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Volume 13 • Number 3

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The Aiken Horse

December-January 2017-2018

December-January 2017-18


Deirdre Stoker Vaillancourt

803.640.4591

THIS IS MY NEIGHBORHOOD Aiken, South Carolina — Southern Charm and Equestrian Sport 785 GRACE

• 10 Acres in Historic Horse District • 3 barns; 20 stalls, 20 paddocks • 2 grass training fields • Guest cottage

MLS # 71716

• Frontage on 3 clay roads • Easy access to The Woods • 4BR 3BA residence • $3,100,000

147 STAG DRIVE

525 LAURENS ST. SW

• Historic Hitchcock Stables • 11.5 acres adjoins The Woods • 27 12X12 stall barn

MLS # 97065

• 2 carriage houses • 3BR 2 BA bunk house • 8 large paddocks • $2,952,500

503 CHIME BELL CHURCH ROAD

• Ideal setting for equestrian barn & paddocks • 6327 sq. ft. main house, 4 bdrms, 3.5 baths

258 BECK ROAD

OLD TORY TRAIL

MLS # 99533

MLS # 92056

MLS # 99504

• 42 acres • Total of 10 stalls • Fenced jump field with excellent footing • 2 large fenced pastures with shade • 1932 sq. ft. Cape Cod 3BR 2.5 BA • 2BR 2 BA mobile home • Farm has excellent rental history • $495,500

• 10.16 Acres with 11 stall center aisle barn • 5 paddocks and large sand ring • 2BR 2BA well appointed mobile home • Groom’s or guest studio cottage • Turnkey sale including furniture, appliances, etc. • $179,000

103 TRENTON PLACE

304 FOX TAIL COURT

MLS # 96148

• 2086 sq. ft. 4BR 2.5 BA town home • Master bedroom 1st floor • 3 very spacious rooms up • Maintenance free living • $170,000

1064 GRAND PRIX DR

• 1972 sq. ft. GUEST/POOL house • Salt water pool & hot tub • 20 acres

• 25 acres on the ridge overlooking the 302 Valley • Part of The Vista Training Center • Established coastal pasture • Level area for barn & residence

MLS # 73833

• 2BR 2BA 1730 sq. ft.owner’s residence • 8 stall European style cement block courtyard barn • Tack room; feed room • 4 large grass paddocks 20+ acres • Fox Hollow amenities $875,000

• Significant gentle rolling terrain for gallops • Buyer to survey; property may be subdivided once • $325,000

900 NEW BRIDGE

• LA PROMESA @ New Bridge Polo • 12+ acres • 8 stall barn & aptartment • Ample paddocks with hardwoods • $400,000

MLS # 80132

• 9.49 acres in Hollow Creek Equestrian • 4 matted 12x12 stalls • 2 x fenced paddocks • Extensive community trails • Wash Stall; tack room; feed room

350 COLEMAN BRIDGE MLS # 100372

• 11 acres Perimeter fenced • 4 stall shed row barn • Riding Arena; 3 pastures • 3BR 2BA 1600 SQ, FT house • Salt water pool $480,000

www.AikenSCProperties.com WORLD CLASS SPORTING AND LUXURY PROPERTIES

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The Aiken Horse

December-January 2017-18


RISEN STAR

$399,000

KILLARA

$1.29 MILLION

TWIN LANES FARM

$785,000

REDUCED

Working 30 acre horse farm perfect for the eventer, fox hunter or any professional. Lovely 4 bedroom home, extra mobile for help, 1/2 mile sand training track, 4 stall barn, 3 run-ins, 11 pastures & round pen. Mostly cleared with good pasture and fencing.

DANCING MEADOWS $595,000

Gated Horse District 4 BR/3.5 BA home built in 1996 on 5.35 acres w/3 car garage, inground pool, 3 paddocks & 10 stall barn w/apartment, wash stall, tack/feed room and lounge. Recent updates include new roof & HVAC. Easy hack to Hitchcock Woods on the clay roads of Aiken.

NEW BRIDGE POLO

$449,000

Turnkey equestrian property in gated Fox Hollow w/hardiplank 4 BR/3.5 BA two story home w/pine floors, 2 fireplaces & chef's kitchen. 3 stall barn w/wash stall & storage, 4 paddocks & in-ground pool. Amenities include cross country course, fabulous trails & irrigated show rings. HOA fees only $970.

BASSETT HILL

NEW

NEW

Hopeland Farms turn key property with 9+ acres and a 3 BR/2 BA home featuring a fireplace, sunroom, and wood & tile floors. Property includes a 36 x 72 barn with 4 stalls and storage for carriages. Miles of groomed trails to hack or drive on.

Wonderful opportunity to own in security gated New Bridge across from community barn & new show ring. 9.85 acres of fenced pasture w/new custom 2 BR/2 BA frame & stone home w/open floor plan. Stone fireplace, exquisite kitchen w/pantry, screened porch, large master w/walk in closet & spa bath. Includes storage shed.

SUMMERDAY FARM

COLEMAN BRIDGE LAND

$625,000

$729,000

$399,000

Fieldstone custom 3 BR/2 BA home privately situated on 42 acres w/Heider 4 stall center aisle barn w/heated tack room & indoor wash stall. 4 large pastures w/run-ins, 3 board fencing, dressage & jump schooling area. Gently rolling land w/access to Cedar Meadows trails & community show ring.

WILD OAKS

$1.37 MILLION

REDUCED

Horse farm w/lovely 3 BR Cape Cod on over 53 acres in Ridge Spring area just 15 minutes from downtown Aiken. Home has 2 car garage, hardwood floors, screened porch & fabulous deck w/dock leading to a 4 acre spring fed pond. Miles of riding trails, fabulous pastures, 3 stall barn & equipment shed.

Wonderful privately situated 81 acre parcel in prime 302 eventing and polo area with neighboring horse farms. Just a short drive from downtown Aiken, this property has gorgeous producing hay fields, mature hardwoods and gently rolling terrain. Drastic price reduction!

SOLD $

Lewis Lane 62 A horse farm w/12 stall center aisle barn, 3 BR/2 BA apartment w/granite & hardwood floors, paneled tack room w/half bath & laundry. Gorgeous pasture dotted with live oaks & stick and ball/jumping field. Conveniently located close to downtown Aiken. Available for winter lease.

$

2500/Acre

59,000

3.8 ACRES

BRIARWOOD FARM

$

549,000

Veterans Road

Fabulous land & lots available: Twin Silos Farms, Mt. Vintage, Fox Hollow, & Windsor

803-215-0153 • www.AikenHorseRealty.com December-January 2017-18

The Aiken Horse

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david

your best friend in real-estate

Your online home for every Real-Estate need FineHomesOfAiken.com

THE BALCONY is a prestigious equestrian estate in Aiken’s famed Historic District. The property is a comfortable

and sophisticated showplace in the heart of Aiken’s “Winter Colony.” Close to Whitney Polo Field, Hitchcock Woods, Palmetto Golf Club, Green Boundary Club, and Bruce’s Field, the landscaped 5.85-acre compound is a peaceful sanctuary within tall masonry walls. The elegant slate-roofed residence shows refined craftsmanship in every architectural detail, from stamped copper gutters to intricate wood mouldings. There are six ensuite bedrooms with fireplaces in addition to the stately formal rooms. The kitchen, laundry, pool, and utilities are completely updated. Manicured grounds include an 18-stall stable, a 3-bedroom cottage, a swimming pool with fountains, large paddocks, and ample parking for cars & carriages. See www.FineHomesOfAiken.com $2,995,000

BRIDLE CREEK FARM is a 44.72-acre equestrian eventing center with top-quality amenities such as mirrored dressage arena, a jumping arena, a superb cross-country course, a 9-stall center-aisle barn with two elegant 2-bedroom apartments, and three large run-in sheds. The barn has top-quality hardware, a wash stall, powder room, tack room, and feed room with tractor door. The run-in sheds are easily converted to permanent stalls. All paddocks have 3-board fencing. $1,475,000

GAMBOA FARM -A contemporary equestrian facility on 45 acres. House has 3 BR/2BA on main level, 2BR/1BA and movie theater in walkout basement. Granite/stone wet bar and poolside BBQ island. 8-stll barn w/ space for apartment, carriage parking, vet clinic, etc. Groom’s quarters. Pool. Paddocks. Privacy. Extra land available. $1,350,000

ADNAMA FARM is a 4238 sq. ft. French country estate in the Chime Bell Chase. On a hilltop with superb views, this 18.83 acre property is designed around a lovely courtyard open to a 3-stall covered-aisle barn with tack room & wash station, a 3-door workshop with open interior, and a salt pool with cabana. This style 3 BR 3 BA 2 HB residence is all one level. brick exterior; wood, tile and stone floors; architectural shingles; and more. $1,250,000

SHELBORNE FARM 4 BR/4.5BA custom residence

HIGH COTTON FARM This equestrian estate has a

BLACK RIVER FARM is a vibrant river-front horse farm in historic Barnwell County. Gorgeous contemporary 3 BR residence features wood floors, great room w/ fireplace, formal dining room and sunroom. Multiple garages. 2 BR guest house. 11-stall center-aisle barn. Fenced pastures with lush grass. Includes a large warehouse or parking facility. Lovely gardens, gated entrance, and serene privacy. $800,000

WOOD’S END is your only opportunity to build or purchase a new home adjacent to Hitchcock Woods. Lots 2, 3, 4, & 5 are available for purchase. Each lots is approximately 4 acres in size. Zoned for horses and conveniently close to downtown Aiken. The new home on Lot 1 (140 Wood’s End Way) is a spectacular contemporary residence with wood floors, 3 en suite bedrooms, fireplace in LR, 9’ ceilings throughout, and a 3-stall barn. This perfect equestrian property is available for $698,000.

4 BR/4 BA residence and 4 or 5 stall barn with charming apartment, all on 12.47 acres. Located close to town, the farm has 5 fenced grass paddocks and an electric gate entrance. The home has: new roof, numerous upgrades, tankless water heater, and new interior colors. Gas heat, thermal-pane windows. Extra-large master suite downstairs. $925,000

on 50 acres with magnificent view. 5 fireplaces, granite counters, 2nd floor observation deck, framed-in apartment over garage. 6-stall barn with wash rack & feed room, dressage ring, 150x300 hunter/jumper arena. $1,299,000.

The finest farms in Aiken, South Carolina. Call 803-640-0123 for estates, farms, homes & land.

FineHomesOfAiken.com Meybohm

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The Aiken Horse

December-January 2017-18


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The Aiken Horse

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The Aiken Horse

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Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication P.O. Box 332 • Montmorenci, SC 29839-0332 • 803.643.9960 •

www.TheAikenHorse.com • Editor@TheAikenHorse.com

Time Dated Material • Periodicals • Volume 13 • Number 3

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ecember is the month when horse people in Aiken remember exactly why we are here. There are many months when our weather is beautiful, and others when we might be amazed by all the equestrian events and the immense depth of talent in our horse world. But there is something special about December here. We suddenly have cold nights, but our days are generally warm. The light in the mornings and afternoons has a lovely, soft quality. In some parts of the country, December is dark and depressing, a reminder that icy winter is on the way. But in Aiken, the shorter days seem pleasant and more valuable. Our horses have their winter coats already, but on most days they hardly need them. This afternoon, ours were wading in the frog pond. We hope you enjoy this issue of The Aiken Horse. In our first section, we have a story about Shane Doyle and how he balances his business with a serious passion for carriage driving. Read about the upcoming World Equestrian Games in Tryon and the Hitchcock Woods Foundation’s Red Cockaded Woodpecker restoration project in our News column. We also have a story about a fantastic new exhibit at the City of Aiken’s stables at Rye Patch. This is a collection of life-sized fiberglass horses painted to represent 10 well-known horses from Aiken’s history. We had a chance to see a few of these horses while they were still being painted at a local warehouse. We even followed Linda Knox McLean’s horse trailer, which brought them, two-by-two, to Kendrick’s auto body shop for clear coating, and then to their newly renovated stable at Rye Patch. The horses are very realistic, and it was amusing to watch them travel in a horse trailer, just

December-January 2017-18

like real horses. Other drivers noticed them too, first thinking that they were real, and then looking again and smiling. The exhibit opens this month, and it seems destined to join the Aiken Thoroughbred Hall of Fame and Museum as one of our city’s beloved equestrian attractions. Our first section also has our annual holiday gift guide, as well as an update on Southern Storm, one of the young horses born in Aiken that we are following for our Foals of 2017 series. We love finding out what these young horses are up, to even if it is just playing in the paddock, and we look forward to seeing them all grow up. As ever, there are some new horsemen and new businesses in town, and you will meet a few of them in section two. In section three, we have a story about Gypsy Vanners, glamorous horses with a growing Aiken following. We also discuss some issues surrounding old horses, and of course, we have our regular Secret Lives column about a retired horse in Aiken with a special history. This time, we profile Topspin, a retired four- star eventer owned by Laura VanderVliet. Finally, we have pictures! Our first center spread is the Katydid CDE, followed by cross country at Jumping Branch, and finally, the Aiken Women’s Challenge polo tournament at Aiken Polo Club. We have so many pictures from this fall it was hard to narrow them down for publication. Some of our favorites didn’t make it in. Thank you to all the horses and horse people out there for being so photogenic! One more note: we normally publish The Dog & Hound as the fourth section of the December issue. We have decided, however, to change the schedule of that publication and run the Dog & Hound in February instead: look for it next time. Until then, enjoy your horses and our fantastic weather. Have a wonderful set of holidays.

The Aiken Horse EDITOR & PUBLISHER Pam Gleason

ART DIRECTOR Gary Knoll

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jean Berko Gleason

LAYOUT & DESIGN Gary Knoll

PHOTOGRAPHERS Pam Gleason Gary Knoll

ADVERTISING

803.643.9960 editor@theaikenhorse.com

Going Out Of Town? Don’t miss future issues of The Aiken Horse. We will send you a one year subscription (6 issues) for $24.00. Send check or CC # & your mailing address: P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 Or sign up on the web at www.TheAikenHorse.

Aiken

The

Horse

Aiken’s Horse Publication

All contents Copyright 2017 The Aiken Horse

Pam Gleason Editor & Publisher

The Aiken Horse Policies: The opinions expressed herein are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publishers, editors, or the policies of The Aiken Horse, LLC. The Aiken Horse is owned by The Aiken Horse, LLC.

The Aiken Horse

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SECTION

1

SECTION

2

10 12 20 26 28 33 34

Shane Doyle News & Notes Katydid CDE in Pictures Gift Guide Historic Horses Aiken’s Hunts Foals of 2017: Storm

Our cover shows Shane Doyle coming out of the water hazard at the Katydid CDE. Read about Shane and how he balances his equestrian dreams with running a business. Story on page 10. Photography by Gary Knoll

45 46 48 54 58 60 62

Eventing Calendar Terrybrooke Farm Chris Thompson Jumping Branch X-C The Riding School Ask the Judge Secret Lives: Topspin

Kylie Cahoon competes at the Jumping Branch Farm November Horse Trial aboard Comity. See many more pictures from Jumping Branch in the center spread of Section Two. Photography by Gary Knoll

SECTION 72 74 76 80 81 84 88 97 Maria Cepeda, playing for The Aiken Horse, goes for the goal while Kelsey Kunce of Atlanta Regional Polo Club attempts a rideoff. Find more pictures from the Aiken Women’s Challenge in the center spread of Section Three. Photography by Gary Knoll

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Gypsy Vanners Book Reviews Senior Horses Classifieds Directory Women’s Polo Calendar Index


Looking for a Spectacular Equestrian Estate? LOOK NO FURTHER! WWW.WINDSWEPTFARM-AIKEN.COM

December-January December-January 2017-18 2017-18

The The Aiken Aiken Horse Horse

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Realizing Equestrian Dreams Aiken is the Place

by Pam Gleason, Photography by Gary Knoll

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ccording to Shane Doyle, Aiken is the place to be if you are serious about equestrian sports. Shane owns and runs Shane Doyle Farms, LLC, an arena building and custom farming company based most of the year in New Jersey. He comes to Aiken each fall and stays through the winter, working on various projects at equestrian facilities in the area, while devoting equal time and even more passion to preparing his horses for carriage driving competitions. An amateur driver, he has dreams of competing at an international level. Although he recognizes that he is aiming high, he also believes that hard work, devotion and a solid training plan can get him there. “My model for this is Jimmy Fairclough,” he says. Jimmy, who is Shane’s trainer and mentor back in New Jersey, has competed in carriage driving for more than 35 years. He has been a national champion many times over and has represented the United States internationally, including at the World Equestrian Games (WEG) where he was on the bronze-medal-winning four-in-hand team. Although he is definitely a major name on the driving circuit, Shane says Jimmy is not only a horseman. He also continues to run his family’s business, going to his office every day before coming back to the farm to work his horses. In addition, he trains students and hosts clinics, sharing his knowledge to help promote and improve the sport of driving in the United States. “Jimmy gets up at 4:30 a.m., goes to work, is back ready to drive at 2 p.m. and drives until dark. That showed me that it is possible to accomplish your daily responsibilities and still enjoy a sport. You can compete on a national or even an international level if you are committed to a program,” says Shane. Shane grew up on his family’s farm in New Jersey and rode when he was young. His work took him away from horses for a time, but he came back to them in his late 20s, first competing on the jumper circuit and then changing his discipline to driving. His jumper trainer, Robin Fairclough, was Jimmy’s wife, and she was the one who suggested the switch. “She said I had good hands but that my body sometimes got in the way of what I wanted to do,” says Shane with a laugh. He had a Trakehner mare at the time named Amaryllis, and she readily made the switch from riding to driving along with him. Shane got started competing a single horse in combined driving events (CDEs) and has been successful at the FEI level. He has recently started competing with a pair. CDEs include three phases: dressage, marathon and cones. CDEs are scored similarly to ridden three-day events: in the dressage test, competitors are judged on their accuracy and the obedience and submission of their horses performing a prescribed pattern. In marathon, they must negotiate a set of hazards (obstacles) on a large cross county course. In cones, they demonstrate their speed and nimbleness as they drive through pairs of cones that have balls balanced on their tops. Speed is the goal; knocking down a ball incurs penalty points. When you compete a pair in a CDE, you are allowed to have three horses to mix and match from one phase to the next. This can be very helpful, especially if you have one horse that is a specialist in one phase or the other – a stellar dressage horse or a monster marathoner, for instance. Shane has three horses that he is developing for his pair, all of them experienced competitors who have been to the top levels of the sport. His core pair, Tokyo and Valentino, are both warmbloods from good jumper and dressage lines. He also has a new horse, Bono Sinclair, a Dutch Warmblood that he has been working into the program for a few months. All of his horses are seasoned and successful: Valentino even competed as part of a Four-in-hand at WEG with a Dutch driver.

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“I have been fortunate to be able to purchase schoolmasters, some of which already have international experience,” he says. “My horses already know their jobs. My job is to keep them comfortable, happy and in good condition. This way, I can enjoy the sport and I don’t have to be a horse trainer.” Shane says that he gets up early each morning to work with the horses, and then, when he is done, he starts his regular work day constructing arenas and attending to other projects in the Aiken area. There are three main reasons that he is able to make his program work. The first is that the people who work with him at Shane Doyle Construction also help him with his horses, whether by polishing harness, feeding, or assisting during the competitions themselves – one of his employees, Ryan Fairclough, Shane’s friend and navigator, is Jimmy’s son and has his own wealth of driving experience and knowledge. The second reason is that he is committed to a serious, professional program with his horses. “You need to organize your life in a balanced manner, to enjoy your horses, to enjoy your sport and still keep your business going,” he says. “You can do it, if you set your mind to it; it is attainable. I think that a person that has a program in business can apply those same principles to a sport or a passion. You have to structure your day-to-day life, organize it and stick to a plan. Do a few things and do them very well.” The third reason is that Shane found Aiken where he can pursue his business and equestrian goals in a seamless fashion. On the business side, he has been able to be part of major equestrian projects such as the development of the eventing facility at Stable View, as well as many smaller private jobs that take advantage of his understanding of construction and of horses. “I’m thrilled that we are able to play a part down here in Aiken,” he says. “Sometimes I have to pinch myself when I go to some of these projects, when I am going to ‘work’. The opportunities down here are so fantastic. It really is exciting.” On the equestrian side he has been able to take advantage of the immense depth of experience and talent the Aiken equestrian world offers. He is based at Katydid Farm, which offers world-class facilities and attracts international carriage drivers who train there every winter. In addition, Jennifer Matheson, an international competitor herself and Katydid’s manager, organizes frequent clinics with international experts as well as numerous schooling competitions throughout the year. “I am so fortunate to be at Katydid, to be around so many exceptional professionals,” says Shane. “When I am in Aiken, I am immersed in the sport and that has brought my abilities along so much quicker.” What is it about carriage driving that attracts Shane so much? The first thing, of course, is being around horses: he says that working with them gives him great satisfaction. But at base, he is a competitor, and so are his horses. When they competed last year in Florida at Live Oak, one of the most prestigious driving events in the country, Shane says that he noticed that his horses performed with greater enthusiasm when they saw there was a crowd: “They really stepped it up.” “It can be very exciting,” he continues. “The interaction and communication with an animal, with multiple animals in a pair, the way you communicate through your voice and your hands. When I have a chance to maneuver through an obstacle at high speed, and I feel my horses turn when I so much as look in the direction I want to go – they feel it through your arms and through your shoulders – it’s a thrill. Being able to maneuver something so large with such subtle aids is so rewarding. Really, it makes my hair stand on end.”

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News & Notes What’s Happening by Pam Gleason

WEG Tickets Available

The World Equestrian Games are coming to the Tryon International Horse Park in Mill Spring, North Carolina in less than a year. The competition starts on Tuesday, September 11 and concludes on September 23, 2018. The WEG, held every four years, includes the world championships in eight Federation Equestre Internationale (FEI) sports: eventing, dressage, showjumping, combined driving (four-in-hand only), reining, vaulting, paradressage and endurance. There will also be equestrian demonstrations and exhibitions of various types throughout the event. This is the second time that the WEG has been held on this side of the Atlantic and will be the first time that a truly world class event will be staged at the Tryon International Horse Park. Tryon is about a two-hour drive from Aiken, and many local equestrians have been making the trip regularly to compete at hunter/ jumper and other events. It stands to reason that our horse people will also want to attend the WEG, which will bring the best horses and riders in the world to our own back yard. Tickets are on sale now on the tryon2018.com website. The most expensive ticket is the “All Session Full Games Pass” granting the bearer entry to all the competitions over the duration of the two-week event. This costs $1,380. You can also buy passes for the first week for $750, or the second week for $675. Day passes are $120 per day, but many days are already sold out. All session passes are also available for individual disciplines at various prices. Tickets to jumping cost $375, while you can watch the driving for just $82. Eventing, one of the pricier disciplines, will run you $225. More tickets to the individual competitions will be available at a later date. If you want to stay in the Tryon area for a few nights to make the most of the experience, it is best to reserve now, since desirable accommodations close to the horse park will likely become scarce. According to the website, those who need to find somewhere to stay will be assisted by a company called Connections Housing, which is a Georgia-based full-service company that locates housing for events. The company has two call centers that will be working overtime to find everyone somewhere to sleep. You can call them or try booking your own rooms on the tryon2018 website, where a “Lodgings” tab will lead you to a long list of hotels. Because the horse park is located in a relatively sparsely populated area, many of the hotels where you can stay will be in neighboring large cities such as Charlotte or Asheville (an hour and a half away) with others in Greenville or Spartanburg, which are a little closer. Over its two-week course, the WEG is expected to attract 500,000 spectators and the horse park is planning for 40,000 to 50,000 people to attend each day. The organizers say there will be an international audience drawn from over 70 countries and that the WEG has the potential to be the largest sporting event in North Carolina history. Although there are probably plenty of hotels that will allow people to stay relatively close to the games, actually getting to them might be more of a challenge. The last time the WEG was held in 2014, it was in Normandy, France. Although the organizers declared the event a resounding success, traffic getting to and from the event venues was a serious nightmare. Traffic worries in Tryon are unlikely to be anywhere near as bad, even though the area is not accustomed to crowds. Improvement projects on the roads leading to the horse park are already underway, including new off-ramps from I-26 and Highway 74. In addition, the park itself will be offering shuttle services and has engaged a dedicated traffic and parking control company. Still, anyone who plans to make a day trip from Aiken would be well advised to leave early.

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Want to get involved? There are still sponsorship opportunities for companies and spots open for vendors. You can also apply to be a volunteer, and the horse park is even hiring new staff for the event. Find out more at www.tryon2018.com

Red Cockaded Woodpeckers

This November, a group of five biologists and a bevy of observers traveled from Aiken to the Francis Marion State Forest north of Charleston to trap five pairs of endangered Red Cockaded Woodpeckers (RCWs). They then drove those birds back to the Hitchcock Woods in Aiken where they installed each bird in a specially selected tree equipped with a man-made cavity. The birds spent the night in their cavities, and at dawn, they were all released into the Woods.

This was the second release of Red Cockaded Woodpeckers in as many years in the Hitchcock Woods. RCWs, which live in longleaf pine forests without much understory, disappeared from the Woods in the 1970s. The birds, once common in longleaf forests throughout the Southeast, almost vanished entirely as trees were cut down and forests were lost to development. Today, listed as a federally endangered species, RCWs have been making a comeback, thanks to a dedicated effort to reestablish their habitat, coupled with restoration projects such as the one being undertaken by the Hitchcock Woods Foundation. Of the first ten RCWs introduced to the Woods last year, at least seven are still there. Two pairs even had chicks, which were inspected, banded and weighed by the biologist Mark Pavlosky, Jr. of MPJ Wildlife Consulting shortly after they hatched this spring. None of the homebred RCWs have been seen in the Woods since Hurricane Irma in August, but that does not mean, necessarily, that they are gone. In any

The Aiken Horse

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case, the plan is to continue bringing pairs of birds into the Woods each fall until they establish a self-sustaining population. This might take three or four years. The birds that were taken from Francis Marion this fall had been identified individually in advance. Mark Pavlosky, who is overseeing the project, sent each of the five biologists who were helping to the particular trees in the forest where he knew those individual birds liked to spend the night. At dusk, the biologists stationed themselves near the trees and waited for the birds to arrive and disappear into their roosting cavities. Then they positioned nets over the entrances to the cavities and urged the birds out by tapping on the trees. The netted birds were then placed in boxes to be transported to Aiken. Arriving back at the Hitchcock Woods after nightfall, the biologists reversed the process. The birds were paired off, and then taken to separate areas in the Woods where there were artificial cavities waiting for them. Using tall ladders, the biologists placed the birds in separate cavities in adjacent trees and then carefully shut them in for the night by fixing mesh screens over the openings. At dawn, they returned, waited to hear the birds stirring about, and then whisked the screens away. The birds dashed out, chattered to one another, and then flew off into the forest. Although everything went more or less according to plan, there was a close call at one location. As the biologist and a group of observers from the Hitchcock Woods Foundation looked on, an RCW emerged from a tree, only to narrowly miss being caught by a Coopers Hawk that swooped in from behind the observers, almost as though he knew exactly what was going on.

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Puerto Rican Horses in Aiken

Equine Rescue of Aiken, which was able to provide feed, supplies and support to horses affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma this summer, has now stepped in to help some horses in Puerto Rico. Two months after Hurricane Maria made landfall there, the island is still largely devastated. Jim Rhodes, who runs the Aiken rescue, says that things are bad there for the horses but it is difficult to offer help because the logistics of sending supplies to an island are extremely complicated. Not only is it hard to get supplies there (they must travel on ships, and then must be offloaded at a crowded port and trucked to their destination), there are also complex regulations designed to protect an environment which could be irreparably damaged by the introduction of any invasive foreign species, including weeds and bugs. Because of this, instead of bringing supplies to the island, the rescue decided to help by taking some horses off it. Jim reached out to Caribbean Thoroughbred Aftercare, Inc., an organization that helps Puerto Rico’s racehorses, and made a deal to bring some horses to Aiken. “Of the 500 horses that needed help, we took three,” says Jim. The former racehorses, who survived two major hurricanes two weeks apart, were flown to Miami and then shipped overland to the rescue (The horse hauling company Brookledge donated their services.) After a twoweek quarantine, they will be available for adoption. “They are really nice geldings,” says Jim. “They aren’t very tall, and they are pretty thin, but they have nice personalities and are very sweet

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2677 Wagener Rd. Aiken, SC 29801 803.641.7070 | OakManorSaddlery.com

animals. They are very adoptable and can go to good homes and have great futures and careers ahead of them. Equine Rescue of Aiken is committed to helping adoptable horses that are in danger, so reaching out to the horses of Puerto Rico definitely falls within the scope of the mission. Jim says that there are many worthy activities going on at the rescue and that adoptions have been good this year. However, the organization can always use more financial support from the community so they can continue to provide help to those in need. “It costs $250 a day just to feed the horses that we do have,” he says. “That doesn’t count anything else. We have been doing different fundraisers, but we really rely on donations, and most of what we get are small donations, $25 and $50. Sometimes people add a bag of grain or a few bales of hay to their bill at the feed store. Every little bit helps.” To learn more about Equine Rescue of Aiken or to donate, visit their webpage: www.aikenequinerescue.org.

Remembering Norma

Aiken’s equestrian community was shocked and saddened to learn of the untimely death of Norma Elizabeth Craven on Friday, November 24. Norma, 57, was a longtime Aiken resident who was well known in the equestrian community. In recent years, she was most visible as the manager at Hiler Hay, where her cheerful and engaging manner made her many friends in the horse world. Her devotion to her clients and friends was legendary, and she always went out of her way for those who needed her help, whether that meant making sure that everyone got the hay they needed before a big storm or helping out-of-town horse owners find refuge when their coastal residences were evacuated because of hurricanes. Norma leaves a sister, Catherine Ann Craven and her beloved animals: her Quarter Horse Hott Rodd, Rosie the mule and the dog Martha.

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“Legends® feeds provide a range of products that meet the various needs of all our horses – from young horses just starting out to ones representing Team USA in Nations Cup events.” –Laura Kraut, U.S. Olympic Gold Medalist

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If you have questions or comments, please contact Feed Division Customer Service at sscfeedquestions@sscoop.com. Southern States® and Legends® are registered trademarks of Southern States Cooperative, Incorporated. Kentucky Equine Research® is a registered trademark of Kentucky Equine Research. Cooperative Research Farms® is a registered trademark of Cooperative Research Farms, Incorporated. PHOTO BY JACK MANCINI

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Courtney Conger Randy Wolcott

Lee Hedlund

Mike Hosang

Frank Starcher

Jack Roth

803.645.3308 803.507.1142 803.221.6831 803.270.6358 803.270.6623 803.341.8787 TOLL FREE

Alex Tyrteos

Suzan McHugh Thomas Bossard Brian Cavanaugh Jane Page Thompson

800.880.0108 203.249.3071 803.292.8525 803.640.2845 803.624.6072 803.215.8232

.

.

.648.8660

www CarolinaHorseProperties com . 803

Willow Hill Farm . Historic 1910 farm recently updated features main residence with original woodwork, eat-in kitchen modernized in 2014, 5 bedrooms each with full bath. For guests or grooms, there is a brick 2-story home with 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths. For horses, there are 2 original barns with a total of 18 stalls and hay storage areas; and 8 fenced grassy paddocks, each with run-in shed. Rolling pastures and riding arena complete the 22.81 acre farm. Call Courtney Conger or Jane Page Thompson $1,200,000

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Wit’s End Farm Emerald green hay fields roll gently to beautiful lake on over 140 acres of perimeter fenced woods & fields. Delightful 3,800 square foot residence includes great room with fireplace, state-of-the-art kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 3 full baths, master wing, media room. Includes storage sheds, run-in shed, separate garage/workshop and expansive equipment building plumbed for apartment. Call Courtney Conger $995,000

Bass Pond Farm . This 38.49 acre farm located in Aiken’s

Equestrian Corridor offers it all! The 3 bedroom, 2 bath residence overlooks 3-acre spring-fed pond. Property includes 1BR, 1BA guest house, groom's cottage, and the 20-stall barn with tack & feed rooms, laundry and small apartment. Grand prix or stickand-ball field, exercise track, fenced sand arena and 3-board fenced paddocks complete this very private facility close to town. Call Alex Tyrteos for information and pricing.

CEDAR

WAGENER

Several equestrian lots available, ranging from 6.14 to 11.97 acres of established coastal Bermuda grass with beautiful views. Equestrian amenities include community riding ring and trails.

55 acre parcel has pond, 30 acres established Bermuda grass hay field, beautiful wetlands and mixed woodlands. Located on Highway 302 in Aiken’s east side equestrian corridor, close to eventing, polo and fox hunting

Meadows

Greener Pastures . Located in the Highway 302 east

side Horse Corridor, this turn key equestrian property offers over 41 acres of board fenced pasture & woods. Custom brick residence with 3 bedrooms and 2 full baths, 3-stall center aisle barn with hay storage and tack room, 8-acre pasture with 4 feeding pens and run-in shed, 4 paddocks, 2 more run-in sheds, and 40x50 Hoover work shop. Miles of riding on groomed trails and adjoining dirt roads! Call Courtney Conger $642,000

.

Call Courtney Conger ~ pricing starts at just

$105,000

Oak Tree Farm Country contemporary with 3 bedrooms and 3 full baths is nestled among live oaks on over 48 acres of board fenced Bermuda pastures. The sunlit great room and master bedroom feature cathedral ceilings and window walls with sweeping views of coastal fields. Inground pool with new liner. Center aisle barn has 3 stalls with room for more, tack/feed room, run-in and storage space. Call Courtney Conger $699,000

Acreage

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Tinker Creek Wonderful recreational and timber tract encompasses 349 acres with 2 excellent ponds. Improvements include large center-aisle barn (84' x 36') currently configured with 5 stalls, tack room, wash stall and hound kennels and storage. Also there is a manufactured home serving as a caretaker's or hunting cabin. This multipurpose property has some open areas as well as a good stand of mature timber. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $1,185,000

Polo Vista Cottage . Comfort and crafts-

manship are the hallmarks of this delightful cottage with 2929 square feet. Features include open floor plan with 4 bedrooms, 3 full baths, cathedral ceilings, stone fireplace, wood floors and window walls overlooking one of New Bridge Polo’s beautifully maintained polo fields. Call Courtney Conger $499,000

$535,000

Call JANE PAGE THOMPSON

New Bridge Polo Stables . This beautifully constructed center aisle

barn is in like new condition and offers 18 large, matted stalls on 22.47 acres overlooking polo field. Included are wash stall, spacious tack room/lounge combo, 2 bunk rooms, laundry room and full bath. There is also an 1800 square foot, insulated equipment shed and 13 four-board fenced paddocks and pastures. Amenities include riding trails, clubhouse and pool. May be purchased in conjunction with charming 4-bedroom residence across the polo field (see left). Call Courtney Conger $999,000

NEW BRIDGE

creage A Beautiful 27.82 acre parcel

Pottery Mill Place . Delightful residence on 12

wooded acres bordering a lovely lake. Home features 2100 square feet, wide rocking chair porches front & back and open floor plan. Formal living room with fireplace, dining room, kitchen with breakfast bay, master bedroom with bath en suite. Attached 2-car garage with unfinished bonus room above. Call Courtney Conger $380,000

Three Runs Plantation . Turn key horse farm in

Aiken’s premier equestrian community has 3 bedroom, 3 bath home with custom details, mud room/laundry and 2-bay garage. Barn has 2 stalls with room for more, tack room and feed storage. Includes separate equipment building, fenced paddocks with established grass. Call Frank Starcher or Jack Roth $539,000

close to town and equestrian venues. Perfect for horses, with cleared pasture space plus timber. Level to gently rolling land with lovely home sites may be subdivided.

$165,000

Call MIKE HOSANG

Bridle Creek . New Phase II now open

at Bridle Creek! Lots range from 5 acres to 11.77 acres. Community amenities include miles of trails, gallop, stadium jumps, cross-country jump field, and dressage ring. New community green space added at the entrance of Phase II. Call Frank Starcher or Jack Roth $16,000 per acre

NEW BRIDGE

Polo Club

Solstice Meadow . Two partly cleared

tracts ready for you to have horses at home! Direct access to trail system with miles of dedicated trails, including the 61 acre Freeman preserve, which has a wonderful pond. Call Randy Wolcott and ask about owner financing! May be divided into 5-acre parcels. Tract 4 is 28.38 acres offered at just $449,000, and Tract 5 is 28.89 wooded acres at $375,000

Hidden Field . Unseen from the entrance, this 21 acre tract offers approximately 12 acres of cleared pasture with the remainder in woods. Riding trails available in equestrian community. Call Courtney Conger $3,900 per acre

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Exquisite 11.35 acre building site in a prime location at New Bridge Polo Club. Direct access to polo fields, clubhouse, tennis and swimming pool. Complete with plenty of fencing and 3HP well!

$217,000

Call JACK ROTH

Hutto Pond Acreage . Planted in loblolly

and longleaf pine timber, this 265.97 acre tract offers opportunities for many uses including horses and hunting. Located off Wire Road in Aiken County, with creek, pond and 72 acres planted in 2 year old loblolly pines. Call Courtney Conger or Randy Wolcott $800,000

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Freestone Farm Comfortable 3 bedroom brick ranch offers over 2600 square feet with formal living & dining rooms, country kitchen, 2 fireplaces and huge unfinished basement. Property includes 12 acres established pasture with several outbuildings ~ large metal storage building easily converts to barn. Call Courtney Conger or Randy Wolcott ~ offered at $210,000

NEW BRIDGE

Polo Club

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Chime Bell Chase Gorgeous building lot with 19.67 acres of beautiful gently rolling pasture planted in well established coastal Bermuda grass. Equestrian community amenities include professionally designed cross country course, dressage arena, stadium jump arena and miles of shady riding trails. Call Thomas Bossard $245,000

The Aiken Horse

Large lot (8.71 acres) complete with fencing, well & septic across from endline of Field 2. World class polo community with polo fields, clubhouse, tennis & swimming pool. Well priced at

$115,000

Call MIKE HOSANG

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Red Coat Cottage Adorable and affordable 2 bedroom huntbox on Old Tory Trail is open & airy with hardwood floors, 2 full baths, and 2 living areas. For horses, there is a 3-stall shed-row barn with tack & feed room and storage area, plus 3 large pastures on 2.78 fenced acres. Priced to sell! Call Lee Hedlund $249,900

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Calvary Training Center . Picture-perfect property with a host of potential uses in Bluffton, SC includes 43+ acres, beautiful lake, Low Country home with 7 bedrooms and 4.5 baths, education center with offices and classrooms, and extensive infrastructure that could handle a 100-unit development. The world class equestrian facility includes 25 stalls, tack rooms, grooms’ lounge and baths, wash stalls, storage and 42,000 square foot covered arena. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $4,900,000

Jumping Branch Farm . Aiken's premiere Eventing venue

Windsor Oaks . Stunning private country estate on 30 lovely acres with beautiful live oaks! Custom home features 5 bedrooms & 4 baths, wellappointed kitchen with granite counters, high ceilings and wood flooring throughout. Attached 4 car garage plus finished basement space. Property has 2 large enclosed metal buildings with 6420 & 4860 sq ft, with separate electrical service, plumbing & septic. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh $1,300,000

offers the opportunity to continue operating an established farm and business or enjoy your own private farm with fantastic amenities in sought after location. Four bedroom log home, 51 stalls, 5/8 mile galloping track, cross country jumps, large turnout fields, pond and producing hay fields. Call Mike Hosang or Brian Cavanaugh for information and pricing.

HATCHAWAY

Bridge Farms Stunning lots in one of Aiken's most beautiful equestrian communities! Open grassy hillside, select trees & pine grove. Walk to community Derby/Grand Prix jump field & Olympic-sized dressage arena.

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Red Top Estate Historic Aiken estate with grand rooms for entertaining, 5 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, and classic original architectural elements throughout. This Gilded Age residence with modern updates includes an apartment, formal gardens and carport on 1.22 acres. Additional parcels offered: 3 bedroom guest house for $365,000, and adjoining Carriage House parcel with 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 5-stall barn and 2 paddocks for $745,000. Call Jane Page Thompson or Alex Tyrteos $1,600,000

Shellhouse Lake Farm .

Sportsman's retreat located in Aiken’s east side equestrian corridor less than 10 miles from downtown! Drive through the gated entrance and past grassy fenced pasture to the sparkling 11 acre lake. Parcel Two offers approximately 43 acres mostly cleared and grassed with Shaw's Creek at the back border. The brick 2 bedroom, 1 bath country cabin has spacious kitchen/family room, fireplace and full length porch, with wonderful views overlooking lake. Call Mike Hosang $595,000

Call JACK ROTH

Lot 5A 5.2 acres $78,000 Lot 5B 9.2 acres $138,000

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Snaffle Bit Farm NEW custom built 3 bedroom home in Three Runs Plantation equestrian community on over 5 acres, this Southern style timber frame home features exposed posts & beams, cathedral ceilings, heart pine floors, gourmet kitchen with granite countertops & stainless steel appliances, fireplace, mud room and 2-car garage. NEW 2-stall barn & fencing! Call Frank Starcher or Jack Roth $545,000

THREE RUNS

Plantation

Woolworth House . Historic Winter

Colony cottage with stables in downtown Olde Aiken just steps from Hitchcock Woods! Delightful 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath home, updated in recent years, features high ceilings, wood floors, fireplace, and wall of windows overlooking patio & paddocks. For horses, there is a 3-stall shed row barn. Call Courtney Conger $790,000

Beautiful 9.68 acre lot in Phase II of Three Runs has established Bermuda grass. Fenced and cross-fenced and ready for your house and barn. The lot borders riding trail and has access to more than 30 miles of groomed trails, jump rings, dressage arenas and cross country fences. Other amenities include club house, pool and fitness center.

Three Runs Plantation . Beautiful home on

5 fenced acres with salt water pool features open floor plan with high ceilings, wood floors and custom millwork. Included are keeping room & living room with fireplaces, gourmet kitchen with granite, 4 bedrooms, theater room/5th bedroom, 5 baths, covered porch with fireplace, pool, 3-bay garage, finished bonus. Jack Roth or Frank Starcher $815,000

Call COURTNEY CONGER

$222,640

Indigo Cottage . Amazing brand new custom home on an acre in New Bridge Polo & Country Club features 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, large kitchen with granite countertops and stainless steel appliances, luxurious main level master suite, fireplace, finished bonus room with bath, with oak & tile flooring throughout. Entertain outdoors with wrap-around porches and deck overlooking polo field. Call Jack Roth $489,000

EQUESTRIAN

Corridor

In the heart of Aiken’s east side Highway 302 horse country is this beautiful parcel with 34 acres of gently rolling pasture planted in well established grass, complete with fencing and gate. Adjoins Shellhouse Lake Farm (see above)

Three Runs Plantation . Beautiful prop-

Over 3 acres historic plantation property just minutes from downtown Aiken! The 5,463 square foot residence is in need of renovation, but priced to sell AS-IS. Call Jane Page Thompson $198,500

Aiken cottage adjacent to Hitchcock Woods! Walk downtown from this spiffy 2 bedroom, 2 bath cottage with downstairs master, gourmet kitchen with granite counters, hardwood & tile floors throughout. Space for 3rd bedroom. Lovely private gardens and gated entrance. Call Randy Wolcott $425,000

Call MIKE HOSANG

ONLY $340,000

erty in Three Runs Plantation has 3 bedrooms and 2 baths on main floor, with bedroom and full bath upstairs. All 5 acres are fenced and gated. Two car garage, includes all appliances including refrigerator, dishwasher, oven etc, washer/ dryer. Quality oak hardwood, ceramic tile or carpet throughout. Call Jack Roth or Frank Starcher $549,000

Charleston Highway .

Two Lanterns Cottage . Renovated Old

Downtown Cottage . Classic

Colonial home has direct access to Hitchcock Woods, and offers spacious living areas, large family room/kitchen combination and screened porch. Master suite and 3 additional bedrooms upstairs have magnificent views of landscaped yard in one of Aiken's most desirable neighborhoods! Call Alex Tyrteos or Jane Page Thompson $249,500

Steeplechase Equestrian . Classic

Southern home with open interior, 4 bedrooms, 4 full baths, modern kitchen with granite counter tops, sunporch off greatroom with fireplace. Tiled keeping room, formal dining, bonus room, loft, attached garage with workshop. Two lots comprise 5.73 acres. Rear deck overlooks grassy area which could easily be fenced for horses. Call Jane Page Thompson $528,500

Sanctuary Lodge . Serene, seclud-

ed, and situated on 70 acres with stocked pond & dock, this home features 4 bedrooms (2 down, 2 up), spectacular 2story great room featuring soaring natural timbers, brick fireplace, large kitchen, separate laundry and spacious formal dining room. Screened back porch, covered front porch and upstairs balcony. Call Mike Hosang $375,000

.

Three Runs Plantation Spectacular nearly new home with 3 bedrooms and 3 full baths on 6 perfect acres of grass, irrigated and fenced. The barn has room for 4 horses with heated and air conditioned tack room. The bonus room over the garage is roughed in for another bedroom or office and a full bath and a kitchen. Call Jack Roth or Frank Starcher $769,000

CHIME BELL

TIMSHEL

Chase

Gardens

.

Old Buckland Barn Historic training facility in Aiken’s downtown Horse District has spacious 2,787 square foot main residence, combining 2 original cottages with central great room. Cottage is delightfully renovated with wood floors, granite countertops and all appliances. There are 2 converted race barns with 15 expanded stalls total, board fenced paddocks, grooms’ apartment, dressage arena with mirror. Call Courtney Conger $1, 425,000

Level, partially cleared lots in developing equestrian area with easy access to Aiken, Edgefield and I-20. Riding rings and trails are underway, and homeowners with interests in eventing, hunter jumpers, driving and trail riding are in residence. Best of all, lots from 12.25 to over 14 acres are available for only $4,500 per acre!

Call COURTNEY CONGER

Courtney Conger Randy Wolcott

Lee Hedlund

Annie’s Inn . Meticulously maintained Bed & Breakfast built in the

1800s in Aiken’s Equestrian Corridor! A successful B&B for 38 years, this marvelous property includes 8185 elegant square feet main residence with 6 bedrooms, 6.5 baths and 8 fireplaces. Includes 6 separate cottages with excellent rental history, in ground pool, greenhouse. Contents convey! Call Suzan McHugh $1,500,000

Mike Hosang

Frank Starcher

Beautiful 16.31 acre lot, already cleared, in a wonderful equestrian community that offers top notch amenities, including a dressage ring, hunter/jumper ring, and cross-country course.

Call MIKE HOSANG

$158,200

Jack Roth

803.645.3308 803.507.1142 803.221.6831 803.270.6358 803.270.6623 803.341.8787 TOLL FREE

Alex Tyrteos

Suzan McHugh Thomas Bossard Brian Cavanaugh Jane Page Thompson

800.880.0108 203.249.3071 803.292.8525 803.640.2845 803.624.6072 803.215.8232

.

.

.648.8660

www CarolinaHorseProperties com . 803

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Katydid CDE, November 2017


Photography by Pam Gleason & Gary Knoll


H I S TO RY. T R A D I T I O N . L E G AC Y.

the perfect relaxation after aan adventure in hitchcock woods breakfast • lunch • dinner • sunday brunch full-service luxury spa experience

O P E N DA I LY • 1 0 0 C O L L E TO N AV E N U E S W • A I K E N , S C 8 0 3 . 6 4 8 . 1 8 9 8 • T H E W I L L C OX .C O M

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EQU INE SER VICE S At the University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital, we offer state-of-the-art health care for horses including ophthalmology, lameness evaluations and 24/7 emergency services. We take a team approach to each case, providing both comprehensive and compassionate care. Learn More 706.542.3223 vet.uga.edu/hospital 2200 College Station Road, Athens, GA

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The Aiken Horse

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December-January 2017-18

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Equine Divine: This essential women’s gilet will instantly add warmth to any outfit whether worn alone or layered under a jacket. The scarf is made from a sumptuous blend of lambswool and cashmere, featuring rich, wintry colors. It is finished with a fringed hem. equinedivineonline. com Gilet - $129 Scarf - $59

Downtown Dog: Every dog will do backflips for fresh-baked, Downtown Dog biscuits. They come in a variety of flavors for all canine palates. Perfect stocking-stuffers for your dog. Come to the store for dog presents, too. www.aikendowntowndog.com

AIken County Farm Supply:

Everyone needs clippers! Check out the selection at Aiken County Farm Supply. www.aikencountyfarmsupply.com

Oak Manor Saddlery:

Beautiful bridles in a variety of price ranges. Perfect for schooling or for show. Excellent prices, too! www.oakmanorsaddlery.com

Andis Super AGR+ Cordless Clippers $275.00 KM2 Speed Clippers $159.95

Epona: Fantastic gifts for all the horsewomen on your list! Schockemoehle Equitus Alpha Anatomical Bridle $289.99

“Wild Ride” Silver Bracelet: $24.00

Laurel Burch Painted Purse: $14.00

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Horze snaffle bridle & reins $79.99

The Aiken Horse

December-January 2017-18


Aiken Saddlery: A wide selection of gift items for horse

people. Gloves are always appreciated: choose from Tuff Mate, SSG, Ovation and more. www.aikensaddlery.com

Tuff Mate Soft Suede Deerskin $9.95

SSG Driving Gloves: North American deerskin Buttersoft feel combining comfort & durability. “D” ring strap with hook & loop closure. Driving line reinforcement between fingers. $49.99

Mark Lexton:

Unique handmade jewelry. This season’s design: crop earrings carved and cast in silver and gold. Prices start at $125.00 www.marklexton.com

The Tack Room: A perfect holiday gift: Richard Bishop Glassware Sets Starting at $39. Visit our flagship store in Camden, SC or visit our website at tackroomonline.com

Adams Horse Supplies:

Ovation Alistair Country Boot: These waterproof boots are functional and fashionable. The laced sides allow a customizable fit. $197.95 Browse more styles at www.adamshorsesupplies.com

Respond Systems: Give your pup the gift of comfort, reduced pain and a good night’s sleep. Respond System’s PEMF Canine Therapy Bed is proven to reduce pain and inflammation and accelerate healing. Ideal for dogs with chronic inflammatory conditions and those with acute or old injuries. Rechargeable battery. Prices from $549-$799. www.respondsystems.com.

December-January 2017-18

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The Historic Horses of Rye Patch Painted Horses Bring Stables Alive Story and Photography by Pam Gleason

A

iken, South Carolina has been famous for its life-sized fiberglass horses for over a decade. These horses, decorated with fanciful designs as part of a project called Horse Play, inhabit public and private spaces throughout the city, emphasizing our equestrian heritage. This fall, Aiken is welcoming a second cohort of fiberglass horses, these ones painted in realistic colors to represent famous horses from Aiken’s history. The horses were painted over the summer, and this November were installed in their new home, the stables at Rye Patch, a historic Aiken property that has been owned by the city since 1984. Linda Knox McLean, a Master of Foxhounds of The Aiken Hounds for decades and a descendant of an Aiken Winter Colony family, came up with the idea for the project. “I had heard that the city was renovating the stables, and was wondering what they would do with them and so I volunteered to be on the stables committee of the Friends of Hopeland at Rye Patch,” she said. The stables, once owned by Dorothy Knox Goodyear Rogers, served as the home of Aiken’s police horses until a few years ago. (Aiken does not currently have any mounted police officers.) “There are 14 stalls. We hope someday that there will be mounted police horses there again, and so four stall are reserved for them,” continued Linda. “Then we set up 10 stalls to dedicate to 10 horses with historic significance to Aiken.” The plan was to choose horses from various disciplines and different eras spanning the last 100 years. People with connections to the individual horses that are represented were invited to sponsor the purchase of life-sized fiberglass models from a company that supplies them for public art projects. Artists from the community then volunteered to turn those plain white horse models into replicas of the famous horses. The project took place over the summer in warehouse space donated by Jack Owens and Pam and Dick Verenes. The 10 animals chosen for the exhibit include eight horses, one pony and one mule. They have been arranged in chronological order in the stalls at Rye Patch, each one bearing a placard that says something about its inhabitant. The first horse on display is a replica of Regret, the first filly ever to win the Kentucky Derby, in 1915. Regret was owned by Harry Payne Whitney, a 10-goal polo player and member of America’s “Big Four” polo team that dominated international competition in the early part of the 20th century. Harry Payne’s father, William Whitney, donated Whitney Polo field to the City of Aiken in 1900, and HP Whitney spent many winters playing on Aiken’s fields. Regret, who was a 2-yearold sensation at Saratoga Racecourse, was the first undefeated horse ever to win the Derby. In her career, she won nine of her 11 starts, finishing second by a nose in her last race as a 5-year-old before she was retired to be a broodmare. She was never beaten by another filly. Next comes Cavalier, Louise Hitchcock’s chestnut Thoroughbred hunt horse, which her family says was her favorite. Louise Hitchcock, who spent her childhood winters in Aiken along with her aunt Celestine Eustis was possibly the most important founder of Aiken’s winter equestrian colony. After her marriage to the 10-goal polo player and steeplechase trainer Thomas Hitchcock in the late 1800s, she and her family returned to Aiken every winter, creating an equestrian playground in the city, centered on in the eponymous Hitchcock Woods. Cavalier, in addition to being Louise’s mount on the hunt field, also won numerous ribbons at the Aiken Horse Show in the Woods. Another Hitchcock horse occupies the adjacent stall, the polo pony Tobiana, owned by Louise and Thomas’s son Tommy Hitchcock, a 10-goal polo player who was the best and most famous player of his generation. Tobiana, a black and white paint gelding was selected

in Argentina by another 10-goaler, Lewis Lacey, who sent him to Hitchcock in 1926. Tobiana, flashy and incredibly fast, became the most well-known polo horse of his time and was the first horse ever inducted into the Polo Museum and Hall of Fame. His placard in that museum includes a quotation from a 1927 article in Polo Magazine about him that reads, in part: The picturesque Tobiana, who looked as if he had been painted by an enthusiastic artist armed with a broad brush, enchanted the onlookers by his appearance and he electrified them with his performance.... Tobiana played two chukkers in the first match and two in the second, and when he left the field, his brows figuratively wreathed with laurel, every child sighed, and we all were children. The next horse, Kellsboro Jack, owned by Meg and Ambrose Clark, won the Grand National Steeplechase at Aintree Racecourse in England in 1933. The Aintree Grand National is the most famous and difficult race in the sport of steeplechasing covering more than four miles and requiring horses to jump a total of 30 fences. Kellsboro Jack was an English Thoroughbred that Ambrose Clark campaigned in England. Believing himself to be a curse to his horses that season, he sold the horse to his wife Meg for one dollar just before the big race. The gambit worked: Kellsboro Jack won at odds of 25-1. After the race, the champion horse came back to the United States. He was so beloved by his owners that they renamed their Aiken estate Kellsboro House in his honor. He died in the 1940s and was buried at the Clark’s farm in Cooperstown, NY. After Ambrose Clark died in 1964, he was buried alongside him. The fourth stall is occupied by Mounty, who represents sidesaddle riding. Mounty was a fantastic hunt horse owned by Bettina Ruckelshaus, an Aiken Winter Colony sidesaddle rider. Described by Bettina’s daughter as her mother’s “horse of a lifetime” Mounty was so kind that once, when Bettina fell off and was knocked unconscious out in the woods, Mounty stayed by her side until help arrived. Next comes Dandy, a much-loved family pony that rode and drove and was owned by Dorothy Knox Goodyear Rogers. Dandy represents ponies and his inclusion is especially fitting in this exhibition because not only did he live at Rye Patch back in the day, he has actually been returned to his original stall. The lone mule of the exhibit, The White Tornado, lives next door. The White Tornado, owned by Marilyn Riviere, was famous in the 1970s for his extreme speed. Marilyn and Charlie Bird had decided to hold a mule race at the Aiken Steeplechase in order to drum up interest and enthusiasm for the event. The premise was that riders were to donate money for the privilege of racing against one another on “anonymous mules pulled out of farmer’s fields the day of the race.” Marilyn, however, had secretly had her own racing mule trained for two months by a professional racehorse trainer and jockey. The other mules never stood a chance as The White Tornado dashed to the wire in front of everyone. After his sensational victory, The White Tornado became a family pet and was occasionally brought into the house to mingle with Marilyn’s guests during after dinner drinks. Superflash, a show hunter owned by Pete Bostwick, and Rufus, a Kladruber driving horse that served as a wheeler in Jack Seabrook’s fourin-hand, live in the next two stalls. In his younger years, Pete Bostwick was an internationally known polo player and steeplechase jockey and a regular on Aiken’s hunt fields. In the 1970s he set his sights on the hunter ring, and he bought Superflash, bred in Wyoming, over the phone as an untried 3-year-old. Bostwick showed Flash in Aiken and won many championships on him before passing him along to a top amateur show hunter rider, Mrs. Sylvester Johnson. Superflash then

Left: Tricia Shellhouse puts the finishing touches on Cavalier

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became one of the best show horses in the nation, and was inducted few had to travel to get to the warehouse workshop, such as Tricia into the National Show Hunter Hall of Fame in 2012 Shellhouse, who drove in from Savannah, Georgia to create her portrait Jack Seabrook found Rufus at a stud farm in the Czech Republic of Mrs. Hitchcock’s Cavalier. in 1989. Jack was a self-taught whip, the first American since Alfred Although most of the artists started with the same basic horse, the Vanderbilt to be admitted to Britain’s Coaching Club, and one of the finished products are quite distinct. The differences are not simply coat leading promoters of four-in-hand driving in the United States. Rufus, color. For instance Drew Murphy, an MFA candidate at USC, labored who traveled widely, was well known for his playful manner, which, long and hard over his representation of Rufus, whose Roman nose he according to Jack’s son John Seabrook, earned him the nickname replicated with layers of Bondo applied to the model. He even crafted “Duffus.” Jack, who attended Aiken Prep School, maintained a home the horse a set of eyelashes. “I was going to do something with his mane in Aiken, where his team was a familiar presence in the Hitchcock and tail, but then I decided I had better leave it alone or I would never Woods. He continued driving until he was 85. Rufus, “who was as finish,” he said with a laugh. gentle as he was strong” was also a wonderful riding horse who lived in After the artists had completed their work, the horses were shipped, Massachusetts for a time after two at a time by horse trailer his driving career was over (“They load so easily!” before retiring to Ocala, Fla. exclaimed Linda McLean) The final horse in the to Kendricks, a local auto stable, Mighty Nice, is body shop. There they were Phillip Dutton’s bronzecoated with a finishing medal-winning mount at the layer, after which they were 2016 Olympics. In 2010, transported, again by horse Phillip found Happy, as he is trailer, to their new home at called, in Belfast, Ireland and Rye Patch. At Rye Patch they immediately knew he was truly were carried into stalls, which special. Bruce Duchossois, will be outfitted with shavings for whom Aiken’s Bruce’s (donated by South Carolina Field is named, purchased the Shavings) and perhaps later horse for him to compete, with hay and water buckets to and the two formed a historic make the scene complete. partnership. Not only did they Aiken’s newest painted win the Individual Bronze in horses honor the city’s eventing at the Rio Olympics, equestrian history, bringing Happy was also named USEF the celebrated individuals “Dandy” leaves Kendricks body shop to ship to his new home at Rye Patch Horse of the Year in 2016. back to life in a way that is Sarah Taylor, an artist who almost eerie. With realistic had served on the board of the Friends of Hopeland at Rye Patch, paint jobs and natural expressions, these fiberglass horses don’t recruited the volunteers to paint the fiberglass models. A few of them always seem inanimate. Walking around them, a horseman might are well-known local horse artists, such as Georgianna Conger, who unconsciously behave the way he does around real horses, moving softly, was specially selected by the Rogers family to paint their pony, Dandy. careful not to do anything that might spook or upset them. Each one Others came from the Aiken Artists Guild or from a group of local seems to have captured some animating spark of the horse it represents. painters working with Al Beyer, who teaches at the University of South Aiken’s Historic Horses at Rye Patch had a soft opening and ribbon Carolina, Aiken. cutting in mid-November and will be officially open to the public in According to Sarah, painting the horses was a more difficult task that conjunction with Christmas at Hopelands, an annual exhibition of it might appear to the uninitiated. The painters were supplied with Christmas lights at Hopeland Gardens. The exhibit seems destined photos (or in Rufus, Kellsboro Jack and Cavalier’s cases, paintings) to become one of the city’s iconic equestrian attractions, emphasizing of the original horses, and they strove to make their models as exact Aiken’s equestrian heritage and paying tribute to some of the horses as possible. Most of the painters were local to the Aiken area, but a that have bolstered its reputation as a horseman’s paradise. BodyClipping 4 OctNov17_1 8 Ad AikenHorse 10/1/2017 5:18 PM Page 1

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Aiken Hunts

Winter is High Season by Pam Gleason

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s the foxhunting season winds to a close in the Northeast, foxhunting in the South takes over. Local horses, riders and hounds spend the late summer and early fall preparing for the season. Meanwhile, horses and riders from the colder regions make the trip to Aiken and its environs. By November, the horses are fit and clipped, the hunt clothes have been checked over and taken in (or let out) and it is time for formal hunting to begin. Each hunt in the Aiken area inaugurates its formal season with the Blessing of the Hounds, a tradition going back to medieval France and honoring Saint Hubert, a seventh century cleric and the Bishop of Liege. Saint Hubert started his life as a nobleman and was an enthusiastic hunter, becoming essentially obsessed with pursuing game after the death of his wife in childbirth. According to one legend, one Good Friday, instead of going to church he went out hunting in the woods. There, he had a vision. A stag appeared before him with a crucifix between his horns. The stag approached and warned Hubert to turn to the lord or he would go to hell. The stag further admonished the young nobleman to treat the animals that he was hunting with more respect. Specifically, the stag warned him never to shoot unless he could be assured of achieving a quick and humane kill, never to shoot a doe with a fawn following her and only to shoot older stags past their prime breeding years. The ethics of modern hunting are sometimes said to have been derived from the words of this stag. Hubert returned from the woods and immediately began studying for the priesthood. After his death (he is supposed to have died while reciting The Lord’s Prayer), he became the patron saint of hunters and was said to be able to protect hunting dogs from rabies and bad behavior. For centuries, his feast day, November 3, coincided with the first day of the stag hunting season in France. On Saint Hubert’s day, hunting dogs would be brought to the church where they would be anointed with sacred oil and fed scraps of blessed bread. Today in the United States, the Blessing of the Hounds generally takes place at a gathering place for mounted riders and a pack of foxhounds and is often attended by interested members of the community. The best-attended opening meet in this area is for The Aiken Hounds, which always takes place on Thanksgiving morning at Memorial Gate in the Hitchcock Woods. This year, hundreds of spectators made the pilgrimage to the woods to watch the hounds receive their blessing, see the riders decked out in their formal attire and generally partake of an Aiken tradition that has been going on for over 100 years. Foxhunting will continue through the months of December and January, and then enter its highest point in February, when Whiskey Road Foxhounds has its annual hunt week, and horses and riders from up and down the East Coast and Canada come to Aiken to enjoy our pleasant weather and sandy footing for a month or more. February also brings hunt balls, hunt breakfasts and the annual Presidents Day hunter pace put in by Whiskey Road Foxhounds. With so much hunt activity going on, it can be difficult to keep up with everything. To help our readers, The Aiken Horse publishes an annual hunt directory with important dates, phone numbers and information for each hunt. This year, we inadvertently omitted the listing for the Edisto River Foxhounds, which held a Blessing of the Kennel at a new property in Union Point Georgia on Sunday, November 19. Edisto River Hounds boasts fixtures on 20,000 acres in Georgia and South Carolina and now maintains two kennels, one in the 302 corridor east of Aiken and the new one in Union Point.

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Below is an abbreviated list of the hunts in our area and their contact information, as well as the full listing for the Edisto River Hounds. Aiken Hounds: Drag hunt in the Hitchcock Woods; Tuesdays and Saturdays. Hotline 803-643-3724. (More info on Facebook) Belle Meade Hunt: Live hunt in Thomson, Ga; Wednesdays and Saturdays. Hunt Office: 706-595-2525. www.bellemeadehounds.com and on Facebook. Camden Hunt: Live hunt in Kershaw County, SC; Wednesdays and Saturdays. Contact Ms. Lea Schwartz Edwards. 803-669-1590. www. camdenhunt.com Low Country Hunt: Live hunt in Beaufort, Charleston and Jasper Counties; Tuesdays and Saturdays. Contact Holly Evans: 843.505.4475. www.thelowcountryhunt.com Middleton Place Hounds: Drag hunt in Charleston and Dorchester counties, SC. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays. Contact: Grace Stelling 843-442-9136, www.middletonplacehounds.com Shakerag Hounds: Live Hunt in Madison, Franklin, and Wilkes counties, Ga. Contact: Ms. Tara Stricko Myers: 770.312-3438, www.shakeraghounds.com Whiskey Road Foxhounds: Live hunt in Aiken, Bamberg, Lexington, Saluda, Hampton and Allendale counties, SC. Thursdays and Sundays. Contact: Ms. Cornelia Henderson, 561.309.6636, www.whiskeyroadfoxhounds.com Why Worry Beagles: Foot pack in Aiken County Sundays at 3 p.m., followed by a tailgate. Contact: Helen Dellacroce: 803-260-2680 Edisto River Hounds Live Hunt Fort Gordon Military Reservation, Augusta, Ga., MacDuffie County, Ga. and several fixtures in SC. Hunt attire: Scarlet, Carolina blue collar. Evening: scarlet tails with Carolina blue facings. Master of Foxhounds: Mrs. D.K. Newell, Mr. Walter Cheatham, III. Contact: Hon. Sec. Mrs. Elaine Fent, 803.270-9026, fent@gforcecable. com; D.K. Newell: 803-641-9533. Season: October through mid-March Opening Meet & Blessing of the Kennel: Sunday, November 19, 2017. Union Point, Ga. Hunt days: Saturdays The Edisto River Hounds was recognized by the MFHA in 1995. Suitable to all levels of horses and riders, the ERH features a familyfriendly, newcomer-welcome atmosphere. The ERH hunts 20,000 acres of land in Georgia and South Carolina including land in MacDuffie County and at the Fort Gordon Military base. It keeps Crossbred with some Penn-Marydel foxhounds. Small Game Licenses: South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (www.dnr.sc.gov) Georgia: Wildlife Resources division of the Georgia DNR (www. georgiawildlife.com).

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Foals of 2017

Southern Storm, Warmblood Filly C. Quito out of Alight Story and Photography by Pam Gleason

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t eight months old, Southern Storm has already shown her owner, Antea Kubicek, that she is a smart, kind horse. When we last saw her, she was living in a spacious field at Breeze Hill Plantation in Aiken, along with her older sister Winifred and her mother Tess (properly “Alight.”) Today she is fully weaned and she has moved back to the Kubiceks’ home where she was born in March. She still shares her paddock with Winnie, but her mother lives in an adjacent paddock with another horse. “We planned to wean her at four months because Tess doesn’t like to nurse her babies for longer than that,” said Antea. “But we waited until five months. Tess really hated her by then.” Storm is inquisitive, friendly and fearless. Sometimes Antea and her mother, Julia Kubicek, let the young horses out of their paddock to run around and play in the yard. Storm has walked right up the steps onto

looks like I got two greys.” Over the winter, Storm will continue to grow and mature. Her main job will be to play, but she will also continue to practice being a wellmannered horse: standing for the farrier, having her whiskers clipped, leading calmly and willingly. She is destined to be a big horse and Warmbloods tend to mature slowly, so Antea plans to take her time with saddle breaking and training, not pushing anything too fast. Next year, when she is a yearling, she might have a chance to be shown on the line, but Antea has no definite plans yet. “Young foals are great to learn patience,” Antea continued. “You need to take your time to develop a good horse. It’s not something that you can do overnight – it takes time. I like watching that process. It’s fun to get to know the foals and their individual, unique personalities.” Antea learned about breeding and handling young horses from her

“The best thing about Storm is how kind she is,” says Antea. the Kubicek’s front porch. She also likes to follow Antea’s car. But she is not pushy or difficult. In fact, Antea says that she is freakishly smart and well-behaved and seems to learn by watching what the Kubiceks do with the other horses. “Winnie, who is almost 2, has decided that she is big and she doesn’t need to stand for the farrier anymore,” said Antea. “Storm watches us discipline Winnie, and she stands perfectly for the shoer or for the vet. She’s great with being blanketed, she’s great with wearing a fly mask, you can give her all her shots, no problem. I have put a saddle on her and girthed it up. She didn’t care. I fed her a bunch of treats. My philosophy is ‘nothing scary,’ and food is her biggest motivator.” Storm’s dam is a bay and her sire, C. Quito, an imported Belgian Warmblood, is a grey. This gave Storm a 50 percent chance of turning grey herself. Although she started out life as a solid bay with a tiny star on her forehead, her new winter coat has a few telltale grey hairs sprinkled among the brown ones. She will turn grey, like her older sister Winnie. “I wanted a bay horse with chrome,” said Antea with a laugh. “But it

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mother, who has had a hunter breeding program for over 20 years. Storm is a product of that program, and Antea hopes that she will grow up to be an all around horse that she will be able to compete in international hunter derbies. Although Antea said her mother has been her biggest influence, the young horses themselves teach her something new every day. “It’s always a learning process,” she said. “Their training keeps me on my toes. Storm has been the easiest out of all of her siblings. I like having her home because she puts a smile on my face in the morning when she and her sister both call out to me when I come outside.” ENDNOTE: In our June-July 2017 issue, we introduced five “Foals of 2017.” These are five foals born in Aiken, each from a different breed and each with a different career goal. We are following up with one of these horses each issue so that readers can see how each grows and develops. In our last issue, we had an update on Scorz, a Quarter Horse gelding that has already made a name for himself competing on the halter circuit. Stay tuned for another update in our February-March issue.

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Inside 45 46 48 54 58 60 62

Eventing Calendar Terrybrooke Dressage Chris Thompson Jumping Branch X-C The Riding School Ask the Judge Secret Lives: Topspin


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Eventing Winter Calendar, 2017

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nce again, we have pulled the eventing dates from our calendar to give eventing riders a mini guide to the 2017-2018 winter eventing season. We are including horse trials, combined tests and other opportunities that attract a large number of eventing enthusiasts. Of course, there are also many more equestrian activities going on in Aiken this winter that eventers might be interested in: foxhunts, hunter trails, straight dressage shows, hunter jumper shows and so on. Be sure to check out our full calendar in Section 3 to get the most out of the Aiken winter season. Below, you will find eventing dates and events. The full contact information for each venue follows this list. As ever, if you are a spectator, be sure to check the event’s website or Facebook page before heading out as times and dates do change.

DECEMBER

FEBRUARY

MARCH

Aiken Horse Park (Bruce’s Field) 931 Powderhouse Road. Aiken, SC 29801 803-226-0121 info@aikenhorsepark.org, www.aikenhorsepark.org

Jumping Branch Farm 179 Fox Pond Rd. Aiken, SC 29801 Julie Zapapas, 803.642.3484 zapapasj@bellsouth.net, www.jbfarm.com

Poplar Place Farm 8191 US 27 Hamilton, GA 31811 706-681-8748 www.poplarplacefarm.com

Apple Tree Farm South 1530 Oak Ridge Rd. Windsor, SC 29856 Alison Eastman-Lawler, 603-345-0382 apltrefarm@aol.com, www.appletreefarm.com

Happily Ever After Dressage 260 Meadows Ridge Court Aiken, SC 29803 Susan Neilson, 610-350-6777 www.happilyeverafterdressage.com

Sporting Days Farm 3549 E. Charleston Hwy. Aiken, SC, 29801 803.648.0100 sdaiken@aol.com, www.sportingdaysfarm.com

Carolina Horse Park 2814 Montrose Rd. Raeford, NC 28376 910.875.2074 secretary@carolinahorsepark.com, www.carolinahorsepark.com

Paradise Farm 4069 Wagener Rd. Aiken, SC, 29805 Cindy Swartz, Secretary 803.507.4577 paradisefarmaiken@gmail.com, www. paradisefarmaiken.com

Stable View 117 Stable Dr. Aiken, SC, 29801 484.356.3173 info@stableview.com, www.stableviewfarm.com

Full Gallop Farm 3828 Wagener Rd. Aiken, SC 29805 Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590 fullgallopfarm@yahoo.com, www.fullgallopfarm.com

Pine Top Farm 1432 Augusta Hwy. Thomson, GA 30824 Janet Wilson: 706-449-2029 pinetopeventing@gmail.com; www.pinetopfarm.com.

2 3 6 6-7 10 13 16

USEF/USEA Sporting Days Farm HT Volunteer XC Schooling, Sporting Days Jumper Night, Stable View Wendy Murdoch Clinic, Happily Ever After Dressage Schooling HT, Full Gallop Schooling Dressage Show, Stable View Derby Cross, The Vista

1 3 3-4 4 6 6 7 7 7 8-9 9-11 12 13 14 14 15 16-18 17-18 20 22 22-25 24 24 24-25 25 27 27 28

JANUARY 3 6 6-7 7 9 10 11 13 13-14 13-14 16 17 17 20 20-21 21 22 23 25 26 27 27-28 27-28 30 30-31

Jumper Night, Stable View Apple Tree 2-Phase Schooling Show Michael Page Clinic, The Vista Schooling Horse Trials, Full Gallop Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park. Schooling Dressage Show, Stable View Apple Tree 2-Phase Schooling Show Pipe Opener I CT. Carolina Horse Park USEF/USEA “Aiken Opener” HT, Stable View Ride Better Clinic, Paradise Farm Tuesdays in the Park, Aiken Horse Park SCDCTA CT & Dressage, Paradise Winter Schooling Days, Carolina HP Apple Tree 2-Phase Schooling Show USEF/USEA Poplar Place January H.T. Combined Training Show, Full Gallop Derby Cross, The Vista Tuesdays in the Park Aiken Horse Park Apple Tree 2-Phase Schooling Show Dressage TOC, Full Gallop Winter Schooling Days, Carolina H.P. Dressage in the Park, Aiken Horse Park USEF/USEA Horse Trials, Full Gallop Tuesdays in the Park, Aiken Horse Park USEA Winter HT, Stable View

December-January 2017-18

Apple Tree 2-Phase Schooling Show USEF/USEA Sporting Days HT I USEF/USEA Poplar Place February H.T. Volunteer XC Schooling. Sporting Days Dressage Test-of-Choice Full Gallop Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park USEF/USEA HT, Full Gallop Jumper Night. Stable View Winter Schooling Days. Carolina HP Apple Days 3 Phase. Sporting Days Farm USEF/USEA Pine Top Int. H.T. Derby Cross. The Vista Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park Schooling Horse Trials. Full Gallop I Love Dressage Show at Stable View Apple Tree 2-Phase Schooling Show USEF/USEA Paradise Farm H.T. Dressage I&II Show. Aiken Horse Park Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park Apple Tree 2-Phase Schooling Show USEF/USEA Pine Top Advanced H.T Schooling Horse Trials. Paradise Farm Schooling Horse Trials. Jumping Branch Eventing Academy. Stable View Combined Training Show. Full Gallop Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park Dressage TOC, Full Gallop USEF/USEA Horse Trials, Full Gallop

1 3-4 3-4 6 7 7 8-9 9 10-11 10-11 12 13 14 14 15 16-18 20-21 21-25

Apple Tree 2-Phase Schooling Show USEF/USEA H.T. Sporting Days Ride Better Clinic, Paradise Farm Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park Jumper Nights, Stable View Combined Test & Dressage, Paradise Apple Days 3-Phase, Sporting Days Dressage Tests of Choice, Full Gallop USEA/USEF H.T. 1 Full Gallop Southern Pines H.T. Carolina Horse Park Derby Cross, The Vista Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park March Schooling H.T. Full Gallop Schooling Dressage, Stable View Apple Tree 2-Phase Schooling Show Pine Top Farm Spring H.T USEA Spring Horse Trials at Stable View Carolina Int.ernational CIC & HT, Carolina Horse Park 22-23 Apple Days 3 Phase, Sporting Days 23-25 Poplar Place Farm USEF/USEA H.T. 24 Paradise Farm H. T. (Unrecognized) 25 March Schooling H.T. II , Full Gallop 29 Apple Farm 2-Phase Schooling Show 30 Dressage Test of Choice, Full Gallop 31-April 1 USEF/USEA HT, Full Gallop

The Vista 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken, SC 803-262-5263 vistaschooling@gmail.com

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Terrybrooke Farm in Aiken New Dressage Training Facility by Pam Gleason

“There are three rules of dressage,” says Robert St. Jacques, the owner and head trainer at Terrybrooke Farm. “First, you need a sound horse: the horse needs to have all four legs, his back, and his neck with no problems. Second, the horse must be forward and in front of your legs. If the horse is not in front of your legs, you will never be able to do dressage. Third, you need a brave rider. If you are a rider that is scared, you will not be able to do dressage. You will be tense; you will prevent the horse from going forward because you will think that going fast is bad.” For several decades, Robert St. Jacques, originally from the Montreal area, has been based in Rehoboth, Mass. where he ran Terrybrooke Farm, a dressage teaching and training facility. Last spring, he and his fiancée, Chelsea Reid, decided they were ready to move out of the area and find a place where they could ride and train year round. Their thoughts naturally turned to the South. “We had clients who came down to Aiken in the winter and enjoyed it and they said that if we were going to move anywhere, we should definitely look at Aiken,” says Chelsea. “They said that Aiken is the place to be: it’s beautiful all year round and its up-and-coming with dressage.” And so, over the summer, Robert visited, and liked what he saw. Although he toured various different properties that were for sale, he did not find exactly what he was looking for. After he returned to New England, however, his realtor, Randy Wolcott from Carolina Company, found him the perfect farm, and so he bought it sight unseen. This fall, Robert and Chelsea packed up their entire operation and relocated to the new Terrybrooke, located north of Aiken city limits, not far from Stable View and convenient to Route 20. “It has everything we need,” says Robert of the 22-acre farm that was most recently used as a polo facility. “In dressage we don’t need so much space. This has flat areas for riding, a 16-stall barn, paddocks with lean-tos so the horses can live outside. I needed a place that was ready to go because I have clients that are sending me their horses now: I needed a place that already had fencing and paddocks and a barn. This has everything, and the house is a bonus. I like the location. It’s private, but everything is 15 minutes away.” Robert says he was introduced to dressage through his family. When he was growing up, his parents owned and ran Le Club Equestre St. Jacques, an establishment near Montreal that catered to dressage and hunter/jumper riders. In addition to the riding facilities, the farm also had a successful restaurant overlooking the indoor arena. Both Robert and his older brother Pierre got their start at this farm, and both were bitten by the dressage bug at a young age. “We were chasing the dream: when you are in this sport you want to get to the highest level you can,” he says. Both brothers eventually moved to the United States. Pierre has had a stellar career in the show ring and gone on to represent the United States internationally, riding his longtime partner Lucky Tiger. Robert’s dressage career started on a similar path, but went a slightly different direction “I was lucky enough to have a Grand Prix horse when I was very young,” he says. “My Grand Prix horse, Casper, was a Dutch Warmblood imported from Holland, a bay with four white socks. His coloring was great; his movement was great; his mind was difficult.” At the time, Robert was in southern New England were he trained with several top horsemen from the French and German schools. The trainer who left the biggest impression on him was Michel Vermeulen, a Grand Prix rider from France who had studied with Le Cadre Noir in

December-January 2017-18

Saumur, at The French National School of Equitation. “Michel was an inspiration to me, “ says Robert. “He helped me to turn around Casper, and I spent years training with him. He and Casper taught me how to get through to difficult horses and that overtook the business. People with difficult horses started sending them to me: all kinds of horses, warmbloods, off-the-track Thoroughbreds, Quarter Horses, Morgans. I became the one that they sent those horses to, and so the showing took a back seat. . . I had a talent of not getting bucked off; I had youth and fearlessness.” Robert’s business also included giving lessons, and he and Chelsea met a few years ago when she came to ride with him. Chelsea is a lifelong rider who competed on the University of Rhode Island intercollegiate dressage team and then became the team manager after graduation. Studying animal science and animal management, she had always planned to go to veterinary school, but recently transitioned to the life of professional horseman instead. “I love to organize things and to ride,” she says. “To do something that you always did for fun as a career, that’s priceless, that’s amazing.” This winter, Chelsea and Robert are planning improvements to the facility (an all-weather dressage ring with professional footing is on the agenda) and establishing themselves in Aiken’s horse world. They brought a number of horses South with them including Decimal, a Canadian Warmblood mare that Robert plans to compete at Third and Fourth Level in the coming year, and Chieftain, a Holsteiner schoolmaster that will be helping Chelsea climb the dressage ladder. In addition, they have a Warmblood/Thoroughbred/Quarter Horse stallion named Lord Braveheart, several client horses, a couple of lesson horses and at least one rescue: an off-the-track Thoroughbred named Mikey who came from Nevins Farm, a facility operated by the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Mikey had been adopted out and returned to Nevins Farm several times because, although he has a friendly personality, he can be difficult to ride. (“I love him,” says Robert. “I even took him foxhunting, and he loved it.”) And of course, no Aiken horse farm would be complete without dogs. CJ the French Bulldog and Scrappy the little furry dog came down with Chelsea and Robert. Bones, a young German Shepherd who had been starved and was rescued from life on a chain is their first South Carolina rescue dog. (“We took her to foster for a small rural shelter, but we love her. She isn’t going anywhere,” says Chelsea.) Terrybrooke Farm had a grand opening in November, and, although they have clients coming down for the winter from Massachusetts and New York, they do still have a few stalls open and are looking for new students and clients. They are offering training, training board and lessons, and Robert hopes to start spending more time showing. In the spring, he is planning a horse-shopping trip to Europe with a sponsor in hopes of finding horses with the potential to go to the top. “This is the next phase of my career,” says Robert. “My mission is to make this a premier dressage facility with a training focus. I also want to get back to showing at the FEI level. I want to go as far as I can go with horses. “Dressage happens in the show ring,” he continues. “You can’t fool yourself or the judge, or anyone else. Ninety-nine percent of the time, the judge is right. With his scores, he is giving a clear picture of how you can improve your horses and yourself. At the end of the day, the proof is there, in the ring. That is where I want to be.” For more information: www.terrybrookefarm.com

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Chris Thompson Makes Her Mark QH Trainer & Judge in Aiken By Pam Gleason

T

he All American Quarter Horse Congress is the largest single breed show in the world. Started in 1967, the show attracts over 23,000 entrants for events that range from halter to hunter under saddle, working hunter, cutting, roping, mounted shooting and everything in between. The show is held each October in Columbus, Ohio at the Ohio State Fairgrounds, under the auspices of the Ohio Quarter Horse Association. It lasts just over three weeks. This fall, one of the 29 judges at the Congress was Chris Thompson, an Aiken-based Quarter Horse trainer and teacher who works out of Pait Quarter Horses. Jeffrey Pait’s training operation is focused on halter horses, while Chris concentrates on the performance side. Chris had worked with Jeffrey when both lived in New Jersey, and, about five years ago, not long after he relocated here, he asked her to come farm sit for him. She liked Aiken so much, she soon decided to move here, too. Chris says that this was not the first time that she was asked to officiate at the Congress, but it was the first time that she was able to go as a judge. “At the Congress, they like to select judges who are still involved with showing,” she says. “I used to show a lot, and we always take a lot of clients to the Congress, so it was difficult. They kept asking me and I always said I would go, as long as I didn’t have to judge any halter classes, since we might have clients competing. This year, they finally said that I wouldn’t have to judge the halter and I said yes. They had three arenas running the whole time, so it was easy to juggle me.” Even with 29 judges, Chris had a very full schedule, often judging the first and the last class of the day. (“They told me that because I was new,” she says with a laugh.) Quarter Horse judges, like the horses themselves, are versatile, and Chris says she judged a little of everything this year, including youth halter (Pait Quarter Horses does not have any youth clients) hunter under saddle, huntseat, horsemanship and showmanship as well as a number of classes for equestrians with disabilities. “Equestrians with disabilities classes are getting very big,” she says. “They can be inspiring to watch, to see the sense of accomplishment and excitement on the riders’ faces. They make you think about a lot of things.” The most interesting class for Chris was probably the Master Hunter Under Saddle Futurity, a class for 2-year-old horses at their first show. “All the stands were full,” she says. “Everyone wanted to watch because no one had ever seen any of the horses before.” Chris grew up on Pennsylvania. A lifelong animal lover, she got her start in horses by tagging along with her older sister who went to a local stable after school every day. “We were four girls with a single mom, and my sister had to watch me, so I didn’t have a choice,” she says. “But I loved it.” As a child, Chris was involved in 4-H and got into Quarter Horses from there. She spent her teenage years working at a 300-horse stable that did a little of everything, giving her experience in many different disciplines. “We did Thoroughbred layups, and I got to gallop racehorses. We also had horses that showed in the hunter under saddle classes at the Quarter Horse shows, and we would teach them to jump. Once they were jumping a 2’6” course, they could be sold for three times the money. They were so broke: they had all their changes and they were easy to ride.” Chris showed in the hunter divisions of the Quarter Horse shows, and went to Devon where she showed her Quarter Horse in the (all breed) hunter classes. In addition, she rode and showed in western QH classes, winning the Western Riding class at the Congress when she was a junior. Once Chris passed her 19th birthday and was no longer eligible to ride as a junior, she started training and showing professionally right away.

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She had much success in various disciplines, including hunter under saddle (she and her horse Oscar were World Champions) and pleasure driving. After a rigorous selection process, she became an AQHA judge in 2001. That job has taken her to Germany to judge the German Nationals, to New Zealand for their national show and to France for the first Youth Euro Cup, which she judged alongside Jeffrey Pait. She has also judged in Alaska, Nevada and California, among other places. “There are 400 Quarter Horse judges, and they like to spread you around, so you don’t judge the same shows every year,” she says. “But every three years or so, if they like you they will call you back. And so every three years, I go to Del Mar [Calif.] for the Sun and Surf Circuit. It’s so beautiful and you see really nice horses. I go, and I say to myself ‘They pay me for this?’” Chris says that being an AQHA judge is challenging for many reasons. One is that judges are expected to know, and be able to judge, every discipline. For her, the under saddle classes, both English and Western, horsemanship (under saddle), showmanship (an in-hand handling class) and more common classes such as trail are very natural, but she is less at home evaluating roping (which is a judged class on the AQHA circuit) and other classes involving cattle, simply because she has not been exposed to them as much. It can also be very challenging to pick out all the placings in large under saddle classes where the judge might be able to observe each rider for as little as a minute and a half. “When I first got started, I questioned other judges on how they did it, and the best advice I got was to go with your gut. They said, if you feel like that is a great horse, don’t over think it.” In addition to judging, Chris also teaches and trains in the Aiken area. She says that her business has changed from the way it used to be in New Jersey when she had lots of horses in training for various clients. Judging about 20 shows a year, she is away so much that it is hard to keep training programs consistent. Instead, these days she travels to her clients’ farms to give them lessons, helping them with basic horsemanship as well as polishing their performances for the show ring. “One thing I really like about it here in Aiken is that a lot of people don’t want to send their horse to a trainer. They want to do it themselves,” she says. “It works out beautifully for me. I can help them and teach them things to do and then they have more tools that they can work with. I have clients who go to the Quarter Horse shows in Camden, and I always show them how to do everything themselves so that if I am not able to go, they can show by themselves and feel comfortable.” One of her Aiken clients, Gretchen Heffner, whom she had known back in Pennsylvania, was the high point amateur showmanship exhibitor for the South Carolina Quarter Horse Association in 2016. “One other thing that I am starting to appreciate is that there are a lot of people around who do want to go to the shows, or have shown Quarter Horses before and would like to get back into it,” she continues. “We’re talking about ways to make the Quarter Horse industry bigger around here. Quarter Horses are so versatile and can do so many different events, and they aren’t just the 15.2 hand little horses you might think of – my Oscar was 17.2. There are so many people around here that have Quarter Horses, it’s time for them to become more visible.” What does Chris like best about her job? Like many horse professionals, she says it is being around, and interacting with horses. “They are such beautiful animals and you teach them to trust you and get them to do all these things we train them for – it’s kind of crazy when you think about it. Training them, seeing their potential, seeing them do well, it’s all very rewarding. I just love them.” Contact Chris Thompson at 973-670-1465

December-January 2017-18


Every horse deserves the chance to succeed polyflex shoeing Now available Farrier on-site every thursday

Polyflex is a composite glue on shoe for correction and performance.

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803-648-0430

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The Aiken Horse

December-January 2017-18


Eventing Academy 2018 Series

“A Gath eri ng Pl ace” Aiken, South Carolina

Stable View Forthcoming Events

The 2018 Stable View Eventing Academy will provide Eventers with an opportunity to regularly school and compete at Stable View.

December 2 - Fourth Annual Southeast/ 2018 MFHA Qualifier Hunter Trials

Offering Sprouts, Tadpole, Beginner Novice, Novice and Training levels, there will be year-end awards at each level and year-end high-point awards for levels & individuals.

First Wednesday of Each Month Stable View Jumper Nights Dec 13 and January 10 Stable View Schooling Dressage Show

The Eventing Academy offers a schooling day on the Saturday and a full (but Unrecognized) horse trial on the Sunday. Enter through EventEntries.com.

2018 Dates Feb 24 & 25 April 14 & 15 May 19 & 20 July 21 & 22 Aug 11 & 12 Nov 17 & 18 Dec 8 & 9

January 13 - 14 - USEA Aiken Opener Horse Trials January 30 - 31 - USEA Winter Horse Trials February 14 - USEF/USDF “I LOVE DRESSAGE” Fearturing: Aiken Challenge Dressage Series February 24 & 25 - Eventing Academy 117 Stable Drive, Aiken SC 29801

484.356.3173

info@stableviewfarm.com

www.StableViewFarm.com

Individualized Training Lessons & Sales

MANDY LYNCH AIKEN, SC (804) 852-1923 Lynch1603@gmail.com www.TwiffyLaneFarm.com

December-January 2017-18

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The Aiken Horse

December-January 2017-18


DFG Stables, Inc.

Training ~ Showing ~ Sales

Daniel Geitner (803) 270-5420 Cathy Geitner (803) 270-0574

1224 Sizemore Road, Aiken, SC 29803 dfgstables@aol.com dfgstables.net

Thank You to our Sponsors:

December-January 2017-18

The Aiken Horse

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center spr

2017 FALL SPLASH DOWN. Training and Novice Cross Country at Jumping Branch


read

Photography by Gary Knoll & Pam Gleason photography by Gary Knoll


pait ad

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The Aiken Horse

December-January 2017-18


s ’ t e P r u Yo ! t e V r e Oth December 2, 2017 Horse Trials 3549 Charleston Hwy., Aiken, SC 29801 10:00 am - 4 pm H: 803-648-0100

Get Involved

Sybil Davis DVM: Rehab & Acupuncture Certified 307 Willow Run Rd. Aiken SC 29801 info@petfitnessandrehab.com

December-January 2017-18

February 3, 2018 February 8-9, 2018 March 3-4, 2018 March 8-9, March 22-23, 2018 April 21, 2018 December 1, 2018

USEF/USEA Horse Trials I/P-Starter Apple Days 3 Phase USEF/USEA Horse Trials I/P -Starter Apple Days 3 Phase Apple Days 3 Phase USEF/USEA Horse Trials I/P – Starter USEF/USEA Horse Trials I/P-Starter

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The Aiken Horse

December-January 2017-18


The Riding School Lessons for Life

By Ragan Morehouse, photography by Gary Knoll

T

he Riding School, a venue for lessons with programs designed specifically for beginning riders, officially opened its barn doors in September of this year. Located in the Ridge at Chukker Creek subdivision on Chukker Creek Road in Aiken, the facility is owned and operated by Chan Carman, a 28-year-old Montana native who moved here this spring. The property includes 6 acres, a 20-stall barn and a large sand arena. It has access to the Freeman Preserve: 61 acres of trails, streams, and ponds protected by a conservation easement held by the Aiken Land Conservancy. Chan currently has four school horses and a vision of inspiring the next generation of riders to become lifelong horsemen. “When I got to Aiken, I saw so many wonderful riding opportunities. It is the place to be!” she says. “But finding a kids’ riding program with school horses was harder. As I looked around, I realized that that was something that was really needed. I got really excited because that is my thing. That is what I want to do. I don’t want to train horses; I don’t want to sell horses; I just want to teach kids.” Chan discovered her passion for teaching at an early age. “When I first started riding, we lived in Casper, Wyoming, which was very rural,” she explains. “My sister and I begged for riding lessons and my mom somehow found an English riding barn and signed us up for lessons with a Pony Club instructor. Before too long, I started helping in the Pony Club. I began teaching the little kids as soon as I was a D3. I was probably only 12 or so, but I dove right into that because they needed help.” When Chan was entering high school, her family moved to Billings, Montana. There, Chan took full advantage of the horse world, participating in the Silver Sage Pony Club, eventing, and riding with Jill Hassler-Scoop, a well-known teacher and the author of several books on equestrian instruction. “Jill had us journal about our riding. We practiced teaching each other so we could improve our skills. We lectured on what we were learning. We did video analysis with her; all on top of caring for our horses and taking lessons,” Chan says. “It was a really immersive, indepth experience. We actually went to Germany with this program and rode at the International Equestrian Academy for a couple of weeks. It wasn’t competitive. It was a purely educational experience.” After graduating from high school, Chan earned her HA, a Pony Club rating that focuses on horse care and riding instruction; this rating is the United States Pony Club’s highest unmounted level. Then, she went off to further her education at Lake Erie College in Cleveland, Ohio, an institution known for its strong Equine Studies program. Throughout her college years, Chan continued eventing and being involved with Pony Club. During summer breaks, she went to Virginia where she was a working student for Cathy Frederickson, a well-known clinician, ‘A’ level pony clubber, and USPC National Examiner. While riding with Cathy, she earned her ‘B’ rating. “Once I got my B, I felt like I had accomplished what I set out to do. Regular people don’t always have the horses to do the A,” Chan says. At the time, she was bringing along her young Oldenburg, The Great Gatsby. Gatsby was not ready to perform at the level necessary to pass the A rating: jumping a 3’9” course or demonstrating an Intermediate

level dressage test, for instance. “I would have had to give up Gatsby and I didn’t want to give up my horse. I love my horse!” Meanwhile, in a surprise twist to her seemingly single-minded determination to become a riding instructor extraordinaire, Chan did not earn her degree in Equine Studies. “I was thinking that I was going to do the horse thing and I didn’t. I fell in love with psychology,” she says. She earned her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology at Lake Erie and then her Masters degree in Mental Health Counseling from the University of Montana, in Missoula. “After graduate school, I was looking to get more horse time in my life,” she continues. “So I ended up making a career change and took a job as the director of a non-profit equestrian program in Austin, Texas in December of 2016.” Unfortunately, after a few months, Chan discovered that the Texas job was not what she had hoped it would be, and she found herself wondering what was to come next. “My parents have been vacationing in Aiken for years and they have always begged me to visit. So I decided to come see Aiken. Mom had this whole plan for me to fall in love with Aiken and move here. She had a schedule: we went to the Track Kitchen, toured Aiken, and then went to see the property at The Ridge at Chukker Creek. When my Mom told me that the realtor had named it ‘The Riding School’ in the listing, I began to cry. It was perfect. It was too good to be true.” And so the Carmans bought the property and Chan moved into The Riding School this summer. Currently, she also works full-time at the Aurora Pavilion Behavioral Health Services at the Aiken Regional Medical Center, while teaching riding lessions afternoons and weekends. She also helps out with the Aiken County Pony Club whenever she can. “I go to work really early in the morning so that I have afternoons and weekends free. Of course, I would love to get to a place where I don’t have to do that anymore,” she says with a wide smile. Tracey Turner, a realtor with Meybohm in Aiken, helped Chan purchase the property and also brought her son Hunter to be The Riding School’s very first student. “Chan is a breath of fresh air, teaching classic and sound fundamentals to the little ones starting out,” says Tracey. “She is cheerful, fun, and safety conscious. She has fantastic school ponies that are worth their weight in gold. What parent wouldn’t like that?” Chan’s teaching goes beyond ‘heels down, eyes up.’ “I want to teach kids in a way that enables them to enjoy horses for the rest of their lives,” she says. “I don’t want gimmicks, I don’t want shortcuts. I think that is where bad horsemanship comes from. I don’t want a competitive environment; we get farther if we are all working together. That’s a great thing that Pony Club does, you compete against a standard, not each other. “I want to make the horses lives better and their [the student’s] lives better; that kind of program,” she continues. “I want the barn rats. I want those kids that want it all, knowing that they are learning horse skills but also learning life skills. At the barn, they will learn leadership and problem solving and crisis management; skills that they will need in the real world. So really making sure that it is an environment where they can grow and thrive, that is the most important thing...and also riding horses, of course.” For more information: www.theridingschoolaiken.com

December-January 2017-18

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Ask the Judge

Questions about Dressage With Amy McElroy

Amy McElroy is an FEI competitor, and a USEF S judge. She is qualified to officiate at any USEF recognized national show at all dressage levels. She rides, trains and teaches at Fair Lane Farm in Aiken and judges between 15 and 20 dressage shows and events each year. In her popular Ask the Judge column, she answers readers’ questions about dressage. Do you have a question for Amy? Send her an email at McElroyDRM@aol.com, or visit her website: www.amymcelroy.com.

Dear Amy, I have heard that the USEA eventing dressage tests will be changing soon. Could you tell me when the new tests go into effect and what changes there might be? Also, where can I find these tests?

Eventer Chick Dear Eventer,

The new USEA eventing dressage tests go into effect December 1, 2017. These tests were published in November and can be found online on the USEA website, among other places. There are some significant changes in most of these new tests. Let’s take a look at a few of the changes in Beginner-Novice through Preliminary.

The Halt

In all the tests at all levels (Beginner-Novice through Advanced) halts are now required to be sustained for at least three seconds. This rule makes eventing tests conform with United States Dressage Foundation dressage tests. In the past, the length of the halt was not specified in the eventing directives.

Changes in Beginner-Novice

Beginner-Novice still has a Test A and a Test B. These tests have basically the same movements as before, with the biggest difference being that the final halt in Test A is at G rather than at X. The letter G is an imaginary point on the centerline beyond X. The exact point is the intersection of the centerline with a line drawn from H to M.

Changes in Novice Tests

The Novice level still has Test A and Test B. In Test A, the new tests now include a serpentine of two loops, from A to C. The judges will be looking for the quality and regularity of the trot, the shape and size of the loops and the changes of bend, accuracy and balance. Remember: serpentines do not use the corners: they have the same curvature as a circle. To ride this movement correctly, you would start with a 20-meter half circle tracking left from A to X. Approaching the intersection of X, you should straighten for at least a stride or the length of one horse from nose-to-tail before bending to the right and continuing on to the

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half circle of 20 meters to the right. This movement is only asked for in one direction (starting from the left.) In Test B, there is now a “stretchy” circle. Your judge will be looking for your horse to be going forward with a downward stretch over the back into a light contact, maintaining his balance. The judge will also assess the quality of the trot, the bend, the shape and size of the circle, and the willingness and calmness of the transitions before and after the stretch. The aim of the stretchy circle is not to lengthen your reins as much as possible; it is to show how much your horse can stretch over his back. This movement is only asked for in one direction, to the left.

Changes at Training Level

Training Level still has Test A and Test B. In both tests, there is a new movement at the end of the test. Instead of turning down the centerline from A to make your halt, you will be making a half circle of 10 meters at B onto the centerline. Then you will continue straight on the line towards G. At G, you will halt and salute. The turn and the halt are scored separately. In Test B, they have added new movement. At B, half circle right of ten meters at the trot, returning to the track at M. Going the other way, this same movement is E, half circle left of ten meters, returning to the track at H. Some people call this movement the ice cream cone, because that is what it looks like on paper. The judge will be looking for the bend and balance in the figures, the size and shape of the half circles and the regularity and quality of the trot. When riding this movement, remember to prepare your half circle with bend, and have it centered around your letter. Then, when you finish the half circle be sure to be on the centerline before making your return on the half diagonal to the track. Be sure you keep the straightness and ride this half diagonal the way you would ride a full diagonal. The new Training Level B test also introduces canter work on the

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diagonal. In the canter left, leave the track at H and at X, make a transition to the working trot and continue along the diagonal to F. The judge is looking for balance in the canter, the smoothness and accuracy of your trot transition, the quality of the trot and the overall ease and straightness of the line. When riding this movement, your transition to the trot ideally should be when you body crosses over X. Remember to ride your diagonal as straight as possible and letter to letter, H-X-F.

Modified Level Changes

Modified Level was introduced into the eventing world in 2017, and is a steppingstone from Training to Preliminary. In its inaugural year, Modified Level had one dressage test, which took place in the small arena. In 2018, there are two Modified Level tests, Test A (in the small arena) and Test B (in the large arena.) In Test A, in the trot, you have a pair of conjoined 10-meter half circles in opposite directions. (First, E-X half circle left, followed by X-B half circle right.) There is also a leg yield from D to H going to the left, and then from D to M going to the right. In addition, in the canter, you will be asked to do 15-meter circles. Test B introduces the “counter change of hand in leg yield.” This is two connecting leg yields, with one change of direction. In this test, you leg yield right from F to X, and then immediately leg yield left from X to M. This test also has a halt at C as well as a rein back of three to four steps.

Preliminary Level Changes

Preliminary still has two tests, A and B. Preliminary Test A rides in a small arena; Test B rides in a large arena. In Test A there are single leg yields from D to H and D to M. There are 10-meter trot circles. This test also has the same “ice cream cone” half circle movement as in

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Training Level B, but this time at the canter. The movement is shown in both directions, and introduces the counter canter: the half circle is performed in the true lead, but as you return to the track on a diagonal line, you will be performing a counter canter. A similar movement was seen in the former Intermediate Test A, so it can be considered quite challenging for this level. When riding this movement it is important to keep your accuracy. Make sure you steer and finish your diagonal line at the designated letter. In Preliminary Test B the entry does not have a halt or salute. There is also a “stretchy” movement similar to the stretchy circle in the Novice test, but this time it is performed in a two-loop serpentine at the trot. When riding your serpentine, keep the shape like you would in Novice test A. Be sure to show a clear stretch of frame: the outline of your horse should look different in this movement than in the rest of your test. There is more counter canter work in this test as well. You have a canter loop that starts from the long side on the true lead, goes to the centerline and then heads back to the track while maintaining the same lead. This loop must touch the centerline before heading back to the track: It is important that your horse’s front legs step onto the centerline. Remember to maintain the bend of your lead throughout. This movement is only shown in one direction, starting from the left. The final halt in this test is at L. L is an imaginary letter on the centerline after A and before you get to X; it is at the intersection of the centerline and a line drawn across the arena from V to P. I think these new tests look interesting and a bit more challenging than the previous tests. Remember to ride all your corners, stay accurate, have correct geometry and prepare for all transitions: attention to all the small details will enhance your presentation. I look forward to seeing how these new tests ride! Good luck.

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The Secret Lives of Horses Topspin; 4-Star Horse

By Ragan Morehouse, Photography by Gary Knoll

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ratitude and affection come through loud and clear when Laura VanderVliet, an upper level event rider, talks about her 29-year-old horse, Topspin. “He may be little, but he is the big horse in the barn,” Laura says. That is saying something when Topspin’s stablemates have included Muggle, Nilson Moreira da Silva’s mount for the Olympic Games in Rio and other Advanced level event horses. “He is the only horse here who ever finished Kentucky [the Rolex CCI****],” she adds. Topspin, a 15.3 hand bay Thoroughbred gelding, reached the pinnacle of American eventing in 2002 when he completed Rolex under Sally Cousins. He and Sally finished on their dressage score, earning them a spot in the top 20. “When Sally did Rolex, it was a year when it was absolutely pouring. Very few horses did well in it. Sally and Topspin ran around cross country clean and they had one of the first clean rounds in show jumping as well,” says Laura. “It was amazing.” Topspin’s athletic prowess is not a surprise. His dam, Myschic Tic, is by a French thoroughbred, Mystic who sired top steeplechasers as well as Babamist, a well-known sire of event horses. Quadrangle, Topspin’s paternal grandsire, won the Belmont Stakes in 1964, upsetting Northern Dancer’s bid for the Triple Crown. Mystic Quad, Topspin’s original name, was bred in Maryland by Nina A. Straight for sport rather than racing. When he was 3, he was sold to Kim and Marty Morani, professional eventers with a home base in Maryland. The Moranis started him under saddle, evented him through Training level. In 1994, Karen McCollom bought the then 6-year-old horse from the Moranis. “I announced to Kim and Marty that his name would be changed immediately as it reminded me either of some weird physical ailment or a hippie college,” reports Karen. “He was such a round and bouncy and cheerful horse that he needed a bouncy name, so my husband came up with Topspin.” Karen evented Topspin for the next six years from her home base in Vermont. “He was an utter delight,” recalls Karen. “He was bright and cheerful and always absolutely steady as well as being an extraordinarily good and powerful jumper. I don’t think I ever had a rail with him, despite my best efforts to get in his way!” The pair had many top placings at the Preliminary level, winning at USEF events such as Elysian Hills, Middletown, Huntington Farm, and Waredaca Farm. In 2000, Karen decided that someone else should continue Topspin’s career because she did not want to compete at the upper levels and he certainly had the potential. “Friends suggested I keep him and just ride him Prelim. He was the best hack, easy in the barn, and a very good friend,” says Karen. “But I thought that would be like keeping a Porsche to drive to the grocery store. So very sadly, I made the decision to sell him.” Hearing that Sally Cousins, a USEA Leading Lady and international rider, was looking for a horse, Karen gave her a call. “I let her ride him in the Intermediate at Middletown [Md.] Horse Trials as her test ride,” says Karen. “I would never have done that with anyone else but Sally. All went well, so I dropped him at Sally’s barn in Pennsylvania on the way back to Vermont and cried the entire eight hour drive home.” In 2000 and 2001, Sally evented Topspin at the Advanced level, earning spots in the top five in all but one event in which they were entered. In 2002, the pair finished 19th at Rolex. “He was always a great jumper,” says Sally. “But he was always so cheeky! He ran out to the left for a year and then ran around clear at Rolex in the middle of a thunderstorm. I guess it was finally hard enough to get his attention.” Topspin had a break from competing in 2003 before being sold to Laura VanderVliet. “He had reached that age and Sally was looking for Team horses. His dressage wasn’t at that caliber and she had decided to retire him a bit by selling him,” explains Laura. “He was first sold to someone for whom it didn’t work out. I was taking lessons with Sally

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and I had a horse that I was trying to get to Advanced but was having some difficulties. Sally helped me sell him and then I was looking for the next horse. I certainly was not looking for an Advanced horse; that wouldn’t have been in my budget.” Sally recognized that Topspin would give Laura the upper level experience that had eluded her up to that point and suggested that she buy him. “Kathleen OverBaugh bought him with me. She was a client up until that point and then she became an owner,” says Laura. “I bought him very inexpensively for what he had done. Sally sold him to me for $10,000. It was the best $10,000 I could have spent; the best decision I ever made.” In 2004, Laura competed Topspin twice at Preliminary before moving up to the CIC** at Stuart Horse Trials and then, for her first time, Advanced at Millbrook. “I had been eventing for a long time. Probably most people didn’t know that I hadn’t done an Advanced yet,” explains Laura. “I remember running around Advanced and doing it. It was easy for him. I had been dreaming about that moment for all of my life and when I was driving home I thought, ‘How many people have actually accomplished their dreams today?’” Laura competed Topspin at the Advanced level for the next two years. “The training, the lessons, and the clinic opportunities really open up for you when you are at that level,” says Laura. “He definitely was the turning point for my riding. I spent so much time trying to get to that point and once I got there, I felt like I could relax and concentrate on my career.” Looking back, Laura describes Topspin as a strong but easy ride. “I say he was easy to ride and people might laugh because they might not say that he was. But I think you have to appreciate the talent. That’s what makes a horse easy to ride. You are not trying to create a jump; you are not trying to create a canter that makes a good jump; you are not trying to make the horse clean. The horse does all of that very naturally. That, to me, is what makes him easy and that is the standard when I look for event horses.” To this day, when Laura is looking to purchase a horse, she finds herself drawn to Topspin look-alikes. Pictures that decorate her shelves show numerous bay horses with a narrow blaze. “When people are trying to help put up pictures on my website, they get confused and have to ask which horse is which because they look so much alike,” Laura says with a laugh. “He definitely became my type.” In 2006, a few weeks after competing at the Jersey Fresh CCI***, Topspin came in from the pasture unsound. Laura and Kathleen took him to the the New Bolton Center, a top-ranking veterinary hospital at the University of Pennsylvania. “He had so much cartilage wear and tear that the vets couldn’t believe the horse was still going. Basically, he went until he just couldn’t,” says Laura. In order for him to retire sound, Kathleen paid to do fusion surgery, a procedure that stabilizes joints debilitated by severe osteoarthritis. After the surgery, Kathleen took Topspin to her farm in Trumansburg, New York. He stayed with her for four years, hacking around the farm and enjoying his retirement, before the winters began to affect him and Kathleen asked for him to be permanently retired in Aiken. Topspin now lives at a farm in Aiken County. He comes into the barn every day for meals and is very insistent that he be fed on a schedule. “Food is all he has ever cared about,” Laura says. “I don’t feel like he ever didn’t like his job; he was always cheerful and had his ears up. But he certainly wanted to get it over with so he could get back to the barn to eat. He was very smart. He realized that if he went out and did a good job, he could go back to the barn quickly and get back to eating,” Laura adds with a laugh. “He is still like that today. He is definitely the boss of the barn.”

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Happily

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Gypsy Vanners Book Reviews Senior Horses Directory Classifieds Aiken Women’s Polo Calendar Index


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The Gypsy Vanner A Horse with Charisma By Diana Hunt

“Gypsy gold does not chink and glitter. It gleams in the sun and neighs in the dark.” -A saying from the Claddagh Gypsies of Galway

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here is something special about Gypsy Vanner horses, something that draws people to them. Gypsy Vanners, also known as Gypsy Cobs or Irish Cobs, are sturdy, compact horses from the British Isles. They are generally piebald (black and white) or skewbald (brown and white), but they also come in solid colors, or with splashes of white on their underbellies. They have profuse feathers on their legs and are traditionally kept with long, flowing manes and tails. These distinct little horses are associated with Romani groups (Gypsies) and Travelers in the British Isles, who use them to pull the caravans in which they live and travel, but they also are considered family pets. (Gypsies and Travelers have similarly itinerant life styles, but Gypsies are often descended from ancestors in India, whereas Travelers in the UK may be ethnically Scottish or Irish. Some Gypsies prefer to be called Roma, Romani, or other names associated with their own specific ethnic group.) According to The Official Horse Breed Standards Guide (Voyageur Press, 2009) a Gypsy horse’s facial profile should be straight with a “sweet” head. The neck is strong, muscular and of medium length with a deep throatlatch. The chest should be broad, deep and well-muscled with withers that are well rounded. The back is short-coupled with well sprung ribs and a deep heart girth. The Gypsy horse is mannerly and manageable, eager to please, intelligent, confident, courageous, alert and loyal with a “genuine friendly outlook.” Over the centuries the Travelers and the Romani people bred their horses not only for eye-catching coat colors, profuse feathers and strong bones, but also for high action and small size. The breed most used to create the horse of today was the Dales Pony, described as “thick, strong . . . active yet a great puller.” Other important breeds in the Gypsy’s genetic make-up include the Shire and the Clydesdale. All horses with feathers evolved from a prehistoric, hairy-legged horse called the Forest Horse. “Feather” or long hair on the lower legs is a recessive trait, so in order to develop a horse breed with more feather than any other horse, the British Gypsies only bred horses that had feathers. The feathers on a Gypsy Vanner should start at the knees and the hocks and cover the hooves. Although there have been purposeful breeding programs for Gypsy horses for centuries, there was no written studbook: people communicated pedigree information orally only. It was not until 1996 that the first studbook came into being, created by an American couple, Dennis and Cindy Thompson, who established the Gypsy Vanner as an official breed. In that year, they started the Gypsy Vanner Horse Society to bring recognition and respect to the horses and to the people who breed them. Since that time, several other registries and studbooks have been created in the United States and various other countries, and Gypsy horses have gained a worldwide following. The Thompsons, who live in Florida, say that they first encountered Gypsy horses while on a business trip to England and they “just fell in love” with a colorful piebald stallion they saw at pasture. He had an elegant head, very hairy legs and a certain charisma that captivated them. They stopped at the farm to ask who owned this unusual animal, and the farmer told them he was temporarily keeping the horse for a Traveler, and that he also had a hidden band of mares that looked just like him. Fascinated, the Thompsons spent the remainder of that day talking

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horses with the Travelers. To their delight, they learned that the owner of the stallion was willing to sell him. About a year later, that stallion and a small band of mares arrived in the United States. Today 42 descendants of those first imported horses roam the pastures of Gypsy Gold Farm in Ocala. Gypsy horses have also made their way to Aiken. For instance, Lisa Killion, a realtor with Coldwell Banker, has six of them at her Gypsy Pride Farm. She said she “just fell in love” when she saw her first Gypsy Vanner at the New Jersey State Fair some 10 to 15 years ago, but it wasn’t until she bought her farm in Aiken that she was able to own one at last. “They were expensive and as a single mom I couldn’t afford one,” she said. “Then I moved to Aiken two years ago and met him (gesturing to her partner, Joe Driscoll, across the table) and the conversation one evening over dinner turned to what kind of horse he wanted.” “I said I wanted a horse that was like a dog,” Joe explained, “And she kept trying to tell me that horses and dogs are not the same. Then she showed me pictures of Friesians, she showed me pictures of Clydesdales, then of Gypsy Vanners, and of course they were the flashy ones and I said I want that one. And she said ‘of course you would pick the most expensive’. So we talked about it for a bit and we decided that, yes, that’s what we would like to do, to get into the Gypsies.” The horses at Gypsy Pride Farm in Aiken are typical Vanners: superfriendly, leaving their hay to follow us around, bumping us to be petted. Indeed, the Gypsy horse is the closest thing on hooves to a dog, just what Joe wanted. “You can scratch on them all day long,” he said, “You can put your arms around them. They love to be loved on.” They are also super-smart and easily trained. SD Ebony Lass, a 5 year old, is Lisa’s trail horse. The first time Lisa ever took her into the Hitchcock Woods this fall, she had been ridden a total of five times; three before Lisa bought her and two around the farm. “She was awesome,” Lisa said. “Here we are in 2,000 open acres and nothing bothered her.” Lisa and Joe of have two short-term goals for Gypsy Pride Farm. One is to show off the Gypsy Vanner in Aiken. “We’ve seen the beautiful hunters and jumpers and dressage horses here, the Thoroughbreds and warmbloods,” Joe explained, “But we want the world to see this fabulous, smart little horse.” Gypsy horses are versatile, competing successfully in dressage, jumping, reining, Western and English Pleasure and, of course, driving. Morgan Batton, an Aiken newcomer, successfully showed her client’s 4-year old Gypsy Vanner in Introductory Level dressage at Stable View this summer. Lisa and Joe’s second short term goal is to find a way to use their Gypsy Vanners as therapy horses. “They are not flighty,” said Joe, “They are so eager to do what you want to do. They are so smart. I can’t imagine these horses wouldn’t be a benefit to somebody who needed that kind of therapy. I know they benefit me, especially after a stressful day. Just being around the horses is what I enjoy. They would be adored by anybody around them.” Their long term plan is breeding and growing their herd. “We are not into breeding to get rich,” Lisa said with a laugh. “It is the love and the passion. You don’t make money.” Right: A Gypsy Vanner, photographed by Mark J. Barrett; www.markjbarrett.com. Below: images provided by Gypsy Gold Farm

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Book Reviews

by Diana Hunt

LEAVING THE WILD

The Unnatural History of Dogs, Cats, Cows, and Horses By Gavin Ehringer Despite writing about and being around animals all his life, the author Gavin Ehringer never gave much thought to how and why these animals allowed themselves to be domesticated in the first place. The person who changed his thinking was the natural horsemanship trainer Buck Brannaman. Brannaman told Ehringer “These animals gave up their freedom and their fear of us when they left the wild and came into our campfire. They serve us in many ways. In return, we owe them our care and our understanding.” This thought sent Ehringer on a journey of discovery. Domestication is not a one-way street: each species extracts some advantage, he says. The narrative Ehringer weaves is a mixture of natural and human history, science and personal experience, helping us understand our respective places in the world. The book is divided into sections, each exploring the domestication of a different species The section about horses is fascinating. According to the author, one thing that is so evident about domestication is the human’s role in changing the DNA of the animals we love. We are always on the lookout for the next, better horse, seeking to capture or recapture the exquisite feeling of being one with a powerful creature. Horses evolved on the North American continent for 50 million years, but the last representatives of the species disappeared from this continent 7,600 years ago, not to return until the arrival of the Spanish Conquistadors. But early horses were flourishing on the Eurasian Steppes, which stretched from Asia to Europe. As people moved from a hunter/ gatherer way of life to a nomadic one of shepherding animals for food and clothing, they discovered the value of domesticating the horse. The transition from hunting to keeping tamed livestock has been called the most important change in social and cultural behavior in the history of the human species, but it was just as important for the horse species. Ever since their first domestication, horses have been selectively bred for various traits. The Arabian is a prime example of humans changing a species to fit their desires. Descended from ungainly Mongolian ponies, the Arabian has been praised as the most ethereal of horse breeds, having developed their traits in the climate and culture of the desert Bedouins. They were admired not only for their beauty but for their speed, agility, endurance, strength, gentle dispositions and eagerness to learn. Fast forward to the United States in the 1980s, when Ronald Reagan was in the White House. Reagan was a cowboy enthusiast and his favorite horse was El Alamein, a fiery white half-Arabian, half-Thoroughbred stallion. As president, he turned horse breeding into a profitable tax shelter by creating tax incentives for a variety of businesses as a way to stimulate the economy. Suddenly, horse ownership became a favorite hobby of celebrities, millionaires and ambitious entrepreneurs.. The dramatic, stylish, imported Arabian became the most marketed breed. Few people bought them to ride; they purchased them as an investment, for the prestige of ownership and purely for speculation. The center of this horse craze was Scottsdale, Arizona, where untested horses sold at gala auctions for millions of dollars. It was an exhilarating out-of-this-world fantasy. Clueless owners bred everything to anything and the number of Arabians skyrocketed. Prices for purebreds continued to climb, until 1986, when the tax code loopholes were closed and the fantasy collapsed. Prized $100,000 horses were suddenly worthless. Thousands of horses were left starving or sent to slaughter as speculators pulled out of the business. Damage to the Arabians extended beyond the individual horses that found themselves in dire circumstances. Indiscriminate breeding during those high-flying years produced many horses with undesirable traits, and it will take generations to weed out the poorly bred lines. Profligate breeding and tax shelters also affected generations of the

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American Quarter Horse. In AQHA circles, the show horse that won the most was always in great demand as a stud. With today’s high tech breeding techniques (artificial insemination, embryo transfer, frozen semen) one stallion could reproduce himself and his traits– the good, bad and ugly – many thousands of times over. Inbreeding increases the odds of unhealthy genes being passed on, and the result of futurity events in cutting, reining and barrel racing, which award huge prize money to very young horses is that winning stallions often are put out to stud at 4. That leaves a lot of years for breeding bad things. According to the author, by changing nature’s course we have sometimes created unnecessary weaknesses in many horse breeds, perhaps in a permanent way. Each purebred animal developed certain characteristics suitable for a particular type of work, but poorly-thoughtout breeding practices run the risk of undoing generations of careful management. Ehringer argues for setting things back in balance through the adoption of high ethical and moral standards in the care, showing and breeding of our animals. Leaving the Wild is available from Pegasus Books, www.pegasusbooks.com or from your favorite bookseller.

SPIRIT

A Book of Happiness for Horse Lovers compiled by Anouska Jones

This book is an uplifting, cheerful book of horsey quotations that will leave you smiling. Some quotations are by famous people and some by people who are not so famous, but all demonstrate affection for horses. Each quotation is on a page with an accompanying photo on the opposite page. The book is high quality, over-sized and beautifully designed. It also contains some interesting facts. For instance, the saying “There is nothing so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse,” is often attributed to Winston Churchill. According to this book, however, the person who first said it was Sir John Lubbock, a member of the British nobility who lived from 1865-1900. Lubbock was Charles Darwin’s neighbor, friend and collaborator, an influential author, a politician and an archaeologist. This book makes a great gift for Christmas or any time of year. Available from your favorite bookseller.

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Senior Citizens

The Old Horse Dilemma

by Pam Gleason; Photography by Gary Knoll

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hen George Thorndike Angell visited France in 1869, he was invited to dinner at a private home, where he was surprised to be served horse meat: “The use of which is very common there, and saves many old horses past use from cruelty,” he wrote. “If I had not known, I would have supposed it some kind of wild game and the taste not at all disagreeable.” What is striking about this statement is not what it said, but who said it. Angell was one of the main leaders of the humane movement in the United States. He was the founder of the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the second oldest humane organization in the country, as well as of the American Humane Education Society. Humane education for school children was one of his great passions, and he promoted a greater understanding of animals’ interior lives. As an evangelist for animal welfare, one of his primary tools was the book Black Beauty, which he daiscovered in England and brought back with him to the United States, referring to it as the “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” of the horse. (Uncle Tom’s Cabin, written in 1852, is often considered one of the catalysts of the Civil War, since it enlightened its readers about the cruelty of slavery.) He had thousands of copies of Black Beauty printed and distributed to children around the country, hoping that the book would inspire a generation of animal lovers who understood that horses were not just machines but thinking, feeling creatures. Angell’s matter-of-fact acceptance, and tacit approval of eating horse meat might seem to be at odds with this humane mission, but to him it made perfect sense. In the late 1900s, American cities were crowded and bustling with activity. Before the automotive revolution, they were also filled with horses performing all kinds of work, but especially pulling carriages and hauling heavy loads. Thinking back to the days before the “horseless carriage” many of us probably envision idyllic scenes in a countryside unmarred by superhighways, with the sound of birds chirping in the trees. But the reality in many cities would be pretty grim for a horse lover. Working horses were often underfed, overworked, and cruelly treated. Horses were literally worked to death on a routine basis, dropping in the street where their carcasses might even be left to rot for weeks. According to the New York Times, in 1880, the City of New York removed 15,000 dead horses from its streets. That means an average of 41 horses died there every day. Compared to being forced to work until they dropped in their harnesses, a speedy death at a slaughterhouse does sound like a kinder option. For Angell, as for other members of the 19th century movement, the humane mission was to exercise benevolent stewardship over animals, not to grant them personhood. Slaughtering them and eating them was perfectly all right, as long as they did not suffer unduly in the process.

Old Horses Today

Fast-forward to today, and thing have changed quite a lot. Horses, no longer needed for hauling and transportation, became our partners in sport. Over the past few decades, they have also, increasingly, become considered part of our families. This new status is somewhat at odds with horse sports and with the horse business. We buy horses that can help us be competitive in our chosen sports, and when they are no longer working for us, we often sell them along, trading them in for younger, faster, sounder, models. This is how the world of equestrian sports works and this model has many benefits. Older, seasoned horses can be paired with younger, less experienced riders, giving the horses jobs and the riders invaluable partners. But the sports-partner model begins to break down when the horse has an injury that makes him unrideable or when when he simply gets too old to compete. When the horse no longer has a “use,” he begins to enter dangerous territory. Some people have the means and the facilities

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to keep their old or their lame horses, caring for them as pets until the end of their days. Others do not. People who don’t have their own farms may only be able to afford board on one horse. If the horse they bought as a schoolmaster a few years ago is no longer rideable and they want to continue to ride, they need to find a solution. In the sportspartner model of horse ownership, the horse needs to find a new home so that the owner can purchase another partner to continue competing. But in the family pet/family member model, this solution is often not acceptable. If our horses are our pets, we owe it to them to ensure their comfort and safety even when they are no longer useful to us. The longevity of horses makes the old horse dilemma especially acute. With proper attention to teeth and diet along with a good worming program, a horse that retires in his early 20s could easily live another decade. Older horses do not tend to be easy keepers and can be expensive to feed. Horse owners who would never dream of selling their horses when they become senior citizens might find themselves supporting two or three pensioners in addition to their current performance partners. This can strain budgets to the breaking point, but there are few ways around the fact that, if we are to care for our horses until they die from natural causes, it is not going to be cheap.

Retirement Farms

One solution to the old horse dilemma is to find somewhere less expensive to send a retired horse. In this area, there is no shortage of farms that specialize in equine retirement, as well as farms whose main business is competition horses but also take in seniors. The price of board at these farms varies quite a bit, as does the level of care that the horse receives and how he is kept. What kind of facility you should choose for a retired horse depends as much on your horse’s personality and lifestyle as it does on your budget. A horse that has lived turned out his whole life might do well at a no-frills retirement home where he stays outside with just a run-in shed or trees for shelter. A show horse that has spent his whole life in a stall might be happy to live out and “finally be a horse,” or he might be horrified if he doesn’t get to sleep in his own stall every night. Obviously, a horse that needs a stall is likely to be more expensive to keep than a horse on turnout. One drawback to sending your old horse to a retirement farm is that when you no longer see him every day, there is a tendency to fall into the “out-of-sight, out-of-mind” syndrome. This is especially true if the retirement farm is far away from you. Visiting your old horse regularly is always a good idea, especially if you have any questions about your horse’s condition. If you can’t visit, asking for regular updates, with pictures, can be the next best thing. Not only does this keep you in touch with your horse, it also reminds the caretaker that you are thinking about your horse, and might mean he gets more attentive care. There are many excellent retirement homes for horses, but there are also some where there might be too many horses, and your old horse could suffer from neglect if you don’t keep on top of his condition. Sending a horse to a retirement farm is a far bigger responsibility than many people realize. As the owner of the horse, you are still the one who must look out for his well-being, whether that means ensuring that the owner of the farm is taking appropriate care of him, or being sure that you continue to pay your board, farrier and veterinary bills on time and throughout your horse’s retirement. It also means that you are the one who must make responsible end-of-life decisions for him. “A lot of people are worried about their horses for the first year or two,” says Jill Diaz, who has some retirees at Estancia La Victoria, a polo training and boarding facility in Wagener. “But then they stop calling, and they start complaining about their bill, and they don’t want to keep paying. But I am feeding their horses, and it isn’t cheap for me either.” People who run retirement facilities for horses can find themselves

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in very difficult positions. It is standard practice for horses that are left behind at a boarding facility without payment to be considered abandoned, giving the owner of the farm the right to sell them after a designated period of time. This works when the horse is valuable, but old horses that can’t be ridden have little value, except to the slaughter market, and few owners of retirement farms would consider getting into that business. If you stop paying (and surprising numbers of people do, even with good boarding contracts) the owner of the farm is faced with taking on the expense himself, or with disposing of your horse another way, such as euthanasia. For a horse with significant lameness or other problems, euthanasia may be the best solution. For a healthy, happy older horse, however, it feels like a betrayal. In its purest form, euthanasia should be performed to relieve the horse from suffering, not for the convenience of the owner’s bank account. On the other hand, some people believe that putting a horse down before his health has declined is the kindest option, ensuring that he never suffers at all.

The Giveaway Horse

“We got a call from the woman who was managing his estate asking us if we could take her,” says Caroline. “He didn’t have any plans in his estate for taking care of his horses if he died unexpectedly. The horse was 31 or 32 at the time, and he surely thought he was going to outlive his horse, but unfortunately he didn’t and so that horse had nowhere to go and very easily could have ended up at the auction or at the slaughterhouse. “The reason we said yes to this horse was that she was clearly very loved, and we felt like it was a good chance to educate the public on these situations because they happen all the time.” Now, Equine Rescue has a program to help people make sure that their horses are covered in their wills, and to provide a home for those horses if need be, along with financial support to prevent them from becoming someone else’s burden. “It’s something that we always tell people on our tours,” says Caroline. “Even if you have family, your family doesn’t always want your animals. They can fall through the cracks so easily. It’s a bad problem and it’s something that people don’t think about.”

“Almost every day we get calls from people who have older horses and they don’t want to pay for them anymore,” says Caroline Mulstay, who is the rescue manager at Equine Rescue of Aiken. “We have to explain to them that we are constantly full and that we are an adoption facility, not

Senior Citizens Today

a sanctuary, and we can’t take them. We just can’t afford it.” Although it is certainly possible to find a good home for your old horse, giving him away to someone you don’t know well is generally not a safe option. Horses that have been given away run the risk of ending up in bad places or in poor condition. This is especially true for old horses who require special care and feeding. There are many horror stories about giveaway horses that are later found in slaughter lots, or are discovered emaciated and suffering in the backyard home of someone who lost interest in them or thought they could survive through the winter on a weedy pasture. “When people call us about an old horse, we might start out by giving them advice on what feed to give the horse that is going to be the most beneficial for the horse and for their finances,” says Caroline. “With certain people we discuss the possibility of euthanasia because, as hard as it is, it is a better thing for the horse than just giving it away and potentially having it end up in a bad situation. That’s why, the senior horses that we do have here, we don’t adopt them out because they are at such a high risk of ending up in a bad spot. I might explain to them that they have a responsibility to the horse, and we believe that responsibility goes to the very end. Sometimes euthanasia is not the worst thing that can happen.”

better cared for and live longer than in the past. We know more about their health needs and we focus more on their happiness and quality of life. This is not to say that we do not have abuse and neglect, or that the majority of horses necessarily spend their golden years in comfortable retirement. But there is a growing awareness that we do have a responsibility to our old horses, and an increasing sense that these horses are pets and family members rather than tools to be discarded when we no longer need them. There is also a better understanding of what happens to horses that are not provided for in retirement. Better sharing of information, the rise of the Internet and the stories told by a growing number of horse rescuers make it much harder for people to believe the fairytales they might once have told themselves about the fate of old camapigners that they give away or sell. People who keep and care for their old horses are often quite attached to them, both because they might have a shared history going back decades and because old horses themselves tend to have special qualities. “The old horses we have at the rescue are my favorite horses on the property,” says Caroline Mulstay. “There is something about an animal that has lived that long. They are wise in a way that I can’t explain and they are so appreciative to get some attention and to get loved on and have treats. These horses do so much for people, they bring people so much joy while they are younger, it makes me really upset to see any senior horse fall through the cracks. You never know how much that horse has done for somebody. Just because they are older doesn’t mean you should throw them away. They deserve all the respect and the care in the world.”

Estate Planning

Of course, Equine Rescue does take in some old horses. One fairly recent example is Franny, a 34-year-old Thoroughbred who is the oldest horse at the rescue. Franny came to ERA a few years ago after her owner, a 62-year-old man, died unexpectedly of a heart attack.

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A lot has changed since the late 1800s, when the leader of a humane movement might consider the practice of eating horse meat a reasonable solution to the problem of what to do with old horses. Our horses are

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Directory of Services BARNS,CONSTRUCTION & REMODELING

Aiken Horse Blanket. Servicing equestrians with high quality horse blanket repair, wash and waterproof. or your convenience, drop off locations are; Aiken Saddlery, 1044 E. Pine Log Rd, Aiken, 29803 or the 302 General Store, 4746 Wagener Rd. Wagener, 29164. www.aikenhorseblanket.com; on fb Aiken Horse Blanket Group. Contact Elisa @803-640-3211.

Aiken Horsemanship Academy. Your naturally inspired adult learning resource! Offering Clinics, Courses, Starting Young Horses, Evaluations, and Lessons. www. JulieRobins.com 803-641-4715. Hunter/Jumper Trainer with winners at WEF, Indoors and Big Eq Finals. Will come to you. Cindy Purcell. 803-649-0990. Jodi Hemry Eventing. Three-Star Eventer offering professional training, sales, boarding, instruction, horse shows, located in the heart of Aiken, SC. 803-6406691 JodiHemryEventing@gmail.com www.JodiHemryEventing.com Dressage in Aiken. Tanya Rennie will be teaching here in February and March, at her place or yours. She is a USDF Gold Medalist with a 5-Star rating from Centerline Scores. Training horses and riders for over 30 years. Students at Training Level through Grand Prix; AA, Jr/YR, and Professionals. Talk or text 207-831-4263. Complete bio at www.viennafarm.com Riding With Reason. Want to improve your riding position, balance and confidence and work in sync with your horse? Try a lesson on the Equi-simulator in our purpose built classroom here in Aiken or bring your own horse for a ridden lesson. Agent for ‘Heather Moffett’ Soft tree saddles. Yvonne Brookes: 803 842 3114; info@ridingwithreason.com; www.ridingwithreason.com

BOARDING/TURNOUT/TRAINING/SALES

PHOTOGRAPHY & DESIGN SERVICES

Cooper Home and Stable. For Equestrians by Equestrians. A unique design and build general contractor specializing in equestrian construction and farm development, architecturally designed custom homes, historic renovations, remodeling and additions. Contact J. D. Cooper, cell 502-417-2307, office 803-335-3527, www. cooperhs.com. Joshua Jackson Builders. Building custom homes, barns, and estates in and around the Aiken area. Acreage available for sale. www.JoshuaJacksonBuilders.com 803-6422790 Larlee Construction, LLC. Fine Equestrian Facilities. 1096 Toolebeck Road, Aiken SC 29803. 803.642.9096. www.larleeconstruction.com.

BLANKET CLEANING & REPAIR

Chime Ridge Stables. Stalls available, full, partial or self care. Fun, friendly, adult atmosphere. Convenient to town, South Aiken 803-508-3760. Du Lop Acres. Retirement/Rehab. The farm is based in one of the quietest areas of South Carolina and is ideal for any horse to retire or rehabilitate. A peaceful farm for horses offering personalized full care for your horse. www.dulopacres.com. 858208-6027 The Stable On The Woods: Elite boarding & training facility and home to trainers Darrell and Melissa Vaughn. With access to Hitchcock Woods, our barn sits on 70 acres and boasts a full size dressage arena with mirrors, show jumping arena and high-quality grass pastures making this the ideal place for you and your horse. Training program to meet your needs, whether your discipline is Dressage, Eventing, Hunters, Jumpers or Foxhunting. www.thestableonthewoods.com 603.785.0435 Vaughn Equestrian: offering training, sales, and boarding. Professionalism is the guiding principle of owners Darrell and Melissa Vaughn in shaping every component of Vaughn Equestrian. Dressage, Jumpers, Eventing & Young Horses. training and sales. www.vaughnequestrian.com (603)-785-0435

COMPANION ANIMALS, CARE & SERVICES

Horses & Hounds Aiken, Pet & Horse-Sitting. Reasonable Rates, Bonded & Insured, Vet Assistant. 803-643-9972/803-443-8303. horsesandhoundsaiken@gmail.com; www.horsesandhoundsaiken.com. Palmetto Dog Club. Training classes, puppy socialization, obedience, rally & agility. 803-262-9686. www.palmettodogclub.org. Trinity Farms Terriers: Norfolk Terriers & Russell Terriers. Quality family dogs with proven calmer dispositions. Generations of great temperaments. Health/ dispositions guaranteed. Breeder of terriers for 30+ years. Donna Fitzpatrick. 803.648.3137. www.easyjacks.com & www.trinityfarmskennel.com & trinitynorfolkterriers.com.

FEED, SUPPLEMENTS & SUPPLIES

Aiken County Farm Supply. 1933 Park Ave., Aiken. 803.649.2987. Aiken Saddlery & Supply. Full service tack & feed store. 1044 E. Pine Log Rd., Aiken. 803.649.6583. www.aikensaddlery.com HAY Hoss Luva Hay! Exceptional quality Coastal Bermuda. Real fertilizer and lime to Clemson specs, not chicken litter. Never rained on. Square and round bales. Competitively priced. Can deliver state-wide. Fully enclosed truck. Satisfaction guaranteed. Jim McClain. 803.247.4803.

HOME & FARM SERVICES

A & A Septic Service. Pump septic system, build and repair leach lines and septic systems. Serving Aiken, Edgefield and Lexington counties. 803.507.1024 Be Fly Free. Automatic fly systems for barns and sheds. No unpleasant odor, no synthetic insecticides, no petroleum distillates. Call Carlos: 803-645-0361. www. beflyfree.com; carlos@beflyfree.com.

INSURANCE

Betsy Minton, Dietrich Insurance Company, 803. 617. 8353. Providing competitive comprehensive insurance for horses and farms. Excellent professional and personal service always delivered with a smile. www.betsyminton.com. 800 942 4258 Hutson-Etherredge Company. Insuring Aiken farms since 1876. Your hometown independent insurance agency can customize your equine property coverage by choosing the best company to fit your needs. We are a full service insurance agency. Call Sandi Vogus for a quote! 803-649-5141

INSTRUCTION/LESSONS

Gary Knoll Photography.com. Commercial, portrait, weddings, advertising. Pet portraits. Complete wide-format video service. 803.643.9960 410.812.4037. www. garyknollphotography.com

REAL ESTATE/ RENTALS

Aiken Fine Homes and Land. Specializing in selling or renting homes, farms, land & barns for short or long term leases. 28 years experience in helping people find the property of their dreams, even if it takes building it! Call Barbara Lawrence, 803439-0778 for honest & realistic answers to your real estate questions. Aiken Luxury Rentals. Distinctive accommodations for horse & rider in beautiful Aiken, SC. Downtown fully furnished cottages, historic stables. Executive relocation; corporate housing. Short & long term. www. aikenluxuryrentals.com; info@aikenluxuryrentals.com. 803.648.2804. Carolina Real Estate Company. Fine homes, estates and horse properties in Aiken, South Carolina. Let us welcome you home to AIKEN, Home of Horses, History & Hospitality! www.carolinahorseproperties.com. (803) 648-8660 Black Sheep Farm. Unfurnished 3 Bed/ 2 bath cottages for long term rental and small furnished loft apartment, small guest house for short term 2 night to seasonal rental, charming pastoral setting yet proximate to downtown Aiken, and Hitchcock Woods. Horses and pets welcome. 904-234-9596 Magnolia Shadows Equestrian Retreat: Where European hospitality meets Southern charm. Offering horse boarding and bed & breakfast with the traveling horseman in mind. Charming 1895 plantation house, guest cottage, barn apartment, RV sites, matted stalls, 7 paddocks with run-in sheds, arena & riding trails for longand short-term stays. 20 minutes from historic downtown Aiken in Ridge Spring. Dog boarding also available. www.magnoliashadows.com / 803-522-1226 / info@ magnoliashadows.com. Sharer Dale, RE/MAX, Tattersall Group. “Where town meets country.” sharerdale@ gmail.com. www.sharerdale.remax-carolina.com 803.522.3648. Suzy Haslup, Meybohm. “Your Aiken Horse Real Estate Specialist.” Buying or selling in the most celebrated equine community in the South. ww.aikenhorserealty.com; 803-215-0153 Tracey Kenworthy Turner, Meybohm. Specializing in marketing & selling Aiken’s horse country properties for 15+ years. www.southernhorsefarms.com. 803-2154734.

TACK & TACK CLEANING/REPAIR

Tack and harness cleaning and conditioning. Will come to your farm Reasonable rates, $15 per hour. Call Bernadette: 910-639-3115. Finally Found it Equestrian has some of the horse world’s favorite brands & products. Specialized attention. Place orders from your phone! Specializing in JPC and Equine Couture products. Also stocking gently loved items. I will buy used tack, bits ,bridles etc. No consignment items. Tack shack at 3914 Wagener Rd. Aiken, S.C. Appointments preferred or by chance. www.finallyfounditequestrian.com. 803640-2339 for monthly specials. The Saddle Doctor. Saddlery and harness repair. 538 Two Notch Rd. HollyMacSpencer@aol.com. 803.642.5166.

YOGA/FITNESS

Aiken Yoga. At Aiken Yoga we are passionate about sharing the benefits that regular Yoga practice has on one’s wellbeing, energy level and state of mind. In addition to Yoga classes, including Yoga for Equestrians, we offer Pilates, Barre and Teacher Certification. Sarah Acord, RN, 116B Pendleton St. Aiken. 803-524-8833, sarah@ aikenyoga.com; www.aikenyoga.com for schedule.

Amy McElroy. USDF Gold Medalist and USEF S judge. Instruction and training at all levels. Visit www.amymcelroy.com or call 803.640-4207.

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Classifieds Nice Double Wide

3/2 on 10 acres across from Gopher Tortoise Preserve. Ideal for riding and hunting $69,000 Priscilla Denehy Meybohm RE 803-617-9706

Land For Sale

10 ac off 78 in Aiken. Fenced, in grass and horse shelter. Karenphillis@yahoo.com 803 646-8606

Antique Farm House on 6.3 acres with fenced pasture stalls. 2 car garage-carport + pool. Potential for Apartment over barn/ garage pond view creek - Beautiful wood floors - Character detail. 7 minutes to Williston! Formerly the “Diamond Home” moved from Elko to Blackville by Mennonites. $200,000 Priscilla Denehy Meybohm RE 803-617-9706

Antique Victorian Child’s Push Sleigh

Burgundy With Gold Pinstriping: Circa mid to late 1800’s. This replica of the full-size horse drawn sleighs is in original condition including paint, striping, tufted horse hair upholstery. The handle is removable. $575.00. Email for more pictures or information. redpony7250@gmail.com. 803-645-7538.

BOARDING/TURNOUT Mill Race Farm, Aiken, SC. Warm weather luxury horse retirement, breaking, training, layups. 803-6401818 Chime Ridge Stables. Stalls available, full, partial or self care. Fun, friendly, adult atmosphere. Convenient to town, South Aiken 803-508-3760. BUILDING/REPAIRS/PAINT Building & Repair: Carpentry, Doors, Windows, Decks, Cabinets, Trim, Stairs, Railings, Gates, Wood Siding, Floors, Framing, Repairs. Licensed, bonded, insured. Contact Paul Dyches. paul.t.dyches@gmail. com. 803-645-6645. Interior/Exterior Painting. Fast, affordable service. One room or entire house; decks, sheds, barns. Great local references. Call Mitzi Brownlee, Georgia/Carolina Local Painter. 803450-8872. HAY Top Quality Second Crop Alfalfa & second crop grass hay from Salem, Ohio, delivered. 330-692-5925. Round and Square Bales. Oakwood Farms: 3593 Silver Bluff Road, Aiken SC 29803. $60 per bale round

hay bales. $70 per bale round bales kept inside. Square bales at $7.00 per bale. Will deliver for a small fee. Please call 706-830-2600 or 803827-0864. email garymcelmurray@ glmconstruction.net PETS&SERVICES Horses & Hounds Aiken, Pet & Horse-Sitting. Reasonable Rates, Bonded & Insured, Vet Assistant. 803-643-9972/803-443-8303. horsesandhoundsaiken@gmail.com; www.horsesandhoundsaiken.com. Black Russian Terrier Puppies: Call Karen. 803-646-8606; karenphillis@ yahoo.com Trinity Farms Terriers: Norfolk Terriers & Russell Terriers. Quality family dogs with proven calmer dispositions. Generations of great temperaments. Health/dispositions guaranteed. Breeder of terriers for 30+ years. Donna Fitzpatrick. 803.648.3137. www.easyjacks.com & www.trinityfarmskennel.com & trinitynorfolkterriers.com. Palmetto Dog Club. Training, obedience, rally, agility. 803-262-9686. www.palmettodogclub.org.

REAL ESTATE & RENTALS Black Sheep Farm. Unfurnished 3 bed/ 2 bath cottages for long term rental and small furnished loft apartment, small guest house for short term 2 night to seasonal rental, charming pastoral setting yet proximate to downtown Aiken, and Hitchcock Woods. Horses and pets welcome. 904-234-9596 Aiken, SC: Available: 2 six stall barns & turnout. 3 BR. living quarters. Show ring & riding trails. 803-640-1818 For Rent: 10 acres, 10 stalls. 2-bedroom, 2-bath. Close-in to town. $2,000 per month. 803-474-5194

Private Farm has seasonal room for rent near Full Gallop & Paradiae Farm. Possible stall for horse. Call 803-640-2339. RIDING LESSONS Dressage in Aiken. Tanya Rennie will be teaching here in February and March, at her place or yours. She is a USDF Gold Medalist with a 5-Star rating from Centerline Scores. Training horses and riders for over 30 years. Students at Training Level through Grand Prix; AA, Jr/YR, and Professionals. Talk or text 207831-4263. Complete bio at www. viennafarm.com

Magnolia Shadows Equestrian Retreat Where European hospitality meets Southern charm. Offering Horse Boarding and Bed & Breakfast Services with the traveling horseman in mind. Charming 1895 plantation house, guest cottage, barn apartment, RV sites, matted stalls, 7 paddocks with run-in sheds, arena and riding trails for long- and short-term stays. 20 minutes from historic downtown Aiken in Ridge Spring. Dog boarding also available on the premises. www.magnoliashadows.com / 803-522-1226 / info@magnoliashadows.com.

Advertising in The Aiken Horse CLASSIFIED ADS are $25 for the first 30 DIRECTORY LISTING ADS: $25 per issue words & 40 cents for every word or $90 for the year (6 issues.) thereafter. BUSINESS CARDS: $60 per issue or $240 PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for horses: $35; for the year (6 issues.) Limit 30 words & one picture DISPLAY ADS are available in a range of PHOTO CLASSIFIEDS for real estate, etc. sizes. For a detailed rate sheet and $45; Limit 60 words & one picture. publication schedule, visit our website: BOXED CLASSIFIEDS: add $5 to your total www.TheAikenHorse.com

December-January 2017-18

MAILING ADDRESS: The Aiken Horse, P.O. Box 332, Montmorenci, SC 29839 EMAIL: theAikenHorse@gmail.com We accept Visa, Mastercard, Discover and American Express.

Advertise in the Feb/March issue! Deadline: January 12, 2018 Publication date: February 2, 2018

Pay online: www.TheAikenHorse.com or call us: 803.643.9960

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Odors Never Sleep.

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I-20 Exit 101

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For Booking Information (803) 983-0366 info@scequinepark.com Dates Subject to Change

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288 STALLS WITH RUBBER MATS, 3 EXHIBIT RINGS WITH STATE OF THE ART FOOTING, 2 COVERED ARENAS, FANS, CATTLE PENS, GENEROUS SPACE FOR LUNGEING AND SCHOOLING, AND VENDOR AREA

scequinepark.com Camden SC I-20 Exit 101 December-January 2017-18

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Aiken Women’s Challenge, Aiken Polo Club


Photography by Pam Gleason and Gary Knoll


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Aiken Area Calendar of Events

DECEMBER

Nov. 30-3 Equus Events USEF Horse Show. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@ aikenhorsepark.org, www.aikenhorsepark.org 1 Moonlight Ride. 5:30pm. F.E.N.C.E, 3381 Hunting Country Road, Tryon, NC. 828.859.9021, www.fence.org 1-3 SCHJA Palmetto Finals. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Rd, Camden, SC. www.scequinepark.com 1-3 Grand Oaks CDE/DT/CT ADS North American Preliminary ​Championship. Weirsdale, FL. www. aikendrivingclub.org 1-3 Carolina Classic Ranch Sorting. Braxton Training Center, 151 Red Hill Road, Edgefield, SC. Eddie Braxton, 850.496.6716, www.facebook.com/braxtontraining/ 2 Fourth Annual Southeast Hunter Trials. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. www.stableviewfarm.com 2 Just for Fun Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com 2 USEF/USEA Sporting Days Farm Horse Trials IV. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass, 610.613.2010; 803.648.0100. , jhallglass@aol.com, www. sportingdaysfarm.com. 803-648-0100 2 Equestrian Art Exhibit, Vineta Sayer at the SPCA Albrecht Center for Animal Welfare. 199 Willow Run Road, Aiken. 29801. Benefit for the SPCA and Equestrian Rescue of Aiken. 803-413-0839. 2-3 Trotting ‘Round the Tree Horse Show. T. Ed Garrison Arena, 1101 W Queen Street, Pendleton, SC. 864.646.2717, www. clemson.edu/public/garrison/calendar 3 Volunteer XC Schooling. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass, 610.613.2010; 803.648.0100. , jhallglass@aol.com, www. sportingdaysfarm.com. 803-648-0100 4 Grand Opening of Palmetto Feed Exchange. 1171 Richland Avenue SE, Aiken 29801. 803-955-6972

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Jumper Night at Stable View, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. www. stableviewfarm.com Wendy Murdoch Clinic. Happily Ever After Dressage, 260 Meadow Ridge Court, Aiken. Susan Neilson, 610.350.6777, sneil54530@aol.com, www.happilyeverafterdressage.com. Equus Events Horse Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. JP Goddard, 803.643.5698, www.willspark.com/equestrian-calendar Triangle Sandhills Holiday Classic. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www. carolinahorsepark.com GQHA Georgia Classic. Georgia National Fairgrounds, Perry, GA. www.gqha.com Pleasure Drive. Meadowridge Farm. 1521 Syrup Mill Road, Blythewood, SC. chateaulog@gmail.com, www. aikendrivingclub.com Holiday on a Horse Dressage Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. www.carolinadressage.com Tye Sturgeon Clinic. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www. aikenhorsepark.org Palmetto Paint Horse Show. South Carolina Equine Park, 443 Cleveland School Rd, Camden, SC. Anne Louise Miller, millawayranch@windstream.net, www.scequinepark.com Trick Riding and Training with Ashley Pletcher. Dragonfly Farm, 590 Implement Rd, Aiken. 29803. julierobinsinc@gmail. com, www.julierobins.com Tri-Meet: WRFH, AH, and Middleton. Aiken. www. whiskeyroadfoxhounds.com Schooling Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm.com Fun Show. Almost Heaven Stables, 220 Golf Course Road, Warrenville, SC. Valeria Beard, 803.663.3001 or 803.646.1021, almostheavenstables@msn.com, www.almostheavenstables.com Schooling Dressage Show. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. www.stableviewfarm.com

December-January 2017-18


14-17 Equus Events Horse Show. Wills Park Equestrian Center, 11925 Wills Rd, Alpharetta, GA. JP Goddard, 803.643.5698, www.willspark.com/equestrian-calendar 16 Hoofbeats and Christmas Carols Parade. Downtown Aiken. https://allevents.in/aiken%20county/hoofbeats-christmasparade/191934448047807# 16 New Bridge Fun Drive & Christmas Games. New Bridge Polo Club, Aiken. Peggy Dils, 8​ 03.295.6785, www.aikendrivingclub. com 16 Derby Cross. The Vista Schooling at Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. www.schoolthevista.com 16-17 Stepping Stone I USEF Horse Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com 18 Whiskey Road Foxhounds Hunter Pace. Oakwood Plantation, Firetower Road, Aiken. www.whiskeyroadfoxhounds.com 30 CEC Voxton Farm HJ Show. 226 Cleveland School Road, Camden, SC. 803.425.4795, www.voxtonfarm.com

JANUARY 3

4-7 6 6-7 7 9 10 11 11-12 11-14 11-14 13 13 13

13

13-14

Jumper Night. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. www.stableviewfarm.com Aiken Challenge I USEF HJ Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www. psjshows.com Apple Tree Farm 2-Phase Schooling Show. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com Michael Page Clinic. The Vista Schooling at Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. www.schoolthevista.com Schooling Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm.com Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www. aikenhorsepark.org Schooling Dressage Show. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. www.stableviewfarm.com Apple Tree Farm 2-Phase Schooling Show. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com Aiken Hound Trials at Belle Meade Hounds. 3532 Wrightsboro Rd, Thomson, GA. 706.595.2525, www. bellemeadehounds.com Aiken Challenge II USEF HJ Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com Lowcountry Hunt Weekend. Melinda Shambley, 843.571.1934, melinda@shambleyequine.com, www. thelowcountryhunt.com Pipe Opener I CT. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www.carolinahorsepark.com Schooling Show. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706-681-8748 www.poplarplacefarm.com Historic Stables Experience. $30/person. 8:45am. Rye Patch parking lot, 100 Berrie Road, Aiken. 803.643.2121 or 803.642.7631, halloffame@cityofaikensc.gov, www. aikenracinghalloffame.com/Historic_Stables_and_Barn_ Experience.html Pain-Free Rider’s Seminar. NC State College of Veterinary Medicine & Veterinary Hospital, 1060 William Moore Drive, Raleigh, NC. www.facebook.com/ WesternDressageAssociationNC/ USEF/USEA “Aiken Opener” Horse Trials. BN, N, T, P. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. www. stableviewfarm.com

December-January 2017-18

13-14 Ride Better Clinic. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie, Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail. com 13-20 Augusta Cutting Horse Futurity. James Brown Arena, 601 Seventh Street, Augusta, GA. 706.823.3417, augustafuturity. com 16 Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www. aikenhorsepark.org 17 SCDCTA CT & Dressage Show. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie, Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail.com 17 Winter Schooling Days. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www.carolinahorsepark.com 20 Apple Tree Farm 2-Phase Schooling Show. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com 20-21 Highfields Winter I PSJ Series HJ Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com 20-21 USEF/USEA Poplar Place Farm January H.T. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706-681-8748; www. poplarplacefarm.com 21 Combined Training Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm. com 22 Derby Cross. The Vista Schooling at Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. www.schoolthevista.com 23 Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www. aikenhorsepark.org 23,25 SWH Class. Dragonfly Farm, 590 Implement Rd, Aiken. 29803. julierobinsinc@gmail.com, www.julierobins.com 25 Apple Tree Farm 2-Phase Schooling Show. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com 26 Dressage Test-of-Choice Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www. fullgallopfarm.com 27 Winter Schooling Days. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www.carolinahorsepark. comJan 27-28 - Full Gallop Farm January H.T 27 CEC Toopler Branch HJ Show. Toopler Branch Farm, 1035 Lee Lane, Lugoff, SC. Tooplerbranch@hotmail.com, 803.699.2282, www.camdenequinecircuit.com 27-28 Dressage in the Park. Bruce’s Field at Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. www.aikenhorsepark.org 27-28 USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm. com 30 Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www. aikenhorsepark.org 30-31 USEA Winter Horse Trials. BN, N, T, P. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. www.stableviewfarm.com

FEBRUARY 1 3

Apple Tree Farm 2-Phase Schooling Show. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com Just for Fun Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com

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3-4 4

6 6

USEF/USEA Sporting Days Farm Horse Trials I. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass, 610.613.2010; 803.648.0100. ; 803.648.0100. jhallglass@ aol.com www.sportingdaysfarm.com USEF/USEA Poplar Place Farm February H.T. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706-681-8748; www. poplarplacefarm.com Volunteer XC Schooling. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass, 610.613.2010; 803.648.0100. jhallglass@aol.com, www. sportingdaysfarm.com Dressage Test-of-Choice Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www. fullgallopfarm.com Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www. aikenhorsepark.org

13 14 14 15 15-18 16-18 17 17-18 19 20 22 22-25 23-24

7 7 7 7-11 8-9

8-11 9 9-11 10

10 12

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USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm. com Jumper Night. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. www.stableviewfarm.com Winter Schooling Days. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd, Raeford, NC. 910.875.2074, www.carolinahorsepark.com WRFH Hunt Week. Aiken. www.whiskeyroadfoxhounds.com Apple Days 3 Phase. Sporting Days Farm, 3549 Charleston Highway, Aiken. Joannah Hall Glass, 610.613.2010; 803.648.0100. ; 803.648.0100. jhallglass@aol.com, www. sportingdaysfarm.com Cupid Classic USEF HJ Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com WRFH Hunt Ball. Aiken. www.whiskeyroadfoxhounds.com USEF/USEA Pine Top Intermediate H.T. Pine Top Farm, 1432 Augusta Highway, Thomson, GA. pinetopeventing@ gmail.com, www.pinetopfarm.com Backstretch Experience: Behind the Scenes at the Aiken Training Track. $30. 8:45am. Rye Patch parking lot, 100 Berrie Road, Aiken. 803.643.2121 or 803.642.7631, halloffame@ cityofaikensc.gov, www.aikenracinghalloffame.com/ Backstretch_Experience.html CEC Springdale Stables HJ Show. Pine Tree Stables, Camden, SC. Candi Cocks, 803.432.2703 or 803.243.4417, www. camdenequinecircuit.com Derby Cross. The Vista Schooling at Event Center, 859 Old Tory Trail, Aiken. www.schoolthevista.com12-18 Belle Meade Hounds Hunt Week. 3532 Wrightsboro Rd, Thomson, GA. 706.595.2525, www.bellemeadehounds.com

24 24 24 24-25 24-25 24-25 25 27 27 27 28

The Aiken Horse

Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www. aikenhorsepark.org Schooling Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm.com USEF/USDF “I Love Dressage” Show. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. www.stableviewfarm.com Apple Tree Farm 2-Phase Schooling Show. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com Carolina Classic USEF HJ Show Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www. psjshows.com USEF/USEA Paradise Farm H.T. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie, Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail.com Belle Meade Hounds 50th Annual Hunt Ball & Silent Auction. 3532 Wrightsboro Rd, Thomson, GA. 706.595.2525, www.bellemeadehounds.com Dressage I&II Show. Bruce’s Field at Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. www.aikenhorsepark.org Whiskey Road Foxhounds Hunter Pace. Oakwood Plantation, Firetower Road, Aiken. www.whiskeyroadfoxhounds.com Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www. aikenhorsepark.org Apple Tree Farm 2-Phase Schooling Show. Apple Tree Farm, 1530 Oak Ridge Club Road, Windsor, SC. 803.266.5870, apltrefarm@aol.com, appletreefarm.homestead.com USEF/USEA Pine Top Advanced H.T. Pine Top Farm, 1432 Augusta Highway, Thomson, GA. pinetopeventing@gmail. com, www.pinetopfarm.com Old Ford Fire Department Rodeo. Sen Bob Martin Ag Center, 2900 Highway 125 S., Williamston, NC. www.ipra-rodeo.com Schooling Horse Trials. Paradise Farm, 4069 Wagener Road, Aiken. Lellie, Ward, 803.640.4918, paradisefarmaiken@gmail. com Schooling Show. Poplar Place Farm, 8191 US Hwy 27, Hamilton, GA. 706-681-8748; www.poplarplacefarm.com Schooling Horse Trial. Jumping Branch Farm, 179 Fox Pond Road, Aiken. Julie Zapapas, 803.645.1098, zapapasJ@ bellsouth.net, jbfarm.com Eventing Academy. Stable View Farm, 117 Stable Drive, Aiken. www.stableviewfarm.com Highfields Winter II USEF HJ Show. Highfields, 147 Warehouse Rd, Aiken. 803.649.3505, psjshows@gmail.com, www.psjshows.com Low Country Dressage Classic I&II. Mullet Hall Equestrian Center, Mullet Hall Road, John’s Island, SC. www. carolinadressage.com/events Combined Training Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm. com Tuesdays in the Park. Aiken Horse Park, 931 Powderhouse Road, Aiken. 803.226.0121, info@aikenhorsepark.org, www. aikenhorsepark.org Dressage Test-of-Choice Show. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www. fullgallopfarm.com SWH Class. Dragonfly Farm, 590 Implement Rd, Aiken. 29803. julierobinsinc@gmail.com, www.julierobins.com USEF/USEA Horse Trials. Full Gallop Farm, 3828 Wagener Rd, Aiken. Lara Anderson, 803.215.6590, www.fullgallopfarm. com

December-January 2017-18


December-January 2017-18

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Business Cards

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December-January 2017-18


Monetta Farrier Specialties

Now with Two Great Locations

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December-January 2017-18

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Mortality FarM liability Care/Custody/Control shawna dietriCh

800-942-4258

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94

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December-January 2017-18

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Skills: entity Visual Id g Brandin Design Cohesion e r Servic Custome creative services • graphic design • web design

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December-January 2017-18


Advertiser

Page Section

Index of Advertisers Advertiser Advertiser

Page Section Page Section

Adams Horse and Pet Supplies

52

2

Fencing Solutions

32

1

Respond Systems

23

1

Aiken County Farm Supply

99

3

FOTAS Aiken

84

3

Sand Hill Realty

26

1

Aiken Equine & Associates

50

2

Foy Insurance

32

1

Sarahsetter Kennels

75

3

Aiken Fine Homes and Land

6

1

Gary Knoll Photography

88

3

Scribble Horse

22

1

Aiken Horse Show

79

3

Great Oak ATRC

38

1

Shadow Trailer World Inc.

100

3

Aiken Horsemanship Academy

30

1

Happily Ever After Dressage

64

2

Shane Doyle

37

1

Aiken Luxury Rentals

6

1

Indigo Moon

53

2

Smoking Gun Barbecue

32

1

Aiken Pet Fitness

57

2

Johnson’s Farm & Garden

38

1

South Carolina Equine Park 85

3

Aiken Saddlery, Inc.

65

2

Julia Kubicek

50

2

Southern Equine Service

31

1

Aiken Tack Exchange

50

2

Keller Williams- Gutierrez

22

1

15

1

Apple Tree Farm

50

2

Larlee Construction

5

1

Southern States Cooperative, Inc.

Auto Tech

61

2

Lightning Protection

32

1

SPCA Albrecht Center

89

3

B & H Storage

75

3

Mark Lexton

23

1

Sporting Days Farm

57

2

Barnware

38

1

Marrinson Stables

52

2

Spring Meadows

26

1

Bridlewood Farm

57

2

Matrix Corporate Park

36

1

Stable View Farm, LLC

51

2

Bulk Shavings

64

2

Meybohm RE Haslup

3

1

Supreme Top Form

14

1

Carol Gillis, DVM

9

1

Meybohm RE Vaillancourt

2

1

Susan’s Body Clipping

30

1

Carolina Cup Steeplechase

71

3

39

1

Sweet PDZ (PDZ Co. LLC)

85

3

Carolina Real Estate

16

1

Meybohm Realtors (Sullivan/Turner)

Terrybrooke Farm

51

2

Meybohm Realtors Stinson

4

1

The Tack Room

23

1

Carolina Real Estate

17

1

Morton Buildings

53

2

The Willcox

22

1

Clint Bertalan Farms LLC

98

3

Oak Manor Saddlery

13

1

Three Runs Plantation

40

1

Deceased Pet Care, inc.

85

3

Optimum Equine LLC

52

2

Tod’s Hill/ReMax

68

2

DFG Stables

53

2

Pait Show Horses

56

2

Trailer Country. LLC

67

2

Dogwood Construction

15

1

Palmetto Feed Exchange

6

1

Triple Crown Feeds

43

2

Downtown Dog

27

1

Paradise Farm

64

2

Twiffy Lane Farm

51

2

Earthmuffin Spa

22

1

Pat Blewett

9

1

UGA Veterinary Hospital

26

1

Epona

26

1

Patty Merli Saddles

53

2

Equine Divine

27

1

Polysols/GGT Footing

35

1

Wagons to Wagener

75

3

Equine Rescue of Aiken

70

3

Progressive Show Jumping

66

2

Warneke Cleaners

32

1

Estancia La Victoria

83

3

ReMax -S.Dale

18

1

Wolf Construction

42

2

Estrella Equine

44

2

ReMax -S.Dale

19

1

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‘TIS THE SEASON TRAILER WORLD

Georgia-Carolina

Wishes you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! Thank you to all our customers for a great year! FIND YOUR DEALER BY VISITING WWW. SHADOWTRAILERWORLD.COM or call: Shadow Trailer World Georgia-Carolina

Jeff Lehman

Toll-Free Number: (888)-749-4955

Profile for Aiken Horse Productions

Dec jan 17 18  

Dec jan 17 18