Associates, LLC and an avid horseman. He represents business and equine law clients across the Carolinas. For more information visit tryonequinelaw.com or call 864.527.5955. © Ritchie & Associates LLC

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AIKEN COUNTY FARM SUPPLY

SERVING AIKEN COUNTY FOR OVER 50 YEARS

803-649-2987

1933 Park Ave. Aiken, South Carolina 29801

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developed with lots of imagination and plenty of Horse sense.

BRIDLE CREEK EQUESTR I AN COMMUN I T Y

From the developer of Three Runs Plantation comes another wonderful equestrian neighborhood in Aiken, South Carolina. Bridle Creek meanders across 600 wooded acres, featuring five-acre lots and larger. Amenities include a dressage arena, jump arena, X-Country Schooling area and an activity center with meeting, social and fitness space. All this plus miles of scenic trails. Phase One is already sold out, with more to come. Inquire today by calling 1-888-297-8881 or email info@bridlecreekaiken.com 600 Acres • Miles of groomed and marked trails • Jump arena • Dressage arena with mirrors • X-Country schooling area Activity/Fitness Center • Homesites from 5+ acres • From the developer of Three Runs Plantation HOMESITES INDIVIDUALLY PRICED • DEVELOPER FINANCING AVAILABLE • BRIDLECREEKAIKEN.COM Marketed by The Carolina Real Estate Company, Aiken, SC. Plans and prices subject to change without notice. This does not constitute an offer in any state where prohibited by law. No time requirement to begin construction.


Inside 32 34 36 40 44 48

Secret Lives: My Tyme Remaking Mustangs Ask the Judge Aiken Polo Spring 2020 Eco-Equestrian The Caribbean Connection


WE ARE OPEN! FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS WE ARE OPEN! We are now allowing foot traffic inside the store. Please, wear a mask when entering our store and we are providing hand sanitizer. We want to keep our community safe and supplied!

CURBSIDE PICKUP AND DELIVERY SERVICES ARE AVAILABLE!

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR BUY 12 GET 1 FREE DEALS!

Call 803-649-6583  Text 803-522-5448 or Email aikensaddlery@gforcecable.com to order 30

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©ESI 2019

1224 SIZEMORE ROAD AIKEN, SC 29803

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Secret Lives – My Tyme Legendary Aiken Schoolmaster

By Nancy Johnson, Photography by Pam Gleason

I

n the case of My Tyme, perhaps this column’s title should be “Not So Secret Lives.” Throughout his dressage career, the 25-year-old gelding has had many riders and fans in Aiken. “When I was showing him, there were always people I didn’t even know coming up to me and greeting him by name,” says his current owner Amy Blunt. “I think he knows more people in Aiken than I do!” A Hanoverian, My Tyme was imported from Germany as a 5-yearold by the Canadian Olympic dressage team rider Evi Strasser. After working with him for a short time, she realized that while he was a very talented horse, My Tyme was not going to be a prospect for the level of competition she needed, and so she sold him to Carol Hannaford. Carol spent years carefully bringing the horse along. She showed him very successfully and also gave numerous other riders an opportunity to show him. For many years, My Tyme travelled from Carol’s home base in Canada to Aiken every winter. While he did compete a bit at Grand Prix under Ellen King, My Tyme and Carol excelled at Intermediaire. His USDF Lifetime Scores read like an Aiken dressage Who’s Who listing. From 2010 through 2018, his riders included Laura Klecker, Aileen Daly, Carol Hannaford, Ellen King, Amber Lee, and finally Amy Blunt. He happily performed for all of them, whether it was a First Level or Grand Prix test. When My Tyme was 21, Carol Hannaford thought he deserved to take it a little bit easier, but she knew he could still help someone along as a schoolmaster. Amy was the perfect candidate, since she was already a competent event rider, but wanted to change her focus to dressage. “Carol adores this horse and the most important thing to her was that he had the right home,” Amy explains. “I was just so fortunate that she chose me.” When My Tyme first came to Amy in 2017, she started showing him at Second Level. “In just over a year I progressed from Second Level to Prix St. George with My Tyme’s help. I got my Bronze Medal and only need one more score for my Silver,” she says. Amy did change one thing about My Tyme without consulting Carol – his barn name! “Carol always called him by his full name. I nicknamed him MT when we were texting and emailing back and forth and it just stuck,” she says with a laugh. Lynn Coates-Holmes who trained Amy on MT, is one of his biggest fans. “From the moment he came, this horse was a blessing for Amy. He’s just a great teacher,” she says. “I’d get on him once in a while to tune him up and he was so much fun to ride. He was always willing and loved being worked,” she adds. Lynn says one of his best attributes is that “He will do the best that the rider who is on him can do and he helps them out, but he makes them work. He wants them to do it

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correctly, and when they do, he performs correctly.” About a year ago, Amy decided that it was time for MT to step down from the upper levels, but she had to find just the right home for him where he could do lower level work and have someone who would love him. Lynn said she knew just the right situation. A longtime student of hers, Christy Gomes, had a lovely farm and was looking for a dressage schoolmaster to take lessons on and just enjoy. “Carol is the reason that all of us in Aiken were fortunate enough to learn from MT,” Amy says. “She was very generous to allow so many of us to ride and show him. So I’m just carrying on with her example by allowing Christy to borrow him. Of course, he’s spoiled rotten, so he’s enjoying his semiretirement.” “MT is a big baby; just a real sweetheart,” Christy says. “He’s a push ride, so you have to work for everything you get, but he’s so kind and never has an attitude.” He loves trail rides and just hanging out in the pasture with Christy’s two minis and mini donkey. He’s especially fond of the mini donkey and follows him around like a shadow. Christy has had a few setbacks with minor surgeries but a lucky situation came her way. She formed a friendship with Caitlee Greene through their love of gardening, and then learned the young woman wanted to take dressage lessons, since she had only done some pleasure riding. With Amy’s permission, Christy offered to let Caitlee take lessons with Lynn Coates-Holmes on MT and it turned into a great situation for all involved. Caitlee is currently studying for her equine massage therapy certification and MT is one of her case study horses. “He loves his biweekly massages and I have truly enjoyed getting to know MT, both riding him and on the ground,” she says. “He’s a perfect gentleman and a forgiving teacher. For me, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity to learn dressage, my first riding lessons ever, on this unicorn horse!” “It’s worked out great because not only is Christy learning from him, but so is Caitlee,” says Lynn Coates-Holmes. “Christy has the knowledge, but not always the physical ability, whereas Caitlee has the physical abilities, but not the knowledge. So Caitlee can get the engine going and rev him up and then Christy can get on and enjoy the engine Caitlee just built.” Christy is hoping to do a virtual dressage show with MT in the near future. “It’s a very cool idea to give a rider some experience riding a test and getting scores,” says Lynn. The ultimate goal is for this pair to compete in a Century Class, which is a dressage test for horses and riders whose combined ages add up to 100 or more. “If my math is right,” Christy says with a laugh, “We should be eligible in a few years!”

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Remaking Mustangs Nicola Bolt and Sawyer By Ragan Morehouse

ecently, Nicola Bolt turned a $125 investment into more than $10,000 in just six months. She’s not a day trader or a real estate R flipper; she is a wild mustang trainer based here in Aiken. In 2019,

Nicola hit her small jackpot with Sawyer, a 4-year-old grey mare from Green Mountain, Wyoming. Nicola has gentled mustangs who were born on the range in the American West for the past three years. To promote adoptions and awareness of the breed, the Mustang Heritage Foundation (MHF) ships horses across the country to trainers like Nicola who work with them for a specified amount of time and then compete them at MHF events. Winners receive cash and prizes. The MHF sponsors several events, including the Extreme Mustang Makeover, the Trainer Incentive Program (TIP), and the Extreme Mustang Race. Extreme Mustang Makeover competitions are held approximately 100 days after trainers are assigned their previously unhandled mustangs. Trainers and their mounts are judged in three

The Extreme Mustang Race is a mustang-only division of the Extreme Cowboy Association’s annual World Championships. Competitors vie for $10,000 as they race over obstacles and perform tasks more challenging than those found in traditional trail classes, for example, jumping through a flaming hoop. Nicola has competed in several Mustang Heritage Foundation events. On her first try in 2017, she and the mustang Coraline walked away with the Reserve Champion title at the Extreme Mustang Makeover. Cora found a loving home with a little girl who likes to braid flowers into her mane. The following year, Nicola she had a tougher experience with Taz, a fearful 4 year old chestnut gelding. They finished 11th in the makeover, and, although Taz was adopted after the event, Nicola recently bought him back from his adopters. “That wasn’t a moneymaking move,” Nicola says with a laugh. “That was a decision I made with my heart.” Nicola’s next mustang, a rose grey 2-year old named

classes: handling and conditioning, maneuvers, and trail. Those that earn the top ten scores compete in the crowd-pleasing freestyle finals, a trainer-devised demonstration incorporating music, costumes, and props. Another program, the Trainer Incentive Program, awards approved trainers $1000 once they are able to halter and lead their mustang, pick up all four of its feet, load it into and out of a trailer, and find an appropriate adopter, who pays a $125 fee to the MHF. TIP Challenge events, sponsored by the MFH and organized by local TIP trainers, can include western dressage, jumping, in-hand, trail, and freestyle classes.

Piper, was named Reserve Champion at the Georgia TIP Challenge, and was then adopted by a young woman in North Carolina. Nicola picked up Sawyer, her current mustang, on June 7th, 2019 at the Calhoun Stockyards in Calhoun, Georgia. “There were 150 horses to pick from and I was 10th to pick,” explains Nicola. “I was trying to decide between a really nice, big gelding that would sell really well and a mare which I really liked.” Her choice was important because Nicola had two goals in mind: the Georgia TIP challenge and the Extreme Mustang Race. “I chose Sawyer because she seemed like she thought a lot; that she wasn’t just reacting off of

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emotions. Plus, she’s so pretty.” Sawyer is a dark grey with a stocky, quarter-horse type build. She has a soft, kind eye; a prominent mustang brand on the side of her neck; and a long flowing, black mane and tail. “She didn’t always look like this,” says Nicola. “When I unloaded her after pick-up, she came off the trailer really colicky.” Thirty eight sleepless hours later, Nicola was relieved when Sawyer finally began to feel a little bit better. “She lost a lot of weight and body condition in those first few days,” says Nicola. For the rest of the week, Nicola began working with Sawyer, keeping her comfortable and unstressed. After a few days of gentle interaction, Nicola was able to approach her, touch her on the neck, and lead her around. “I spent a lot of short sessions with her,” Nicola says. “Mustangs learn hugely from the release of pressure. To them, at that point, just you being there is a lot of pressure because they don’t understand people. To

Above: Harrison Labuschange and Sawyer compete at Stable View

develop a relationship with them, they have to realize that the pressure goes away when they interact with you versus fleeing from you. They need to see that you are not a threat.” Nicola spent the next few weeks focusing on Sawyer’s body condition, regaining weight and building topline. “I hopped on her bareback once or twice just to teach her to turn her head left and right and I put a bunch of saddles on her, but mostly I just let her eat grass and recover,” Nicola says. “Her body shape was so hard to fit that I ended up buying her a treeless saddle.” In the second and third months of their partnership, Nicola began more intensive under saddle training. The pair schooled at the Roann Farms arena, hacked in Hitchcock Woods, completed the obstacle course at Dancing Horse Equestrian Center, and won the barrel race at Almost Heaven Stables. They also went further afield, competing in two mustang series shows at Rebecca Bowman’s North Atlanta Equestrian farm in Cartersville, Georgia. In September, 90 days after pick-up, Nicola and Sawyer headed to Chattahoochee Hills for the Georgia TIP Challenge. “After such a slow start, we really came a long way,” Nicola says. “She was so good. She did everything I asked her and tried so hard.” The pair were placed first in two classes and second in the third, garnering them enough points to win overall Reserve Champion and $7000. Nicola then set her sights on the Extreme Mustang Race in Glen Rose, Texas November 5 through 10. “We really hadn’t done a ton of riding at that point. We’d been cruising around and I hadn’t pushed things a

June-July 2020

whole lot. I was really careful not to stress her out,” says Nicola. “We started really training after the TIP show.” Nicola built Sawyer’s confidence by exposing her to as many new places and experiences as she could. In late September, Nicola entered Sawyer in an open Cowboy Race in Gaffney, South Carolina. “We came in last in our division,” Nicola says with a laugh. “But she did every obstacle and completed every task. We were just slow. I wanted her to pick up the right leads and do everything right so we lost quite a bit of time.” When November rolled around, Sawyer, Nicola, and her husband Chris, drove 15 hours to Rose Bend, Texas for the Extreme Mustang Race. The course was posted on Friday night and the pair were as ready as they could be Saturday morning. “They changed our course in the walk through right before we started the class. I was panicked because I’m not very good at remembering things when I’m nervous!” Nicola says. “We were second to go and the guy that went before me got disqualified because he forgot the change. I was terrified I was going to mess up, too, so we went a little slower than we could have.” Nevertheless, Nicola and Sawyer were in second place going into the final race Sunday afternoon. “Before I went into the arena, one of the people there told me to ‘trust your horse and go,’” says Nicola. So she did. Nicola and Sawyer galloped around the arena, crossing bridges and platforms, running barrels, jumping brush poles, and dismounting at a canter. “She had what I think was a perfect run,” says Nicola. “She even nailed her flying changes!” That evening, Nicola was presented with the Extreme Mustang Race Champion belt buckle and a check for $3500, bringing her total earnings with Sawyer to over $10,000. When she returned to Aiken, Sawyer was turned out for a month vacation. Even in her time off, the accolades kept coming. The American Competitive Mustang Club named her the 2019 overall winner of the versatility division for earning points in a range of disciplines. “It was a complete surprise,” says Nicola. “The plaque just showed up!” This May, Sawyer debuted in the English horse show world, winning $20 in the two foot jumper division at a PSJ show with Nicola and winning all three classes in the crossrails division at Stableview with a new pilot in the irons, 10-year-old Harrison Labuschagne. “She loves Harrison! She can be a sensitive creature and she is totally calm and quiet with him,” says Nicola. “I wasn’t sure she would understand short legs because she hasn’t had any kids ride her, but he didn’t have any trouble getting her to canter around.” Harrison first rode Sawyer at the PSJ warm-up. “When I got on her, my first thought was she is super soft in the mouth. The second thing is when you put your leg on, she immediately moves over how you want her to. Her canter feels like clouds and she has a really pretty long mane,” says Harrison. “At Stableview, Sawyer was super quiet and relaxed even though my mom’s horse was rearing right next to her,” he continues. “I’m really looking forward to the next show because I know we will improve with more time riding her. I love my pony but Sawyer is way easier!” “Hunter pony is a perfect side career because she gets real game in the races,” says Nicola. “In general, she likes mellow.” Mellow is a surprisingly apt descriptor for this 4-year-old mustang who has been out of the wild for less than a year. With more hunter shows, the Georgia TIP Challenge Open show, and the 2020 Extreme Mustang Race lined up, Sawyer’s future looks exciting...and profitable!

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Ask the Judge

Questions about Dressage With Amy McElroy

Amy McElroy is an FEI competitor, and a USEF S judge. She is qualified to officiate at any USEF recognized national show at all dressage levels. She rides, trains and teaches at Fair Lane Farm in Aiken and judges between 15 and 20 dressage and eventing shows each year. In her popular Ask the Judge column, she answers readers’ questions about dressage. Do you have a question for Amy? Send her an email at McElroyDRM@aol.com, or visit her website: www.amymcelroy.com.

Dear Amy

I am going to be competing at the dressage Training Levels starting this summer. I know everyone says “remember to use your corners,” but I am not sure what that means and what the judges are looking for. I also don’t see where you get a score for the corners. I also wondered if the short sides are scored, since I do not see a place for a score for that, either. What is the judge really looking for in the Training Levels?

Dressage Newbie Dear Newbie

It’s great that you will be starting your dressage show journey this summer. These are very important and interesting questions. Let’s start with another question: what is Training Level? On all dressage tests each level has its own purpose. You can find the purpose written on every test. It is useful to know what is going to be required and expected of you and your horse. This is what judges will be taking into consideration when critiquing your ride. Let’s see what the Training Level purpose states: To confirm the horse demonstrates correct basics, is supple and moves freely forward in a clear and steady rhythm with a steady tempo, accepting contact with the bit. In other words these are the basics and fulfill the bottom four rungs of the training scale. For each Training Level test, it is interesting to take into consideration how many test movements there are, and of these, which ones are coefficients (double points), how many transitions, how many corners, and how many short sides are in each test. Training Level is comprised of three tests. Let’s take a look and make some comparisons: Training 1: 13 test movements, 6 coefficients, 11 transitions, 10 corners, 0 full short sides Training 2: 16 test movements, 6 coefficients, 11 transitions, 15 corners, 4 full short sides Training 3: 15 test movements, 7 coefficients, 12 transitions, 11 corners, 0 full short sides Training Level includes the following gaits and movements: working trot and canter, medium and free walks, 20 meter circles left and right in trot and canter, stretchy circle (introduced in Training 2) and a trot three-loop serpentine (Training 3). As you can see these tests all have many transitions. In fact, it may surprise you to learn that scores for transitions make up more than 50% of your final score at this level. So how do you perform a corret transition? According to the USEF rule book DR 107.1, the changes of gait and pace should be clearly shown at the prescribed marker, they should be quickly made yet must be smooth and not abrupt. The rhythm of a gait or pace should be maintained up to the moment when the gait or pace is changed or the horse halts. The horse should remain light in hand, calm and maintain a correct position. In DR107.2 the same applies to transitions from one movement to another. In other words when riding your transitions the objectives should be smooth, willing, calm, regular, obedient, and accurate. In Training Level tests, the coefficients are assigned to nearly half the movements of each test. Since these moves are counted double it is even more important to be secure in your ability to ride what is requested as effortlessly and accurately as possible. There are an abundance of corners you must ride through in each test. Although there is not a specific scoring box for just the corners, this does not mean they aren’t being judged. Keep in mind that from the

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time you enter at A and until you salute and leave the arena, your judge will be taking every stride into consideration. The corner scores will be combined either with a movement before, a movement after, or with a transition. Corners are very important because they encourage your horse to stay supple, and to rebalance as well as to prepare for the next move, to name a few of their benefits. When riding corners, as a general rule you want your horse’s bend to correspond to the correct bend of the smallest size circle of each gait in that test. In Training Level, the smallest circles are 20 meters in both the trot and canter. It is generally expected that corners should be ridden about two meters smaller than the smallest required circle. Therefore, in Training Levels, corners should have the bend and depth of about an 18-meter circle. Your short sides are taken into consideration in the same way the circles are in the scoring. Although there is not a direct score for every short side, they will be linked to a movement before, a movement after, or a movement within. So, yes they are being judged. Short sides are not a rest break. Similar to corners, they are where you can regroup, encourage and balance your horse as you prepare for what’s to come. Here are a few ideas to keep in mind specifically when riding Training Levels: 1. Halts may be done through the walk, and you may move off from the halt through the walk. If you do choose to walk, I would suggest limiting your trot to halt and halt to trot transitions to no more than three walking strides. 2. The trot may be ridden rising or sitting. Try to decide which style would best show your horse off and keep him moving freely forward. You will not score higher just because you are sitting. 3. A reminder that in correctly ridden circles and in the serpentine you DO NOT “use” the corners: in other words, do not go deeply into them. 4. You may wear half chaps, gaiters or leggings in solid black or brown, without fringe, matching the color of your footwear, and made of smooth leather or leather-like material instead of tall riding boots if you prefer. Other thoughts to impress your judge at any level. 1. Be prepared. Know your test and be able to perform it reliably. 2. Be on time. 3. Remember to wear your number and to remove any schooling boots your horse may have been wearing in the warm-up because these are not allowed in a test. 4. Know the rules, purpose and directives of each level and test you ride 5. Smile and be confident I hope I have clarified what is expected in the Training Level tests and the way corners and short sides are incorporated into a score. Enjoy the ride!

June-July 2020


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Aiken Polo Club Spring 2020

Photography by Pam Gleason


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Randy Wolcott, who is a director of the Hitchcock Woods Foundation, spearheaded the RCW project for the organization, while Mark Pavlovsky, who is a wildlife consultant, created the RCW plan, Creating Habitat; Preserving Species oversees the translocations and monitors the birds themselves. The Story and Photos by Pam Gleason controlled burns and other aspects of forest maintenance are run by Bennett Tucker who is the woods supervisor. Bennett also monitors orse people have not always been known as enthusiastic some of bluebird nesting boxes that dot the woods. These have also been birdwatchers. But their reputation has been changing lately supremely successful, attracting ever-increasing numbers of breeding in Aiken, with private stables and local equestrian venues taking pairs and resulting in a noticeable increase in the bluebird population a keen interest in bird life. Horse owners are putting up feeders, in the woods and surrounding areas. Last year, the South Carolina installing plants that provide food and shelter for native species and Bluebird Society designated the Hitchcock Woods an official Bluebird mounting and monitoring bluebird houses. The Hitchcock Woods Habitat, and bluebird monitors have counted 1723 fledglings from Foundation and Stable View have gone one step further by working boxes in the woods between 2011 and 2019. with governmental organizations and private consultants to establish a “It’s been very rewarding,” says Randy Woolcott. “The fact that the population of endangered Red Cockaded Woodpeckers here in Aiken. RCWs are here and they are thriving is nature telling us that our forestry In addition, both the Hitchcock Woods and Stable View have thriving management plan is working and that we are doing the right thing. The bluebird colonies, and Stable View, better known as an eventing and RCWs add so much to the woods. They draw people from all around horse show venue, has a number of larger breeding boxes which have to see them – a lot of the groups of RCWs in this area are on private been used by nesting kestrels. property or government land so this is one of the few places where bird The Hitchcock Woods Red Cockaded Woodpecker project got its watchers can go to see them. The horse people enjoy them, too. They are official start in 2016. The woodpeckers, known by their initials RCW, very social birds, and when they are out foraging, they talk to each other live in old growth longleaf pine forests and were once abundant all and it’s neat to hear.” over the Southeast. However, when these forests were cut down in the th Stable View is another equestrian destination that has made an effort mid to late 20 century, their populations plummeted. By the early to attract bird life. Barry Olliff, who owns the facility along with his 1970s, they joined the federal endangered species list. At that time, wife Cyndy, says that this is all part of their plan to make Stable View a ornithologists estimate that there were only about 10,000 individual gathering place for the community. birds left, a reduction of approximately 99%. “It’s a matter of making it interesting to Things looked bad for the birds, different people,” he says. “Eventing can be which nest in cavities they excavate rather elitist, and we are not elitist people. high up in mature pine trees. Unlike We’d like to have a cross section of people other woodpeckers, which nest in dead enjoying the property.” trees, RCWs use live trees, and it takes The main way they have encouraged them several years to complete a nesting bird life is by creating habitat for native site. When a tree with an RCW cavity species through controlled burns and other is cut down, it may be years before a forestry management practices. They have breeding pair will have a place to lay also put up two varieties of bird house: 15 eggs and reproduce. A breakthrough smaller houses for bluebirds and 5 large in RCW conservation came in 1989, houses designed for screech owls. They after Hurricane Hugo hit Charleston, installed their bird houses four years ago destroying prime RCW habitat near the with the guidance of the South Carolina coast. Conservationists then discovered One of the Hitchcock Woods’s first RCW chicks is banded by Mark Bluebird Society, and every year they have that RCWs will happily take up residence Pavlovksy, who oversees the woodpecker restoration project. fledged more and more birds. Last year, 87 in artificial nesting boxes installed in baby bluebirds left the nests, and this year they are hoping to have 100 man-made cavities in likely-looking trees. This made it possible for or more. The screech owl boxes attract kestrels, and there are currently conservationists to expand RCW habitat and increase the number of three kestrel nestlings living in one of them. Other birds that nest on the eggs laid and woodpeckers hatched. The species began to rebound. property include killdeer and quail. Red Cockaded Woodpeckers once lived in the Hitchcock Woods, Stable View is starting its own RCW project. Getting all the necessary and bringing them back is part of a forest management plan that was approvals to translocate the endangered birds can take a long time. The implemented 30 years ago. This plan relies on controlled burns and Olliffs decided to start the process by creating the appropriate habitat, aggressive thinning of the forest understory to restore the woods as a installing some artificial nesting cavities in their larger trees and waiting longleaf pine ecosystem. This ecosystem, one of the most biodiverse -the “if you build it, they will come” method. It worked. Last year, a in North America, supports native birds and other animals, including lone male RCW showed up on the property. Mark Pavlovsky, who now RCWs, quail, wood ducks and turkeys. manages all the Stable View bird programs, was able to determine that The Hitchcock Woods RCW plan itself involved many steps this was one of the RCWs from the Hitchcock Woods. There are plans and there were lots of hoops to jump through in order to remain in in the works to bring him a mate this fall, if one does not show up on compliance with various rules and regulations associated with the her own. Endangered Species Act. Finally, in the fall of 2016, five pairs of young The attention that the Hitchcock Woods Foundation and Stable RCWs were netted at the Francis Marion State Forest in Charleston and View have paid to birds has definitely helped raise awareness of them translocated to the Hitchcock Woods. The hope was that they would in Aiken’s equestrian community. Bluebirds especially have been find the territory to their liking and stay. beneficiaries of this new interest, and more and more horse owners are They did. By the next spring, there were several active breeding pairs, putting up bluebird boxes on their farms. Horse farms and bluebirds and, by summer, the first fledgling RCWs left their nests. In 2017, 10 are a natural fit, since bluebirds like open fields and love to perch on more birds were relocated to the Woods, followed by eight more in horse fences while hunting for insects. For horsemen, having bluebirds 2018 and four more in 2019. This year there are 50 RCWs living in the nesting on the property adds another dimension to farm life, and makes Woods, including 10 breeding pairs. So far this spring, 19 baby RCWs summer in Aiken just a little more colorful. have fledged, four more than last year.

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The Caribbean Connection Aiken Equine Rescue and Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare Partnership By Nancy Johnson

“I’ll be sure to say ‘Hola’ and the few other Spanish words I know,” country, stadium jumping, and foxhunting. He’s also done low level jokes Caroline Mulstay, the manager of Aiken Equine Rescue (AER) dressage, trail riding and worked cattle.” She adds with a laugh, “He’s as she anticipates greeting a horse named Boy Cut. The 5-year-old even been through a fast food drive-thru!” Skyla is so happy she and Thoroughbred gelding is arriving in Aiken after an arduous journey Tomato found one another with the assistance of the two rescues. She from Puerto Rico. Boy Cut is coming from Caribbean Thoroughbred describes him as “A genuine sweetheart who will always try to the best Aftercare, Inc. (CTA), an organization that has sent AER very nice of his ability to do what you’re asking,” horses in the past. This horse will be the eighth horse from Puerto Rico “People need to realize that 70% of the horses running [at racetracks to come to AER via CTA. “They are a phenomenal organization! Just in the Caribbean] are imported from the U.S. and many of them are great to work with and are always very honest about their horses,” she already war horses when they get here. I’ve seen many that are just 6 or says. “Kelley Stobie, the founder, is a huge Thoroughbred advocate and 7 years old when they come down and yet, have already run 60 or more is passionate about helping these horses after their racing careers in the races,” Kelley explains, adding emphatically, “These horses deserve to go Caribbean are finished.” home! We don’t have the outlet for retired racehorses like they do in the Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare and Aiken Equine Rescue are states where there is horse country everywhere.” both accredited by the Thoroughbred Aftercare Alliance Kelley emphasizes that (TAA), a nonprofit that inspects and awards grants to CTA is the only equine approved aftercare organizations. In 2017, Puerto Rico rescue in the Caribbean and was hit very hard by several hurricanes, leaving Camarero while she has mostly placed Racetrack, with 800 horses on the grounds, all but horses that raced in Puerto completely destroyed. CTA was quickly overwhelmed Rico, she also has helped with horses that needed homes, and so Kelley sought help find new homes for horses from TAA to find other accredited rescues that would be from racetracks in St. Croix, willing to take some of the horses to the mainland. Jim St. Thomas, Antigua, and Rhodes, AER’s board president, immediately stepped up Barbados. “It’s very different and offered to take three horses. than on the U.S. mainland “I felt comfortable working with Aiken Equine where there are many rescues Rescue knowing that they, too, have been through the with lots of volunteers. “It’s accreditation process, which is quite excruciating. Jim impossible to get volunteers Skyla Evangelista and Tony Tomato and Caroline have just been fantastic from the first horses down here because of the to the one on his way,” says Kelley. She adds, “Many of the horses that economy. Nobody wants to work for free, with the exception of a few come in to me are broken down or are a rack of bones. They need time kids who have no experience with horses.” before they can go to new homes. I can call Jim and Caroline and they Kelley does basic ground work with the horses and gets them going are open to taking one that needs a bit more rehab or just down time.” under saddle a bit before sending them to a new home or to a partnering One such horse that needed more time was BJ Diablo, one of the rescue like AER. “I don’t have the space or money to have a lot of horses original three horses to come to AER in 2017. “He had been through a here. My limit is 20, so I have to get them moving because I constantly lot mentally, not physically,” Kelley explains. “He needed to be turned have a waiting list.” out for at least a year to learn how to be a horse.” Sending horses from the Caribbean to the mainland requires a As it happened, BJ not only needed some time off, but he also needed considerable amount of logistics as well as money. First, the horses must the right rider to bring out his best. “A young, local professional, spend seven days in quarantine before leaving the island. Kelley explains Alexandria (known to her friends as Andi) Dukes, just adopted him a that, unfortunately, the air transport does not permit them to schedule few weeks ago and she’s doing a rock star job with him!” Caroline says. the flights. So often, as in the case of Boy Cut and another horse headed Kelley recalls the phone conversation from about a month ago. to Pennsylvania, there are delays. These two horses had to remain in a “When Caroline called and told me BJ was finally adopted, I just cried,” quarantine facility for an additional eight days as several flights Kelley says Kelley. had hoped to have the horses on were cancelled. The horses finally made “He’s one of those horses that really needs a program,” explains Andi. it to Miami and then were shipped to a farm in Ocala to await rides to “I’ve been working him very consistently for just a few weeks and he’s their final destinations. already getting in the groove. He’s really smart, super sweet, and quiet.” “No other rescue has the expense that we have with shipping,” Kelley Since she didn’t feel his name fit him, Andi changed it to Hershey’s emphasizes. “The seven day quarantine and flight for each horse to Kiss, Hershey for short. Her main discipline is eventing, but she has Miami is $2,795, plus $250 to get them to layover farms in Ocala.” determined that Hershey would enjoy being a show hunter. In fact, he Before sending a horse to the States, Kelley ensures that it has had already made his debut in the 2’6” hunter division at Bruce’s Field where complete blood work, a health certificate, all vaccinations, worming, Andi was thrilled with his performance. “When I get a training project, and dental records. “I’m really transparent with the horses I send, so I test them in a lot of things and let their personality come out to see they also come with a full set of x-rays,” she says. what they are best suited for. He loves to jump, but is very quiet and “Boy Cut is such a nice horse; he’s sound and a real sweetheart. I’ve likes a slower pace. He’s going to make someone a great partner in the been doing this for 20 years and I am pretty good at matching horses hunter ring.” up with people. I try not to send people horses they can’t move,” Kelley Another success story from the CTA/AER partnership is Tony says. “Aiken [Equine Rescue] has helped us more than anybody and they Tomato. Skyla Evangelista adopted him as a 4-year-old in March 2019. have taken more horses for us than any other rescue. I love working with “We love trying new things together,” Skyla says. “Our favorites are cross them and hope our relationship continues for a long time.”

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Boy Cut arrives at Aiken Equine Rescue after a long trip from Puerto Rico


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Inside 55 62 66 69 76 77 78

Foals of 2020 Remembering Thomas Hitchcock Full Gallop & The Vista Calendar Directory of Services Classifieds Index of Advertisers


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Foals of 2020

Hope for the Future By Pam Gleason

This March, when our world shut down for the COVID-19 pandemic, there were some things that did not change at all. One of those things was that horses that were bred last year started having their foals. Foaling season in Aiken starts early, as it does anywhere that horses are bred for performance, but the majority of the horses we are presenting this year were born in March and April, at the height of the shutdown. They did not know this, of course. Even if the world we see has been altered by the pandemic, the world the mares and foals see is exactly the same as before. For their breeders, the future may seem a little less certain than they expected when these breedings were planned. But having a new foal on the ground always brings hope for the future. This is the fourth year that we have profiled foals born in Aiken. Our goal is to follow up on these foals from time to time to see how they are doing and find out what they become. We are profiling four foals this year: a Hanoverian with a future as a dressage horse, a Thoroughbred destined for the track, a Quarter Horse bred for performance, and an Icelandic filly who will do a little bit of everything. Meet the Aiken Foal Class of 2020.

Donna Sera

(Dannebrog X Walina) Hanoverian Filly Owned by Tom Murray Dressage Born June 5, 2020 Career Goal: Dressage

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om Murray has been breeding imported Hanoverian horses since 1989, and Donna Sera is the 69th foal that he has bred and foaled out. Tom Murray Dressage recently relocated from the West Coast, and this filly is Tom’s first Aiken baby. Donna Sera was born at a new farm in Three Runs Plantation on June 5. Her dam, Walina, is a State’s Premium Hanoverian that Tom imported from Germany. Walina has an impressive lineage, going back to the Olympic bronze medal-winning stallion Weyden. Donna Sera’s sire, Dannebrog, is also royally bred. His sire, Don Schufro, was a leading sire of dressage horses in Europe and was known not just for his athleticism but for his wonderful personality. Dannebrog’s dam is from the renowned Kassette dam line, which also produced such international superstar dressage horses as Gribaldi, sire of the famed stallion Totilas. “Most people look at the stallion and ignore the mare and the mare line”, Tom says, “I feel that the mare is 60 to 80 percent of the equation in any breeding, so that’s where I put my focus.” Tom has high hopes for his new filly, who was blessed with correct conformation and is already showing impressive movement. She also has a sweet and inquisitive personality, which promises to translate into a tractable and willing temperament. Tom says his plans for her this year include letting her grow up and learn to be a horse out with her dam in their pasture. They are currently awaiting the arrival of another foal who will be her companion. The two mares will decide when it is time to wean the babies, usually at about six months. Then they will be moved to an adjoining pasture while the babies will stay where they were raised. “It makes for an easy weaning process,” says Tom. Meanwhile, Walina has been bred back to the same stallion. Tom says Donna Sera has a bright future as a dressage horse, and that she will likely be offered for sale after she is weaned.

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“Smoochie Madden”

Jess’s Dream X Wildheartsneverdie by Gators n Bears Thoroughbred Colt Born: March 18, 2020 Owned by Ron and Kathy Madden of Jellicoe Creek, LLC Career Goals: Racehorse

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t’s an old adage in breeding racehorses: breed the best to the best, and hope for the best. “Smoochie” does not have an official Jockey Club name yet, but he certainly has a lot of the best racehorses of the past decades in his pedigree. His dam, Wildheartsneverdie, was a great granddaughter of the immortal Storm Cat on her sire’s side and of A.P. Indy on her dam’s side. His sire, Jess’s Dream, is a son of two Preakness Stakes winners and Horses of the Year: Curlin and Rachel Alexandra, the only filly ever to have won the Preakness. Curlin is one of the top sires anywhere, with 51 stakes-winning progeny, including Aiken’s own Belmont Stakes winner Palace Malice. Rachel Alexandra, a supremely talented racehorse, had some troubles as a broodmare, with the result

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that she had only two foals, Jess’s Dream and the grade 1 stakes winner Rachel’s Valentina. Jess’s Dream won his only start in spectacular fashion at Saratoga, and then retired with an injury. Smoochie was born in Aiken at Chime Ridge Stables, and spent his first few months frolicking with his dam and demonstrating an exuberant, proud and energetic spirit. Then tragedy stuck. His dam got very ill, and both mare and foal were sent to the clinic. Unfortunately, Wildheartsneverdie could not be saved and Smoochie went home to Chime Ridge an orphan. He was already mostly weaned from his mother and eating hay and grain, so physically, he was not too young to be on his own. But the loss of his mother has left him sad and lonely. “We hope he’ll start playing and acting like a colt again soon,” says Shirl Tronoski, who owns Chime Ridge Stables with her husband Billy. She says they are looking into finding him another foal to be his companion soon, hoping this will cheer him up. Meanwhile, he has become especially attentive and affectionate to people. “We tried out a lot of names,” says Shirl. “But Smoochie seems to be the one that fit.”

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“Archie”


Archie

Slick By Design X Escape the Drama AQHA Colt Born: April 26, 2020 Owned by Chris Thompson and Jeffrey Pait Career Goal: AQHA Performance and Performance Halter

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rchie, a black Quarter Horse colt was bred to run, jump, stop and turn. At six weeks old, he certainly seems to know this. He enjoys galloping around his pasture at Pait Show Horses on Aiken’s Southside where he was born. He has a proud and self-assured personality coupled with an athleticism that bodes well for his future as a performance horse. Most of the horses that are bred at Pait Show Horses are destined for the AQHA halter ring, but this colt has performance lines. His dam, Escape the Drama, earned an AQHA Register of Merit in Hunter Under Saddle. She was also named an AQHA Superior Performance Halter Mare and won Reserve World Champion Amateur Hunter Under Saddle Mare. His sire, Slick by Design, is a barrel racing champion who holds the record for the fastest time ever run by a stallion in the National Finals Rodeo. The colt will spend the summer at the Pait farm, learning his first lessons in being handled for his future career. Exactly what discipline he will specialize in will be up to him. Will he be unflappable and steady, a hunter champion like his dam? Or will he have the fire and speed to break records in barrel races? He could be a bit of both: Quarter Horses are known for their versatility, their ability to compete in several disparate disciplines without skipping a beat – perhaps he will be the next AQHA All Around Champion. Wherever his talent takes him in the future, he is getting a good start here in Aiken, which is becoming known as a breeding ground for horses of many breeds.

Valkyrja from Meant to Be Farm

Nafnleysingi from Meant to Be Farm X Vanadis from Azur Icelandic Filly Born April 19, 2020 Owned by Meant to Be Farm

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alkyrja was born this spring at Meant to Be Farm in Aiken. She is a purebred Icelandic horse, a breed that is not common in the United States and quite rare in Aiken. Icelandics are gaining a following here, however, and for good reason. They are smaller horses, averaging about 12-14 hands, and they can be three, four or five gaited, able to perform a walk, trot, canter, tølt, and flying pace. These last two are ground-covering lateral gaits that are very smooth to ride. This makes four and five gaited Icelandics an excellent choice for people who looking for comfort, while the fact that all Icelandics also have a distinct walk, trot and canter means they can also compete in the standard English and Western disciplines. They tend to have kind, safe and sane temperaments, too. Valkyrja’s sire, Nafnleysingi, is also on the property, as are several of her other relatives. Juli Cole, who owns and operates the farm, has been breeding Icelandic horses for many years, and has recently also started crossbreeding Icelandics to Appaloosas in order to produce a horse with Icelandic traits and Appaloosa coloring. Her breeding program is very scientific: she sends out her horses’ DNA to be analyzed for various traits, especially for the genes that determine whether or not a horse is gaited, so she ends up with few big surprises.

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Juli says that her future plans are to train Valkyrja for competition and pleasure riding, and eventually to enter her into the breeding program. “Her first few years will be spent playing with her sibling, due any day now, and learning the age appropriate basics as a foundation of her overall training. But mostly playing and being a horse!”

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Valkyrja from Meant to Be Farm June-July 2020

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Remembering Aiken’s Horsemen Thomas Hitchcock, 1860-1941 By Pam Gleason

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lthough Thomas Hitchcock left an indelible mark on Aiken, he is not as well known as his wife, Louise Eustis Hitchcock. Loulie, as she was called, was a larger than life figure, the Master of Foxhounds of the Aiken Hounds, a polo player and an enthusiastic promotor of horse sports and of Aiken. When people remember the Hitchcocks, the elder Thomas is also often overshadowed by his oldest son Thomas, known as Tommy. Tommy was a 10-goal polo player and a renowned international superstar. One reason that the elder Thomas is less talked about may be that he was a quiet man, more apt to keep to himself than his gregarious wife or his charismatic oldest son. And yet, if you look at Thomas Hitchcock’s accomplishments in Aiken and in the wider equestrian world, he is every bit as interesting and impressive as his more flamboyant family members. He was a polo player, foxhunter, steeplechase trainer and all around horseman whose steady drive, vision and commitment to horses and to sport helped make Aiken what it is today. Thomas Hitchcock was born on November 23, 1860 in Westbury, New York. He was named for his father, a Harvard-trained lawyer who was a co-owner of the New York Sun newspaper. The elder

he became enamored of horses when he was quite young. Determined to go to college in England, he persuaded his father to send him there in 1876, when he was 16, in order to study and prepare. He spent a year at the home of a vicar in Gloucestershire, who made extra income tutoring classics. The vicar was an avid foxhunter, and introduced Thomas to the English country life. By the time he arrived at Brasenose College at Oxford, Thomas had become a foxhunting addict, joining a club called the Breister, a group of undergraduates who hunted three times a week. He also started riding in steeplechase races, competing for the first time in 1882. While at Oxford, Hitchcock took up polo, which had been played in England for a half dozen years and was just starting to make its debut in America. Hitchcock played on the Oxford polo team, earning a “blue” in the sport. After he graduated in 1884, he returned to New York, where polo was on the upswing. His years of experience playing in England, coupled with excellent horsemanship and natural athletic ability stood him in good stead, and he was quickly acknowledged as one of the best players in the United States. He was a member of the Westchester team (in the literature of the day, this was usually

Above: Loulie and Thomas in May, 1893. The gentleman in black is William Collins Whitney for whom Aiken’s Whitney Field is named. He is in mourning after the death of his wife, Flora Payne Whitney, who was killed in a riding accident in Aiken that February. Their son Harry Payne Whitney is holding the piebald horse.

Hitchcock also wrote a financial column for the New York Sun under the pseudonym Matthew Marshall. The Matthew Marshall column was the best known financial column of its era, filled with acerbic advice that promoted thriftiness and living within one’s means. It also provided detailed analyses of various businesses and gave investment advice. Perhaps because of the success of the newspaper, perhaps by following his own stock tips, Hitchcock made quite a lot of money. He became so wealthy, in fact, that he discouraged his three sons from going into any trade. Instead, he wanted them to grow up to be gentlemen in the old fashioned sense: men who did not work for a living. Thomas, his first born, was happy to do so. A rather small, wiry man,

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referred to as the “crack Westchester team”), which had a reputation for dominating its opponents. In 1886, he captained America’s team in the inaugural Westchester Cup against England, a game that he helped to organize. In 1888, the Long Island player H.L. Hebert came up with the idea of assigning players handicaps to equalize game conditions. Thomas Hitchcock was one of two players to be ranked a 5, the highest handicap possible at the time (the other 5-goaler was Foxhall Keene.) In 1890, the rating scale changed, and by 1894 Hitchcock had became one of America’s first 10 goal players, a rating he retained until 1901. Thomas had a great deal of influence on the sport off the field as well.

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In addition to playing, he was one of five men who formed an executive committee to establish the Polo Association (now the United States Polo Association) in 1890, thus giving American polo players their own governing body. Although he stopped playing polo after 1920, Thomas remained deeply involved in the sport his whole life. For one thing, he was the trainer of all of his son Tommy’s polo horses, and he was always on the sidelines to give his 10-goal son advice. An elder statesman of the sport as well as a hands-on horseman, he was occasionally put in charge of the training of the whole United States playing string. In 1891, Thomas married Louise Eustis, the orphaned daughter of an American diplomat. Loulie was the sister of Thomas’s polo playing Long Island friends George and William Eustis. She was an energetic horsewoman who had grown up spending her winters in Aiken along with her aunt and guardian Celestine Eustis. After the couple was married, they started spending their winters in Aiken together, building a home called Mon Repos. There, they indulged in foxhunting, polo, shooting, and golf, among other things. They have often been credited with establishing the Winter Colony in the city: a population of active

Francis purchased these properties from Whitney’s estate, and presented them to his brother and sister-in-law as a gift: This is the genesis of the Hitchcock Woods, one of Aiken’s most iconic and beautiful attractions. Thomas and Louise Hitchcock started the Aiken Hounds in 1914 (it was officially recognized in 1916) and they were a familiar sight at the head of the field, though Loulie, not Thomas, was the master. He was, however, the master of the Meadowbrook Hounds on Long Island, where the Hitchcocks had their main home, Broad Hollow Farm. By 1895, Thomas was making a name for himself as a trainer of steeplechase horses. He was thoughtful and innovative, often making champions out of horses that others considered unpromising. Steeplechasing then tended to be a rough and ready affair, and horses often fell and were injured when they failed to navigate the jumps. Hitchcock believed that this could be blamed on their training. He understood that jumping is not natural to horses, and so his methods emphasized slow and careful schooling. He invented the Hitchcock chute and the Hitchcock corral. The chute was a passageway that his young horses had to navigate in order to get from their stalls to their corral and back again. He placed jumps

sportsmen and women who came down from New York and New England every winter to indulge in outdoor pursuits. Although Aiken was a winter destination years before the Hitchcocks arrived, they certainly helped popularize the city. Not only did they winter in Aiken themselves, they also convinced their friends to come down, and they ensured that there were always plentiful sporting opportunities for everyone. The Hitchcocks had four children, all of whom participated in Aiken’s extensive program of outdoor activities for young people. One way the Hitchcocks helped make Aiken the horseman’s paradise it is today was by buying and preserving land. This practice started with Celestine Eustis, who loved the pine forest that bordered the city and started buying large portions of it in the 1870s. After Thomas and Loulie were married, Thomas bought hundreds more acres. His friend William C. Whitney, who was an early member of the Winter Colony, bought even more. After Whitney died in 1904, Thomas’s brother

in this chute, which he gradually raised over time so that, eventually, his horses were jumping fences as high as 5’6” as naturally as they would gallop. The Hitchcock corral was similar to a modern round pen, except that it had an interior fence so that the horse would be effectively enclosed between two rings of fences. Jumps were placed on opposite sides of the corral, and the horses learned to free jump by cantering around this chute and over the fences long before they ever had a rider on their backs. Hitchcock’s steeplechase horses got their early educations at Cedar Creek Farm, a 1,000-acre spread about 10 miles from downtown Aiken. Once they were reliable under saddle, the horses were trained over jumps on the Ridge Mile Track in the woods. In the first decades of the 20th century, Hitchcock invented the elastic-ended girth, which became a standard option in English tack. He did this because he was distressed by the sight of a groove left in his horses’ sides from their girths after they raced. He reasoned that this

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likely lessened a horse’s performance and that an elastic end would be more humane while still keeping the saddle securely in place. Other Hitchcock inventions include the Hitchcock fence, now simply called an Aiken, which is a rail fence with brush piled beneath it. Hitchcock used the brush to teach his horses to stand well back from their fences, believing that it is easier to teach a horse to jump from close in when necessary than to correct a horse that learns to get “under” a jump. He schooled his steeplechasers in hand using long lines to teach them to use their hocks, and he taught all of his horses to neck rein and be highly responsive to their riders, like polo ponies. While other steeplechase

bells were rung to signal when it was time for a meal. “There was one bell that rang ten minutes before the meal and one that rang when it was time to eat. And you had to go in then. It didn’t matter if there were house guests, even if they were royalty. The meal wouldn’t wait,” said his granddaughter. And if you were dining with Mr. Hitchcock, it was important to eat as efficiently as he did, not always an easy task, because he was not a talker. This was because his waitress, Rebecca, would pick up all the plates as soon as he was done eating whether everyone was finished or not. “If you didn’t know, you might leave the table starving,” she said. “But

Thomas Hitchcock with Peter Green and racehorses, February 1928.

trainers may have warmed their horses up by galloping in a straight line, Hitchcock’s horses did figure eights. He was well ahead of his time in his belief that proper flatwork could benefit horses whose main purpose was to go fast and jump high. Thomas Hitchcock had many additional accomplishments and achievements. He was a founder of the Palmetto Golf Club in Aiken and the Meadowbrook Club on Long Island, where he was also a founder of the Piping Rock Horse Show. He was a founder of Belmont Park racetrack and a member of the Jockey Club. In addition to training top steeplechase horses, he also trained horses for the flat track, including Salvidere, the champion juvenile male of 1906. In 1917, wanting to help the war effort, he joined the military and learned to fly an airplane. He was soon commissioned with the rank of major and put in charge of the Mineola Air Field on Long Island. He was 57 years old at the time, making him the oldest aviator in the U.S. Army. At the same time, his 17-year-old son Tommy had joined the Lafayette Escadrille, a French flying corps, and was flying combat missions in Europe. The official age to join this corps was 18 – the father and son pair may have been the oldest and the youngest people flying airplanes for the Allied war effort in World War I. Personally, Thomas was quiet and reserved, but in no sense forbidding or severe. It was simply said that it took a long time to get to know him. His granddaughter Louise Hitchcock Stephaich, who remembers him slightly from her childhood, says he was always very organized, extremely punctual and did things very much on a schedule. Twice a day he went out to watch is horses, always taking his stopwatch to time them. Every house he had was equipped with an electric bell system, and

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I think he must have had a nice sense of humor. I remember that he had smiley eyes.” Thomas’s wife Loulie died on April 1, 1934 at the age of 67, the consequence of a severe fall while out hunting in Aiken the day after Christmas, 1933. Thomas died seven years later, in 1941. He was at his farm on Long Island where he suffering a heart attack a few moments after returning from schooling his horses over fences, as he did every morning. He was 80. His obituary in the New York Times called him the dean of American steeplechasing and credited him with effecting a revival in interest in riding horses in the New York area before the turn of the 20th century. He was inducted into the National Racing Hall of Fame in 1973 and the Museum of Polo Hall of Fame in 2002. There, he joined his wife and son, who were elected in 1995 and 1990 respectively. After his death, Hitchcock’s steeplechase horses were sold at auction. He left the bulk of his Aiken real estate holdings, 1,191 acres of woods, to the Hitchcock Foundation, with the expressed wish that future generations would continue to enjoy them. “These woods have been a great source of pleasure to my wife and myself,” he wrote in a 1939 letter to the foundation. “It is my hope that they will continue to be of pleasure and use to my friends and neighbors in Aiken, and to the public generally.” Thomas Hitchcock’s wish was granted. A horseman, sportsman, visionary and philanthropist, his legacy in Aiken can hardly be overstated. Along with his wife, he was among Aiken’s most influential equestrian figures and his name will be forever connected to the city and to the sports that he loved.

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Spring School: Full Gallop and The Vista

Photography by Pam Gleason


Aiken Area Calendar of Events

JUNE

2-14 Aiken Polo Club Pro Am Invitational. Aiken Polo Club, Aiken. Tiger Kneece, 803.646.3301, tigerkneece@bellsouth.net, aikenpolo.org 3 Twilight #1. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 3-7 Tryon Spring VI/TR & HC Charity Horse Show. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/competition-schedule 5-7 Ride Better Clinic. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken.com 6 Combined Test and Dressage Show. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 803.262.5263, schoolthevista.com 6 Pine Tree CEC HJ Show. Pine Tree Stables, 1265 Sanders Creek Road, Camden, SC. Lynn Conto, 803.424.1952, conto@bellsouth.net 6 Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 6-7 PSJ Aiken Summer Classic Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 6-7 HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 6-7 USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 10 Twilight #2. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 10 Yappy Hour. 6-8pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. letlovelive.org

June-July 2020

10-14 Classic Company Aiken Summer Classic I- USEF Premier. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 10-14 Tryon Summer I. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule 10-21 Pete Bostwick Memorial 8-Goal Tournament. New Bridge Polo Club, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. Haley Bryan, 803.215.3577, HBryan2485@aol.com, newbridgepolo.com 11-14 Harmon Classics HJ Show. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@ fence.org, fence.org 12-14 Tryon Summer Dressage I & II. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon. com/page/competition-schedule 13 Dressage Test-of-choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, fullgallopfarm@gmail.com, fullgallopfarm.com 13 Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 13-14 USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, fullgallopfarm@gmail.com, fullgallopfarm.com 13-14 USEF/USDF “Summer Solstice� Dressage. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 13-14 SCDCTA Clinic. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 13-14 WHES Horse Trials, CT & Dressage. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com

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13-14 HJ Fox HJ Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 17-21 Classic Company Aiken Summer Classic II- USEF Premier. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 17-21 Tryon Summer II. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule 17 Twilight #3. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 18 Sunset Jumpers I. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 19-21 USEF/USEA “Summer” Horse Trials. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm. com 19-21 SCQHA. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 19-21 Summer Fox Summer Classic HJ Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 20 Painted Ponies Auction. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com. 20 Summer Solstice Classic. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 20-21 Dressage Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 20-21 PSJ Highfields Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 21 Atlanta Youth Dressage Challenge. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 24 Twilight #4. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 24-28 Tryon Summer III. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule 25-28 Stars and Stripes GQHA Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 26-27 Wateree CHA Summer Championship Show. Georgia Sports Arena, 1093 Highway 56, Swainsboro, GA. nchacutting.com 26-27 Ranch Sorting. BSC Arena, 3976 Highway 24 South, Waynesboro, GA. rsnc.us 27 Pups ‘n Suds. Dog wash: 9-12pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. letlovelive.org 27 Schooling Hunter Jumper Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 27-28 Dressage at the Park. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com. 27-28 Chatt Hills Horse Trial. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 27-28 Dressage Summer Series I & II. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 28 Schooling Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, fullgallopfarm@gmail.com, fullgallopfarm.com 28-29 Ride Better Clinic. Stono River Stables, Charleston, SC. Laura Quarles, 843.813.5506, paradisefarmaiken.com 30-Jul 5 Tryon Summer IV. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule 29-Jul 5 Big A GQHA Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com

JULY

1 Twilight #5. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 4-5 Chatt Hills Horse Trials. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com

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7-12 Tryon Summer V. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule 8 Twilight #6. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 11 Voxton Farm CEC HJ Show. Voxton Farm, 226 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. Linda Klein, 803.425.4795, voxtonfarm@aol.com 11-12 PSJ Highfields Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 11-12 USEF/USDF “Only in America” Dressage. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 11-12 WHES Horse Trials, CT & Dressage. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com. 11-12 USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 11-12 Newton County Saddle Club Open Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 11-12 Greater Atlanta Dressage Southern I/II. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 12 Combined Test and Dressage Show. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 803.262.5263, schoolthevista.com 14-19 Tryon Summer VI. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule 15 Yappy Hour. 6-8pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. letlovelive.org 16 Sunset Jumpers II. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 18 Dressage Test-of-choice. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, fullgallopfarm@gmail.com, fullgallopfarm.com 18 FENCE Dressage Show. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence. org, fence.org 18 Cats on the Mat (cat yoga). $10, 11-12pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. letlovelive.org 18 Freedom Classic. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 18-19 Ride Better Clinic. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken.com 18-19 Eventing Academy Schooling Horse Trials. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 18-19 Tall Boots July HJ Schooling Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com. 18-19 HJ Fox HJ Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 18-25 NBHA Youth World Championships. Georgia National Fairgrounds & Agricenter, 401 Larry Walker Pkwy, Perry, GA. 478.987.3247, gnfa.com 19 USEA/USEF Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, fullgallopfarm@gmail.com, fullgallopfarm.com 21-26 Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show – HJ Division Week #2. Broyhill Preserve, 1500 Laurel Lane, Blowing Rock, NC. brchs.org 24-25 South Congaree Championship Rodeo. South Congaree Arena 395 Oak St W. Columbia, SC. ipra-rodeo-org 24-26 Camden Summer Classic. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 24-26 Carolina Classic Paso Fino Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. Julie Aldred, 828.221.4035, piedmontpfha.org 25 HJ Schooling Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 25-26 FENCE Horse Trials. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence. org, fence.org 25-26 Dressage Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com

June-July 2020


25-26 Novice GQHA Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 26 Clear Round Jumper Day. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 803.262.5263, schoolthevista.com 29-Aug 2 Blowing Rock Charity Horse Show – HJ Division Week #2. Broyhill Preserve, 1500 Laurel Lane, Blowing Rock, NC. brchs.org 29-Aug 2 Southern Classic (Appaloosa Show). Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 31-Aug 1 Good Times Barrel Racing Association The Equinety Race II. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. gtbra.wpengine.com

AUGUST

1 Chatt Hills Schooling Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 1-2 PSJ Back to School Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 5-23 Equus Events HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 8 Pine Tree CEC HJ Show. Pine Tree Stables, 1265 Sanders Creek Road, Camden, SC. Lynn Conto, 803.424.1952, conto@bellsouth.net 8-9 Eventing Academy Schooling Horse Trials. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 8-9 Tall Boots August HJ Schooling Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com. 8-9 Tryon Summer Dressage 3 & 4 Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule 11-14 Peach State Futurity. Georgia National Fairgrounds and AgriCenter, 401 Larry Walker Parkway, Perry, GA. nchacutting.com 12 Yappy Hour. 6-8pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. letlovelive.org 12-13 USEF/USDF “Too Hot To Trot I” Dressage. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 14-15 Ranch Sorting. BSC Arena, 3976 Highway 24 South, Waynesboro, GA. rsnc.us 15 Carolina Paint Show. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence. org, fence.org 15 PSJ Just for Fun Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 15-16 USEF/USDF “Too Hot To Trot II” Dressage. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 15-16 Made in the Shade Performance and Breed Show. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com. 15-16 Horse Show Ventures - The Southeastern Hunter/Jumper Series. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 16-17 Windridge Farms DT & CT. Windridge Farms, 3323 Chimney Rock Road, Hendersonville, NC. Alicia Henderson, 828.595.3950, windridgeservices@gmail.com 21-22 Blast From The Past Barrel Racing. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 22 CT and Dressage Show. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 803.262.5263, schoolthevista.com 22-23 Ride Better Clinic. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken.com 22-23 PSJ Mullet Hall Classic. Mullet Hall Equestrian Center, Johns Island, SC. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 22-23 WHES Horse Trials, CT & Dressage. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com. 22-23 GHF/Massey Ferguson Summer Dressage Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 28-29 Annual Sandy Oaks IPRA Pro Rodeo Round-Up. Lazy J Arena, 2237 Highway 23, W EdgeField, SC. 803.637.5369 or 803.480.0045, sandyoaksprorodeo.org

June-July 2020

29 JTO Horse Clinic. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence.org, fence. org 29 HJ Schooling Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 29 Wind Ridge Farms DT & CT. 882 Goodes Creek Church Road, Mooresboro, NC. Alicia Henderson, 828.595.3950, windridgeservices@ gmail.com, americandrivingsociety.org 29-30 Chatt Hills Horse Trials. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 29-30 GDCTA Labor Day Classic I & II. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com

SEPTEMBER

2-13 Equus Events Aiken Fall Festival - USEF Premier HJ Show. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Rd SE, Aiken. 803.226.0121, aikenhorsepark.org 4-6 HJ Show. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 4-6 SCQHA. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 4-6 NCQHA Annual Charity Ride. Broyhill Preserve, 1500 Laurel Lane, Blowing Rock, NC. brchs.org 4-6 Lendon Gray’s Dressage4Kids & Atlanta Youth Festival. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 5 Unrecognized Horse Trials. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken.com 5 FRC CT & Dressage Show. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence. org, fence.org 5-6 Five Points Horse Trials. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com. 5-6 USEF/USDF Dressage Fall Series I & II. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 5-6 Newton County Saddle Club Open Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 9 Schooling Dressage Show. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 10-27 USPA Northrup Knox Cup 12-Goal Tournament. New Bridge Polo Club, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. Haley Bryan, 803.215.3577, HBryan2485@aol.com, newbridgepolo.com 11-13 Timberland HDT &CT. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, carolinahorsepark.com. 11-13 Camden Fall Classic. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 11-13 Mustang Challenge. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 11-13 Tryon Fall Dressage 1 & 2. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule 12 Derby Cross and Clear Round Jumper Day. The Vista Schooling and Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. 803.262.5263, schoolthevista. com 12-13 USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 Us Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 12-13 GHF/Massey Ferguson Fall Dressage Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 12-13 HJ Fox HJ Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 12-13 Blue Ridge Mountain Horse Trials. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/competition-schedule 16 Yappy Hour. 6-8pm. SPCA Albrecht Center, 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. letlovelive.org 16-20 Stable View Fall Hunter Jumper Classic. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com

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16-27 USPA Master Cup 6 Goal Tournament. Wagener Polo Club, 5720 Wagener Road, Wagener, SC. Billy Raab, 561.719.3318; Hotline, 803.566.8610, wagenerpolo.com 16-Oct 3 USPA National President’s Cup 8-Goal Tournament. New Bridge Polo Club, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. Haley Bryan, 803.215.3577, HBryan2485@aol.com, newbridgepolo.com 17-19 Southeastern Charity Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 18-19 Ranch Sorting. BSC Arena, 3976 Highway 24 South, Waynesboro, GA. rsnc.us 18-20 Tryon Fall I. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule 18-20 Southeastern Reining Association. South Carolina Equine Park (SCEP), 443 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.486.4938, scequinepark.com 19 Tally Ho CEC HJ Show. 3962 Lawson Grove Road, Timmonsville, SC. Katrina Hutto, 843.319.9286, Katstallyho@yahoo.com 19 Fall Classic. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 US Highway 27, Hamilton, GA. 706.681.8748, poplarplacefarm.com 19-20 PSJ Aiken Fall Festival Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 19-20 TRHC XC Schooling. Foothills Equestrian Nature Center, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, horseshow@fence. org, fence.org 23-27 Tryon Fall II. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule

25 SC NBHA State Show. T. Ed Garrison Livestock Arena, 1101 West Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. clemson.edu/extension/garrison 25-26 Outlaw’s Championship Rodeo. Antioch Community Center, 1591 Bishopville Highway Camden, SC. 803.421.9833 or 803.421.9114, rodeosportsnetwork.com 25-27 104th Aiken Horse Show. Hitchcock Woods, Aiken. hitchcockwoods.org 25-27 USEF/USEA/FEI CCI-S 1/2/3/4* Oktoberfest Horse Trials. Stable View, LLC 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. 484.356.3173, info@ stableviewfarm.com, stableviewfarm.com 26 PSJ Just for Fun Show. Highfields Event Center, 147 Warehouse Road, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows.com 26-27 Newton County Saddle Club Open Horse Show. Georgia International Horse Park, 1996 Centennial Olympic Parkway, Conyers, GA. 770.860.4190, georgiahorsepark.com 28-Oct 4 Fjord and Friends Fest. Broyhill Preserve, 1500 Laurel Lane, Blowing Rock, NC. brchs.org 29-Oct 11 Wagener 4 Goal Tournament. Wagener Polo Club, 5720 Wagener Road, Wagener, SC. Billy Raab, 561.719.3318; Hotline, 803.566.8610, wagenerpolo.com 30 Twilight #7. Chattahoochee Hills Eventing - Hosted at the Bouckaert Farm, 9445 Browns Lake Road, Chattahoochee Hills, GA. 770.892.2117, info@chatthillseventing.com, chatthillseventing.com 30-Oct 4 Tryon Fall III. Tryon International Equestrian Center, 4066 Pea Ridge Road, Mill Spring, NC, 828.863.1000, tryon.com/page/ competition-schedule 30-Oct 18USPA Copper Cup 12-Goal Tournament. New Bridge Polo Club, 862 New Bridge Road, Aiken. Haley Bryan, 803.215.3577, HBryan2485@aol.com, newbridgepolo.com

Business Cards

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MyMalvernBank.com

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The Aiken Horse

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The Aiken Horse

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Directory of Services BARNS,CONSTRUCTION & REMODELING G. L. Williams & Daughter. Serving the CSRA for over 52 years. Specializing in hauling, grading, clearing, property maintenance, and excavation.We provide everything from several types of fill dirt, top soil,compost, mortar sands, crushed asphalt/concrete, to screenings and a variety of rocks.Free Estimates Available (803)6633715 Certified DBE.WOSB. www.glwilliamstrucking.com BLANKET CLEANING & REPAIR Aiken Horse Blanket Couture. Please see our business card ad on page 81. Elisa: 803-640-3211; elisa@aikenhorseblanket.com BOARDING/TURNOUT/TRAINING/SALES Chime Ridge Stables. Stalls available, partial or self care. Fun, friendly, adult atmosphere. Convenient to town, South Aiken 803-5083760. Horse boarding in Windsor, SC carriage driving community. Lovely, low country setting. 12x12 stalls connected to 2 acre fields and a short term paddock with shelter available. Jog’lin Board Farm Contact Lisa Whitcomb 414-477-9419 www.Sporting Days Farm.com. 3549 Charleston Hwy, Aiken, SC 29801 - 5.5 miles from Aiken By-Pass. Offers year round, seasonal or short term board as well as dry stalls. 150 acres with trails and practice areas. USEF/USEA Horse Trials in the winter, schooling shows. Visit our website to see all that it offers in 2020. sdaikenht@ aol.com - 610 613 2010 The Stable On The Woods: Elite boarding & training facility and home to trainers Darrell and Melissa Vaughn. With access to Hitchcock Woods, our barn sits on 70 acres and boasts a full size dressage arena with mirrors, show jumping arena and highquality grass pastures making this the ideal place for you and your horse. Training program to meet your needs, whether your discipline is Dressage, Eventing, Hunters, Jumpers or Foxhunting. thestableonthewoods.com 603.785.0435 Vaughn Equestrian: offering training, sales, and boarding. Professionalism is the guiding principle of owners Darrell and Melissa Vaughn in shaping every component of Vaughn Equestrian. Dressage, Jumpers, Eventing & Young Horses. training and sales. vaughnequestrian.com (603)-785-0435 COMPANION ANIMALS, CARE & SERVICES Trinity Farms Terriers: Irish Russell Terriers & Norfolk Terriers. Old World, Healthy 100 year old Bloodlines with proven calmer dispositions. Health & Dispositions guaranteed. Preservation breeders for 48 years. Donna Fitzpatrick 803-648-3137 easyjacks. com, trinityfarmskennel.com

EQUINE THERAPY/MASSAGE Mikaela Engert: Holistica PEMF Therapy & Equine Bodywork Certified Practitioner providing equine massage & PEMF Therapy in Aiken & the CSRA. PEMF helps to relieve pain and inflammation, improves performance, range of motion, speed and strength, while providing many other wellness benefits for you, your horse, your dog, or your other favorite four-legged friends! Call/Text: +1.603.748.4325; holisticaEQ@gmail.com; www.holisticaeq.com

FEED, SUPPLEMENTS & SUPPLIES Aiken County Farm Supply. 1933 Park Ave., Aiken. 803.649.2987. Aiken Saddlery & Supply. Full service tack & feed store. 1044 E. Pine Log Rd., Aiken. 803.649.6583. aikensaddlery.com HAY Hoss Luva Hay! Exceptional quality Coastal Bermuda. Real fertilizer and lime to Clemson specs, not chicken litter. Never rained on. Square and round bales. Competitively priced. Can deliver statewide. Fully enclosed truck. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jim McClain. 803.247.4803.

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INSURANCE Betsy Minton, Sterling Thompson Equine, 803-617-8353. Now writing homeowners insurance for private residences. No horses required but certainly welcomed. Access to top-notch unerwriters offering customized, affordable coverage. Still delivering excellent competitive insurance options for your horses and farms. betsyminton@sterlingthompson.com. Sterling Thompson Equine: 800 942 4258 Hutson-Etherredge Company. Insuring Aiken farms since 1876. Your hometown independent insurance agency can customize your equine property coverage by choosing the best company to fit your needs. We are a full service insurance agency. Call Sandi Vogus for a quote! 803-649-5141

INSTRUCTION/LESSONS Amy McElroy. USDF Gold Medalist and USEF S judge. Instruction and training at all levels. Visit amymcelroy.com or call 803.6404207. Aiken Horsemanship Academy. Your naturally inspired adult learning resource! Offering Clinics, Courses, Starting Young Horses, Evaluations, and Lessons. JulieRobins.com 803-641-4715. Jodi Hemry Eventing. Three-Star Eventer offering professional training, sales, boarding, instruction, horse shows, located in the heart of Aiken. 803-640-6691 JodiHemryEventing@gmail.com JodiHemryEventing.com The Riding School: Private, semi private or group lessons. Children a specialty. Beginners on up; excellent lesson horses. Unmounted programs available for children; birthday parties and camps. Barn and stall rental also available. Convenient Aiken location close to town. Chan Carman: 803-845-5102. Chan@theridingschoolaiken. com; www.theridingschoolaiken.com.

REAL ESTATE/ RENTALS Aiken Fine Homes and Land. Specializing in selling or renting homes, farms, land & barns for short or long term leases. 28 years experience in helping people find the property of their dreams, even if it takes building it! Call Barbara Lawrence, 803-439-0778 for honest & realistic answers to your real estate questions. Aiken Luxury Rentals. Distinctive accommodations for horse & rider in beautiful Aiken. Downtown fully furnished cottages, historic stables. Executive relocation; corporate housing. Short & long term. aikenluxuryrentals.com; info@aikenluxuryrentals.com. 803.648.2804. Carolina Real Estate Company. Fine homes, estates and horse properties in Aiken, South Carolina. Let us welcome you home to AIKEN, Home of Horses, History & Hospitality! carolinahorseproperties.com. (803) 648-8660 Sharer Dale, Meybohm. “Where town meets country.” sharerdale@ gmail.com. 803.522.3648. Suzy Haslup, Meybohm. “Your Aiken Horse Real Estate Specialist.” Buying or selling in the most celebrated equine community in the South. ww.aikenhorserealty.com; 803-215-0153 Tracey Kenworthy Turner, Meybohm. Specializing in marketing & selling Aiken’s horse country properties for 15+ years. southernhorsefarms.com. 803-215-4734. TACK & TACK CLEANING/REPAIR The Saddle Doctor. Saddlery and harness repair. 538 Two Notch Rd. HollyMacSpencer@aol.com. 803.642.5166.

June-Juyly 2020


Classifieds Spunky Registered Paint 15 hand mare. Fearless and great on trails. Will go anywhere! 15 years old & sound. $2,500 obo 803-295-8687

BOARDING/TURNOUT/ TRAINING Chime Ridge Stables. 803-5083760. Please leave message. Jodi Hemry Eventing. ThreeStar Eventer offering professional training, sales, boarding, instruction, horse shows, located in the heart of Aiken. 803-6406691 JodiHemryEventing@gmail. com JodiHemryEventing.com www.Sporting Days Farm.com. 3549 Charleston Hwy, Aiken, SC 29801 - 5.5 miles from Aiken By-Pass. Offers year round, seasonal or short term board as well as dry stalls. 150 acres with trails and practice areas. USEF/ USEA Horse Trials in the winter, schooling shows. Visit our website to see all that it offers in 2020. sdaikenht@aol.com - 610 613 2010 Horse boarding in Windsor, SC carriage driving community. Lovely, low country setting. 12x12 stalls connected to 2 acre fields and a short term paddock with shelter available. Jog’lin Board Farm Contact Lisa Whitcomb 414-477-9419 The Stable On The Woods: Elite boarding & training facility and home to trainers Darrell and Melissa Vaughn. With access to Hitchcock Woods, our barn sits on 70 acres and boasts a full size dressage arena with mirrors, show jumping arena and highquality grass pastures making

this the ideal place for you and your horse. Training program to meet your needs, whether your discipline is Dressage, Eventing, Hunters, Jumpers or Foxhunting. thestableonthewoods.com 603.785.0435 Vaughn Equestrian: offering training, sales, and boarding. Professionalism is the guiding principle of owners Darrell and Melissa Vaughn in shaping every component of Vaughn Equestrian. Dressage, Jumpers, Eventing & Young Horses. training and sales. vaughnequestrian.com (603)-7850435 HAY Hoss Luva Hay. Exceptional quality local Coastal Bermuda Hay and Alfalfa mix from out of state. Competitively priced. Will deliver state-wide. Satisfaction Guaranteed. Jim McClain: 803.247.4803 Round and Square Bales. Oakwood Farms: 3593 Silver Bluff Road, Aiken SC 29803. $60 per bale round hay bales. $70 per bale round bales kept inside. Square bales at $7.00 per bale. Will deliver for a small fee. Please call 706-830-2600 or 803-8270864. email garymcelmurray@ glmconstruction.net HORSES/PETS & SERVICES Trinity Farms Terriers: Irish Russell Terriers & Norfolk Terriers. Old World, Healthy 100 year old Bloodlines with proven

calmer dispositions. Health & Dispositions guaranteed. Preservation breeders for 48 years. Donna Fitzpatrick 803-648-3137 easyjacks.com, trinityfarmskennel. com LESSONS The Riding School: Private, semi private or group lessons Children a specialty. Beginners on up; excellent lesson horses. Unmounted programs available for children; birthday parties and camps. Barn and stall rental also available. Convenient Aiken location close to town. Chan Carman: 803-845-5102. Chan@ theridingschoolaiken.com;. theridingschoolaiken.com. RENTALS Cozy, cute carriage house for rent on Hitchcock Woods on iconic equestrian estate. 1BR/1BA. Sleeps 4. $125/night. European style barn with soaring ceilings. 3 stalls available (self care) $20/night per horse. 5 min to downtown Aiken and close to all horse venues. Perfect for female solo travelers. Monthly discounts avail. www.StayAiken.com Small efficiency cottage & stable. Large stalls, rolling pasture & paddocks, 300 acres of trails, Xcountry course, stadium area, hot and cold water wash stall, nestled in horse subdivision. 15 min north from downtown Aiken. Cottage $600 per month, stall $185 per

month. 262-844-8734 Horse boarding in Windsor, SC carriage driving community. Lovely, low country setting. 12x12 stalls connected to 2 acre fields and a short term paddock with shelter available. Jog-in Board Farm Contact Lisa Whitcomb 414-477-9419 SHAVINGS Shaving Saver: Delivering you bulk shavings the economical & convenient way! Large, durable bags (950 lbs.) of pine shavings delivered to your stable. Reusable, eco-friendly bags make storage neat and simple; bulk pricing makes your bedding affordable. Quality blended easy sift & large flake shavings that your horse will love. Claudia White 410-3034617. scshavingsaver@gmail.com TACK & APPAREL Aiken Horse Blanket Couture. Creative coolers; your colors. Creative equine-ware. Tack covers/carry bags Saddle pad enhancements. Blanket wash/ waterproof . Blanket repair. AikenHorseBlanket.com. Elisa Denaburg. 803-640-3211 The Saddle Doctor. Saddlery and harness repair. 538 Two Notch Rd. HollyMacSpencer@aol.com. 803.642.5166.

Advertising in The Aiken Horse

DIRECTORY LISTING ADS: $25 per issue CLASSIFIED ADS are $25 for the first 30 words & 40 cents for every word or $90 for the year (6 issues.) thereafter. BUSINESS CARDS: $65 per issue or $280 PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for horses: $35; for the year (6 issues.) Limit 30 words & one picture DISPLAY ADS are available in a range of PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for real estate, etc. sizes. For a detailed rate sheet and $45; Limit 60 words & one picture. publication schedule, visit our website: BOXED CLASSIFIEDS: add $5 to your total TheAikenHorse.com

June-July 2020

MAILING ADDRESS: The Aiken Horse, P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 EMAIL: theAikenHorse@gmail.com We accept Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

Pay online: TheAikenHorse.com or call us: 803.643.9960

Advertise in the August-September issue! Deadline July 28, 2020 Publication date August 11, 2020

The Aiken Horse

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Index of Advertisers Advertiser

Aiken County Farm Supply Aiken Fine Homes and Land Aiken Horsemanship Academy Aiken Polo Club Aiken Saddlery, Inc. American Glory Style Anderson Farms Art and Soul of Aiken Auto Tech Banixx Barnware Be Fly Free Boyson Hill, LLC Bridle Creek Carolina Co: Tom Murray Carolina Company RE Carolina Company RE Clint Bertalan Farms LLC CM Grading DFG Stables Discover the Forest Epona Equine Divine Equine Rescue of Aiken Fencing Solutions FITS Equestrian FOTAS Aiken G L Williams and Daughter Gary Knoll Photography

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The Aiken Horse

Advertiser

Harrison K-9 Security Service, LLC Home to Home Jill Diaz Polo Keller Williams Stinson Kneaded Edge Kneaded Edge Lightning Protection Systems Marrinson Stables Meybohm (Sullivan/Turner) Meybohm RE Haslup Meybohm RE Vaillancourt Meybohm RE Vaillancourt Meybohm: Dale Meybohm: Pony Express New Bridge Polo NibbleNet Oak Manor Saddlery Patty Merli Saddles Retired Racehorse Project SCQHA South Carolina Equine Park Southern Equine Service SPCA Albrecht Center Stable View, LLC The Tack Room Tod’s Hill/ReMax Tryon Equine Law

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June-July 2020


Harrison K-9 security services, LLc

offering the finest internationally titled european German shepherds for your family’s protection. Since 1975

Harrison K-9® Has been featured in tHe following publications: ABC’s Good Morning America • ABC’s Nightline • New York Times Newspaper Robb Report Magazine • Forbes Life Magazine • Fortune Magazine Cigar Aficionado Magazine • Billionaire 500 Magazine • Haute Living Magazine New York Resident Magazine • Millionaire Magazine • Desert Living Magazine S.W.A.T. Magazine • Soldier of Fortune Magazine Travel Channel • Playboy, November 2014 issue • Discovery Channel Entertainment Channel • Style Network • Fox News

June-July 2020

Harrison K-9® Security ServiceS, LLc

Aiken, South Carolina Questions? Talk to an expert 803-649-5936. HarrisonK9.com • info@HarrisonK9.com Follow Us: Additional information available upon request.

if it’s not a Harrison K-9®, it’s just a dog. The Aiken Horse

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Profile for Aiken Horse Productions

June-July 2020  

Our June-July 2020 edition features information about how the equestrian community is handling reopening during the COVID-19 pandemic, profi...

June-July 2020  

Our June-July 2020 edition features information about how the equestrian community is handling reopening during the COVID-19 pandemic, profi...

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