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O’hANGLUINN

The Surname ‘Anglin’

by Aidan Anglin

Image © GenealogyWorldwide.com

Contents 1

2

The Anglins of Ireland 1) Mapping the presence in Ireland of the surname Anglin 2) Tracing the origin of the surname O’hAngluinn 3) The O’hAngluinn surname in Ireland from 1600-1900 4) DNA and the Anglin story 5) Could there be other Sources for the Anglin surname? 6) Anglin genealogy… our identity 7) Unresolved issues 8) An historical supplement to the Anglin study 9) General conclusions The Anglins of the Diaspora 10) An overview of the Anglin Diaspora 11) Anglins in mainland Europe 15001800 12) The story of the Anglins in England 13) Immigration of Anglins into USA 14) The Canadian story 15) The Anglins of the Caribbean 16) Links between the Iberian Peninsula and the Anglin Story

A Research Report With Particular Reference to Pre-20th Centuries

Appendices 1) Research data showing location of Anglins in Ireland (updated 2010) 2) Searching Ireland for Anglin ancestors 3) Searching records outside Ireland for Anglin ancestors 4) American history page (years pre-1774) 5) The Anglins of Australasia 6) Pre-1800 O’hAngluinns / Anglins /Hanglins of Ireland 7) Pre-1800 Anglins of the Diaspora 8) Miscellaneous information on the Anglin surname 9) Final findings 10) 4th Edition supplement


CONTENTS SECTION 1

O’hAngluinn: The Anglins of Ireland ....................................................................... 7

Chapter 1

Mapping the presence in Ireland of the surname Anglin .............................................. 8

Chapter 2

Tracing the origin of the surname O’hAngluinn .............................................................. 23

Chapter 3

The O’hAngluinn surname in Ireland 1600-1900 .......................................................... 37

Chapter 4

DNA and the Anglin story .......................................................................................................... 56

Chapter 5

Could there be other sources for the Anglin surname? ................................................ 60

Chapter 6

Anglin genealogy – our identity .............................................................................................. 67

Chapter 7

Unresolved issues ......................................................................................................................... 72

Chapter 8

An historical supplement to the Anglin study .................................................................. 78

Chapter 9

General conclusions to Section 1 ........................................................................................... 85

SECTION 2

O’hAngluinn: The Anglins of the Diaspora ......................................................... 86

Chapter 10

An overview of the Anglin Diaspora ..................................................................................... 88

Chapter 11

Anglins in mainland Europe 1500-1800 ............................................................................ 95

Chapter 12

The story of the Anglins in England ................................................................................... 101

Chapter 13

Immigration of Anglins into the USA ................................................................................. 105

Chapter 14

The Canadian story ................................................................................................................... 116

Chapter 15

The Anglins of the Caribbean ............................................................................................... 120

Chapter 16

Links between the countries of the Iberian Peninsula and the Anglin Story .. 129

BIBLIOGRAPHY ......................................................................................................................................... 134 APPENDIX 1

Research data showing location of Anglins in Ireland (updated 2010) ............. 140

APPENDIX 2

Searching Ireland for Anglin ancestors ............................................................................ 152

APPENDIX 3

Searching records outside Ireland for Anglin ancestors .......................................... 161

APPENDIX 4

American history page (years pre-1774) ........................................................................ 163

APPENDIX 5

The Anglins of Australasia ..................................................................................................... 166

APPENDIX 6

Pre-1800 O’hAngluinns / Anglins /Hanglins of Ireland ........................................... 167

APPENDIX 7

Pre-1800 Anglins of the Diaspora ...................................................................................... 170

APPENDIX 8

Miscellaneous information on the Anglin surname .................................................... 172

APPENDIX 9

Final findings ............................................................................................................................... 178

APPENDIX 10

4th Edition supplement ............................................................................................................ 179


Foreword to the 2009 Updated Report A Foreword to the research material added in 2009, extending the original research report on ‘OhAngluinn, the Surname Anglin’, which was prepared in July 2008. The original document was a report on research carried out and published on the Internet in July 2008. Such research of its nature is ongoing. As further study continues new insights and sometimes new material is unearthed which is relevant to the study. The question arises, what is the best way to put this new material into the public domain? A solution would be to produce a second edition of the published research report. After consideration it was felt that this would be unwise. Instead, the new material is appended to appropriate chapters of the original research report in sections entitled ‘Further Developments’. The Appendices are treated in a similar fashion. To facilitate this approach, the Supplement added to the original Report, ‘An Introduction of the links between the countries of the Iberian Peninsula and the Anglin Story’, is now incorporated into the main body of the Research Report as Chapter 16. This allows for new material relevant to the Iberian story to be placed in the ‘Further Developments’ section of Chapter 16. The new material has meant that the content of the original Appendix 6 is no longer valid. It has therefore been replaced. The additional material within each chapter’s ‘Further Developments’ is sub-divided into: •

Corrections to the original report due to new understandings, and

New material

In view of these changes and also due to the material inserted as Further Developments, the page numbering has changed so that those who have an earlier download will find a discrepancy in page numbering when comparing the new with the old. The original report indicated directions for further study if the study were to be advanced. Those directions are: •

A deeper examination of the various geographically scattered Anglin groups within Ireland;

An effort to explore the shipping corridors along which the movement of Anglins would have historically occurred, and

An examination of relevant pre-1800 records, be they Literary; Estate records; Wills, or Town/Corporation/ Government records of County Cork and its environs.

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A real debt of gratitude for assistance with the new material is due to: •

Diarmuid O’Murhuadha, author of ‘Family Names of County Cork’, whose advice, guidance and corrections have been invaluable at many points during this further research;

Dr. John Mannion for his assistance regarding the Anglin migration to Newfoundland

Joanna Rothwell regarding Waterford Anglins and the Lismore Papers

Introductory Note After updating this research, my conclusion in regard to the spelling of our surname is: Anglin, Anglim, Hanglin are just different spellings of our original Gaeilge surname O’hAngluinn.

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Introduction This is a report or resume, of issues raised, findings uncovered and conclusions drawn from an ongoing study into the origins and scatter of the family name Anglin. Obviously it cannot be complete as it concerns a living line of people. As the study is ongoing, an area titled ‘Further developments’ is placed at chapter ends, to allow additions so the report can continue to be relevant. The form chosen for the report was guided by a desire to make the Anglin story available to the ordinary reader without the need to ‘wade through’ the mass of detail that underlies and supports the issues, findings and conclusions. However it has to be apparent the findings are based on reliable evidence, so footnotes and appendices are used. I researched the Anglin surname’s presence quite widely if not exhaustively. Initially gathering any available information from whatever source. A blessing in following this rather illogical approach was the comparative rarity of the surname, even if it’s spelling could vary. Gathering material in this manner resulted in occasionally being sidetracked, as unexpected information was unearthed1. But I lived with that. In deciding whether or not to accept the information gathered as valid I followed as a standard ‘is it written? And on face value does the written evidence seem reliable?’ This was necessary as too often hearsay, presented under various spurious guises, was and is put forward as fact2. There were migrations of the Irish, including Anglins, to two broad areas, mainland Europe and its colonial offshoots, and to England and the English speaking new world. Realizing historical events would be an essential backdrop; time was spent re-reading relevant aspects of Ireland’s historical relationship with England and mainland Europe, particularly the migrations to the continent and the new world. I do not have French or Spanish, but recently historical and genealogical material held for centuries in mainland Europe, relating to the Irish migrations is becoming available. A practical reason for building historical awareness is the fact genealogical records of Ireland’s past are sparse and even more so for a rare surname; however, history guides one towards substitute records. A brief sketch of relevant historical facts is given in a supplement after section 1 for the benefit of those Anglins living abroad, and a brief list of milestones in early US history is placed in an appendix for non American Anglins.

1

2

An example of this occurred while researching the early arrivals into the Americas; I realised the issue of ‘the Irish Slave’ and the ‘Black Irish’ may have relevance So often true in dealing with information on the Internet

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While it has been difficult at times to unearth Anglins of the past, in another way their rarity has given unexpected benefits. I found the story of the few Anglins involved in the Migration to Europe to be a mirror of the migration of Irish people to Europe in the years 1500 to 1900. Some of the study is still quite fragmentary but by putting all of it into the public domain other Anglin researchers may avoid walking roads already walked. An example of fragmentary and superficial work is the Australasian material but it is included as an appendix in the hope others will focus their research there. I add an apology to Anglin descendants who now live there. In the presentation, the report is divided into two sections, the first: ‘O'hAngluinn: the Anglins of Ireland’ to which is added an Historical Supplement’; the second, ‘The Anglins of the Diaspora’: with Bibliography and Appendices following. The first section ‘The Anglins of Ireland’ is divided into chapters. Each chapter examines a different thread. Each thread on its own presents a partial story but when drawn together as is attempted in Chapter 6 insight is improved and pathways indicated which make possible further progress in the research. While the Study’s purpose is the origin and scatter of the Anglin Name, it will involve genealogical research, but the building of individual family trees is not it’s direct purpose. I wish to express my thanks to Mary my wife for her patience as hours were spent in libraries and on the computer; to my brother Art for his help as various problems were analysed and to Alistair Johnston for his work in reading, correcting and giving the material its typesetting and presentation format. I wish also to express thanks to Karen, Joan and Robert of the DNA project team for invaluable help, to the staff of various County Libraries particularly Matthew Gannon and staff of Boyle Library, the staff of the National Library Dublin, the local Studies departments of Thurles in Tipperary and Cork County Library. Thanks also is due to the Cork Heritage Project, To Bill Anglin and Frank LeVay for giving me access to their research and to other individuals just too many to name. I thank God too for the leisure time following retirement, which allowed for this research. I dedicate the work to our children Marianne, Oliver and Colum and to Anglin nephews and nieces and others who carry forward the Anglin surname. Aidan Anglin

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SECTION 1 O’hAngluinn: The Anglins of Ireland O’hANGLUINN THE ANGLINS OF IRELAND

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Chapter 1 Mapping the presence in Ireland of the surname Anglin The Aims of this Chapter are: a) To identify the spread of the Anglin surname in Ireland by gathering information on their presence in times past b) To geographically map the presence of the O'hAngluinn / Anglin surname in Ireland c) To identify the earliest presence in an area d) To also value the Anglin Story in the various Irish Geographic Areas An acknowledgement I begin by acknowledging the approach taken in this chapter is strongly influenced by the work of Professor W. Smith of UCC published on the Internet in ‘Atlas of family names in Ireland’.

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Introduction I began the research aware of the rarity of the O’hAngluinn / Anglin (m) surname. In this year 2008 the only Anglins I could locate in Ireland3 were in: •

Belfast:

a small single family grouping of ‘Glanmire Anglins’4

Kilkenny:

one family group again of ‘Glanmire Anglins’

Roscommon:

these are ‘Glanmire Anglins’

Co. Kildare:

one family group whose ancestors are from South Co. Tipperary

Cork City:

Few identified, one from Co. Tipperary

County Cork:

A few families in Clonakilty, but others in the Glandore area and again between Millstreet and the Kerry border

Co. Tipperary:

There are family groups in the South Tipperary area5

Limerick:

A few occurrences and they are in the City

County Wexford: A family group of Anglims

17th century documents likewise showed but few examples of the surname. So sensible mapping was to be a problem, However by adjusting the research period, I felt a set of results could be obtained which could at least be indicative of the possible geographic origin and spread of the Anglin Surname.

The approach used I sought out all examples of the O’hAngluinn / Anglin surname from the various Irish records without attempting to be exhaustive6; paying attention to name, date, place and information source. Data was arranged according to county. When numbers were large within a county I subdivided them, allocating entries to the nearest town within the county. I did not retain material after c.1890. The quantity of data is large and is placed in appendix 17. The ‘organised’ data suggested the inferences I make below. In the gathering stage the spelling ‘Anglin’ was used but I soon realised such an approach was as scribes were not concerned with precise spelling. So there is a particular weakness in this work due to inconsistency in the gathered statistics. However I do not think the discrepancy is large enough to invalidate the general conclusions.

3

4

5

6 7

Telephone directories are a simple way to identify the presence of Anglins in an area, unfortunately many today do not list their names in directories and further many use mobile phones. Further electoral roles are not alphabetical I am aware of various family trees, cf. appendix 8, to these I have assigned names merely for reference purposes, one of those trees is ‘the Glanmire Anglins’ The variation in spelling in South Tipperary is quite marked and does not follow the pattern of County Cork where Anglin seems to prevail, here forms in the past include Anglum, Anglim, Anglam, Anglin The list of the sources used is in appendix 2 In fact the quantity of data would be increased markedly if all the variation of spelling were included

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Where did Anglins live in Ireland’s past? Data supporting the tables below is given in Appendix 1. Cork Baltimore Bandon Boherbue Britway Castlelyons Clonakilty Cork City Crookstown Dunmanway Glandore Glanmire Kilworth Kinsale Leap Macroom Mallow Middleton Skibbereen

Tipperary Ardfinan Cahir Clogheen Cloneen Clonmel Fethard Rosegreen

Limerick Abbeyfeale Limerick Newcastle

Wexford Wexford

Waterford Dungarvan Lismore

Kerry Glin Tarbert

Clare Feakle Killalo Kilrush Scariff

Kilkenny Ballyragget Freshford Kilkenny Ossory Tullaroan

Belfast Bangor Belfast Drumbeg Lisburn

Misc. Donegal Dublin Leix Mayo

Having drawn the items together, besides proving ‘Anglin’, was the more common form of the O’hAngluinn surname; the data suggested the following inferences. 1.

The vast majority of Anglins were in the County of Cork in areas around the towns of Cork City, Macroom, Clonakilty, Crookstown, Glanmire, Bandon, Mallow, Boherbue, Castlelyons, Skibbereen, Middleton, Kilworth, Kinsale, Baltimore, Leap. On a re-examination of the county data an identifiable concentration in three to five separate geographic areas is evident. a) Cork City: It is a city and cities grew from the coming of people from other places. So the O’hAngluinn / Anglins present there did not originate there. b) An area in West Cork: Bandon, Desert surges Parish, Kinsale, Dunmanway, Bantry, Clonakilty, Leap, Glandore, Skibbereen, Baltimore and possibly Macroom c) An area in North Cork: Mallow, Kanturk, Newmarket, Charleville, Boherbue, Duhallow. Here the concentration seems to be less8 d) East Cork: Castlelyons, Middleton, Kilworth, Carrigaline, Killeagh. The concentration of Anglins here is very sparse indeed and scattered9

8

There is a strong presence of the name ‘Angland’ there

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e) Glanmire: Glanmire and Carrignavar. There were many Anglins here, particularly in the latter years. It is difficult to discern ‘Is it a separate area or an overspill from Cork City or, a westward extension of East Cork’10 2.

There are Anglin/m groups in all Munster counties adjacent to Cork, Waterford, Clare, Kerry, Limerick Wexford and Tipperary, this latter county is of particular note for reasons that will be discussed later. Since the Anglin presence is basically confined to these counties it may suggest they are an overspill from Cork through marriage occupations etc over the generations.

3.

There are individual families scattered across the rest of Ireland. I emphasise individual families. In the case of one family the apparent scatter was due to their ‘moveable’ occupation.

The Geographic areas of scatter of the Anglin surname in Ireland While mapping has pointed to County Cork as the source for the Anglin name, it would be unwise to discount the importance of ‘other county’ Anglins in the Anglin Story. I have divided County Cork into three West Cork, North Cork and East Cork ignoring Cork City and the Glanmire area. By taking this approach it does help to concentrate the mind, as the Anglin story in each geographic area seems to offer a different insight. Without going into the detail of their story at this time, some comments on each county are given to indicate particular geographic issues. Most Anglin/ms living in Ireland today have given little thought to their family trees, but are aware of their ‘geographic root’ or source area. The Anglin/ms living in Ireland in 2008 and who live in Belfast, Roscommon and Kilkenny all trace their origin to County Cork, while Kildare Anglins trace theirs to County Tipperary I will omit these, as they are part of the story of another county. I now take a very brief look at these Geographic areas, and hope others will delve more deeply into their particular stories West Cork A lot of research has been done on this area and it is very clear the Anglin presence has been there for hundreds of years. Merely to examine the family trees of the DNA group two indicates the importance of this area. I make many references to West Cork in the course of this report as for some time scholars saw it as the source of the Anglin surname. Geographically I see it as extending from Bandon westward to Dunmanway and Bantry and everything south of it, showing up on the coastline from Kinsale to the Kerry border

9

Britway is still the earliest evidence we have of the Anglyn name in records My Father who was a ‘Glanmire Anglin’ had cousins in Glandore, so possibly assigning that group to the west Cork area, there are still Anglims in that area

10

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North Cork This includes the Slieve Luchra and goes right over to the Kerry Border. O’Kief in his many volumes gives a lot of information on the area. Here even the very music seems to be a little unique. There are Anglins (including surname variants) here for two or three centuries. There is also another unusual surname in that area ‘Angland’. There are Anglins in the area Millstreet to the Kerry Border. Geographically it covers all the area of County Cork north of the West Cork area, so includes towns like Boherbue, Millstreet Charleville Buttervant Mallow etc. East Cork This area is quite different from the other two County Cork areas as the presence of the name here, if Glanmire is excluded, is very sparse indeed. But the possible presence of the surname in the Pipe Rolls of Cloyne means the area cannot be discounted without more extensive research. Belfast/Down I commence the areas outside of County Cork with the Belfast11/County Down group as though the surname’s presence is numerically small it highlights the importance of paying attention to these ‘Outside Cork’ Anglins. Through a recent investigation of County Down Anglins a group of US Anglins were shown to have an Irish origin. Further study of these County Down/Belfast Anglins may indicate they had come there from another county and so have an earlier root source in Munster, maybe even in County Cork as is the case of one Belfast Anglin group. This particular piece of investigation indicates the need to explore all these ‘overspill counties’ South Tipperary Research indicated an absence of Anglins in the north riding of County Tipperary. Today the Anglins living in County Kildare have their roots in South Tipperary. A current Anglin living in Cork City also has South Tipperary roots. There are other Anglin/ms, in Clonmel, in the Fethard area, Danagan area, Rosegreen area and Mullinahone area of South Tipperary. I am unaware of any written material by these South County Tipperary Anglin/ms regarding their geographic origin, or indeed their relationships with one another. The data in Appendix one and Appendix 8 E shows the spelling of the surname varies. A further indication of an unexplored story in South Tipperary is the presence of Anglin/ms in England, in Cork City; in California all tracing their origin to South Tipperary, indeed records in Kew England show a first war soldier from Cahir.

Belfast city is partly in County Down

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Waterford The surname is present in old wills, in an Augustinian priest of the European migration, in Griffith's valuations, in a Father Anglin of Burnfoot and Clogheen in Tipperary, a Tipperary parish which is in the diocese of Waterford and Lismore. These Anglins are mostly in an area close to County Cork. Waterford was a major port and so the story of Anglins in this county may deepen our insight into the Anglin story generally. Limerick There are few Anglins in Limerick today and the spelling seems to be Anglim. I am aware of research been done by a Chris Anglim in the USA, but his work may suggest an earlier origin in County Cork. Wexford There are Anglims in Wexford today. Anglims of the past were associated with a Wexford Newspaper; a young man killed in a shipping accident almost a hundred years ago was also from Wexford. Like Waterford, Wexford is a port town. Incidentally hearsay links the Wexford Anglins to county Clare. Clare There should be Anglin/ms in County Clare today as they were there fifty years ago but I cannot presently trace any. Looking at the Flax Growers lists in the 1796 and the Griffith’s valuations of the 1850’s indicates there is a story there. I have a memory of two brothers Anglin who were Capuchin Franciscan priests in the 1950’s. In view of the scatter of the name in county Clare there is a need for further study into their story. Kerry Kerry is a bit different as the name is very scarce and seems to be just in Tarbert at the Shannon river mouth. Tarbert was a home to Coastguards in the past. A member of the Glanmire Anglins was born there and her father was a coastguard. They originally were Cork people.

Concluding comments to this Chapter This research has emphasised the importance of Cork as an original source of the name, but the surrounding counties have a story to tell and their own story of the migration of the people may add further refinements to our understanding of the precise beginnings of this surname.

A recommendation Independent study into each of these separate Geographic areas is necessary, particularly in view of an issue that will be raised later; namely there is more than one line of the Anglin surname. Some of the documents examined in the preparation of this Chapter: •

Cf. Appendix 1 and 2 for details

Atlas of Irish Surname by Dr. W. Smith of UCC

‘Tracing your Cork Ancestors’ written by Tony McCarthy and Tim Cadogan

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‘Tracing your Irish Ancestors by John Greenham’

‘Irish Records-sources for family and local history’ by J.G.Ryan

Marriage Licence Bonds

Roman Catholic Records for County Cork. My work was not exhaustive here

Church of Ireland Records again my work was not exhaustive, but focus was on the Bandon records

Civil Registers in Dublin

Pender's Census

Military and Naval Records Kew England by Internet

Some graveyard records by Internet

Irish Flax Growers list 1796 for County Clare

Irish Wills 1700+ Diocese Cork and Ross and Diocese of Cloyne

A Calendar of wills of the diocese of Waterford and Lismore 1645 to 1800

The Convert Rolls by Eileen O’Byrne.

The Protestant Census Cloyne 1766

The Fiants of the Tudor monarchs

The Pipe Rolls of Cloyne

The Presentments of Kinsale vols. 1-3

Griffith’s Valuations for all Ireland and all variations of the surname

Directories (various)

Ellis Island records to identify place of origin

1881 English Census to identify place of origin

Various Family trees

Data from Mormon site examined but not always used www.familysearch.org

Waterford Augustinian Records

Various Irish Manuscripts, including Annals and Genealogies

Burke’s Pedigrees

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Further developments on Chapter 1 The Aims of this ‘Further developments’ section are: •

To deepen understanding of the ‘geographically separate, Irish Anglins’

To identify within County Cork the source of the Anglin surname

To deepen understanding of the ‘geographically separate, Irish Anglins’ Introduction The ‘Mapping of the Anglins in Ireland’ opened the possibility of: •

a further examination of Anglins according to their geographic area within Ireland;

obtaining a better understanding of the location of origin of the Anglin surname, and

identifying the point of their departure to the New World.

These possibilities are now explored. As before in this research, unearthing relevant documentation has been difficult and some knowledge of the details of relevant family trees is necessary for success. Only the Belfast / Down geographic area has been fully examined. Note

Anglin, Anglim and Hanglin are just different spellings of the same Gaeilge surname O’hAngluinn. Belfast / Down Anglins I have completed the investigation of the Anglins of this geographic area. Belfast City lies on both sides of the River Lagan, half in County Antrim and half in county Down. But all the Anglins are really in the City of Belfast and its environs. These Anglins have been exhaustively examined using censuses; directories; birth, marriage and death registry material etc. There are two distinct and separate groups: one line are descendants of the ‘Glanmire Anglins’ with a Group 2 DNA profile; the other referred to as ‘Bangor Anglins’ are of Group 3 DNA. (See Chapter 4 for a discussion on DNA profiles.) The names ‘Bangor’ and ‘Glanmire’ are merely identifiers. The family first names are quite different in the two groups. The family tree of the Glanmire Anglins shows their movement within Ireland was due to their seafaring links. A partial tree of the Bangor Anglins also exists12. The Glanmire Anglins are Catholic, traceable to a John Anglin of County Cork with many of the line in Britain. The Bangor Anglins are Protestant and traceable to a Francis Anglin and Isabella Carbery who had a marriage licence bond for Dromore, Down, Connor in 1833 and who lived in Drumbeg outside Belfast in Co Down13. Information is with the DNA team In the 19th century Carrickfergus Castle was still in the hands of the military so all records of those people serving within the castle (that would include Francis Anglin Master armourer) were held by the military. Some of these records were destroyed in Dublin. I contacted the National Archivist in Dublin, they do not hold the information and advise contact with the military historian in Kew London

12 13

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The issue in respect of this group is to trace the birth place of Francis Anglin who took out the M.L.Bond. I suspect the family will be traced back to County Cork. Family descendants are now in the USA. A separate individual ‘Pat Anglin’ cannot presently be placed in either group. The Glandore area Anglins of County Cork A few individual Anglins remain in that area today but Ellis Island and the familysearch.org records show the migration of Anglins from: Leap, Baltimore and Skibereen to the New World particularly America. Hearsay indicates the ‘Glanmire Anglins’ may have a common source in this sea coast area of West Cork. Further DNA studies of some of the descendants of these Leap, Baltimore and Skibereen migrants may assist the study. I am unaware of any serious research done on this group. The supposition would be that they are related to other Group 2 lines of Anglins. The Clonakilty / Bandon area Anglins of County Cork This group, containing separate Anglin groups has unintentionally been the most researched. Historically they are present in the Lismore Papers; Welply Papers; Griffiths Valuations; Directories; Census; Graves; Church and state registers, and passenger records. The earliest date uncovered in the Lismore Papers is 1695.14 The various documents show the presence of the Hanglin form of the surname becoming the Anglin Form in succeeding years. Anglins still remain in the Clonakilty area today and these in the past were linked to the Leap/Glandore area. The two lines of Canadian Anglins trace their origins to this area. As is seen from their incomplete family trees, the Protestant line to the Bandon Innishannon area and the Catholic group to Clonakilty. All these groups share the same Group 2 DNA profile, with the exception of the Canadian Catholic line which has not been tested. Efforts have been made, without success, to link all these groups together by documents – later efforts may be more successful. My feeling is that the separation of the lines occurred pre-1700. The Anglins of West Waterford Recent studies have increased awareness of the past presence of this group both in west County Waterford and East County Cork15, even though today they are absent. Their presence is confirmed by Griffiths Valuations; by migration studies to the European mainland in the 16-18th centuries and by 18th century Irish Wills.

The information re the Lismore Papers is given later in the update Youghal

14 15

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This new awareness opens up the need for an examination of the County Waterford Story. Recent Studies by Dr. John Mannion on migration to Newfoundland shows a few Anglins from this area 16. This particular research may help deepen knowledge of the Canadian lines as hearsay might link East Cork Anglins to Clonakilty. True descendants of Waterford Anglins need to be identified to advance the story. I am unaware of any family tree or DNA research been done on these Anglins. South Tipperary Anglin/m This group (or is it groups?) are spread from east to west across the south riding of Tipperary from Clogheen, Ballylooby, Cahir, Clonmel and Mullaghone. History refers to an Anglin as a parish priest in Clogheen; natives of there are seen on passenger lists to the USA, and there is a large number listed in Griffiths. Tipperary Anglins are present in Essex in England and one in Ireland in Cork City. They have also spread to Kildare, Dublin and in California in the US. There is a record of a Cahir Anglin killed in World War I. I am unaware of any family trees: both forms of spelling – Anglin and Anglim – are used in the county, and seemingly interchangeable, but mostly Anglim. No detailed research into this group has been carried out, but one desendant has a DNA profile indicating relationship with Group 2. Anglins of North Cork Of all the research this has been the most neglected group and yet may be very important, as analysis of the County Cork scatter suggests their importance is second only to West Cork groups. Besides identifying current residents, the information available in civil and church registers of the area17; emigration records, and estate papers e.g. the Doneraile Rent books18 may help not just to open up the story of the area itself but help in the overall story of the Anglin name. However, one has to be aware not to mistake Angland for Anglin/m as Angland is a different surname with a different origin. I am unaware of of any family or DNA research done on this area of Anglins. Clare Anglins In Griffiths the Anglims are confined to two poor law unions, Kilrush and Tulla. Kilrush is opposite Tarbert in Kerry. These towns, Tarbert and Kilrush, were guard stations (coastguard) for the entrance to the Shannon. It is known that a member of the Glanmire Anglins worked and lived in Tarbert and a Catherine was born there; it is also known another male member, Daniel, served in County Clare. I have only two references to Anglins in Newfoundland. A Joseph Anglin was sued by Timothy Flannery for L19. 8. 6, Oct. 27, 1820, St. John's., Flannery was a shopkeeper /publican /trader from Stradbally, Co. Waterford, in St. John's. He won the case "by default" , This usually means Anglin did not appear in court. The debt is substantial. Anglin may have been an artisan, supplied by Flannery. G.N.2/1/A, Oct. 27, 1820. St. John's Court Records. No other reference to Joseph. He likely moved on. 17 www.corknortheast.brsgenealogy.com 18 I have examined the Doneraile papers without success 16

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For this reason it is suggested the presence of Anglins in Clare is not a source of the Anglins but the results of movement from an origin in Cork. The Tarbert presence of the surname is even more confined and is present only in the town itself and did not spread though the county of Kerry. The spelling of the surname in Clare is usually Anglim, and in Tarbert it is often Anglin. However, I am unaware of any real family or DNA research done on these Anglims. Limerick Anglins The spelling of the surname in Limerick seems to be of the Anglim form. A major study of a family tree of descendants from Limerick has been done by Chris Anglim in the USA. He states his line is traceable originally to County Cork. They have not been part of the USA DNA research as yet. Dublin Anglins Being a city, and like Cork city, any Anglins found there would have their origins elsewhere. There is a Fr. Anglin St. Michaels of Dublin who died curator in November 1835, and also in the 19th century a gunsmith called Anglin. Wexford Anglins This small line of Anglins is a different DNA line from other Anglins. While little study has been carried out on them, their presence in the 1800’s in that county is clear and shows up with tenuous links to the sea, guns and newsprint.19 Identification of descendants living abroad could be useful. Again no real research has been done here. I am unaware of any family tree research.

To identify within County Cork the source of the Anglin surname Introduction This analysis is influenced by the Introductory article to the book, ‘Families of County Cork’ by Diarmuid O’Murchadha. I quote. The outstanding 16th century source for the quarrying of information on Irish families, especially those of minor importance, is, of course, the 'Fiants,' in particular those of Elizabeth's reign’. The important thing about these Fiants is they furnish names and surnames of practically every able-bodied man in the countryside, and oftentimes his place of residence and occupation as well.

AN IRISH FLINTLOCK DUELLING PISTOL BY ANGLIN, CIRCA 1810 with octagonal sighted barrel stamped with Irish census mark 'WX-4690' and fitted with standing back-sight over the breech, signed lock fitted with roller and engraved with a foliate border (top-jaw screw and steel replaced, pan chipped), figured walnut full stock (cracks and repairs), and engraved steel mounts including trigger-guard decorated with a trophy-of-hunting (the steel parts pitted throughout, worn, later ramrod) 38cm; 15in William Anglin is recorded in Wexford circa 1820-46. £400-500. Editors of a Wexford newspaper and almanac and a Japenese Gazette in Japan etc.

19

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In the case of chiefs, heads of families, and their close relatives, this last was invariably given as 'gentleman.' One step below this rank came 'horseman,' followed by 'yeoman,' a title which indicated a semi-independent 'strong farmer' type, whereas a 'husbandman' was probably a less secure tenant-farmer. Terms such as 'labourer,' 'smith,' 'surgeon,' need no explanation, but at the bottom of the pile came 'kern' (Irish ceithearnach), a lightly-armed footsoldier, the material supplied by a chief to his overlord (or to the crown) in times of war and rebellion as (to use a modern term) cannon-fodder. Frequently a pardon was granted to the head of a sept or family group and to all his relatives and followers who are specified in the list. This is of inestimable value when attempting to place a particular family name in its proper locality. (This is something genealogists seek to do: indeed the name may still be flourishing today in those places – my words). Despite all the plantations and upheavals throughout the centuries and all the incentives to migration provided by modern travel facilities, name-distribution in Co. Cork today is not all that different to what it was in Elizabethan times. Plantations normally affected only those with the rank of gentleman or, perhaps, horseman… yet it was the mass of commoners, the silent majority of yeomen, husbandmen, labourers, and others who because they were not disturbed to the same degree, kept the family name extant from generation to generation… so a surname can persist in a given area even till today. The scholar Ken Nichols felt the surname had a west Cork origin while Diarmuid O’Murchadha felt the origin may lie in north Cork (both were speaking from general knowledge and without investigating this particular surname20). Influenced by their views a table with these specific headings was developed: Date

Source

Surname

Forename

Townland

Associated

Associated

County

Parish

Family

Family

Cork

Names

Places

Area

Possibles?

Possibles?

Early data from Fiants, Griffiths valuations, Wills, Lismore Papers and old documents gives the table substance. However, some comments are necessary: many Fiant place names are no longer in common use; the geographic bases of the major Cork families is already known cf. publication mentioned above, and while Griffiths Valuations belong to a later date (1850) it was an extensive survey, and so is used here.

In view of current DNA research, they are possibly both correct

20

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The Table (blanks indicate a lack of knowledge) Date

1364

Source

Pipe rolls

Surname

21

Anglyn

Forename

Simon

Townland

Associated

Associated

County

Parish

Family

Family

Cork

Names

Places

Area

Possibles?

Possibles?

Castleyons

North East

Britway

1490

Four

O’hAngluinn

Fionn ua

Unknown

O’hanglin

Fynyn

Kellaghir?

M’Dermodie

Co.Cork

Kellaghir?

M’Dermodie

Co.Cork

Listarnlie

Quirke?

Rathclarin

North ?

Masters 1586

Fiant (4619)

1586

Fiant

M’Dermody O’Hanglyn

(4619) 1591

Fiants

Dermody O’Hangelen

(5508) 1600

Fiant Fiant

Teig husbandman

O’hanglen

(6469) 1600

Margaret ny

Nevan

O’Riordan? Garranfeen

M’Dermodie

22

M’Dermodie O’hanglen

6469)

Dermodie

Cork Pallice

M’Dermodie

North ?

M’Teig

Cork same footnote

1600

Fiant

Ny Anglyn

Grany

Ballym’kowe

Wife of

Liscarroll

6465

Philip fitz

Lisgriffin

Davy oge

Rathinclare

Barrie 1600

Fiant

O’Hanglin

Dermot bane

Inniskarrie?

Mocallop?

Poet RIA

O’hAnglainn

Dirmuid ban

Munster area

Fiants

O’hangelen

Nevan

M’Dermody

Ballenecarrigye

West

M’Dermody

Ballinacoursie

Dermot

late of

Condon?

Cloghleigh?

North East

East Carbery

West

6465 1600 + 1601

(6516) 1601

Fiant

O’hanglen

6486) 1659

Petty

Rathdahiffe?? Hauglin

James

Lisnacunna parish Desertsurges

1676

Kinsale

Hanglane

David

Kinsale

West

Anglin

Dermot

Honora

West

Presentments 1670-

Burke’s Peerage

O’Donovan

21 22

It is possible this is a different surname and is part of the Norman story These two O’hAnglen of Garranfeem and Pallice are followers of Florence MacCarhy Mor of Pallice (nr. Killarney) Corig.of Carbery Co. Cork cf.page 54-55 of ‘Family Names of County Cork suggests north Cork

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Date

1681

Source

M..Bond

Surname

Anglin

Forename

Francis

Townland

Associated

Associated

County

Parish

Family

Family

Cork

Names

Places

Area

Possibles?

Possibles?

Wife

Cloyne

North

Elizabeth Mills 1695

Lismore

Hanglin

John

Cloghnalilty

West

Hanglin

Francis

Cloghnakilty

West

Papers 1704

Lismore Papers

Robert & William

1769

Grave

Hanglin

Francis

Kilgariffe

Clonakilty

West

1742

Wills

Hanglin

Francis

Clonakilty

West

1723

Wills

Anglin

Mark

1743

ML.Bond

Anglin

James

Doneraile

Doneraile

North

1726

Wills

Anglen

Cicely

NyHaegerty

1786

Wills

Anglin

Mary

1754

Wills

Hanglin

John

West

1850

Griffiths

Anglin

John

Dunmanway

Dunmanway

West

Nt 1850

Griffiths

Anglim

Jane

Kill St. Ann S

Castlelyons

North East

1850

Griffiths

Anglin

Catherine

Kilbonane

East Muskerry

North

1850

Griffiths

Anglin

Edward

Rathard

East Muskerry

North

1850

Griffiths

Anglin

John

Scartaga

Clonakilty

West

1850

Griffiths

Anglan

Robert

Tawnies

Earl of

Clonakilty

West

Lower

Shannon

Desert

Earl of

West

1850

Griffiths

Anglan

Robert

Shannon 1850

Griffiths

Anglin

Robert

Tawnies Upp.

Clonakilty

West

1850

Griffiths

Anglin

John

Farranmareen

Enniskeane

West

1850

Griffiths

Anglim

Redmond

Grange

Middleton?

West

1850

Griffiths

Hanglin

Thomas

Tawnies Upp.

Clonakilty

West

1850

Griffiths

Hanglin

Ellen

Tawnies Upp.

Patrick St.

Clonakilty

West

1850

Griffiths

Anglam

Timothy

GortKnockaner

oe 1850

Griffiths

Anglam

James

GortKnockaner

1850

Griffiths

Anglane

Francis

Ardnacrushy

1850

Griffiths

Anglum

John

Knockglass

1850

Griffiths

Anglum

Thomas

Subulter

This table indicates: •

Predomination of West Cork;

A real presence in North Cork, and

A vague possibility of a presence in North East Cork

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A Special Note On Clonakilty, Cloghnakilty And Kilgariffe These three names refer to the same place in West Cork. The town of Clonakilty only came into being in the early 1600’s but there was a settlement there for generations. The research for the original report and for the further developments indicates the special importance of this geographic area in the story of the Anglin/Anglim/Hanglin surname. The reasons are: •

There is documentary evidence of the surname there from the late 1600’s

The O’Brien tomb in Kilgariffe shows a family using the form Hanglin as well as Anglin

The Anglin Surname is still there to day over 300 years from our earliest documentary evidence

The documentary evidence of their presence is varied in type

The DNA research on the Anglins of the diaspora shows definite links to the Clonakilty area

Some of the documents examined in the preparation of this Chapter •

Families of County Cork by Diarmuid O’Murchadha

Lismore Castle Papers

Families of County Cork by Michael O’Laughlin. (The Anglin and Anglim name mentioned nothing futher of note ir 9292072)

The Master book of Placenames (iR 92941020)

The Book of Fermoy (no Anglins)

Crichad an Chaoille ed. P. Power (no Anglins)

MacCarthaigh’s Book. (Pub. Miscellaneous Irish Annals ed. S.O’ Hinnse ir 941028)

Corpus Genealogiarum Hiberniae Vol 1 by M.A. O’Brien (1r 929102: no Anglins)

Doneraile Papers

Ordinance Survey of Ireland: The Inquisitions of County Cork

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Chapter 2 Tracing the origin of the surname O’hAngluinn The Aims of this Chapter are: a) To identify in the literature the initial occurrences of O'hAngluinn as a surname b) To identify the milieu in which the surname originated c) To find the original O’hAngluinn / Anglonn !!!! d) To take note of the dates of the occurrences of the surname

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An Introductory comment on surnames Surnames came into existence in Europe about 1000 A.D. Ireland was one of the first nations to use them. The introduction occurred in Ireland between 950 and the end of the 1100’s and was well established by the time of the English Tudor monarchs.23 It is very important to be conscious the method of naming people in pre 1000 a.d. Ireland was different from today’s method of first name followed by a family surname24.

The approach25 The approach taken will be to imbibe what the scholars have to say about the name, then seek to put flesh on the bones of their work by examining any books, manuscripts, registers or documents that might fill out the story of this surname.

What the scholars have to say about O'hAngluinn ‘A Rare Gaelic Surname almost exclusive to the County of Cork’ This comment sums up the views of 20th century scholars when they speak of the surname O'hAngluinn26. I am referring to the work of MacLysaght27, Woulfe28, scholars who have studied in depth the whole issue of Irish Names and Surnames. In ‘Sloinnte Gaelheal is Gall: Irish names and surnames’ by Patrick Woulfe and in MacLysaght’s ‘Supplement to Irish Names and Surnames’, the name O'hAngluinn is stated to be an old and quite rare Cork Surname, almost peculiar to that County in Ireland. These scholars add other points. The surname Angluinn has descended from a simple Gaelic word ‘anglonn’29 (meaning a hero or champion). O'hAngluinns then are descendants of an ‘Anglonn’, a hero or champion. They also state the usual English form of the name is Anglin/m, but there are variations. (MacLysaght adds that in 1850 the most common form in parts of North Cork was ‘Angland’30. Other scholars feel ‘Angland’31 is a different name.) Phonetically the name Anglin is pronounced ‘ang lynn’ with the ‘g’ being soft.

Cf. ‘Atlas of the Family names in Ireland’ the work of William J Smyth of University College Cork Ireland’ There is a full treatment of the origin of surnames in ‘Irish names and surnames, by Patrick Woulfe 25 In researching the OhAngluinn / Anglin surname I find, due to the rarity of the name, it is important to look at the supplements or appendices to important books as well as the main body of the book 26 These scholars remind us the ‘O’ in Gaelic names indicate descent ‘grandson of’ 27 Edward MacLysaght wrote in the latter half of the 20th century. He was the Chief (head) Herald of Ireland. He wrote many volumes on Irish family names. The Anglin name is dealt with in his supplement to Irish names 28 The Rev. Patrick Woulfe was a priest of the diocese of Limerick, His initial book was published 1906 but his main work on Irish names and surnames came in 1923 29 Smith ‘The most enduring feature of the Irish fashion in naming, is the continued use of the forename in the creation of the very distinctive Irish second or surname system, in this case an epithet 30 Since MacLysaght refers to ‘parts of Cork’ I have placed a list of such Anglands of the 1850’s in appendix 8 31 I spoke to Anglands and they gave me the Irish spelling of their name as ‘Aingleont’. I looked up the name Aingleont in Woulfe. He lists the following names as if they were the same name Angylont; Anglant: Englant: Anglound: Angland: Ankland: England: He feels they come from the Norman. De Englond, Latin being de Anglia and says they are rare but are found in Cork and Limerick. To me there are two Irish names Ohangluinn and Aingleont, the first is rendered in English as Anglin the latter as Angland. They are different names in my view but both Irish 23 24

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Some comments 1.

Smith’s references to names in the ‘Annals of Ulster’ may suggest ‘champion’ as an occupation within a ‘race’. He does not deal with numerically small surnames like O'hAngluinn and so makes no suggestion of the beginning of the O'hAngluinn surname,

2.

The amount of scholarly research on the earlier periods of our history including this whole issue of Irish History and surnames is increasing markedly. So it is important to keep abreast of developments.

Having reread the writings of the scholars the effort is now to put ‘real flesh’ on their statements i.e. identify real people from the manuscripts books documents of the past.

Seeking the Anglin story in the Corca Luighe area of County Cork Putting together the writings of scholars, my own reading, speaking with scholars32 and contact with Anglins at home and abroad who know something of their past history I was persuaded the focus of my research should be in West Cork if I am to find the beginnings of the surname. This area of County Cork in times past was known as Corca Luighe. Corca Luighe is a coastal area. It has had trade links with Europe and England for hundreds of years and in later times also with the Americas. In the 1600’s pirates from North Africa raided Baltimore and about one hundred of their people were taken as slaves. So the area has history. I searched for the Anglin name in historical material of this Corca Luighe area but to date without success.33 There was a reference to ‘Angli’ in the Genealogies in MacFirbis Book of Genealogies34 in the Corca Luighe area. This ‘Angli/e’ comes up also in the Annals of Ulster for the year 1121; there was a bishop of Dublin called Samuel hAngli. I researched this name lest it is another source for O’hAngluinn/Anglin but it is not. In O’Donovan’s ‘Miscellany of Celtic Society’ on page 51 in the footnote on O’hAngli (initialled in one edition by TS) the author makes clear this ancient name O’hAngli became ‘Ceangail’ or Munitir Ceangail in Gaelic and possibly MacAngli35. Not having found any O’hangluinns, the Corca Luighe is set aside until something else surfaces.

Ancient genealogies Before recording information taken from Ancient Genealogies, some comments are necessary on the role of these Ancient genealogies in Irish history and genealogy, particularly for the benefit of Anglins of the Diaspora. These early Gaelic Genealogies pre-date surnames, even going back to pre-Patrician times. The early Gaelic Genealogies, as with Jewish Genealogies, sought to bring in deeper dimensions Ken Nicholls of Cork University says the name belongs to west Cork This is my present understanding of the place of origin of the O hAngluinns / Anglins, built up from examining old manuscript material. I searched these manuscripts with the purpose of gaining an understanding of the territory and history of Corca Luighe and gain some insight into the clan, and family names of this race. But no Anglins as yet! 34 References: 677.17, 1360.4 1057.3 204.1 of Mac Firbis 35 There is Aodh MacAingli a Franciscan monk and scholar in Louvain (c.1600) and his English name is Hugh MacCaughwell 32 33

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beyond a listing of parentage. They gave credence and validity in important issues such as ownership of territory, inheritance, leadership background etc. Parentage and descent are valuable but ancient genealogies are much more. In Ireland, genealogy was an expression of custom, and for the Irish, custom was a basis for law. Sadly some people through a lack of insight, into the why of ancient genealogies, feel they are just ‘rubbish’. Modern people have a desire to know their roots, their origin; a desire leading to tracing out family trees. This need to know descent was also part of, but not the main purpose, of ancient Genealogies. The ancient genealogies could be said to ‘have filled out’ for a person, their identity, responsibilities etc.

Interlude on Irish surnames It is necessary to interject here a few brief comments on three issues regarding Irish names: a) the form of names pre the growth of surnames; b) the use of ‘O’, ‘Mac’ in Irish names, and c) the use of the letter ‘h’ in the writing of words in Gaeilge. This is necessary to understand the growth and story of Anglin/m from Anglonn36. In early years people had just one name, like the people in the Bible. In the Ireland of those times there were thousands of names and as the village populations were small and people did not travel much names did not have to be used twice. As populations grew, if a name was used more than once, as is the case of the three Conall’s to be mentioned below, there grew the custom of adding an epithet to the name and so Anglonn (hero) was added to Conall giving us Conall Anglonn37 to distinguish him from his grandfather another Conall, named Conall Ceranach (victorious). Notice no ‘O’s or ‘Mac’s at that stage in history. I presume in those times other individuals had the epithet ‘anglonn’ added to their name38. The next developmental stage39 comes with the naming of immediate descendants, e.g.’ grandson of’ Conall becomes O’Conall40: Or using another method ‘son of’ Conall which becomes Mac Conall41. At the same time another method came into use with names. Instead of using ‘O’ or ‘Mac’ and the proper name of the person in this case Conall, the focus was put on the epithet rather than the

There are a few examples of Anglon as a surname given in Appendix 1 in Boherbue Cork and Killarney Co. Kerry This Anglonn does not immediately become O’hAnglonn for the grandson. This is merely the earliest example I have unearthed of the epithet Anglonn been used. It is before 950 a.d. before the ‘O’ idea started 38 It is possible after that stage; this surname like a number of others went through an intermediate stage before the introduction of the ‘O’ or ‘Mac’ step by using the genitive case of the word e.g. Teige of Anglonn 39 This movement from single name to family name occurred in Ireland over the period 950 to 1200 a.d. and was complete by 1200 40 This practice of forming new surnames with ua ( or ‘O’) had almost certainly ceased before the coming of the English and doubtful if any ‘O’ surnames can be shown to have arisen at a later date. ‘Mac’ surnames are generally speaking of a later date than ‘O’ surnames but by the end of the 12th century, surnames were universal among Irish families” this is a quote from Woulfes’ introduction to his special revised edition of 1923 of his work on Irish names and Surnames. This suggests the name O’hAngluinn is prior to the end of the 12th century 41 In Gaeilge ‘O’ means ‘grandson of’ ‘Mac’ means ‘son of’… Gaeilge is the Irish for the Irish language, Gaelic refers to the Irish race 36 37

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proper name by referring to his grandson as O’Anglonn. (In the Anglonn / Anglin line the Mac version was never used, so never MacAnglonn) Putting the ‘h’ before Angluinn. I simplify this; the use of ‘h’ was cosmetic; it was placed before any ‘O’ name beginning with a vowel to make it easy to say. In Gaeilge the ‘h’ is also used in another fashion. It is used to indicate a varying of the sound of a consonant. A ‘h’ is placed after a consonant e.g. Anghluinn is not to change the spelling but to indicate the sound of the consonant ‘g’ is different when speaking the word.

Anglonn Having failed to find a source for Anglin within the examination of ‘h’Angli’ the research continued but this time yielding valuable information. In ‘MacFirbis Book of Genealogies’42 written in Gaelic compiled in 1650-1660 from earlier sources43, an important stage in evidence of the origin of the O'hAngluinn / Anglin name is found. There are two references 1290.4 ff. and 573.5 ff. and they concern names with epithets. The quotations below are from the English translation. First reference The first reference is found in 1290.4: The Families of Rudhraighe together with various compilations There are numerous progenies from various fathers in old books intermixed together. The proper arrangement of whose ramifications we do not find; here are some of them according to the language of the old writings themselves, which say: 1290.5: These are the families whose history is not easily captured, even though it is not right to be dubious about them…Sons of Feidhlimidh Reachtmhar44… i.e. the three Conalls: … 1292.5

The Progeny of Conall Cearnach: Clann Aimhirghin who redden a wound Conall Cearnach is their eldest (member) Meac Deas and eager Meas Dearghadh Laoghaire Cas for whom the warband used to fight

1292.6

The two Conalls of Eamhain Mhacha45: Conall Cearnach mac46 Aimirgin47 and Conall Anglonn mac Irel Glunmhar mac Conall Cearnach

This is a large five-volume set of books of ancient Genealogies written in Gaelic to which has been added, page by page, a translation into English by modern scholars. The introduction says the material is of the 6th to the late 17th century and some may be earlier than the 6th century 43 We are dealing here with material pre surnames well before 1000 a.d 44 In the Gaelic writings accents are used just as in French. Often an aspiration mark, a dot, is put over a consonant, which changes the sound. Today in writing Gaelic instead of putting the ‘dot’ they add a ‘h’ instead – it changes the pronunciation not the spelling. This is important when reading this quotation 45 It would be good to identify precisely where this is…Druim… near Armagh 46 ‘Mac’ means son of 42

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1292.7

Fionnchaomh, daughter of Cathbhtaidh the druid, was mother of Conall Cearnach

1292.8

Three daughters Maghach, d…were born to Cathbhaidh the Druid, i.e. this Fionnchaomh; and Deithghean mother of Cu Culainn; and Ailbe, mother of the sons of Uisneach, as the poet said:

1292.9

‘Fionnchomh daughter of gentle Cathbhtaidh was the good mother of Conall Cearnach three sons of Ailbe who did not refuse battle Naoise and Ainnle and Ardan etc48.

Second reference The second reference is 575.3 ff: The Genealogy of O’hEilighe He speaks first of the clan Chonchabhair and then goes to speak of the Clann Chonaill Chearnaigh, starting there we find written: 576.8

Clann Chonaill Chearnaigh

The original name of Eamhain Mhacha was Druim. Some say. 576.9

Why is Eamhain Mhacha49 (so called) The historians find out for us What its original name was Since the time of the Tuath De Danaan

576.10

Cas Coill was its original name at first I remember its history Eachros Cuanda was its name after that Until the time of Eochaidh Ioldathach

576.11

See Eamhain Mhacha in an Leabhar Dinnsheanchaasa (the Book of place lore) (se page 579)

576.12

The two Conalls of Eamhain (sp.na) Mhacha (sp.Maiche): Conall Cearnach Aimhirghin and Conall Anghlonn s. Irial Glunmhar s. Conall Cearnach

This really places us at the beginnings of the O’hAngluinn / Anglin Story with a real person Conall who had been given an epithet of Anglonn50. I have been unable to identify the progeny of Conall Anglonn. Of course it would be difficult as in those days there were only first names the ‘O’ idea had not commenced and further this is unlikely to be the Anglonn from whom we take descent, it is historically too early. But knowing epithets were used puts flesh on the scholar’s statement 49 50 47 48

During this time a name of a person could be used repeatedly – no surnames One could draw up a short family tree here This the name of a place it is in County Armagh according to Rosemary Evans in her book ‘Out of this World Ireland’ I did not say this is our ancestor But this shows an early stage in the origin of the name

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that our surname grew form the epithet Anglonn in a manner similar to many other epithet surnames. This material belongs to Patrician times or earlier.

Irish mythology While few texts of Irish Mythology have survived yet those, which have survived, give information on the Fenian Cycle. This cycle is about Irish heroes. The stories appear to be set around the 3rd century and mainly in Leinster and Munster. The stories, usually in verse, concern Fionn Mac Cumhail and his band of soldiers, the Fianna. The most important source for this Fenian Cycle is the ‘Acallamh na Senorach 1’ (Colloquy of the Old Men)51. It is found in 15th century manuscripts. The text is dated by linguistic evidence to the 12th century. The following is a quotation: 272

Francan ocus Luth Re Srian da ech thaisigh scuir na bh—fhian

273

Luth ac Scuirin, codhnaibh gal is Francán ac Dub Druman

274

Gerr in Oir, Gerr in Arcait maraen do cinndis carpaid,

275

da ech do bhi ag Aillmi ann ag ingin aird-righ Eireann.

276

Dub Esa is Duhb Thuinne da ech Aenghuis Angluinne52,

277

Cáilti is Oisin amach maraen teigdis gach n-aenach.

278

Each Guill meic Morna don muigh fa faire do b(ui) a Maenmhuigh,

279

tan do—leicthe ar sliabh no an muigh fa comhluath r(e gaeith) n-erruigh.

Here is seen the development of the name from an epithet but not yet as the surname O'hAngluinn53, I suggest it is at the intermediate stage, Aenghuis of Angluinn.

Other ancient documents The next document is later but still in the period when Ireland was Gaelic speaking. In the 14th century we have ‘The Pipe Rolls of Cloyne’, a Latin document, recording land use in the parishes of Cloyne diocese54. Bishop Swaffham of Cloyne prepared it in 1364 a.d. he was a Carmelite monk a native of Norfolk, England. In it a ‘Simon Anglyn’ had rented some land (it gives the acreage and also the rent) in the parish of Brewhy now Britway, which is near the modern town of Castlelyons in northeast County Cork. The scribe seemed to have used a phonetic spelling of the Gaelic name to Latin, rather than a translation into Latin.55

53 54 55 51 52

Available on the internet I assume, without proof, that Angluinne is the genitive case of Angluinn so ‘Aenghius of Anglonn’ It does suggest an historic period after the use of only first names, but before the introduction of the ‘O’ period Cloyne is one of the 2/3 dioceses in county Cork, the others Cork and Ross This spelling is also found as an English form in some of the Elizabethan Fiants

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Irish annals There are other Irish historical writings called ‘Annals’, the most well known being the ‘Annals of the Four Masters’. These Annals contain historical information of Ireland’s past, set out annually. They record the unusual events of a year rather than recording the common occurrences. In the ‘Annala Rioghachta Eireann; Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters from the earliest period to 1616’ written in Irish, but now with translations. There is recorded under the year 1490 a.d. the death of a Fionn ua56 hAnghluinn, chief timpanist of Ireland. The quotation in Gaeilge is: 1490

Fionn ua hAnghluinn primh thiompanach Ereann dec.

Unfortunately it does not state where in Ireland he lived. The English Translator spelt the name in English Finn O’hAuglinn57.

English documents regarding Ireland ‘The Elizabethan Fiants’58, are legal documents59 of Queen Elizabeth who reigned (1557-1603). The correct title is ‘Fiant Litterae patentes’; they are the decisions of her courts regarding individuals60. The following is a list of pardons taken from those documents. The numbers refer to a particular Fiant each Faint contains a group of names. At this time the Anglicisation of Gaelic names had commenced so the variation in the English spelling of the Gaelic names61. The first surnames in the following list clearly derive from O'hAngluinn even if in the later cases do not. These documents importantly indicate O' hAngluinns were living in County Cork in the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1 (1558-1603) as the places named seem to be in county Cork. Their occupation indicate they were ‘ordinary’ people: •

Teig O’hangelen husbandman Drishane or Listarnlie 4 Dec 1591 (5508)62

Nevan M’Dermody O’hangelen or Ballinacoursie Cork 14 May 1601 (6516)

Fynyn M’Dermody O’hanglin 18 Feb 1586 Co. Cork (4619)

Margaret ny Dermody O’Hanglyn 18 Feb 1586 in Cork county (4619)

Nevan M’Dermodie O’hanglen of Girranfien 7 March 1600 (6469)

Dermodie M’Teig O’hanglen of the Pallice 7 march 1600 (6469)63

Dermot O’hanglen, late of Rathdahiffe in county Cork 28 March 1601 (6486)64

Philip fitz Day oge Barie & wife Grany nyAnglyn of Rathinclare65 27 Jan 1600 (6465)

• Dermot M’Teige carpenter and wife Ellen Anglant (6407) 15th June 1600 58 59 60 61 62 63 64

‘ua’ is another form of ‘O’ The Annals of Ulster for 1121 have a Samuel ua hangli Bishop of Dublin. He may have been foreign, Danish or Norman National Library Reference IR 941 p 8 The Fiants are the reports of the deputy Keeper of Public Records 1875-1890 Woulfe states the double names of a person, or the double structure of some in the Fiants occurred quite regularly There may also have been an issue of literacy Numbers in brackets refer to Fiant reference There is another entry Ganglen (misspelling?) in (6469) These examples in the Fiants give real examples of the form of Irish names had in the 16th century. The form of the name changes in the 17th century 65 This might be Rathclare in Buttevant Mallow area of Cork 56 57

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Others:

John Fitz William Anglound yeoman of Kilmanehyn66 (2269) 4 May 1573

Ynory ny Angyllen widow (4752) 16th July 1585

Thomas Angyllonte of Dromore, Dromore is nr Bantry West cork (2251) 6 May 1573

Thomas Anglyant wife Katherine ny Teig M’Shane 15 June 1600 (6407)

Burke’s Pedigrees In Burke's 'A Genealogical History of Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, enjoying territorial possessions of High Official Rank, but uninvested with heritable Honours' in Volume 3 pages 397399, he refers to a marriage between v. Honora O'Donovan Daughter of Teige O'Donovan of Rahine and Drishane67, the great grand daughter of Donell, chieftain of the O’Donovan Sept to a Dermot Anglin. This Honora died in the 1670's. A full reading of this reference is important for a number of reasons: a) It places the Anglin name in West Cork in the mid to late 1600’s the assumed root area of O’hAngluinns b) The spelling of Anglin is a complete Anglicisation of O’hAngluinn, a stage beyond that of the Fiants c) This particular link to the O’Donovans comes at an historical point where some members of the Gaelic families O’Donovans and so O’hAngluinns are now involved with ‘New English’ people. This link involves the colonies of the Americas d) One might now ask was this Dermot Anglin a member of the reformed faith?

The history of Clonakilty by local historian O’Rourke O’Rourke in his history of Clonakilty may be suggesting the surname is present in the Book of Ballymote (14th century). I have yet to find the evidence to support that view68. O’Rourke a local historian of latter half of the 20th century states ‘each tuath of Corca Luighe was governed by a Taoiseach and beneath him were the hereditary leaders. Tuatha O Fitcheallaigh and O Dunghalaigh merged in Clonakilty. O'Fehilly and O'Dunlea were the Taoiseacha. Oglaigh or Leaders are represented by names which still survive, i.e. Duggan, Keady, Eady, Anglin, Kennedy, Cagney, Hennessy, Leary, Dineen, Cronin, Hayes or O'Hea, Murray, Dulea, Coffey, Cowhig, Cullinane, Downey, Lahiffe, Shinnick, Deady and Muintir Oh Illigh or Hill. The O'Driscolls were the ruling race. These races were gradually pushed south of the Bandon River by the Eoghanachta of whose ruling families were O'Mahony's and O'Donoghues. Other names have descended in the form of

this might be in Tralee in Kerry Both Rahine and Drishane are in the Barony of West Carbery of West Cork, Rahine in the parish of Aghadown and Drishane in the parish of Castlehaven both in the Poor Law Union of Skibereen. There is more than one Townland of Drishane, but in Skibereen you have Rahine and Drishane together 68 O’Rourke gives Anglin among the names of the leading families of Clonakilty. This is an issue that I need to explore 66 67

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Spillane, O'Neill, Long, Flynn, Keating, Ring, Canty, Mehigan, Dillon, Healy, Slattery, Coghlan, Cahalane, Canniffe, Heenigan, and Flahive. I include this material but for the moment I cannot use it as evidence regarding the story of the O’hAngluinn / Anglin surname.

Relating the evidence found to the aims of this section Following the evidence given in Chapters one and two of the study, it is reasonable to accept the scholars were correct69. The geographic source of this old and rare Gaelic name, O'hAngluinn, lies not only in Cork but specifically in West Cork; the evidence supports this even if it is weak. Some literature has been uncovered relating to the surname and the milieu in which the name originated. The study has revealed an Anglonn, Conall: Was he the first? Who knows! This actual origin of the surname may in itself explain why the O’hAngluinns were a numerically small grouping (heroes are rare), in truth they had to be rare.70 In view of the use of ‘Anglonn’ as an epithet attached to a personal name it seems reasonable to accept there will be more than one DNA line of people whose name would be O’hAngluinn. The research supports the view the English surname Anglin/m has its source in the Gaelic surname O’hAngluinn which in turn has its source in the epithet Anglonn being applied to real person(s?). The issue ‘Did the original Anglonn reside in the Corca Luighe race area of County Cork, or somewhere else in County West Cork (!)’ was not proven, but indications suggest early Anglins came from West Cork. The possibility of there being another Anglonn in a neighbouring area or county still exists. A multiplicity of ‘champions’ would not seem to make sense, as by definition they were quite special people. However that there were a small number over the years seems reasonable Before Concluding: It must be stressed; efforts need to continue in the examination of literature in 1200 to 1490 period to find persons with the O’hAngluinn surname.

Postscript 1 It is important to hold fast to a realization of the ‘epithet’ nature of this surname. This Anglonn epithet may have been ‘conferred’ on others in the time span from Conal ‘Anglonn’ to the point when surnames were introduced (950-1200 a.d.). But whether they were many or few, it is only in 950-1200 that the step to ‘grandson of Anglonn’ (‘O’hAngluinn) could have occurred. It is at The issue of Angland being the same name as Anglin is doubtful It was not a family or sept name. When we come to the 20th century and the numbers increase this is due to the fact that by then it had become a family name

69 70

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this period and only at this period that O’hAngluinn became a family name. Could this step have been taken for two or three individuals? The answer must be yes. The Surname by its very nature must be rare, even if more than one family of O’hAngluinns came into being. In this it differs from clan/sept names, where members of the clan/sept used the clan/sept name.

Postscript 2 Relevant information on Anglins surfaced when records of important people were searched e.g. Elizabethan Fiants, or the O’Donovans family records. This fact must influence research methods. Study of the O'hAngluinn name up to 1700 has been difficult due to the surname’s rarity. This fact has to be accepted as normal and ‘research methods’ adjusted accordingly. The evidence unearthed for O’hAngluinn during 1200-1550 is scant, so exploration of the major Gaelic families of West Cork for that period is necessary.

Postscript 3 To date the presence of Anglins in the Corca Luighe area in the 12-15th centuries has not been found, but material in the 16th and thereafter points to West Cork as the root source of the surname. This territory Corca Laoighdhe of the race Lughaidhe Laidhe of whom Mac Con was monarch of Ireland in the 3rd century was also co extensive with the Diocese of Ross, (now part of Cork and Ross) and whose centre was the town of Ross Carbery. The O’Driscolls and O’Learys were the chief families in this area in later generations. The O’Donovans were also located roughly speaking in this broad area too. And there was a MacCarthy presence at times. These families have been researched but to date other than the earlier reference to O’Donovan’s have not yielded appropriate evidence. This geographic area today would extend from the Bandon River to Clear Island71 and it is in that area the search must continue.

Documents examined in research for this chapter on the O’hAngluinn name •

‘Irish names and surnames, by Patrick Woulfe including the introduction

McLysaght’s various books on Irish surnames particularly his Supplement

The ‘Annals of the Four Masters’

‘Acallamh na Senorach 1’ written in Middle Irish, recording earlier material

‘The Atlas of Irish names and Surname by Smith’ cf. Internet

‘The History of Clonakilty’ by O’Rourke (a local historian) cf. Internet

‘Lectures on Manuscript Materials of Ancient Irish History by Eugene O’Curry (Four Courts press) specifically chapter X ‘Books of Genealogy and Pedigrees’ O’Curry

‘MacFirbis Book of Genealogies’ compiled from earlier sources in 1650-1660

This information is taken from Woulfe. The Annals of Inisfallen says this territory was greater at an earlier period

71

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The Tudor Fiants particularly Elizabeth’s: Reference in National Library Dublin is 1r941p8

The Pipe Roll of Cloyne (in Latin) (English translation available)

The Annals of Ulster

Burke's 'An Genealogical History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, enjoying territorial possessions of High Official Rank, but uninvested with heritable Honours' 4 volumes specifically vol 3

Book of Ballymote ...problem is getting translation

Off the Beaten Track by Rosemary Evans re position of Eamhain Mhacha

The Annals of Inisfallen

The Miscellany of Celtic Society by John O’Donovan published in 1849 including Corca Laoi

Genealogy of Corca Laoighdhe ed J O’Donovan

Some history of West Cork Bandon, Clonakilty, Skibbereen, Rosscarbery, Bantry, Dunmanway etc.

Diocese of Ross history whose centre was the town of Ross Carbery

Most of these books are available in the National Library Dublin and some of them in other libraries and possibly on the Internet

Family Names of County Cork by Diarmuid O’Murchadha Glendale Press

Other material worthy of research: •

John O Donovan’s The genealogies of Hy Fiachrach

The manuscript Ui Maine

The Book of Leinster year 1130

The Book of Lecan year 1416

The History of the MacCarthys of West Cork

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Further developments on Chapter 2 1

Necessary corrections

The short section entitled The history of Clonakilty by local historian O’Rourke has been removed from the original research report as the author seems to have assumed the O’hAngli, the Group leader, present in the Corca Laoidhe Genealogy can be rendered Anglin in English. This is not so. In O’Donovan’s ‘Miscellany of Celtic Society’ on page 51 in the footnote on O’hAngli (initialled in one edition by TS) the author makes clear this ancient name O’hAngli became ‘Ceangail’ or Munitir Ceangail in Gaelic and possibly MacAngli. O’Donovan and others make clear the Oglaigh’s surname ‘h-Ua- Angle’ is not Anglin, but a different surname, rendered in English as Hanley. However there is still solid evidence of Hanglins / Anglins in Clonakilty as early as the 17th century. In treating the Elizabethan Fiants in “English documents regarding Ireland”. The following surname variants had raised some concern in the original report. Following further study they have to be deleted as not relevant to the Anglin study. The names in question are: •

Ellen Anglant (6407) 15th June 1600

John Fitz William Anglound yeoman of Kilmanehyn (2269) 4 May 1573

Ynory ny Angyllen widow (4752) 16th July 1585

Thomas Angyllonte of Dromore (2251) 6 May 1573

Thomas Anglyant (6407)

The reasons for the change in understanding are as follows: •

None of the individuals had Gaeilge first names

They followed the old Norman English use of ‘saints’ first names

‘Fitz William Anglound’ is clearly a Norman surname

The five surnames are linked to a Geographic area outside of West Cork

There is an absence of the Gaeilge ‘O’ or ‘Mac’…typically Norman

For these reasons the five surnames are considered unrelated to the Gaeilge O’hAngluinn and have a different source, probably Norman. Also in the second chapter of the report reference was made to the ‘Pipe Rolls of Cloyne’ to a Simon Anglyn. In view of the comments just made and also of the Further Developments on the surname Angland considered in Chapter 7 it is possible this Simon Anglyn has nothing to do with O’hAnglainn’s but is Anglo Norman.

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2

New Material •

There was a Munster Bardic poet, Diarmaid Ban O’hAnglainn, in the early 1600’s. Details regarding him and his poetry are presented in the Further Developments added to Chapter 3.

Could ‘O’hAinlighe’ be another Gaelic source for the Anglin surname?

The Gaeilge surname O’hAinlighe is in MacFirbis (243.2) and without the O’h is also present in 242.23, 243.16 and 1077.5 and 6. It also occurs in ‘MacCarthaigh’s Book (published in Miscellaneous Irish Annals ed. S.O’ Hinnse). He refers to: •

Aindriu O’hAinlighe, died 1395 prior of the friars in Roscommon

Aodh O’hAinlighe, died 1405

Lochlainn O’hAinlighe - son of Aidh, died 1405

Tagdh O’hAinlighe, killed 1311

The surname also occurs in the Annals of Connaught particularly in the 1400’s. I have examined this surname in depth. It has no relationship to O’hAnglainn or Anglin. It is rendered as Hanley in an English translation of MacFirbis p.192 and is still rendered today in County Roscommon as Hanley. Conclusion O’hAinlighe is not a source for the surname Anglin.

Some further documents examined in the preparation of this Chapter •

An leabhar Muimhneach: The Eaghanacht Genealogies per Rev.O’Keefe, 1703

Genealogy of Corca Laidhe (ed. J. O’Donovan)

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Chapter 3 The O’hAngluinn surname in Ireland 1600-1900 The Aims of this Chapter are: a) To appreciate the historical background to the O’hAngluinn story during this period b) To note the various spellings in the Anglicization of the Gaelic name c) To seek to know the O’hAngluinns as persons in this period

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Brief historical background 1600-1900 To appreciate the O’hAngluinn72 story, particularly during this period, some background knowledge of historical events is necessary. Real efforts at the Anglicization of Ireland began during the reign of the English Tudor monarchs in the 1500’s and grew in strength with Elizabeth who completed her reign in 1603. This Anglicisation of Ireland was on a grand scale. It included a desire for total control73 and so efforts to anglicise the Gaelic culture, system of clan organisation, Catholic faith, Form of Government, Gaelic language etc were paramount. These efforts, begun by the Tudors continued unabated throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, they were reinforced by displacement of local people by further plantations, a system already implemented in Munster by Elizabeth74. Other major events were: •

The establishment of the Church of Ireland (a sister church of the Church of England) as the state Church75

The establishment of planter towns e.g. Bandon (1604) and Clonakilty (1613) is of that category too

The defeat and flight of the Earls to the European mainland in 1607

The rebellions of 1641-1652 by the Irish against repression

The devastating ‘visit’ of Cromwell and his severe response in Cork in 1649

The battles between William and James towards the end of the 1680’s and into the 1690’s

The great movement of Irish soldiers76 and families, students both religious and secular to Europe

Some forced movement of ordinary people to the new colonies of the Americas

Then the Penal Laws begun 1695 and continued thereafter, weakening in severity in the late 1700’s, until Catholic Emancipation in 1829

The late 16th and early 17th centuries corresponds with English colonisation of the Americas, which also impinged on the Irish story

These events made the 17th century and early 18th quite unique in Irish history. This is the context of the Anglicisation of the name O'hAngluinn

Some scholars state the name was sometimes corrupted to O h’Angluim. I have not being able to find evidence of this in the pre 1700 period 73 One reason for this may have been the fear Ireland could be used as a conduit for attacks by the French or Spanish on England itself 74 These new arrivals of the Tudor period and following years are referred to by scholars as the ‘New English’ to differentiate them from the ‘Old English and Norman’ settlers who had come in earlier 12th and 13th centuries and had in a sense become part of the people. The Old English had shared the same religious persuasion as the Irish, while the new settlers were protestant, though not always of the same denomination of Protestantism 75 The establishment of the Church of Ireland as the official church to whom tithes had to be paid preceded 1600 76 In1635 there was the formation of Irish regiments particularly as regiments of France. (Such regiments were also in the US and England at a later stage). This continued for years. A study of these regiments may be helpful to unravel the possibility of the Irish Anglins becoming residents of France 72

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Some books examined in researching the historical background:

Narrative History of Ireland by Micheal O Siochfhradha ISBN 1-903497-21-3 published by Aubane historical Society Millstreet Co. Cork I recommend this for someone seeking our genuine history but in narrative form

A Concise course of Irish History by Moody and Martin

The Illustrated History of Ireland by C. F. Cusack (Nun of Kenmare) written in 1860’s

Anglicisation of the surname O'hAngluinn77 The 17th century is decisive in the Anglicisation of Irish surnames. It took place gradually and in rural areas in a disordered manner as the people continued to speak Irish. Government edict wanted the change, but the new English spelling depended on the whim of the local scribe who entered the Gaelic names into English documents, whether business, legal or official church documents. The local intonation, pronunciation and accent influenced spelling. For these reasons Anglicisation resulted in a fragmentation of the original Gaelic Surname. Early English spelling of O'hAngluinn in the late 1500’s Looking at the 1500’s, the only evidence unearthed was the pardons granted in the Elizabethan (reign 1558-1603) Fiants of the late 1500’s, I just use the surnames here: Column 1 Anglant Anglyant Angyllont

Column 2 Anglyn Angyllen Anglound

Column 3 O’hangelen O’hanglin O’hanglyn

Column 4 O’hanglen O’hanglen

Column 1 and part of 2 might even be a different name. Early English spelling of O'hAngluinn in the 1600’s There is little documentary record in the 1600’s naming ordinary Irish people, much less those with a rare surname. The early volumes of the ‘Presentments of Kinsale’, highlight the problem. They record many English names but rarely Irish names. The earliest reference to an Anglin in the 17th century is in Petty’s Census of 1659 for the Parish of Desert Surges an Irish titulandoe78 James Hauglin79. The second, an entry in the Grand Jury Presentments of Kinsale80 of 1676 a David Hanglane, who according to the records seems to have escaped punishment!!

I have only found a few references of Anglon as a surname; one in Boherbue Cork and another in Killarney Co. Kerry cf. appendix 1 78 In this specific case Petty records all tituladoes to be Irish. A tituladoes is one of the highest poll tax payers i.e. he is of the gentry, the professionals, the merchants 79 He lived in the townland of Lisnicurry, which is in the Barony of East Carbary. This is of note as we are again in south west Cork and the diocese of Ross 80 The entry reads for no. 30. On 2nd October 1676 a number of men including a David Hanglane were brought before the jury for being newcomers and inmates in Fryans Street Kinsale without surety. It would seem David was not fined as there is a bracket around his name and ‘del.’ is added 77

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The next in Burke's Pedigrees81 referring to a marriage of v. Honora O'Donovan Daughter of Teige O'Donovan of Rahine and Drishane, and Grand daughter of Donell, chieftain of the O’Donovan sept. to a Dermot Anglin. This Honora died in the 1670's. The fourth and latest in date, the marriage licence bond for 168182 of a Francis Anglin to Elizabeth Mills in the county of Cork. Interestingly these last two carry the English spelling now normally expected for the O’hAngluinn surname.83 It is also noteworthy these four examples are all in County Cork and all seem to have linkage with the ‘colonisers’. Some of the Documents examined for the presence of surname O'hAngluinn in the 17th century: •

Elizabethan Fiants

Petty’s Census of 1659

The Presentments of the Corporation of Kinsale

Marriage Licence Bonds of the Church of Ireland

Burkes 'Genealogical History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, enjoying territorial possessions of High Official Rank, but uninvested with heritable Honours' in Volume 3 pages 397-399

English spelling of O'hAngluinn in 1700’s In the 18th century there is greater evidence of the surname in the records. Wills from 1723, Marriage licence records from 1729; and thereafter numbers grow. A major increase occurs as some Catholic Church records begin c.1762. The usual spelling in all these records is ‘Anglin’, though Hanglin occurs quite regularly and sometimes Anglim, Anglinn, Anglen, Anglan and Hanglan. Some documents examined for the surname O'hAngluinn/Anglin in 18th Century: •

Marriage Licence Bonds

Roman Catholic Records earliest entry is 1742 and this is exceptional

Church of Ireland Records earliest entry varies with individual Parish; earliest in 1643 are unique

Irish Flax Growers list of 1796 for County Clare

Irish Wills 1700+ Diocese Cork and Ross also Diocese of Cloyne

A Calendar of wills of the diocese of Waterford and Lismore 1645 to 1800

A Genealogical History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, enjoying territorial possessions of High Official Rank, but uninvested with heritable Honours' in Volume 3 pages 397-399 82 The accuracy of that date requires verification as the other licence bonds are all later, beginning 1720’s. This marriage took place in the parish of Ballymoney, near Dunmanway. Do remember marriages usually took place in the parish of the bride. While the male line is good for family trees; the marriage of daughters is more useful to identify residence 83 In America in this same century there are three Anglins carrying the expected English spelling of the name O’hAngluinn. They are: • Ruth Anglin entering the Virginia colony in 1635 • Eleanor Anglin on a passenger list arriving in Maryland USA in 1688 • There is a William Anglin in Maryland in 1696 81

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The Convert Rolls by Eileen O’Byrne

The Protestant Census 1766

The complete Book of Emigrants in Bondage 1614-1775 by Peter Wilson Cobham:

Irish American Associations early years by David Beers Quinn:

The History of Bandon by George Bennet

What of the 1800’s? The quantity of records increased markedly in the second half of this century. The evidence shows the common spelling to be Anglin, particularly in County Cork; but the presence of Anglim in the neighbouring counties to Cork is quite noticeable. In regard to County Tipperary and the Griffith’s valuation lists, which I have placed in Appendix 8 E, the situation there merits independent study. Some of the documents examined for the surname O'hAngluinn/Anglin in 19th Century: •

Griffith’s Valuations

Civil Birth Marriage and Death Registers

Church of Ireland Church Records

Roman Catholic Church Records

Concluding comments on the English form of O'hAngluinn In the 17th century the English form takes root in the country. From the mid 1700’s more records are available for scrutiny and the evidence shows the usual English form had become ‘Anglin’ but other forms do occur, sometimes due to voice intonation or accent. But still local spellings occur, with County Tipperary being unique84. Care was necessary in going beyond usual spellings as it could lead to accepting a different name; e.g. ‘O’Hanlon’ is a different name with a different history85. (The guideline I used was the need for the presence of the consonants ‘g’ along side the ‘l’ and ‘n’). Cf. footnote on the surname Angland86. It is clear the prefix ‘O’ and the ‘h’ were discarded during these centuries but sometimes the ‘h’ still remains as part of the name as in hanglin.

There is evidence those who transcribed records seem to be quite willing to choose a spelling e.g. Anglin or Anglim and convert all the other spellings to the chosen one 85 The name O’hanlon, in Gaelic O h’anluain, comes from the word ‘anluan’ meaning hero or champion while the name Anglin comes from the Gaelic anglonn. cf. Woulfe 86 MacLystaght notes Griffith’s Valuations (1850) for North County Cork suggests the most common form of the Gaelic name O’hAngluinn at the time was ‘Angland’ This name is still found in County Cork today. His view of a link between Ohangluinn and Angland changes in his work of 1969. Internationally the form Anglin and sometimes Anglim, became the most plentiful. In support of MacLystaght, the ‘Bristol Anglins’ note the name of one of their direct ancestors was entered in a Bristol Poll Book 0f 1837 as ‘Angland. I have spoken by phone to adult ‘Anglands’ and they gave me the spelling of their name in Gaelic as ‘Aingleont’. In some cases the ‘i’ was omitted. Woulfe sees the name ‘Angland’ as a different name from ‘Anglin’ and with a different source, Woulfe makes clear that the Gaelic name Aingleont is the source of Angland and of the name English. To me the issue is now closed Angland is a different name 84

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Summary of stages in the evolution of the Anglin surname87 Pre 950 a.d.

Anglonn

1100’s

Angluinne

e.g.Aenghuis Angluinne

1490

Ua hAngluinn

e.g.Fionn ua hAnghluinn

Angli

William Angli (Unique to Spain)

1568 +

e.g. Conal Anglonn

1573 to 1600 (Early Anglicisation) O’hangelen; O’hanglin; O’Hanglyn; O’hanglen; Anglyn Post 1600 (Further Anglicisation) Hauglin; Hanglane; Hanglin; Anglin Anglim; Anglinn etc. 1850’s (Spellings in Griffith’s)

Anglum; Anglin; Anglim; Anglam; Hanglin; Anglan; Anglane

Today (Mainly…)

Anglin(m); Hanglin; and simple spelling variations. Also Angli in Spain

The story of the O’hAngluinns as persons in this period Having examined the books and documents on this surname, the focus now moves to the persons ‘behind’ the name. While records are few, it seems legitimate to make the following deductions. The Anglins were ‘ordinary people’ ‘Official’ documents only treat of those Irish who had standing88 in the mindset of the governing elites, even if their standing was as opponents. Therefore the absence of the surname suggests the Anglins were very much ‘ordinary people’, but we remember they were descendants of individuals whom their peers considered to be ‘Anglonns’. But they were mentioned when they broke the law or became in some way attached to the ruling English elite, be it by marriage or even by religious allegiance. Also where business directories named Anglins their occupation indicates ‘ordinary’ people. The Anglins and education A love of knowledge is part of Irish culture and tradition. This fact is evidenced in difficult times with the ‘hedge schools’ and in the migration to Europe for education when it was denied at home. Though the name is rare the fulfilment of this desire is seen in a young man at College in Louvain and in the presence of the Augustinian Prior in Dungarvan Co. Waterford89. (It is a joy to see that continuing love of knowledge and learning in the migrants to Canada) Anglins were mostly Catholic The Gaelic Anglin name pre dates the Reformation so it is reasonable to assume they were Catholic by religious persuasion. The growth in visibility of Catholic Anglins in the late 1700’s is evidenced in Church Records, now kept as the priest’s fear of keeping information on their people

ua’ is another form of ‘O’ The exception would be Catholic birth and marriage registers which commence in the very late 1700’s where everyone is involved. The marriage licence bonds are different. They cost money and were not necessary for the marriage of ordinary persons 89 cf. chapter 11 87 88

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waned. These records show the presence of many Anglins in the births, marriages and death records of Catholic Churches. Some Anglins accepted the Reformed Church90 While there is not a lot of evidence for the presence of any Anglins in the 17th century, those who are named suggest allegiance to the reformed Church. Thereafter the Protestant Anglins are clearly present in the records of the early 18th century.91 The Anglins were ‘rural people’ Reviewing the records of Cork and its county towns during 1600-1900, there is a growing presence of Anglins in the towns as years progress, even growing to a relatively substantial number. This fact suggests a rural people moving into towns for employment or to improve their lot. Even their occupations, where known, have a relationship with rural life. The location of the Anglins We have already established this in the geographic mapping in Chapter One. The vast majority of Anglins were in the County of Cork with an overspill in small groups in counties adjacent to Cork, but some individuals seemed to have ‘wandered’ even up to Donegal and Belfast. The emigration of the Anglins Initially the movement of O’hAngluinn / Anglins was within Ireland. An example is the story of the Glanmire Anglins, who beginning in Glanmire, Cork moved along the west coast line around the north till they settled in the Belfast area. But there is another movement that takes O’hAngluinns beyond Ireland’s shores… the Anglins of the Diaspora. This Irish migration is examined in an historical supplement at the end of Section 1. A few comments are needed at this stage. Within Ireland there are no records of ordinary emigrants in the 16th-18th centuries. Fortunately outside Ireland there are some in the later centuries, even if little is recorded as to why they left Ireland92. Examples of such records are in the British National Government Archives in Kew London, Ellis Island records, naturalisation papers, censi, social documents and death registers. These speak of many Anglins whose birthplace was Ireland93. Further there are European records e.g. Records of Irish Colleges and of Irish military Regiments and even here Anglins are mentioned. This knowledge forces me to comment, how is it in those bygone days the name Anglin is barely mentioned yet when emigration is examined the presence of the Anglin name is multiplied a hundred fold! Today but few Anglins remain in Ireland.

Conclusion to the Chapter While the anglicised form of the name varies the normal is ‘Anglin/m’. They are a numerically small group of Gaelic origin, mostly Catholic, rural, and seemingly natives of Cork. While stating they are a numerically small group, since the surname re-appears in numbers in records post 92 93 90 91

My impression is they were Methodist, But because of their method of evangelisation their records are hard to find Marriage Bonds, And Church of Ireland records Our knowledge of history will have to fill the gaps There are records in Europe only now being researched showing the presence of the name Anglin there in the 16th century and later

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1740, it is clear they must have been more numerous than earlier documents suggest. They are not associated with the ownership of large tracts of land in Ireland’s past, nor are they one of the large Gaelic clan/sept names. The silent and hidden years of the 17th century Reflecting on the absence of records of the Anglin name in 17th century Ireland, I can only call it ‘The tragic Silence of the 17th Century’, where even the very names of ordinary people were devalued94. Having searched the story of this name through the generations it is clear the period from Queen Elizabeth, circa 1560, till about 1720 was an important stage in the story of the O'hAngluinn family name, yet few official records speak of them. The Bishop of Elphin made an instructive comment to the Pope in 1770. He reported, ‘though the persecutions had ceased, the priests were as yet unwilling to keep records’!95 Hopefully the reawakened interest of Irish Scholars in Irish migrations to Europe in 1500’s to 1800 may uncover more information about our predecessors. This ‘silent period’ continues to be of concern for research, and substitute sources of information need to be uncovered. Major events occurred in this period, the Anglicisation of their name occurred, the beginning of the Protestant lines, the emigration, forced or voluntary, occurred. It is important to keep in mind till the late 1700’s, Irelands migration and cultural leanings were to Europe and it is only from then the migration destinations changes direction to the English speaking new world Moving the search forward It will be a slow process to move this search forward, requiring knowledge of the place of residency of people. This will require searches of estate records, state records, court records, the place of female marriages etc. This cannot occur without more precision as to the actual place of residency. In English Record offices and in the Old Irish Colleges on the continent there is material. I am sure with more interest in these issues, as time goes on, such material will become available through national libraries. Other material worthy of research •

The Munster Plantation: English migration to South Ireland (1583-1641) by McCarthy Morragh (Oxford 1986)

Ireland under the Commonwealth and Protectorate (164-1656) 2 Vols by Dunlop (Manchester 1913)

The Litany of Saints by Aengus written in the eighth century

The History of Cork by Dr. Smith written in the early 1800’s

This is a real problem for researchers as this would have been the period when some O hAngluinn / Anglins would have changed religious lanes and also the period of movement of individuals from land and even from Ireland. It is also true large numbers were lost in the troubles in 1922 95 The absence of records was not all due to the troubles of 1922 94

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An important additional note There was movement of Irish people to the European mainland before the Anglicisation of Gaeilge Surnames, which had become official English Government policy in the reign of Queen Elizabeth the first (1558-1603). If O’hangluinns / Anglins were among those who migrated at the pre Anglicisation period to mainland Europe and particularly Spain; then their surname would have been in the Gaeilge form. In those circumstances it is more than possible that a form of the Gaeilge surname could occur today in Spain or Spanish colonies alongside the surname in its anglicised form.96

This refers to South American countries such as Argentina

96

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Further developments on Chapter 3 Introduction Chapter 3 of the report sought to record insights into the Anglins as persons in the post 1600 period using documentary evidence. While it was understood Civil registers existed really only from 1864 no serious focus was made on the necessary relationship of documents and the existence of stone buildings. Documents would only survive the generations in ‘stone’ buildings. So besides paying attention to the historical vicissitudes of the Irish people attention has to be paid not just to when parishes were established, but also the year the stone-like buildings were erected. That study while being part of the bedrock of this type of research is outside the narrow focus of this study. The original report concluded little would be recorded about ordinary people (this would include the Anglins) and church records of people were not kept really before 1750. Consequently if progress is to be made, areas outside those normally used in genealogical research need to be searched. So Literary records, Estate Papers, Town Corporatio/Government records, Wills and similar type papers are examined. As the surname belongs to County Cork and its environs, the search is made of pre 1800 Papers in that geographic area.

1

Identifying Anglins in Literary material within Ireland pre 1800

The Poet Diarmaid Ban O’hAnglainn lived early 1600’s: Introduction Bards were in Ireland in the Gaelic Period attached to major Gaelic patrons, clan leaders etc. They held an important position in society. They were educated and had knowledge of law, history, battles particularly those enhancing the good name of their patron. Their message was disseminated in the form of Gaeilge Poetry. With the effort to destroy the Gaelic Culture, beginning in the late 1500’s, the Bards gradually lost position. A lot of their writings still exist as collectors in the 1600’s gathered their Poetry. This material is in the Royal Irish Academy and Universities at home and in Europe. Since the mid 1800’s efforts have been made to regain some of their ‘Story’ from these ancient documents. Among the Bardic poems there is at least one poem written by an Anglin, the Bardic Poet Diarmaid Ban O’hAnglainn. His poem was written in the early 1600’s and commences ‘Saoghal so nach saoghal damh’ , it is a didactic poem of the ‘Aithrighe’ (repentance) type. The manuscript is in the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin, the reference is: 9146 RIA5 (23/D/4) Munster 17th cent. (It is possible the next poem in that collection was also written by Diarmaid). The poem originated in Munster. The poem is also present in a collection in National University at Maynooth (Ms 87,pp550-1). Diarmuid O’Murhuadha, author of ‘Family names of county Cork’, has kindly made a translation into English, for which I express my sincere gratitude. O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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Besides its inherent value, the poem again emphasises: •

the Gaelic origin of our surname in the Munster area

the Gaelic spelling of the surname

the use of the surname in the Gaeilge language in the early 1600’s even post the early stages of anglicisation of surnames in official documents of the Elizabethan Fiants had begun

the Christian inheritance and traditions

Reading it draws one to recall a cultural element in an earlier O’hAnglainn who was a tympanist. An internet site reference is: http://bardic.celt.dias.ie/displayPoem.php?firstLineID=166897 The Poem (Diarmoid Bán Ó h’anglainn cecinit) Saog[h]al so nach saog[h]al damh, ní hé an

This life is no life for me, this life is not our

saoghal so ár saoghal

life;

saoghal ó nach saoghlach sinn, baoghalach

a life in which we are not long-lived, this life

an saoghal so saoilim.

is dangerous, I feel.

Níor thuigios, ba t[h]uigsi shlim, trúagh

I understood not, slight was [my]

nar thuigios mar thuigim

understanding; a pity I did not realize as I

now do

nach í an tuigsi do thuig me, tuig nar

that it was not the understanding I grasped;

thuigsi mo thuigsi.

know that mine was no understanding.

Anois tuigim nar thuig me, giodh mall do

Now I realize I understood not, though

thuig mo thuigsi

slowly my understanding grasped it,

ní fhaghaim lem thuigsi ar ttoil, tuigsi do

I do not obtain understanding accordingly,

adhair d[’]anntoil.

[but] understanding that worships self-will.

Mo thuigsi ar thoil mo thoile, le toil do

My understanding in accord with my will, a

thoil mh[’]anntoile

will that wills self-will,

mo thoilsi ar thoil na tuigsi, toil dar

my will in accord with my understanding, a

bhfoigsi síorthuigsi.

will that nears eternal understanding.

Déis a ttuigim truagh mo thoisg, dar leam

Since I realize the pitifulness of my state, I

These search terms are highlighted: ‘o hanglainn’. These terms only appear in links pointing to this page: bardic poetry 1668. Saoghal so nach saoghal damh (Length: short 6qq + 4 in amhran metre; Certainty: 5; Period: 17th early; Classes: Didactic; Manuscripts: RIA5 (23/D/4) Munster 17th cent. Prints: text MD i, no. 33; Motifs: envoi to God; renunciation of the world; body enemy of soul; need to discipline. Poet Christian Names: Diarmaid Ban (RIA 5) Surnames: ‘O hAnglainn’ Meter Vars: deibhidhe. Another Internet site is:- http://bardic.celt.dias.ie/displayIndexHead.php?indexHeadID=2732

97

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is duine díochoisg

feel a wayward person,

nach géil[l] ó thoil do thuigsi, le céill oimh

who yields not willingly to your

na hanntuigsi.

understanding, from a crude sense of

misunderstanding.

Mo thoil a Dhé ar do thoilsi, coisgeadh da

May my will, O God, be as Thy will, a

t[h]oil mh[’]anntoilsi

hindrance to the will that is my self-will,

mo thoil mo thuigsi mar so, tuigsi gan oil a

May my will, my understanding, be thus, an

Íosa

understanding without reproach, O Jesus.

2 Identifying Anglins in Irish Wills pre 1800 Introduction In seeking to learn more through Wills, other information came to light. The geographic areas of these ‘wealthy!’ Anglins98 were identified. Also a new insight into the Anglin surname’s arrival into Canada was found (cf.‘Further developments’ added to Chapter 14). The focus here is on ‘Wills held in Ireland’. A collection outside Ireland was uncovered and a reference to that is footnoted. It is anticipated few Anglins will be unearthed and those found will be in County Cork or its environs. A brief historical Introduction to Wills in Ireland Will documentation was rare in the Gaelic period. The New English set up a system, in which up to 185799. Irish Wills were probated in courts of the established Church, the Church of Ireland. Two methods were used: 1.

Where an estate was completely within one diocese then the Diocesan Consistorial courts were responsible for granting probate and administration.

2.

If an estate extended beyond one diocese then probate matters were passed to the Prerogative Court100. These wills are really of the wealthy, or merchants. This Court gained a fixed base in 1816 at the Kings Inns Henrietta Street Dublin.

The original documents of both Courts were centralised in the Public Records Office in the Four Courts, Dublin after 1857101 and Indexes to them102 were prepared. William Betham and other private individuals, made abstracts of some wills and retained them outside the P.R.O. Some ‘wealthy’ families had their own private collections.

100 101

Wealthy in the sense of being in position of having a will 1857 was the year responsibility was removed from the Church of Ireland and passed to the state. Prerogative Wills and administrations generally cover the wealthier or merchant classes 1857 as the year the testamentary authority of the Church of Ireland was passed to a principal registry in Dublin and its eleven districts 102 Not all wills were forwarded to the P.R.O. 98 99

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A further development occurred in 1708 with the introduction of the Registry of Deeds. (This Registry was originally established to copper fasten the new ownership of land following the Cromwellian and Williamite conquests of Ireland). Fire in the P.R.O. in 1922 destroyed the original documents, but most Indexes survived. Some researchers since 1922 have gathered will information from various sources in Ireland and England, one such collection being W.H. Welply’s ‘Pedigree Notebooks’. As family collections of early wills come into the public domain other Anglins may surface. An Examination of the Consistorial court Wills for Anglins103 Indexes are in the NAI Dublin. Published Copies are: ‘Testamentary Records of Ireland’ ed. Phillimore and Thrift, covering all Munster dioceses104. Other sources are: O’Kief ‘Coshe Mang Slive Lougher105 vols 5,6,8106. The following Anglins are named in these Consistorial Indexes107: •

James Anglin Cork, probated 1783 (I assume Cork here means Cork City)

Mark Anglin Cork probated 1723 (Presumably Cork City)

Mary Anglin Cork probated 1786 (Presumably Cork City)

Cicely Anglin (formerly Heagerty) widow, probated Cork (Presumably Cork City)

Francis Hanglin Clonakilty, probated 1742

John Hanglin Clonakilty, probated 1754

William Hanglin Clonakilty, probated 1771

Waterford and Lismore covering 1645-1800

John Anglin Knockatimore, County Waterford probated 1730

John Anglin Ballylaffin, County Waterford probated 1779

John Handlin, H.M.S. The Cornwall probated 1749 (English Ship): note spelling!!

John Hanglin, Ballynhally County Waterford probated 1750

O’Kief offered this extra information: •

Jeremiah Hanglin from Clonakilty, probated 1742

There was an Anglin will of Ferns diocese (Wexford) but I know nothing of it.

Other Locations of Indexes to Consistorial Wills and Administration Grants and results include:- The Journal of Cork Historical and Archaeological society they have an index covering 1548-1833: The Journal Irish Ancstors 1975 for Killaloe Diocese ( Co. Clare) 104 N.L.I. reference is. Ir 9293i3. also The Munster Dioceses are:- Cashel and Emily; Cork and Ross; Cloyne; Waterford and Lismore; Ardfert and Aghadoe; Ferns (Wexford): Killaloe and Kilfenora Clare): Limerick. 105 N.L.I. reference IR 944145c12 volumes 5,6,8 106 Incidentaly, a cursory examination of areas, other than wills, in these volumes of O’Kief indicate quite a number of Anglins/Hanglins in this Slieve Luchra area of north Cork and Kerry 107 Linking this information to Lismore papers information and to a study of Clonakilty Anglins would be beneficial 103

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An Examination of Consistorial Anglin Will Abstracts Only two will Abstracts were unearthed, both in the Welply Collection108. In a section headed “Deeds copied Dublin 31/5/51 to 18/6/51 Registry of Deeds” 109 in notebook 22a page 186, this handwritten statement occurs: 41. 173,465,128483. Agreement 10 Novr. 1755. Elizh. Payne. Wid. And Exectr. of Silvanus Payne late of Ardclugg near Inishonam, Co. Cork (i) Wm. Hanglen of Ardclugg, wool comber (ii). Elizh. Had an interest in the lands of Ardclugg by virtue of a lease 2 made to Silvanus by Rev. John Moore decd. Wm. Hanglen had married Mary Ann Payne, docee110. of Elizh. above Wits. :- Robert Payne of Inishowan Co. Cork and John Cusick of the same, linen weaver. (i) nee Burgess (m.l.d.) (ii) Lease not registered The second relevant entry is in Notebook 22a page 188, again handwritten, and reads: 47. 221,500,148822. Lease 1763 Cath.Allen wid. & admx. of John A. of Cork, clothier (i) Wm Hanglin of same, clothier. Demise of Dwelling house111 An examination of Prerogative Court wills for Anglins112 Indexes to these are in the N.A.I. Dublin. Published Indexes are: •

Betham’s, ‘Index of testators up to 1810’

Vicars ‘Prerogative Index to Wills 1536-1810’

CD Rom: ‘Index of Irish Wills 1484-1858’

Records at NAI Dublin (Eneclann 1999)

There are no Anglin/ Hanglins in any of these Indexes. An Examination of Registered Wills in the Registry of Deeds for Anglins113 The index is in Registry of Deeds, Dublin. Published Indexes are: •

‘Registry of Deeds Index & Abstracts’ Vols 1 and 2: 1708-1785 ed. Beryl Eustace; Vol 3: 1785-1852 ed. Ellis & Beryl Eustace

‘Abstracts of the Registered wills’, by the Irish Manuscript commission, which are in the

National Library and in the Registry of Deeds. This collection is in the Library of the Church of Ireland Dublin The pedigree notebooks of W. H. Welply were prepared by between 1922 and 1966. He was a genealogist. He focused particularly on the diocese of Cork and Ross. And has two entries of agreements re Hanglins. He also has a pedigree of a Robert Anglin of Bandon which I have placed in Further Developments to Appendix 5. 110 This word is difficult to read 111 In view of the wording it is difficult to know if this comes from the Cork and Ross Consistorial court or from the registry of Deeds, it may come from both 112 Other locations of Indexes and Abstracts of the Prerogative Courts include Bethams Index up to 1810 in NAI; index to preroative grants in NAI; Index to Will Abstracts in the Journal Analecta Hibernia no 17 (1949) NLI reference (Ir 941 a 10) and ms 429 in The Geneological office; Indexes in the Journal Irish Ancestry published in years 1969- 1986 113 Other Locations of Indexes and Abstracts of Registered Wills in the Registry of Deeds are the indexes and Abstracts in the Registry of Deeds itself: Abstracts of Wills by Phair and Ellis for 1708-1888 in Reg. Of Deeds; Granters Index in Registry of Deeds 108 109

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There are no Anglins/Hanglins in any of these Indexes. A Comment on Irish Wills held abroad listing Anglins Indexes/abstracts of Wills held abroad are given in this footnote.114 The Canterbury Court for Prerogative Wills in England is available online. There are four Anglin wills from Jamaica in the Canterbury Court Wills.

3

Identifying Anglins in Collections of Estate & Private Papers pre-1800

Introduction During the reign of Elizabeth 1 who died c.1600 and in the reigns of subsequent English monarchs the land in Ireland was taken over (confiscated) and given to English Lords, their followers or ‘friendly Irish’. Their estate papers often record the names of Irish people who lived or paid rent to these Lords. The major Estates in County Cork would include the Lismore Estate and the Doneraile estates. In the national Library Dublin (www.nli.ie) there are collections of manuscripts. The following Papers cover estates in County Cork and environs. They have or are being examined. •

Lismore Castle papers are relevant to the Anglin story

Doneraile Papers are geographically relevant to the Anglin story

Welply Papers are relevant to the Anglin story

Kinsale Corporation Presentments115 are relevant to the Anglin story

Doherty Papers (Bandon)116not examined

McCarthy Papers contain nothing relevant to the Anglin story

Inchiquin Papers contain nothing relevant to the Anglin story

Lord Castletown Papers contain nothing relevant to the Anglin story

The Civil survey for Cork: The Inquisitions

Findings •

Kinsale Grand Jury Presentments: These were examined for the original report up till 1720 and a David Hanglane was recorded in 1676.

The Welply Collection of Papers: This collection, which is in the C.of I. Library, Dublin, in Notebook 26 page 316 has a pedigree referring to Anglins. I quote:

The Irish Genealogical Research Society London holds:- The Swansy Collection contains Consistorial and Prerogative wills. The Society of Genealoogists London has the Rosbottom Collection of wills: 115 Held in Kinsale Library 116 Held in the Cork Archives institute 114

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These two entries are stated to appear in the (printed) Index to Cork and Ross Marriage Licence Bonds 1751-1845 Official Letter 14.1.56 from P.R.O. Dublin. The above portion of a pedigeee came to me via Mrs. Hesketh-Williams of 32a Clanrickard Gardens W2 from Mr.Ronald Siliott of Newcomber, 126 Boulevard Stratfield Sydney, NS.W. who is professor of Greek in some school or college in Sydney who states that the pedigree was given to him by Mr. James Penrose Anglin. •

The Lismore Castle Papers: This estate extended from West Waterford to West Cork. At various stages belonging to Sir Walter Rayleigh, the Boyles, Cavendishes and Duke of Devonshire. It can include Tallow, Youghel, Bandon, Kilgariffe, Cork City and Clogheen in Tipperary, areas in which Anglins lived. A summary of these papers is on the Internet at: www.nli.ie/pdfs/mss%20lists/129_Lismore.pdf There are no Anglins in these summaries but there are Anglins in section 6 of the manuscripts117 which includes the Rental lists, sub lease and tenant lists etc. of various sections of the estate. Attention was paid to those relating to areas where Anglins were assumed to have lived e.g. Bandon, Clonakilty Clogheen, Tallow etc. A list of manuscripts examined is in a footnote118.

Information uncovered on Anglins: John Hanglin is listed three times in MS 43,737/3 as paying rent in Clognakilty in 1695/6. In MS 6152 in 1735 a John Hanglin is paying rent for property in Cloghnakilty. •

Francis Hanglin is listed in MSS 43,737/3 to12 on a number of occasions as paying rent for the Millington Plot in Clognakilty.

In /4 it is stated he had a 21 year lease beginning Lady Day 1704. It also confirms the payment of the rent for 1706-1707.

available in N.L.I. Dublin Lismore Castle Papers: mss43,737/1 to /14: mss.43,734/1,/2,/3,/6 : mss 43,756/1 to/4: mss 6152: mss43,741/ 1 to /5:

117 118

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In MS 43,737/10 there is further detail, I quote: “Francis Hanglin for Millington Plot in which he built a handsome house and a good malt house which cost him as he alleges 150. He has a lease of 21 years granted him by Lord Castleton from Lady Day 1719 and afterwards proposed for a lease of 3 lives which was amazingly demised and sent over for Lord Castleton but never sent back …12. 60 half rents 1730.” This rent is again paid in 1731 by Francis Hanglin.

In MS 43,737/11 the entry is repeated.

In MS 43,737/12 Francis Hanglin he is still there and also in 1731 and 1735 and paying rent and adds a statement that “the lease was granted in 1701 for 31 years”.

In MS 6152 for 1733-1735 he is shown in November 1733 paying rent.

In MS 43,741/4 shows Francis Hanglin in 1737 and 1738 and paying rent for Millington Plot.

Wil Hanglin is listed in MS 741/4 in a difficult entry to read paying rent through a Edward Hayes”. The title for this dwelling area is ‘Cloghnikilty Manors’.

In MS 43,741/5: covering Rent collectors account books for 1743 – 1751 shows Wil. in 1747 paying rent on Lady Day’.

• •

Rob Hanglin is listed in MS 43,741/5 as paying rent in 1743, 4 and 5.

Doneraile Papers: A list of their contents is on the Internet. I examined manuscripts pre-1800 for Anglins and found none.

The Ordinance Survey of Ireland. The Inquisitions…Cork119: These cover the period late 1500’s and the 1600’s. They cover the land confiscations from the Irish incumbents, Clan leaders, and their transfer to others ‘friendly’ to the ruling government. It would include the reigns of James, Cromwell and Charles. I examined areas linked to Anglins and specifically north County Cork. Not unsurprisingly I found no Anglins. I was not surprised as Anglins were ordinary members of the clans even if ‘heroic’and would have been tenants rather than owners. In this sense the negative findings help to substanciate the view that the Anglins were ‘ordinary’ people.

The Doherty Papers of the Earl of Bandon Estate: A minor group just now available: they were not examined.

Conclusion This examination of old records clearly establishes Anglins in West Waterford, Cork City and a line into West Cork as far as the Clonakilty area, and from as early as 1676. It also shows a gradual Anglicisation of the Gaeilge surname to Hanglin and then Anglin, but with some retention

These are seven volumes, hand written, mostly in Latin and record decisions of the inquisitions. They do have a townland index and are kept in the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin

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of the Hanglin form; indeed the Hanglin120 form was more common in the 1700’s than anticipated. While Anglins are still rare, the surname shows a certain permanence particularly in the Clonakillty area.

4 Aim: To update the evolution of the English spelling of O’hAnglainn The section entitled ‘Summary of stages in the evolution of the Anglin surname’ is now updated to include understandings flowing from the new material unearthed, particularly the common use of Hanglin in the 1700’s. Pre 950 a.d.

Anglonn

1100’s

Angluinne

e.g. Aenghuis Angluinne

1490

Ua121 hAngluinn

e.g. Fionn ua hAnghluinn

Angli

William Angli (Unique to Spain)

1568 +

e.g. Conal Anglonn

1573 to 1600 (Early Anglicisation) O’hangelen; O’hanglin; O’Hanglyn; O’hanglen; Anglyn Post 1600 (Further Anglicisation) Hauglin; Hanglane; Hanglin; Anglin Anglim; Anglinn etc. 1850’s (Spellings in Griffith’s)

Anglum; Anglin; Anglim; Anglam; Hanglin; Anglan; Anglane

Today (Mainly…)

Anglin(m); Hanglin; and simple spelling variations. Also Angli in Spain

Some comments •

It is noteworthy the consonants A, N, G, L and N/M are present in the original epithet ‘Anglonn’ and are retained throughout the generations and the vicissitudes of misspelling. It is the vowels that seem to change.

The stages of anglicisation seem to be firstly the dropping of the ‘O’ and then the dropping of the ‘h’.

In the pre-1800 period the common anglicised forms are Anglin(m) and Hanglin and simple spelling vowel variations of these. I see the use of M or N as merely due to local intonation.

The earliest proven presence of the surname outside Ireland is in the anglicised form and is ‘William Angli’ in Spain. The dropping of the ‘n’, I believe, is due to linguistic structures of the Spanish language.

The form ‘Hanglin’ present in Clonakilty, and in Cork and Ross and Waterford and Lismore Wills seems to have followed the mercantile and through Spain to the old Spanish colonies. (Dare I suggest wealth/importance was a factor?)

The form ‘Anglin’ in its various spellings seems to have followed the lines of England and the English colonisation.

For this view of the Hanglin form cf. www.familysearch.org which is confirmatory. ‘ua’ is another form of ‘O’.

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Conclusion Having extensively studied the evolution in the spelling of this surname in Ireland from the original Gaeilge form of O’hAnglainn / O’hAngluinn through the early efforts at anglicisation evidenced in the Fiants and then in the literary, historical, civil, religious, state and corporation records of the 16th to 19th centuries122 it is clear Anglim, Anglin and Hanglin have a common origin and are clearly different spellings of the same surname. These three specific spellings stabilised during the 1700’s in Ireland and abroad.123 Some of the documents examined in the preparation of this Chapter’s ‘Further Developments’: •

Families of County Cork by Diarmuid O’Murchadha

Annals of Connaught: No Anglins

Pecata Hibernia: No Anglins

Lismore Castle Papers: The contents are available at the Internet address: www.nli.ie/pdfs/mss%20lists/129_lismore.pdf

Doherty Papers on Bandon Estate

Doneraile Papers

Welply Notebooks

Cork Inquisitions

cf updated appendix 6. Of course rare examples of different spellings can still be found.

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Chapter 4 DNA and the Anglin story The Aims of this Chapter are: a) To seek understanding of relevant aspects of the Anglin DNA project b) To outline how this study and the DNA project are interrelated

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Introduction This chapter is merely an outline of one aspect of the Anglin DNA project but one relevant to this study. The DNA project is an essential thread in the narration of the story of the Anglin name. I will not attempt to explain the DNA system, primarily as my understanding is too superficial; but I accept its broad findings in relation to the Anglin Surname. It is therefore appropriate to express thanks to Karen Parker, Joan Bulach and Robert Anglin, particularly to Karen who has invested her time, energy and expertise not only to gain an understanding of the system but applying her knowledge to advance the Anglin story. Anyone seeking further knowledge on the Anglin DNA project should go to the web site. I simply use their findings. Web address is: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~kmparker/AnglinDNA/index.html

The DNA findings as related to the Anglin Story While each individual person has a unique DNA there is a close similarity in the DNA pattern of those males who are closely related to one another by physical parental descent, in ordinary speech we speak of brothers and sisters, first cousins, second cousins and so forth or indeed ‘blood relatives’. I use a ‘laypersons’ language. Again those requiring precise information please go to the web site. Over some hundreds of years, the various O’hAngluinn / Anglin family threads have separated even to the point of people wondering if there is any relationships at all. By analysing various individuals’ DNA this project has identified five ‘threads’ of Anglins. These five threads have ‘different’ DNA profiles, which suggest the divergence of the threads, occurred centuries ago. But the analysis has also identified individuals who unknown to one another have a DNA profile similar to other specific Anglins indicating they are ‘blood related’ i.e. they belong to the same thread, and the divergence has been more recent.124 The DNA team have named three of these threads, group 2, group 3 and group 4. Since they have not as yet given group names to the other two, till they do so I refer to these as ‘Wexford Anglims’ and ‘Bristol Anglins’. The DNA team have also examined another line of Anglins who have the surname but whose DNA profile is unrelated in any way to these five groups.

The Origin of the Anglins The earlier chapters of this study identified the historical and geographical origin of the name O’hAngluinn/Anglin/m to be in Ireland. Investigations into possibilities of another origin for the And I expect to find others

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surname outside Ireland were examined and found to be untenable; and merely for the purpose of record the details are reported in the next chapter…Five. There are Anglin families abroad who by documentary research know their country of origin is Ireland. There are also Anglin lines throughout the world that surmise they originated in Ireland but have no documentary evidence to prove it. Consequences of linking the DNA project results to Geographic Mapping can be stated thus: - a) If a family line is of the same DNA profile as an Irish Anglin Family line (or a family living outside Ireland who have documentary evidence of their Irish origin) then the members of both lines are one group i.e. ’cousins even if distant cousins’. But there is a second consequence both lines must have the same geographic root. In this case their root origin is in Ireland for all. For this researcher one aspect of his efforts has been to assist the DNA project in linking Anglin lines to their geographic root origin by documentary evidence.

A closer look at one DNA group To highlight the value of the DNA work to this study a closer look is now made of just one DNA group of Anglins, namely Group 2. Group 2 is made up of discrete Anglin families. This grouping of families are related to one another, evidenced by their DNA profiles, but because of the divergence over the generations they did not even know they were related. In this group 2 there are a line of Anglins who are Protestant and living in Canada, there is another Anglin line who are Catholic and living in Ireland and England: another family line in this group are Catholic Anglins of West Cork: another line is in the USA and are descendants of William of Caswell County in NC who came there c.1733; there is a family line of Anglims with some members living in England and others in County Tipperary; and there is an individual Anglin whose origin is Macroom in County Cork. All these are considered related due to the similarity of their DNA profile. Since the root origin of some of them is Ireland and specifically County Cork then the original origin of all of these is County Cork. So when the DNA profiling and the documentary evidence come together they jointly further understanding of the Anglin story.

Other aspects of the DNA Anglin project The DNA project has a number of other benefits but those seeking further knowledge should go to the web site as other aspects are outside the objectives of this study.

Known Anglin family lines A number of family lines have built trees; I list them in Appendix 8 G. To gain details of any of the lines one could contact the Anglin DNA project site.

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Conclusion At a simple level the DNA project has helped this study by identifying lines that are related closely to one another and other lines that are unrelated. In so doing it can help link lines geographically to their root origins, but it also asks the question ‘How is it there are more than one Anglin Family Thread’.

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Chapter 5 Could there be other sources for the Anglin surname? The Aims of this Chapter are: a) To explore other possible sources for the Anglin Surname by examining various hypotheses b) To explore possibilities both in Ireland and abroad

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Introductory comments The possibility of a separate source for the Anglin name other than the one presented so far in this study has been raised. This possibility has been given some legitimacy by the Anglin DNA project findings that there are at least three separate (unrelated?) groups of Anglins. It is incumbent upon this study to answer the question ‘Could there be other sources for the Anglin surname’. This research project to date has been directed to the identification of the source for the O’hAngluinn / Anglin surname. I am quite satisfied the evidence clearly points to an origin in Cork probably West Cork, the name having descended from an individual who had been ‘named’ ‘anglonn’ by his peers and whose descendants had become known as O’hAngluinns. That aspect of the research is true, how then explain the different Anglin DNA profiles as the DNA results demand the possibility of more than a single source for the surname be explored. The hypotheses are now examined.

Other Irish sources for the surname Anglin? Some hypotheses Adoption It is conceivable some ancestors of present day Anglin lines adopted the surname or were adopted into Anglin families. While accepting that as a possibility, and it may be true in some lines, I prefer to seek other solutions to the current dilemma. More than one anglonn Focusing on the information currently available on the geographic spread of the surname Anglin in County of Cork, one can raise the possibility of other ‘anglonns’ ‘champions’ from different clans/septs in county Cork, resulting in different DNA profiles being passed on. Such an hypothesis is argued thus. The O'hAngluinn surname is not a clan/sept/race name, but is derived from an individual declared to be an anglonn. County Cork had more than one sept/race, which in the early days were territorial. All were Gaeilige speaking. If an individual in the West area of County Cork because of some special achievement had been ‘named’ anglonn (hero) in the sept, then the possibility of his progeny being called O'hAngluinns, sons of the Anglonn exists. However if this is conceded for one Cork sept, then it could also have occurred in another county Cork sept. In such circumstance the two ‘anglonns’ would have different DNA profiles and so would their respective descendants. So the possibility of more than one source of O’hAngluinns in County Cork is more than possible. Of course this would have to have occurred pre the Anglicisation of the name, even pre the introduction of surnames c.950 a.d. This hypothesis therefore can be a genuine solution. To test it’s validity, DNA testing of Anglins from the different geographic areas is necessary125. This includes the various geographic root areas referred to in chapter One

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The surname h’Angli was transformed into Anglin on Anglicisation The name O’ h Angli is in manuscripts of earlier centuries with variations in spelling. Mac Firbis’s in his ‘Book of Genealogies’ states (reference 1360.4) one of the hereditary vassals was O’hAingle; and repeats the name in another Genealogy number 677.1. The name occurs in a different form ‘Ua Angli’ at 1057.3 and 204.10 ‘Doire Ui Aingle’126. The two surnames O’hAngluinn and O’hAngli, are in old Irish documents. The question is: Could the two have evolved into one name Gaelic name O’hAngluinn? Having consulted O’Donovan’s ‘Miscellany of Celtic Society’, and others, it is clear this name Aingle did not transform into O’hAngluinn, but is later seen as a different name possibly even Mac Aingle. So this is not a solution. A similar name occurs as Bishop of Dublin in the Annals of Ulster127 for the year 1121, Samuel h’Angli. In the Annals of Inisfallen there is a reference to a Donngus ua h’Aingliu bishop of Ath Cliath reference 1095.13. Though such a link to O’hAngluinn could be considered it is a remote possibility, indeed even the date may suggest this person could be Danish or Norman. It seems sensible to reject ‘Aingle’ as a second Irish source. I reject this hypothesis. A second source, external To Ireland, for the Anglin surname Having looked at the possibility of a second source for the surname Anglin within Ireland, it is legitimate to ask, could there be another source outside of Ireland. Dr. Smith whose work has been referred to earlier makes clear surnames can have more than one source. He gives the name ‘Smith’ as an example. There is the name Smith that has entered Ireland from England, but there are other Smiths whose origin is Celtic. What are the possibilities? Could there be a French Connection to the name Anglin? There is a suggestion of a French origin flowing from the ‘story’ within the Adrian Anglin line. The evidence presented to date in support of a possible French origin is: a) The presence of a river called Anglin in the south west of France. To move from that fact to say the family name Anglin originates in France is quite a jump, too large in my view b) There is a Saint Anglin who lived in France over twelve hundred years ago, again such evidence on its own is too flimsy, plus surnames did not exist in those days c) Another possibility raised: the French name Angelin and Anglin may be the same. I have seen a plaque to the dead of WW1 in Tournas Cathedral in France listing a Francois Angelin, and I have heard of a General Angelin in the first war in Verdun. I have seen isolated examples of the surname Angelin in old English records and this name Angelin is present in other European countries. But there is no evidence that links the two names. I am aware in modern records of the presence of Hangli or Angli in other countries The Annals of Ulster in Irish Annala Senait is a chronicle of Irish Affairs from a.d. 431-1540

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d) Then there is the suggestion ‘The Anglins were Huguenots who came to Ireland in their time of trouble and they are the source of the Protestant Anglins of Ireland and abroad’. This statement is presented without any shred of evidence to support it. For those interested; there were Huguenots who did come to the Cork area of Ireland in those days, their story and the story of the English Huguenots and their surnames is available in many places, including the internet. I have searched Huguenots history regarding their entry into Ireland and England and failed to unearth any names remotely similar to Anglin. But to suggest by implication the Protestant line of Irish Anglins could not have an Irish origin is not acceptable. Quite a number of Irish people changed their religious lanes in the 17th and 18th centuries in Ireland. In fact in the book ‘The Convert Rolls’ edited by O’Brien there is the example of Margaret Anglin who changed lanes. A simple argument against Adrian being of French origin is apparent from an examination of his children’s names, Ann, Mary and Elizabeth. These names do not seem appropriate for a French family of that period. It is of note these three names were among the most common women’s names of the 1659 census in South West Cork128. This seems to indicate a link to Cork rather than France. Much more substantial evidence would be required to put forward France as a possible second source for the name Anglin, The evidence recorded above is insufficient to support a French source for the ‘Anglin’ surname.129 However, the family tradition of the DNA Group 3 is a different matter altogether. There is the evidence from a family tradition of a French connection passed down through the Group 3 family story and present in Evelyn William’s book ‘In search of the Anglins’, and recently supported by the discovery in the Patriarch Adrian’s will of his possession of many French Books. To me the information passed down must be taken seriously and an effort made to identify the nature of this French link if any. Carrying out groundwork to find such a French link to the Anglins is seriously attempted in chapter 10. Could England be a second source for the Anglin name? Historically, for better or worse, people have been passing between Ireland and England since the time of Patrick and Columcille, 5th and 6th centuries and before. In the Irish/English context, trade and shipping routes existed for generations between the Bristol area ports and those on the south coast of Ireland particularly the County Cork coastline. This ancient trade increased with the colonisation of the Americas, as these Irish ports were the last point for supplies prior an Atlantic crossing. CF. Smiths’ Atlas of Family names’ research I understand a genealogist was employed to do work on a French source for the USA Anglins and was unsuccessful. (Source Karen Parker of the DNA team)

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From National Archives, military records in Kew London, censi etc it is clear there have been Anglins in England for generations130. But where did they originate? Valerie Anglin did quite a bit of research some years ago on Anglins in the Bristol area and even into old London records and her evidence points to an origin in Ireland, in one case to an origin in Cork in 1786. This same Irish origin is also evident in the records of the earliest Anglins I could trace in the English military/naval records. On brief research into the Anglins who went to Jamaica in charge of Plantations131, the evidence would suggest they were Protestant and had come from England, but there is no evidence of their pre history in England, if any. Also this period is the 18th century, and by that time there were Irish Anglins in England. The Surname England or English as a Source for the name Anglin? The surname ‘England or English’ as a source for the surname Anglin was considered by the Irish Scholars in their books on Irish names and surnames and rejected. The surname England or English is a name in its own right and has been in Ireland for some time. Its source is England. And it can be translated into Gaeilige. From current evidence the conclusion has to be, there is no adequate evidence of an English origin for the name Anglin

A concluding note to the Chapter No solid evidence exists for a secondary source for the Anglin surname either in or out of Ireland. But the possibility of more than one anglonn resulting in more than one line of O'hAngluinns does seem totally reasonable and requires further research. This aspect of the study again highlights the need to find and then investigate records of the Anglin Story in the period 1100 to 1490132 and again in the period 1580-1740. However DNA work based on the geographic mapping of the surname may give insight133. Also research into old state or court records held in Ireland, England or France may yield further information.

In the birth records between 1838-1914 there are 202 surnames Anglin(g). In the marriage records 1831-1913, 89 have this surname: and in the death records 1833-1904 125 of the Anglin surname. This information was sourced from Valerie Anglin. She accepted the variations of spelling 131 I have not as yet been successful in tracing Anglins who may have been taken to the plantations from Ireland as workers even thought there is evidence of Irish people been sent there as ‘slaves?’ in the Cromwellian period 132 The name in the annals of the four masters 133 cf. chapter 6 130

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Some further material examined in the research for this chapter •

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline (This is a British Government site and is excellent. )

‘Irish names and surnames, by Patrick Woulfe… Introduction

McLysaght’s various books on Irish surnames including his Supplement

Anglin Family Trees / Story

‘In Search of Anglins’ by Evelyn Williams (seen in part)

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Further developments on Chapter 5 Corrections I referred to a Book ‘In search of Anglins’ as written by Evelyn Anglin of course it was written by Evelyn Williams R.I.P.

New Material Reference the links of DNA group 3 to a French tradition. Karen Parker has brought to light new information indicating that Adrian Anglin had reached America using the method of ‘debentured servant’. Also there is DNA evidence now of a link of this group to Anglins whose origin has been identified as Irish.

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Chapter 6 Anglin genealogy – our identity The Aims of this Chapter are: a) To ask what is the value of genealogical research b) To indicate what research tells us about our identity c) To draw together the essential elements of the work of research d) To use the knowledge gained to guide future research

A key chapter This is a key chapter of the study as it seeks to draw together in one coherent whole the various threads referred to in earlier chapters.

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The value of genealogy In the past I ignored family trees. I accepted my name to be Anglin, I was Irish and I was a Catholic and I left it so. No Anglin group in Ireland had prepared a family tree, yet many of those living outside Ireland had. Having pursued the study of the origin of the family name I now realise genealogy has got to do with a persons identity. Each tree listed in Appendix 8G has set out a potted family history by merely listing the members of their family line. Why do people prepare such trees? I believe it is an expression of something important to us – our identity; who we are. Family Trees, Family Genealogies, Pedigrees etc. are not new. There are a number in the Old Testament of the Bible; in the New Testament there are two genealogies of Christ, slightly different. Ancient Gaelic Genealogies and MacFirbigs Book of Gaelic Genealogies134 have been referred to. A study of genealogy is an exploration of identity. This explains why religious minded people of the Judea Christian tradition wrote in their history a link to Adam and Eve. They were expressing their understanding that in some manner they were linked to the Divine. In Michael Mullens135 book on Matthews Gospel he opens up the genealogy of Christ in a manner I found quite eye opening, I really had not grasped what the author was about when he wrote down all those names. Mullen makes clear the scriptural author was saying much more than parent naming. This aspect, expressing something beyond physical parentage, was true of the old Gaelic Genealogies. The law governing people and behaviour in ancient Ireland flowed from the native customs. Annals and Genealogies were an expression of law but based on past custom, they were the whole story of a people, of a clan/sept, they were not a mere set of rules; Native law and custom came as it were from the people up; but with the coming of the New English, Law came from the Top down. So what am I doing when I write down my own family genealogy, is it just a list of names or is it more? Something in the human spirit seeks knowledge of who we really are; the family tree search is just one aspect of such searching. Now an effort will be made to broaden insight with the help of the various threads referred to in the other chapters. Hopefully family trees and other aspects of genealogy will then be viewed with more understanding and depth. Our identity is in our name but our name symbolises so much more than a name on list. Hopefully this study adds a little more understanding of ourselves. What does the family tree give us? I am aware of the following Anglin family trees. The Anglins of Bristol and Bridgewater in England; the two lines of Anglins in Canada: the three groups of USA Anglins of the DNA Groups, then the Maryland Anglins now ceased? and the Chris Anglim line in the USA; the Glanmire Among other things this established land ownership, identity, leadership etc. The Gospel of Matthew by Michael Mullins p.68ff

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Anglins and the Wexford Anglims in Ireland; and the Madeira Azorean Hickling/Anglins. What have these family trees given us? Fundamentally they give us our descent by male physical parentage. What has geographic mapping added to the knowledge present in family trees? Geographic mapping indicates the scatter of the Surname. But in so doing indicates specific areas within Ireland where the surname has taken root136. It then raises the question where in Ireland is the original root source or sources. The answer presently suggested for Anglins is County Cork; but mapping also indicates a long presence of the surnames in other counties. The next question follows, where in county Cork is the ultimate root area? There is no clear answer but historical documents would suggest West Cork is certainly the original root area for some Anglins. What has history added to the understanding gained from family trees? It has told us the Anglin name is a Gaelic Irish name with a long history in Ireland. It was born in, and into a Gaelic language and culture, and the surname has scattered via Europe and England to many other countries. What has the DNA project added to the knowledge present in family trees? The DNA Project gives confirmatory evidence of discrete Anglin groups, possibly five to eight of them, with more than a suspicion the root origin of each group lies within Ireland irrespective of where the surname is in the world today. This Irish origin has been proven to be true for some groups, 2 and 3, and is being investigated for others. DNA also indicates each Anglin group is made up of more than one individual family tree. The separate family trees of a particular group belong together as they share the ‘same’ DNA profile. Within a group all are ‘cousins’ though the relationship may be remote in time. The story hidden within the list of names of family trees This is an important aspect of genealogy and identity and as yet has not featured much in the work of Anglin researchers though there are some exceptions. Part of Genealogy is the ups and downs of Anglin history and there is no harm in the ‘down bits’, it reflects the Irish history of which we are part. But there are also the up bits and we all need to be conscious of them. Those stories remain to be told. A few individual stories have been told. I have heard the story of the Anglin brothers of Alcatraz, Margaret Anglin of the Theatre, Timothy Anglin the Canadian Journalist. But what of the others? I am vaguely aware of a Mary Anglin a nurse in the first war in England who nursed injured Russian soldiers, got smallpox? And ended up a nun serving people in South Africa. I wonder is all that true! cf. Appendix 6 and chapter 2

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Some general thoughts on Anglin identity Anglins carry a Gaelic Surname O’hAngluinn, which grew out of the epithet ‘Anglonn’ being awarded to individuals before surnames began. One such individual is known, Conal, he was credited with being an Anglonn, a brave person, a hero, a warrior. These Anglonns were of the Gaelic tradition, not Viking, nor Norman nor English. O’hAngluinns were born of a person(s) who were considered ‘brave’ by their peers. Anglins, being Gaelic Irish in origin belong to a culture, which understood suffering, had compassion for those in need, was Christian, which lauded ‘military courage’, respected learning. That is the culture to which we belong. This is our heritage. The way forward – learning by reflecting on group two DNA group 2 is a grouping of family trees sharing the same DNA profile. It includes The Macroom Anglin, The Canadian Protestant line, the present day Clonakilty Anglins, The Glanmire Anglins. Some Tipperary Anglims. The first three of these have documentary evidence their root source is west Cork and where exactly in West Cork is currently being investigated. Since Glanmire Anglins share the same DNA they too must originate in West Cork, even though to date they are rooted north east of Cork City. Incidentally their tradition is they had cousins in Glandore, which is West Cork. What of the Descendants of William of Group 2 (‘The Caswell County NC Anglins’)? They are similar to Glanmire Anglins, they hold appropriate DNA but have yet to establish by documentary evidence their root area to be West Cork. But they have to be rooted in West Cork, as that is the source of the other members of Group two. Maybe by further research they too will unearth documentary evidence. The Canadian Catholic line is different. They have documentary evidence that their roots are West Cork, so if they were DNA tested it would be natural to expect their profile would be group 2. The way forward – the procedure The Group 2 consideration above can be the template to move things forward. the surname is Irish so all Anglins have Irish roots unless they adopted the surname. Three general groups can be identified: •

Anglin/ms living in Ireland in counties, Belfast/Down, Tipperary, Clare, Waterford, Wexford, Limerick and in North Cork and East Cork.137

Anglin/ms living outside Ireland who have documentary evidence of Irish Roots138

Anglin/ms living outside Ireland whose name is Irish but that is all that is known.

A two pronged approach is needed a) to identify the DNA profile of those who are definitely Irish, that is those living in the various Irish Counties listed above, or attached to them by known West Cork has been examined already The Hickling Anglins are an example of this

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parentage. This done then those Anglins outside Ireland can compare their DNA with these samples139. b) Anglins outside Ireland who have documented their Irish Origins, but unlinked to any Family living in Ireland. They require a DNA test to establish their link to an existing Anglin group, or as with ‘Bristol Irish Anglins’ they may actually establish a new, previously unknown, DNA profile line of Anglins. Note 1 An aspect of work still undone is the linkage of Anglins in the various counties to County Cork140. Note 2 Cork City is treated differently, as City dwellers must originally have their roots outside the city. ‘The Bristol Anglins’ are belong to this category.

Materials consulted in writing this Chapter •

The written and unwritten work of the DNA team

Bill Anglin’s site is on the Internet

Work of the members of the Anglin Convention group of Evelyn Williams

Most of the material supporting this chapter has been taken from information received from those who have prepared family trees. Access to such material is really at the discretion of the families involved. Contact with them can be through the Anglin DNA Project team at: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~kmparker/AnglinDNA/index.html

This has already linked a line of USA Anglins to Co Down Anglins I am inclined to think there were various Anglin lines descended from different Cork Anglonns, but of course some Anglonns may have originated outside County Cork

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Chapter 7 Unresolved issues Introductory comments In this study overall issues, not just individual family/genealogical relationships, have arisen that have not been resolved. Each will now be listed as to ignore them would be unwise in a research project.

Substitute records for two time periods There are two periods where availability of records is scant. One is the historical period of 12OO to 1500, where there is a need to find examples of the name O’hAngluinn. The second is the period 1550-1700 where little has been uncovered regarding the Anglin name or its variants in an Irish geographic or occupational setting.

Substitute records for ships manifests and passenger lists No satisfactory substitutes have yet been identified to deal with the movement of people pre the introduction of ships manifests. Some work has been done on court records, but has not benefited this study.

The movement of Anglins out of Ireland in the 17th /18th centuries Emigration is part of the Anglin story. The tracing of the actual movement of individuals from Ireland after the introduction of Passenger lists and manifests is straightforward. Those lists become available in the later half of the 19th century. Such lists may give a person’s origin and destination. But prior their introduction there is difficulty. What then is sought is information from substitute sources within Ireland showing a named individual and the place he left, and records within a receiving country showing the same individual’s place of destination etc. An example is a death record of John Anglin, the patriarch of the ‘Bristol Anglins, which gives his birth place as Cork City and from the recorded age at death allows a calculated birth date circa 1786141. In this case the record is speaking of Bristol England and Cork City Ireland. Such a record gives hope to a researcher. This absence of evidence of actual movements has been a major problem in this study.

The Anglands This surname seems to be quite unique not just to County Cork but also to an area of North County Cork in the vicinity of Mallow / Boherbue, an area historically referred to as Slieve Luchra. In the records this name has not spread far geographically. In Appendix 8 is a group of past Anglands. Having examined the scholars, Woulfe and Maclysaght, there seems to be an

Care with round numbers e.g. 80 in old records, is needed it may be guesswork

141

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absence of clarity as to the source of the Angland name142. So putting it quite simply there is vagueness here and hopefully one day someone will bring clarity to this issue. My experience on asking Cork people about Anglins is the common response “They are mostly in North Cork but they spell the name Angland”!!

Anglin versus Anglim While there are variations, the Anglin / Anglim spelling is the more commonly used. I have found in the same record a father and son given a different surname spelling, really just a misspelling. I believe the two names are a matter of different spellings caused in times past by a scribe, or through a spelling given by a person who was not literate. I have not proved this to be always the case, so I must admit this view may be wrong and there may be real reasons for the Anglim Anglin spellings. I notice the Anglim form in Ireland occurs mostly outside County Cork and indeed is often the more common spelling in Counties Clare, Tipperary, Wexford cf. evidence in Appendix 1 for these counties143 or in Griffith’s valuations listed in Appendix 8. However there is a Tipperary line where both spellings are used. This raises the question are their historic reasons for a ‘different spelling’ occurring outside County Cork. Again no answer presently.

Catholic / Protestant Anglins Serious research says this issue must be considered, not as an examination of individuals but rather as an effort to gain clarity as to why two different lanes grew. To date I have not solved the riddle. Since the name Anglin is derived from O’hAngluinn a name predating the Reformation then the movement of Anglins would be from Catholic to Protestant. The purpose of research is to open and resolve the story of the Anglins. So a question arises why is it the early Anglins in the USA seem to be of the Reformed faith? I was also going to ask why are so few protestant Anglins still living in Ireland today, but I realise the question is why are so few Anglins of any denomination still living in Ireland today. The 1703 Act demanded converts from Catholicism to Protestantism prove their conformity to their new beliefs. The Convert Rolls prepared by O’Beirne using this data have only one example of the lane change by an Anglin. This suggests the formation of the Protestant line of Anglins is much earlier, possible in the 16th century

Marriage licence bonds An investigation into these may assist in the Catholic Protestant link. The National Archives holds a list of Anglins/hanglins who had taken out marriage bonds. It does not mean they married but it is probable they did. They would have been mostly of the reformed faith but a few were Catholic. No information is given of the parish they belonged to, so some guess work and a lot of

Is there a relationship between the name Anglin and Angland in their Gaelic or their English form? Unfortunately initially in this study my focus was on Anglin and often did not keep records of the presence of the variants of the name

142 143

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painstaking examination of parish records in required. The bonds merely record two names and a year.

Have Anglins a relationship with continental Europe and its colonies? I have examined this. There were Anglins who went to continental Europe and while rare, the name is rare anyhow, the name is present today in Portugal, Spain and Argentina. Historically trade and migration links between the continent and ports in county Cork, particularly Waterford, grew immensely in the 1600’s. The Irish and wine is a trade story in itself. Today some continental vineyards are owned by people of Irish descent. Were Anglins in this movement to and from the Continent in the 16th and 17th Century? Recent University research into Ireland’s links with Europe in the past has already been helpful cf. chapter 10 and appendix 5. There was a movement of Anglins, but how extensive remains to be discovered.

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Further developments on Chaper 7 New Material 1 The Anglands Besides chapter 7, reference was also made to Anglands in chapters 2 and 3 particularly in their footnotes. I commence by expressing my thanks to Diarmuid O’Murhuadha, author of ‘Family Names of County Cork’ who strongly redirected my thoughts in this matter. This surname ‘Angland’ became a problem due to an entry in an early edition of MacLysaght in which it is suggested the most common form of O’hAngluinn / Anglin in Griffiths Valuations of 1850 in North Cork was Angland. (This view seemed to change in later editions). The Gaeilge form of Angland is Aingleont. So the question, ‘Is there a relationship between Aingleont / Angland and Anglin?’ Findings: •

A school Principal in North Cork who personally knows ‘Anglands’ informed me the spelling of Angland in Gaeilige is ‘Aingleont’ and that spelling is used today by Anglands144. She also quoted ’An Slointeoir Gaeilge’ by Woulfe on the Gaeilge English language equivalents: Angland…

Aingleont145

(O) Anglim…

O hAnglainn

(O) Anglin…

O hAnglainn

MacAnkland… Aingleont •

I have been unable to find a Gaeilge surname Aingleont or Angland or a variation in any of the Old Gaeilge Genealogies or in any of the Annals. This absence strongly suggests the use/origin of the surname Aingleont has a source outside of the Gaelic Irish lineage, possibly the Norman Irish lineage.

In treating ‘Further developments on Chapter 2’ I excluded some English surnames which had been included as possible anglicisations of O’hAnglainn, namely: Thomas Anglyant, Ynory ny Angyllen, John Fitz William Anglound146, Thomas Angyllonte, Ellen Anglant. These five may now become very relevant to the Angland story, particularly as some of them are associated with North Cork. Those entries seem to have an Anglo Norman origin rather than a Gaelic one, the individuals may be descendants of the Normans/Old English, who came to Ireland in the 12th century.

This Gaelic spelling is totally different from the Gaeilge surname O’hAnglainn from which the English surname, Anglin, descends. 145 There is a poet Michael Aingleont who lived in 1770 146 There is an Anglound in Kanturk registers for 1866 the correct area for Anglands. 144

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While my research interest is ‘the Anglin surname’ and not the surname Angland. I humbly suggest Angland, Gaeilge form ‘Aingleoint’ has had various forms deAnglond, Anglound, Angloint and has a relationship with these five ‘Fiant’ individuals147. Such a view would make this common North Cork surname Angland to be of Norman origin, but still Irish, and quite distinct from the Gaelic surname O’hAnglainn.148

A Separate Note for DNA Researchers

From a point of view of the DNA researchers there is still a real possibility that some, and I repeat just some, O’hAnglainns in the process of Anglicisation of their surname simply used this already existing old English/Norman name, Angland, as the English form of their Gaeilge surname instead of going for Anglin or Hanglin. For DNA researchers this raises a complication as then the DNA profile for some Anglands would be of the O’hAnglainn line while others could be of the de Anglond line.149 It is interesting these fringe individuals of the Fiants belong to Cloyne / the North Cork area and not west Cork: Date

Source

Surname

Forename

Townland Parish

1600

Fiant (6407) Fiant (6407)

Anglant husband carpenter Anglante

Fiant (2269) Fiant (2251) Fiant (4752)

Anglound yeoman Angyllont

Ellen Wife of Dermot M’Teige Thomas wife Katherine ny Teig M’Shane John Fitz William Thomas

Anglyllen

Ynory

1600

1573 1573 1585

Associated Family Names O’Callaghans

Associated Place names

County Cork Area

Clonmeen

North

O’Callaghans

Clonmeen

North

Kilmanehyn

Waterford

Dromore

Ocallaghan

North

Kilshannig Parish

2 A new unresolved issue Nichloas de Anglin. This person is obviously Norman English. 'De Faknham Nicholas' (rf. 1287), bishop of Durham; professor of medicine in the universities of Parta and Bologna; began his studies at Oxford and proceeded to Paris, where, in addition to medical studies, be directed courses of dialectics, physics, and theology: went for a short time to Bologna as professor of medicine; returned to England, 1229; taught logic and natural philosophy at Oxford and became physician to Henry III: received much ecclesiastical preferment: elected bishop of Durham, 1241; had cathedral rebuilt; resigned, 1248. Two treatises, Practica Mediciiurand De Viribus Herbarum mentioned as his by Pits, have not been traced. There are three medical treatises extant in manuscript in the Bibliotheque Nationale Cf the article in the Gaeilge magazine Eigse no. 29 (1996) Dha Dhearbhu page 137 following. Cf. Woulfe p.220 re. de Anglond. 149 I am aware at least once in the Bristol Anglins line, whose proven origin is Cork City, their name in official records was spelt Angland. 147 148

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in Paris written by Nicholas de Anglin, who is probably identical with Nicholas de Faruham. I think it would be very unwise to build the Anglin story on this isolated piece of information.

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Chapter 8 An historical supplement to the Anglin study Introduction A scholar advised me to have an overview when researching the Anglin family name, lest I got lost in undirected detail. In this study attention to historical events was found necessary to gain insight into appropriate sources for Anglins. What follows is a recall of essential historical events impacting the study. It is not a history, simply a naming of relevant events. It is included as a supplement for the benefit of those who living abroad who may be unaware of relevant events of Ireland’s history.

The invasions a) The Vikings: The first invasion relevant to this study is the Danish invasions of 790 a.d., which lasted a few centuries. They were long lasting raids, attacking, and at times settling in coastal and river towns: They established Dublin and in 840 sacked Ross Carbery in County Cork etc. The Danes who remained can be named the ‘Scandinavian Irish’. b) Anglo Norman Invasions: These commenced circa 1170, involving Normans and English: persons like King Henry 2nd. Many Anglo Normans settled into Ireland and became integrated. They are the ‘Old English’. They shared the same religion as the Gaelic Irish and gradually also its language and many of its customs while retaining some of their background. Their surnames help identify them. Today they are seen as Irish. c) The ‘New English’ Invasions: A new kind of invasion occurred with the English Tudor monarchs – colonisation. People from England and Scotland were planted in the countryside, the Irish losing land and control of their country. This ‘invasion’ began in the 1500’s, continued for a few centuries, with consequences experienced for centuries, indeed in small ways still today. The ‘New English’ held to the reformed faith, did not speak Gaelic, and had little love of Ireland or its people. Those who settled and remained till today are now part of the fabric, some being referred to as Anglo Irish while others are considered Irish: Of course others left150.

The North of Ireland is different the planters were Scots and remained. It is a different story to the South.

150

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Ireland: Century by Century a) Ireland pre-1500: The Gaelic Irish lived in a clan/sept structure of organisation, with a Gaelic culture and language, their own legal system based on custom, a Catholic faith linked to the Papacy. Over generations links with Britain and Continental Europe were strong, differing in form country to country. Irish monks spread the Christian Faith and education from the 6th Century onwards in these countries. Ireland’s literature, writings and places of learning show a love of scholarship. The Anglo Normans who came in 12th Century had now settled into Ireland and lived happily with the Gaelic Irish sharing life with them, some becoming more Irish than the Gaelic Irish themselves. Circa 1500, military connections grew with the continental countries. b) 16th Century Ireland: Insight requires awareness of events and the desires of Irelands neighbour England ruled in this century by the Tudors151, Henry VIII 1509- 1549 to Elizabeth I who died 1603. In this century England was involved in wars and treaties with individual European countries and one motive for her colonisation of Ireland grew from a fear of invasion by Spain through Ireland152.

The 1500’s exhibit a real evolution of English efforts to bring Ireland tightly under her influence. Initially seeking support from Irish Earls, then, as the century progressed, seeking the destruction of the clan system, the legal system, the language and ultimately it became an attempt to remove the native Irish from their land and replace them with ‘trustworthy’ people from England and Scotland153. The Munster plantation of 1585 is an example of what was being attempted – colonisation in the raw154. The situation of the native peoples became acute as England having embraced the Reformation felt an Irish people committed to Catholicism endangered her. So the Irish, both Gaelic and Old English were ‘encouraged’ to change ‘religious lane’155. I hope this helps readers to The Tudor Monarchs: • Henry VII 1485 – 1509 • Henry VIII 1509 – 1547 • Edward VI 1547 - 1553 • Jane Grey July 1553 • Mary I 1553 - 1558 • Elizabeth I 1558 - 1603 152 The first English Spanish war was 1584-1604; the second English Spanish war was 1625-1630. Between times they tried to have good relations. 153 There were two Irish rebellions against the English in Munster, the Desmond Rebellions of 1569-73 and 1579-1583. These led to movement of Irish to Spain in their aftermath. 154 It was in the latter part of this 16th century the colonisation of the Americas began and some of the colonisers of Ireland eg. Rayleigh and the Baltimores were used by the English monarchy in this new venture. 155 This resulted in the control of 2nd level and university education falling under the control of the Church of Ireland and so university education was forbidden to them unless they took the oath of supremacy. So Catholic students had to leave Ireland for university education 151

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understand why Irish migration to continental Europe began. c) Ireland in the 17th Century: Events of this century had an immense impact on Ireland’s future: •

Economic problems at different stages had a massive influence particularly on the poor and vulnerable.

There is a continual effort to force Catholics to conform to the Protestant Reformation.

Some milestones: •

The defeat of the northern clan leaders by the ‘New English’ led to the destruction of clan control, resulting in the ‘Flight of the Earls’ to Spain and the continent circa 1607.

The plantations of Ireland along with the formation of planted towns e.g. Bandon, (planted by people from Somerset), and Clonakilty began. Kinsale becoming an important military port. 156

1640-1660 saw the formation of Irish Regiments giving over 30,000 soldiers to the French military.

The rebellion of 1641 by Gaelic Irish and Old English lasted to 1652; it was against what the ‘New English’ were doing to them.

Cromwell157 and the Commonwealth in Ireland. He opposed the Catholic faith and sadly the Irish themselves. He sought to remove as many traces as possible of it and them by planting, exile or destruction, paying his debts and his soldiers with land confiscated in Ireland. His plantation occurred in 1654. Even Irish Merchants were forbidden to trade.

In the 1680’s and early 90’s William and James fought for the possession of the English crown, the wars taking place in Ireland. Many Gaelic Irish and ‘Old English’ supported James. On James’s defeat further problems arose for those Irish who had supported him.

A positive comment: In this century three of the great Irish historical works were written, The Annals of the Four masters, by monks in Donegal, the Writings of the priest Geoffrey Keating in Clonmel, Co. Tipperary and the Genealogies of MacFirbhisigh. The love of learning had continued.

The Position of County Cork on the Map of Ireland. The Anglins were almost exclusively in County Cork with an overflow in adjacent counties. This is the province of Munster, which is in the south coast of Ireland. Along Cork’s coastline are the ports of Youghel, Cork (Queenstown), Kinsale and Baltimore. On the coast of neighbouring counties are the ports of Waterford and Wexford. English ports of importance in these early years include Bristol. There were links of Bristol to the Cork ports for centuries. These ports were also close to France and Spain 157 He was in Ireland from 1649 -1650 156

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d) Ireland in the 18th century: The efforts at colonisation were more or less finished. One way of summarising the Irish situation during most of this century is to say no Catholics and no Gaelic Irish were in any positions of importance even though the majority population were Catholic and Gaelic. To speak of Ireland as a Protestant nation one would be referring to the years 1775-1800.

The Age of the Penal laws was 1691- 1778. These were brought to an end with Catholic Emancipation in 1829, though some of their consequences had still to be addressed.

The Irish parliament, for what it was worth, was closed down by England in 1800.

Many ‘Old English’ opposed what was going on in the 17th and 18th centuries but were powerless or unwilling to object.

Some, now Irish, Protestant denominations also suffered in the 17th and 18th centuries, due to various reforming changes in faith and practice by Government leaders in England. e) Ireland in the 19th Century: The major occurrences of this century were i) the famine of the 1840’s; ii) the arrival of Catholic Emancipation in 1829; iii) Mass migration basically due to hunger, and iv) landlord evictions of the native people from their tenancies. This period is well documented. A comment Having recalled the episodes of planting, war, colonisation, imposition of a new way of life and faith it is now incumbent on us to ask the important question, ‘What happened the Irish people, the soldiers, the wives, the mothers, the children and the merchants of those Irish who were on the receiving end of all this?’ Most Irish stayed in the country remaining staunch in their religious faith and love of country in spite of poverty and powerlessness. But many thousands left – the migrations.

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The migrations of the Irish Introduction Knowledge of the migrations is necessary in order to trace the movement of Anglins. The two major migrations to be examined are a) Migration to Europe and possibly then to the new world and b) Migration to England and the English speaking new World. What follows is a summary of these migrations, but each migration is made up of separate smaller movements or migrations of Irish people each small movement a result of what was going on within Ireland at a given time.158 Migration to Europe and thence to the new world Who migrated?

a) Ordinary persons, families, the poor, economic migrants, moving as ‘need’ demanded due to hunger, lack of work, oppression. b) The elite and others seeking appropriate education c) Military personnel and those necessary to support them. Ireland traditionally produced soldiers, often as Irish regiments, fighting on behalf of other nations. The numbers at times measurable in tens of thousands d) Priests for religious reasons. In post Patrician times, to spread the Catholic Faith. In the 1500 to 1800’s to avoid persecution or again student priests seeking training for the priesthood denied them in Ireland e) Irish merchants, traders, mariners, seeking opportunities to trade, at times forbidden in Ireland159. This movement of traders and mariners had gone on naturally for generations Migrations were sometimes temporary, sometimes permanent leading to the establishment of Irish communities abroad, sometimes just stages on a longer journey to a further destination. When and to where did migrants go? •

Economic movement: In the 1570’s the poor Irish left the country to the continent. This economic migration occurred again in the first quarter of the 17th century and at other times as well160. The destinations were Brittany and England; occasionally unwelcome because of the way they lived. The movement was to Quimper, St. Malo on the coast but also and more usually to central Brittany161

Priests and student priests: From 1550 to circa 1800 they went to one of 40 Irish Colleges established in continental Europe e.g. Louvain, cf. list in Appendix 8.

Secular education, Young Catholics sought medicine, law etc. They too used the Irish Colleges and associated universities particularly in Spain, France and Belgium.

I do accept on a minor level there is something of a ‘wandering instinct’ in the Irish that results in some emigration This should be understandable to Americans who faced similar laws from England before they gained their independence 160 There was also a plantation of Munster by English settlers in 1585 161 From now on I omit migrations to England. It is treated separately in chapter 9 158 159

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The military: Irish Earls left after defeat by Elizabeth at Kinsale in 1601 for Spain. This was followed by a mass exodus of the soldiers and their families, thousands of émigrés. There were 20,000 Irish in Spain 1580-1620 and with Spain at war in Flanders Irish soldiers went there too. For a few the stay was permanent but mostly it was temporary. Port of arrival was La Coruna, after arrival scattering to places like Madrid and Valladolid.

The next migration of thousands of Irish soldiers was 1635-1660, to France, 30,000 or more, of course the wives go with them; Women had a role in those wars. Destination towns were in Brittany and pockets of Irish formed in St. Malo, Rouen, Nantes Qumper, Paris etc.

The next major military migration follows in the 1690’s and again to Brittany and again some joined the established Irish, some even intermarried with local families.

Military migrations continued on and off, but by 1760 the mass movement of Irish regiments to Europe had come to a complete end. •

Merchants, mariners: With Cromwell a movement of Irish based merchants and their shipping to Europe occurs. They knew these countries, so they knew what to do162. They moved to Nantes, St. Malo, LaRochelle, Port Louis, Lorient even into Ostend and Bruges in Flanders. This movement of businesses was temporary for some permanent for others. It resulted in an Irish merchant and mariner presence for the next hundred years along the European coast from Ostend to Cadiz and Malaga even to the islands of Madeira and the Canaries. Again history speaks of Irish communities163 164. These Irish traders and mariners became part of a European trade based on the continental mainland, a trade extending even to the West Indies. This network developed and included oversees colonies of France, Spain and the Netherlands.

Movement to the Colonies of Spain particularly, but also to French and Portuguese colonies. This aspect of this study is very much in its infancy but there was migration to Spanish and Portuguese colonies even military.

Summarising these comments

The destination of choice for most Irish in the years 1550 to the end of the 1700’s was Europe, some going on to colonies set up by France Spain, the Dutch etc. Throughout the two hundred year story of migration to Europe, some Irish became residents of their adopted country, some intermarried with the native populations of France Spain and Flanders, some remained strangers and left again when things were better at home. While the different migrant groups have been emphasised here, it must be realised when they were abroad these groups intermingled and

This was particularly marked for Waterford, the same sort of laws were applied to American shipping by the English in the colonial days 163 The Madeira Anglins exemplify the migration as spelt out by the historians 164 I notice the presence of Anglins in Madeira, a Portuguese Colony off the coast of Africa cf. Mormon family search site 162

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helped one another, often with the clergy being the link e.g. between the military and the merchants for example. Once we enter the 1800’s there is a marked change in the direction of Irish migration. The destination of choice changes for the mass of émigrés now to the English speaking new world of America, Canada and Australasia. Migration to England and the English speaking New World Only a few comments on the migration to the English speaking New World is given, as relevant information is already well publicised. The major movement of Irish from 1500’s to 1800 was to Europe, but during this time there was a smaller movement of Irish to the English speaking New World. In the 1500’s it was initially a trickle but as time passed it grows and becomes very great indeed. This migration is closely related to England and her policies both in Ireland and the new World. In the 16th century the trickle of Irish emigrants to the new world was influenced by an individual’s relationship with the ‘New English’ and by England’s involvement in the Caribbean, Virginia etc. There were also Irish who were fond of adventure. In the 17th Century the numbers of Irish emigrants to these places increased. Some going by choice; others unwillingly. Some forced to go to the new world by decisions of the English authorities particularly in the Cromwell period. Irish slaves etc. come to mind. This small and growing movement of the 17th Century to the English colonies of the USA and the Caribbean continued growing during the 18th. Then in the 1800’s the movement to the new World was at times massive as in the Irish famine period. Migration to England herself is different from all of these migrations. Through these centuries 1500 to 1900 there was always movement of the Irish to England, particularly at times of economic hardship in Ireland.

Brief bibliography •

Narrative History of Ireland by Micheal O Siochfhradha ISBN 1-903497-21-3 published by Aubane historical Society Millstreet Co. Cork. I recommend this book for someone seeking to know our genuine history but in a brief narrative form

A Concise course of Irish History by Moody and Martin

The Illustrated History of Ireland by cf. Cusack (Nun of Kenmare) written in 1860’s

The Irish in Europe 1580-1815 ed. Thomas O’Connor

Irish Migrants in Europe after Kinsale edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Ann Lyons

Irish communities in Early Modern Europe edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Ann Lyons

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Chapter 9 General conclusions to Section 1 •

The geographic source origin of the surname O’hAngluinn, expressed in English as Anglin/m or a variant of Anglin, is in Ireland

There is no evidence for a source origin outside Ireland for the Anglin Surname, all Anglin families, except those who adopted Anglin as their surname, irrespective of where they live today, lies ultimately in Ireland

There are a number of lines of Anglins quite distinct in that they originated from a different ‘Anglonn’

Within a particular Anglin line there are different families originating from the same ‘Anglonn’ but who over the generations have lost contact with one another

There is sufficient evidence to suggest that at least one line of Anglins originated in West Cork

The actual area in Ireland where the other lines originated has not been identified as yet, but is in the province of Munster

Some knowledge of Irish history in the 15th to- 19th centuries is necessary to gain a satisfactory understanding of the Anglin Story

The O’hAngluinn / Anglin name has scattered in the variant spellings of both it’s Gaeilge and its English form depending on the period of its movement outside Ireland

When dealing with the early periods in this research, since movement of families was then usually quite local, efforts to advance this work needs a focus on geographic units. Initially focus should be on large units e.g. Spain, or Canada or Ireland, but once that is done then the focus must become refined on smaller geographic areas e.g. Tipperary or West Cork

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SECTION 2 O’hAngluinn: The Anglins of the Diaspora

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Introduction to Section Two Section 1 of this study was a research study, Section 2 is an effort to raise readers awareness of the spread of the Anglin name in the Anglin Diaspora. It is impossible to carry out a study into the Anglin Surname without becoming aware of the Anglin Diaspora. Their Irish origins is of importance to the Anglins of Ireland and the Anglins abroad. Having referred in Section 1 to the problem of finding evidence of the actual journey of individuals from one country to another in the early years, other methods of tracing origins are sought. Historical documents are a valuable tool. But that is only one part of the story of these Anglins of the Diaspora. Issues of where in Ireland did their ancestors come from, why did they leave Ireland, why their particular destination was chosen, what has happened them and their descendants since then in their new homeland are equally important to know. These are stories to be told by each country’s émigrés, and are not the purpose of Section 2.of this study nor will they be explored there. The approach in Section 2 is to have an opening chapter, an Overview of the Anglin Diaspora. Then a chapter on the forgotten aspect of Irish migration, namely the migration of the Irish to mainland Europe especially in the 16th- 18th centuries. Finally separate chapters dedicated to each country, followed by the Appendices. The brief look at the individual countries is not done for the benefit of the Anglins of the country named, but rather to raise awareness in Anglins of other countries so their insight into their family name they may be widened. I could state the purpose thus:- ‘the purpose is to give a meaningful awareness of the geographic scatter of the Anglins rather than a resume of the Anglin story of individuals countries’. To grasp the heart of the Diaspora of Anglins it is necessary to awaken ourselves to the two primary migrations of the Irish, one was to Mainland Europe and thence to its colonies and the second to the English speaking new World. Historically the migration to Europe and their colonies was quite large and preceded that to the English new World, yet it is the less understood.

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Chapter 10 An overview of the Anglin Diaspora The Aims of this Chapter are: a) To get an overview of the extent of the scatter of the Anglins b) To be aware of the available information of the early Anglin Diaspora. c) To review Sources and Absence of Sources for Genealogical Research d) To seek out the hidden story of the migration? The primary focus The focus in this study is primarily on the pre 1800 era, the early emigration of Anglins from Ireland. Sources recording this Anglin migration are scant in contrast with the numerous source records of Anglin emigrants of the 19th and 20th centuries. Examples of the latter sources include Ellis Island records, the Ireland/Australia records, birth, marriage and death registers etc. While not ignoring the emigration and immigration in the years after the great Irish famine of the 1840’s and through to the 20th century, it is not a major focus of this study.

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Introduction A general comment on the pre-1800 scattering of the Irish The Irish Diaspora occurred in three broad tranches: 1.

The earliest scattering of the Irish from Ireland was probably to Britain and continues still today

2.

There was also a migration of the Irish to continental Europe165 with a particular movement to France and Spain in the 1500’s to 1700’s166

3.

Then there was the migration to the Americas, to South America (Argentina) but particularly to the US, Canada and the Caribbean, in the latter case sometimes forced

There was also a lesser emigration to Australia and New Zealand, again occasionally forced. The Anglins as Irish people were part of those migrations.

Historical background History is outside the objectives so such information is omitted from the body of the study167. But awareness of: a) 1550-1800 corresponds to major interconnected and complicating national and international factors b) Ireland’s troubled history and her relationship with Europe particularly her devastating relationship with England c) the myriad relevant historical issues of Reformation, Counter Reformation, Catholic, Protestant, land ownership, planters, who ruled, Anglicisation of the people and language, evictions, who suffered and the role of women; and d) the whole issue of Colonisation including slavery and ‘ the ‘transportation to colonies of undesirables’ is valuable, and sometimes necessary, as all these impinge on who would leave Ireland and their possible place of settlement.

The whereabouts of these Anglin émigrés today A simple examination of national telephone directories gives some evidence of the spread of the Anglin name today. This added to other sources of information indicates the presence of the Anglin surname in Britain, United States of America, the Islands of the Caribbean, Canada, Spain, Portugal, Argentina168 the Scandinavian countries169, New Zealand, Australia and I am sure with It is was south Irish ports that linked Ireland to Europe as linked her to England and the Americas, e.g. Waterford and Cork 166 See Postscript to historical supplement re emigrees to Europe in the 16oo’s and 1700’s 167 Without attempting to write up a history some relevant comments on historical issues is in a separate supplement and appendix 168 The spelling of the name in the Spanish colonies may be derived from the Gaeilge O’hAngluinn 169 In appendix 8A. I have given a short list of Anglins in Finland 165

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the modern movement of individuals for employment reasons, it is possible they are in other countries also170.

The destinations of the early Anglin Diaspora Britain The movement of peoples between Ireland and England has been going on for generations and without records. I am unaware of any written investigation into the Anglin story pre 1800. European mainland For historical reasons research into the movement of the Irish to and from Europe has only been attempted in recent years. ‘The Irish in Europe project’ is an example of recent work. As with England no written investigation of Anglin émigrés to France or Spain has been done. This is now becoming possible on the back of current general work in the European project. (NUI Maynooth). The USA and the Caribbean The Centre for Migration Studies based at the Ulster American Folk Park in Omagh Co, Tyrone Ireland is researching Irish migration to the USA, but to date no lead on early, I emphasise early, Anglin movement to the US has been found.

Recent and current research In the mid 1990’s Evelyn Williams in the USA researched and put into writing171 information on her own line of Anglins. She also led a group of like-minded people to establish an annual convention of Anglins. She had been in contact with Walter Anglin, who had researched and in an unpublished book entitled, “Anglins of Colonial America”, recorded the story of Anglins particularly the ones who came in the early years of colonisation, to Maryland, Virginia and neighbouring states. This decision to call a convention was a blessing as it gave an opportunity to other interested Anglins to come together. This grew and grew, even drawing in Canadian and Irish Anglins. With this blossomed the Anglin DNA project172. Thanks to substantial efforts of Karen Parker, Joan Bulach and Robert Anglin a deeper insight is growing of the family linkages unearthed through earlier documentary searches. This development requires both money and a lot of genealogical and historical searching. In this the support of individual supporters of the Convention has been remarkable. Over the years the efforts of individuals, all of whom living outside Ireland, to gain insight into their own family histories seems not only to have grown but also has been put into the public domain. The breadth of this effort is indicated in the earlier chapter on ‘Anglin Genealogy: Our Identity’ in section 1 and Appendix 8G.The amount of work done is quite massive. The Mormon internet site www.familysearch.org indicates the presence of Anglins in Portugal the early 19th century. There is a need to be careful with data on this site as some information is just repetitive. Some can be considered dubious 171 Evelyn William’s unpublished book is called ‘In Search of Anglins’ was written in 1982 172 Full information can be found on the Internet 170

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Strangely the Anglins who live in Ireland were really oblivious to what was going on abroad. Aware of my own attitude and now having spoken to other Anglins in Ireland, I realise we had simply accepted we were Irish in our origins and left the whole matter rest there. I admit I was aware of Anglins who were Country singers and the escape of John and Clarence from Alcatraz caused a smile! Hopefully section 1 of this booklet prepared by an Irish Anglin makes amends. In researching times past the oldest solid historical evidence unearthed of O’hAngluinn / Anglin /Hanglin as a family name is in Ireland173. Thereafter it is present in England and Europe, then with the discoveries of the new world we find it initially entering the colonies of America in the 1600’s and then in the 1700’s into the Caribbean Islands and in 1800’s into Canada and Australasia. I am unaware of any details of successful research carried out on Anglins in the European mainland or in the South American Countries, other than that in Chapter 9, though some ‘Family Tree’ work was attempted.174

To review the sources and absence of sources of genealogical research This study cannot avoid genealogical issues, the basis of which lies in consulting Registers, Censuses, Passenger lists and their substitutes. This study of the migration has produced an even greater awareness of the massive gaps in available sources; particularly the absence of passenger lists pre 1800. Accepting this as fact allows a change in mindset so the search now becomes an historical search rather than simply a genealogical one. The story of the Anglin’s entry and presence is different for each country, so countries will be treated separately. Section 2 can be considered as just one more contribution in the study of the Anglin Diaspora. Since the study is more than names and dates. Other issues will be raised e.g. appropriate sources of evidence, the previous country of residence of the new arrivals, the historical background to their story etc.

What is the hidden story of the migration? Why the emigrations of individuals and families? In the Ellis Island Website there is a family of Anglins who emigrated from Northern Ireland to the USA and then seemed to emigrate again a few years later. I find this fascinating, why did they come back after their first voyage. This thought leads one to reflect on the human story of the many Anglins who left Ireland? Why did they leave, where did they go? How and why did they arrive at a specific destination? What became of them and of the generations that descended from them? The Family trees give the names of the generations, but there is a fuller story that needs to be told. The following chapters I speak of a family name. I am aware of the suggestion of a St. Anglin, and a river Anglin in France I and others have carried out research for Anglins in one country, France, of the pre 1900 period but without success to date. Since then work has been done and is given in chapter 10

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opens up this aspect by proposing we should now seek to unearth what is known of the story of these emigrants in their new homelands. A comment on the inter-country linkage A further development of this Diaspora of the Anglins is becoming evident. There are definite Family links of Anglins living in Canada, to Anglins living in Ireland to Anglins living in Australasia.175 There are also definite family links between Anglins in Ireland and England176. There are other scattered Anglins for whom linkage has not been sought or has not yet been proven. This too requires attention.

Other material worthy of research •

The Irish in Europe 1580-1815 edited by Thomas O’Connor

Irish Migrants in Europe after Kinsale edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Anne Lyons

Irish Communities in Early modern Europe edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Anne Lyons

Archivium Hibernicum published annually at Maynooth

Journal of the American Historical Society vol 31…Irish Colonists in British West Indies by Purcell

cf. Bill Anglin’s Web site Glanmire Anglins and Bristol Anglins

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Further developments on Chapter 10 Aim: To seek a method for researching the Anglin migration journey pre-1800 Approach In the research report a general understanding developed that the O’hAnglainn surname, in one of its anglicised forms, had over spilled from county Cork into surrounding Munster counties and then over the years a Diaspora occurred into England and into the English new World and to a lesser extent into continental Europe and into the French / Iberian colonies. Little success was achieved in unearthing the actual journey of these early emigrants due to the absence of passenger lists; so the approach had to be refined. A new approach could be to firstly become aware of the ‘shipping corridors’ migrants used in those days and then search for Anglins along appropriate corridors.

Secondary Aim: To identify the shipping corridors of Anglin migration pre-1800 Essential background Information for such a search a) Pre-1800 trade in all its forms was carried out in small ships and these small ships were capable of sailing from small ports. b) People living in port areas of the south coast of Ireland could be the migrants. c) Anglins were residing in the hinterland of these ports namely Cork/Cobh, Waterford, Dungarvan, Youghel, Wexford, Kinsale, Leap/Glandore/Skibereen, and Clonakilty/ Bandon pre-1800. d) The migrants could have been economic migrants, merchants, mariners, soldiers, ‘conscripted people / forced labour’177, plantation owners, students, religious people. e) Migrants went to English ports, particularly those in the West country e.g. Bristol. f)

Migrants went to continental ports like Ostend, La Coruna, Gibralter, Cadiz etc.

g) There is evidence of Anglins in Bristol, Gibraltar, Madeira in the early years . h) Direct migration to the New world is historically later than migration to England and Europe. The Migrants journey to the New World Ships from ports in the English West Country e.g. Bristol called to Irish South coast ports on the their way to Newfoundland. On this route “The recruitment of male servants178 went hand in hand with the collecting of supplies each spring. Passengers were considered another commodity similar to salt meat and butter, adding to the profits of the transatlantic voyage”. This shipping Conscripted people, soldiers, slaves etc. He says elsewhere the earlier movement was of female debentured servants. It is interesting that Ruth Anglin and Adrian Anglin were both debentured servants.

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corridor via Ireland was also used in the English colonisation of the Americas and West Indies. So there is real possibility that individual Anglins who previously emigrated and were now living in the English West country e.g Bristol or Bridgewater area or in Ireland in places like Waterford, Wexford, Cork city, Kinsale Leap area etc could have migrated along these corridors. Such a thought pattern is reasonable as we know: •

A Bristol Anglin was from Cork City

An early Anglin from the Waterford area went to Newfoundland

There is a Cork Anglin in Gibraltar and at a later date a Wexford Anglin died on a ship travelling from Bristol to Alexandria and again a Belfast Anglin (Belfast is a northern Irish port) who went to America.

The movement of Anglins to the Spanish New World, however, would have been a two stage process i.e. they would have settled on the continent for a time and then their movement to the new world could have occurred. The Anglin179 Diaspora pre-1800 In the New World they are present in Virginia, Maryland Carolinas and probably Newfoundland, Jamaica and England pre-1800. In Continental Europe, Anglins are present at least in Spain, Gibraltar, Belgium and Madeira. A local study is necessary for Anglins in each port area along each of the shipping corridors. To commence this an effort is currently ongoing on the Bristol, Waterford St. John’s Newfoundland corridor by seeking out firstly the presence of individual Anglins and secondly by seeking for signs of their migration. But that is just one shipping corridor.

I am using the spelling Anglin to include the various spelling variations.

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Chapter 11 Anglins in mainland Europe 1500-1800 Preamble This chapter has become possible because of the recent in depth work of scholars who are opening up European records of the Irish presence in Europe particularly in the period 1500- 1800. I express thanks to those involved particularly in the Ireland European project and in the Exhibition on Migration to Europe mounted in the National Library in 2008 linked to Maynooth. In this context three books have been of great value in opening my eyes to this ‘story’ cf. footnote180. In studying these books attention to detail is important as underlying the reading is the objective of unearthing the Anglins who were part of this story. So references to lists of surnames are followed. Anglins in Europe today The name is present in Spain but a recent arrival; the name is present in Lisbon Portugal for a long time indicated by the Portuguese first names. The name is present in Argentina (historically linked to Spain) and here also for a long time. The name was present in Finland for some time.

Introduction The historical supplement gives information on Irish migrations to mainland Europe in the period early 1500’s till it ended circa 1800. To emphasise the implications particular points are recalled.

Who migrated? The following five groups migrated to Europe, some permanently, some temporarily: the latter, returning home or using Europe as a staging point on a journey to another place. The groups are: •

Military personnel and their families

Students seeking secular education

Catholic priests or student priests seeking theological training

Merchants and mariners involved in their trades

Ordinary people, families sometimes poor seeking a safer or better way of living

These migrations, known to Irish people in a general manner, are not well understood, spoken of, or written about other than by scholars. This is possibly partly due to language barriers, but also due to historical changes in migration that occurred circa 1800. Research on this ‘Irish to Europe group’ can only be done on records and documents held in Europe. Information on these References: a) The Irish in Europe 1580-1815 ed. Thomas O’Connor b) Irish Migrants in Europe after Kinsale 1602 –1820 edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Ann Lyons c) Irish communities in Early Modern Europe edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Ann Lyons

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‘European Anglin migrants’ is still sketchy at this stage, but is growing. I declare a handicap; I do not speak French of Spanish, but it is still possible to unearth sources and search for Anglins in some of them.

Destinations of the émigrés Where did the Irish migrants go? To Spain, France, Flanders and to a lesser extent other areas of Europe. I omit migration to England, as it will be examined in Chapter 12 – ‘The Story of the Anglins in England’. •

Where did Military Personnel go? Spain, France and Flanders181

Where did secular students go? To the 35 plus Irish Colleges and associated universities listed in Appendix 8

Where did Merchants and Mariners go? To the ports particularly of Brittany and Flanders and a few to Spain initially but as time went on they are present in ports from Ostend to Malaga and Cadiz and even into the Portuguese islands of Madeira and Azores

Where did Mariners go? Besides places just mentioned they also went to the New World of the Caribbean and the Americas, north and south

Irish settlers in Europe Some émigrés who had travelled to avoid problems in Ireland, or for education, or employment settled into their new homeland and did not return to Ireland. Irish communities grew up in some places, some intermarried with locals, some individuals and families entered into positions of importance. Sadly some were ‘trouble makers’, fortunately just a few. The establishment of successful businesses e.g. the wine business is noteworthy. All this occurred even though they may initially have left Ireland for other reasons.

Sources of information on Irish émigrés Knowing who went, to where, and what happened there, now makes possible identification of information sources on the émigrés. They are: •

Birth marriage and death records in the towns of central Brittany where history tells us they settled

Old student lists of Irish Colleges

Military regiment records

Irish membership in religious orders, Augustinians, Franciscans etc.

Government pension information as soldiers were fighting for Spain and France etc.

All that remains to be done now is the slow hard work!! Two Irish Regiments in the French Army, Dillons and Walshes were involved in the Antilles and in the American war of independence on the side of the American revolutionaries. The question arises were any of them Anglins. Also a number of Irish soldiers in the English army changed sides. At this stage there were Catholic Irish soldiers who took any opportunity to fight against England

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Evidence of Anglin presence182 in Europe in the past Without as yet having gone beyond the historical, evidence of Anglins has been unearthed among four of the five groups who were part of the European migration183. Students Thomas Anglin was a student in the Irish College of Louvain Belgium from 1774- 1777. He was a native of Waterford and Lismore Diocese (Source: Strangers to citizens exhibition in NLI Dublin) Military records William Anglin, a sergeant was in an Irish Regiment in Spain and whose name appears in records from to 1568 -1653(Source: Strangers to citizens exhibition in NLI Dublin) see also the footnote184. Priests Patrick Anglin Prior Augustinian house Dungarvan Waterford 1791-1802 returned from Europe. Marriage and merchants John Anglin born Cork 1786 married Anna Hickling of Azores and raised a family in Madeira and Azores185.

Materials searched •

Strangers and Citizens an exhibition on Irish Migration to Europe at the National Library Dublin

The Irish in Europe 1580-1815 ed. Thomas O’Connor

Irish Migrants in Europe after Kinsale edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Ann Lyons

Irish communities in Early Modern Europe edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Ann Lyons

Periodicals Irish Genealogist 1974-1979 and 1980-1985

People have referred to a place in France ‘Angles sur Anglin’ and also the fact of a Saint Anglin of the 8th century who lived in what is now Belgium. The story of how the word Anglin – and I deliberately use ‘word’ rather than ‘name’ – is in those places I have been unable to discover and I do not intend to pursue these two points in this context. Ch the writings of Patrick Clark de Dromantin 183 The study into Spain is important as Irish people went to South America and took up residence there but through Spain 184 In the Book ‘Early Irish Communities in early modern Europe’ edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Ann Lyons there is an article by Oscar Recio Morales entitled “Irish émigré group strategies of survival adaptation and integration in seventeenth and eighteenth century Spain. ( page 258 line 16 ) he states “In general Irish Widows enlisted the support of their husbands’ fellow soldiers who negotiated the payment of their pensions which was invariably delayed”. He then adds a footnote no 59 and I quote “Letter of attorney by Elena Or, an Irish woman and widow of Guillermo Angli, sergeant of the tercios of Flanders, in favour of an Irish captain, Guillermo ‘Baloes’, Madrid, 24th February 1657” ( AHPM, Tomo 8869,ff 598-98v). Guillermo is Spanish for William. AHMP = Archivo Historico de Protcolo de Madrid ( AHPM) 185 Thomas Hickling Anglin 2 pilgrim Drive Warwick RI USA 02888, www.fmilysearch.org is a descendant details 182

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Other material worthy of research particularly seeking surname lists •

Pierre Gouhier “Irish mercenaries in the service of France (1635-1664)” in French

The Irish Sword periodical 7 1965 p 58-75

“Etat et Rolle des Irelandois Catholiques habituez in Bretagne 1666” in the Acrhives du Ministere des Affaires Etrangeres, Paris Ms 1508 ff329-336

Archivium Hibernicum: articles Prosopography by Brockliss and Ferte

The Irish connection, the Irish merchant community in Ostend and Bruges during the 17th and 18th centuries by Jan Parmetier

Journal of the Wexford historical society

Youghal corporation minute books 1666-1725

Karin Schuller’s Die Beziehungen zwischen Spanien und Ireland im 16 und 17 Jahrhundert, Diplmatie, Handel und die soziale Integration katholischer Exulanten (Munster, 1999) p 151-2. The lists of all students are in appendices v and vi pp 244-9

For a detailed list of the soldier’s names see Brendan Jennings (ed.) Wild Geese in Spanish Flanders 1582-1700

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Further developments on Chapter 11 Extract from Parochial Registers of St.Germaine – en-Laye for 1706 The extract given below in French is taken from the Church Registers in that town, Jacobite section. The spelling of Anglin is in the Hanglin form not unusual for that period as it parallels that seen in the Lismore papers dealt with in Further Developments on Chapter 3. The extract shows the migration and presence of the Anglin surname among the Irish exiled officers of the Jacobite army following the defeat of King James by William of Orange. Jacobite Extracts 53 (1708. 29 Juillet). a.e.b. Jean Yves Coulon, f. de Yves Coulon, marchand de bois, et Marie Barillet. P. Jean Prieur, valet de ch. du Roi d'Angl. M. Framboise Angelique Niflet, femme de Jean Chaudpaire, libraire. S. Avenel. Prieur. Coulter. (1706. 24 Oct.) Inh. Eleonore Coulter, femme de Guillaume Nogent, capit. dans les troupes du Roi d'Angl., 45 ans, anglaise. S.S. Desprez. Binet. Courtin. (1707. 10 Nov.) Inh. Honora Courtin, 3 ans, ff. de Jean Courtin, officier dans les troupes, et Helene Courtin. Irlandais de nation. S. Binet. Coutant. (1707. 14 Janv.) a.e.b. Gaspard Coutant, f. de Gaspard Coutant, dit de Sormes, maitre chirurgien, et de Marguerite Guesdon. P. Balthazar Artima, val. de ch. du R. d'Angl. M. Marie Guesdon. S.S- Marie Guedon. Baltasar Artima. Boivin, vicaire. Cox. (1710. 19 Mai). Inh. Rebecca Cox, veuve de Gauthier Dormer, anglaise. 47 ans. S.S. Binet. Boullay. O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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Crane. (1713. 8 Juin). a.e.b. Marie Crane, ff. de Guillaume, ecuyer de la main de la Reine d'Angl., et de Elisabeth Broomer. M. Duchesse de Perth, au nom de S. M. britannique. P. Milord Jacques, due de Perth, gouverneur du Roi d'Angl. S.S. La duchesse de Perth pour la Reine. Le due de Perth. Crane. Ferrier. Creagh. (1706. 9 Juil.) a.e.b. Henriette Creagh, ff. de Mathieu, ecuyer de la bouche de S. M. Britannique, et de Julienne Canty. P. Milord Clare, represente par le sieur Jacques Hanglin, lieutenant au regim. de Clare. M. Henriette de Berwick, representee par Mary Farely, demoiselle de Mad. la Duchesse de Berwick. S.S. James Hanglin. Mary Farely. De Ferencour. (1707. 15 Sept.) a.e.b. Catherine Creagh, ff. de Jacques, lieutenant au regiment irlandais de Fitzgerald, et de Catherine Arthur. P. Jacques Nihell, ecuyer. M. Cecile de Mahony. S.S. Nihell. Cecily Mahony. Geoghegan. (1713. 14 Avril). Inh. Elisabeth Creagh, ff. de Mathieu Creagh, ecuyer de la bouche du Roi d'Angl., 15 ans. S.S. Binet. Boullay. Cretan. (1719. 24 Oct.) Inh. Madeleine Cretan, irland. de nation.

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Chapter 12 The story of the Anglins in England Introduction This chapter has grown out of the study of Anglins in Ireland and what happened them, particularly during the difficult years of the 16th-17th and 18th centuries, but it has also grown out of a fact that many Irish Anglins have relatives who moved to England more recently. No effort will be made here to carry out an independent study the Anglins of England186, but for the benefit of other Anglins what is known of the past is recorded. The story of the Anglins in England differs from other stories of the Anglin Diaspora in that it is possible, even probable, the arrival of some early Anglins into the new world was from Ireland but via a stay in England. Awareness of emigration of Anglins out of England is part of their story. The Aims of this Chapter are: a) To recall any historical background of the Irish English link not already referred to in historical ‘appendices’ b) To identify any information available of the early movement of Anglins from Ireland to England c) To gather together current information of Anglins in England particularly regarding their presence in the 17th and 18th centuries in the Bristol area d) To recognise the possibility of Anglins of England moving to the New World during the 17th and 18th centuries

It is a matter for Anglins living in England

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Some relevant historical background with particular reference to Bristol •

There is historical evidence of trade links in small ships between these Severn estuary ports in South West England and ports on the south coast of Ireland, Wexford, Waterford, Kinsale, Baltimore and Cork

The tobacco trade. Bristol was a major centre for this trade from the tobacco plantations in the new American colonies e.g. Virginia in the early years

The last ports for supplies before transatlantic crossing were the ports of the south Coast of Ireland

Bristol and the Bristol area (Somerset) was the source of the settlers in the English colonisation of the Munster. Bandon is an example

There were other Irish/English trade links. On the East of Ireland Dublin to Liverpool and in north of Ireland Belfast/Derry to Glasgow. These ports also linked to the USA and Canada

During the ‘New English’ period of involvement in Ireland Irish people including Anglins came to England for economic reasons to ‘survive’ often as the ‘poor Irish’

Sources of Information •

War dead plaques of Anglins particularly in Catholic Churches

The National Archives in Kew. The military and naval records and wills

Censuses

Graveyards in Glastonbury…’West country’ again

Family trees

Valerie Anglin put together information of 202 births of Anglins between 1838-1914, 89 marriages of Anglins between 1831-1913, 125 deaths of Anglins between 1833-1904. Much of these were in East London, the Bristol area, and a few in Manchester/Liverpool and a few in the Newcastle area

English Military and naval archives of Anglins of the West Indian Regiments in WW2

Vii Shipping information to Ireland and the New World

Irelands memorial war Records 1914-1918, John Anglin died France 1/7/1916 a native of Cahir Tipperary

Originsnetwork.com. gives a list of ‘Irish Strays’ for 1841 and again for 1871. The value of this data is the evidence of the presence of the name in London, Manchester, and Gloucestershire. It does not give the source of the information

Anglins in England today Directories today show the name in Glasgow in Scotland, in England North West around Manchester and North East as well, but the majority presence is in London, Essex and in the West Country around Bristol. O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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Origin and entry of Anglins into England There is evidence of Anglins in England from the early 1800’s and it is clear those Anglins were from Ireland. E.g. the Family Tree of the ‘Bristol Anglins’ records Patriarch, John, was born in Cork City in Ireland in the c.1786. I give further examples in appendix 8C indicating the spread of these Irish born Anglins throughout England as early as 1880. I have also included some indication of the variation in spelling of the name187 in Appendix 8B taken from Mormon records of the 1800’s. The earliest date we have of an English Anglin is of a Philip Anglin in the Records of Lambeth Palace in 1755 who went to Jamaica as a teacher, but it does not speak of his origins (cf. National Archives.). The earliest marriage unearthed was 5th January 1757 William Anglin to Sarah Crowley St. James Westminster London. Late examples of the poor Anglins coming to England are given in ‘Irish Strays’ in 1841 and 1871.

Anglins in England: The Bristol area •

Valerie Anglin of Bristol did a lot of work in tracing Anglins in the West of England. She made me aware of her own group who traced their family history back to Cork City to John Anglin who was born there in c. 1786. For reference purposes I refer to them as the ‘Bristol Anglins’. They are a separate DNA grouping. In view of the trading links of Cork to the Bristol area it is no surprise Anglins from Cork would have gone to Bristol

Recently I spoke to a John Anglin living in the north east of England and he traces himself back to the Bristol area

Valerie Anglin also referred to another Anglin grouping whom I shall call ‘Bridgewater Anglins’188 and for whom there is also a small family tree

To these I add members of my own family group some of whom live in England whose history goes back to a John Anglin who married in Glanmire Cork in 1850. These are of Gp. 2 of the DNA Anglin project. I refer to them as the ‘Glanmire Anglins’

The above three groups are Catholic

There are other Anglins in England who are not Catholic. I know little of these. I spoke to Anglins in the East London / Essex area they did not profess to have much knowledge of their ancestry, but mentioned they lived in the East London/Essex area for years in places like Billingsgate and Upminster. They mentioned family names like Alfred, George, Harry, John, and gave naval connections of the first war 1914-1918, but nothing earlier. But tellingly they referred to a ‘granny Kelly’ (an Irish name) in their family background

Though I feel in some cases it is a different name Bridgewater is near Bristol

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Local Studies department of the Bristol Library has told me verbally that in the passenger records there is the name of an Anglin who went to Philadelphia from Bristol in the 1700’s

Two sources of evidence of English Anglins linked to County Tipperary exist, one in Hornchurch189 Essex and one a soldier from Cahir Tipperary who died in first war

There are Anglins of the Somerset Regiments and the Guernsey Light killed in WW1.

There was a ship called ‘Anglin’ who travelled to Belfast and to Liverpool in the years 1809 and 1812

Anglins of England linked to Jamaica Examining records in England and abroad of the 1700’s it is clear the Anglins of Jamaica are linked to England. These would be of the protestant tradition190 In Jamaica there were Anglin plantation owners and then those Anglins who married into the Scarlett family. They used the names Cornwall and Westmoreland in their estate names. These are English place names. There is a Philip Anglin whose journey to the Caribbean had to do with the Church of England and teaching. Today there are Anglins with African pedigree who came from Jamaica to England.

Anglins of England linked to USA It is quite amazing that in the pre 1800 period no information is as yet presented of Anglins from England entering America, even though it is presumed to be true. (There is the one exception referred to above).

Postscript In the general research into the Anglins of the early Diaspora, awareness has grown of a real possibility the Anglin Story within the USA191 and the Caribbean may actually begin in England. Initially I thought of London as the point of departure, but now it may be more likely that it is from the Bristol area they left; of course such Anglins would originally have come to Bristol England from Ireland.

This comes from a relative living in Cork Ireland They are considered in the chapter on the Caribbean Anglins 191 Arundel and Severn are two places referred to in the US story of Maryland Anglins. These are places in England. Bristol is on the Severn River 189 190

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Chapter 13 Immigration of Anglins into the USA192 Part A The Early immigrants This first part of this chapter will focus on the early Anglins to the USA, i.e. the period up to the late 1700’s. The Aims for Part A are: a) To identify the original Early Anglins in the USA b) To identify the names of spouse and children of the first generation c) To identify dates and places

d) To record only matters of fact. If suppositions are included they will be marked by the addition of c. for dates; and ?? for other matters

Most of the material available refers to Anglins. There seems to be little as yet put together on the other variants of the Anglin name, though a Chris Anglim has done work

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Introduction The research already carried out is in the unpublished book of Walter Anglin “Anglins of Colonial America” in which he speaks of the Maryland Anglins, a family line that seems to have died out, he also refers to the first Virginian Anglin, Ruth, about whom little is known. Then there is Evelyn William’s unpublished book ‘In Search of Anglins’ written in 1982. There is also ongoing research carried out by individuals and particularly the coordinating and research work carried out by the Anglin DNA project team. Initially I had seen the story of the early Anglins as a unit: now, particularly with the evidence produced by the DNA findings, it really has to be considered as separate stories. The evidence to date is of six different Anglin individuals or groups193 in the mainland American Colonies in the 17th and early 18th Centuries, while some of the supporting evidence is from shipping records, it is mostly from old land records. Each ‘patriarch’s story seems to be independent of the others, with a possible unproven link of the Maryland Anglins with the Patriarch William family line of Group 2 referred to earlier as ‘The Anglins of Carswell County North Carolina’, (not forgetting he originally lived in Virginia). I have placed the available details on the Maryland Anglins as an addendum to this chapter because they are the oldest line and also they may open up a link to Bristol England or directly to Ireland. These six early Anglin individuals are: 1.

The first Anglin in the USA, a lady, Ruth Anglin, arrived in Virginia in 1635 as a debentured servant?194

2.

Eleanor Anglin was the first Anglin in Maryland she arrived 1688195

3.

William Anglin arrived Maryland in 1689 and established a family196

4.

William Anglin arrived Virginia 1733(?), then to N.C. (A family line of Gp 2 DNA Anglins)

5.

Adrian Anglin, a debentured servant, arrived Virginia c.1731 (A family line of Gp 3 DNA Anglins)

Since two were female Ruth and Eleanor to trace them is difficult as their children may carry a different surname Contact Anglin DNA team for detailed evidence. Quotation from Walter Anglins book “During my research I have often been asked the question "Who was the first Anglin in the colonies?" Eleanor Anglin was not the first but may have been the second. Ruth Anglin, who arrived in the Virginia colony in 1635 as an indentured servant was the first. I have included Ruth and Eleanor as a matter of interest only. Descendents, if any, cannot be traced cf. also Ancestry.com records the following: Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Ruth Anglin Name: Ruth Anglin Year: 1635. Place: Virginia. Source 2772 Publication Code: Primary Immigrant: Ruth Anglin Includes 25,000 names from records of the Virginia State Land Office. Excerpts of the Irish names from the Greer list were published in no. 6258, O’Brien, Early Immigrants to Virginia....GREER, GEORGE CABELL. Early Virginia Immigrants, 1623-1666. Richmond [Va.]: W.C. Hill Printing Co., 1912, 376p. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1978. Repr.1982. p. 11 195 The information comes from Walter Anglin’s book, cf. Anglin DNA team for details 196 The information comes from Walter Anglin’s book, cf. Anglin DNA team for details. He established a family 193 194

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6.

James Anglin who arrived Virginia. c. 175? (A family line of Gp 4 DNA Anglins)197

The major problem The problem faced in furthering this study of the early period is the same problem that exists in Ireland for 1600-1750, namely the scarcity of records, specifically in regard to the movement of ‘ordinary people’. An effort has to be made to fill this gap in knowledge. This gap applies to all of these six Anglins. Efforts to identify the initial entry of them directly from Ireland has not bourn fruit198, so I feel the focus must seriously include movement of people from Bristol199 England, to the ports of Virginia and it’s surrounds200. I have taken this view following time spent examining the historical context for the1600’ and 1700’s. That period seems to link England’s Bristol to Virginia and Ireland in quite a definite manner. Some points on the history are referred to in appendix 4 with information on trade and tobacco records available on the net and these may reinforce the Bristol Cork link.

The first generations of USA Anglins In the absence of family records of their predecessors the first names of wives and children are also included as a possible guiding aid in the research for their ancestors. The information here must be certain, so in doubt I have added question marks or a c. to indicate doubt.

Maryland Anglins William arrived 1689; born 1659 died Wife Sarah the probable Children were: •

William born about 1695 married Ellis Taylor, a widow on July 22, 1725

John Anglin born about 1697 married Mary Uneth on May 21, 1734

Cornelius born about 1700 married Barbara (maiden name unknown)

Mary born about 1709 married Robert Gardner

Group 2 DNA Virginia Anglins William bn. c.1730 m. Ann Surname unknown c. 1754. Their children were: •

Cornelius.201 bn. c.1755

John bn. 1759

First name unknown?? Female bn. c.1760.maybe Nancy

First name unknown? female bn. 1762

• Also He may have a son William bn. Louise Co. Vg. C.1763 199 200 201 197 198

Details on d) William , James, Adrian from Anglin DNA team But historical research needs to continue on this direct movement There is also the possible links of Liverpool, London and Southampton Walter Anglin in his book suggests this also Irish scholars writing in Latin used various techniques when dealing with Gaeilge names one of which was instead of Latinising the Irish name they simply substituted a well known Latin name e.g. Cornelius for the Gaelic first name ‘Conchobhar’ cf. ‘Irish names and Surnames by Patrick Woulfe p.38’

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Group 3 DNA Virginia Anglins •

Adrian married Elizabeth Surname unknown Children

Ann bn.1724 William bn. 1733 John bn. 1734 Mary Ann bn. 1735 Mary bn. 1738

Adrian 2nd.marriage Mary Thornhill children

Phillip bn.1742 Elizabeth b. 1744 Sarah bn. 1747 Lydia bn. 1749 Adrian bn. 1752 Joseph bn. 1755

Group 4 DNA Virginia Anglins •

James bn. 1720? In Ireland? d.c.1778 Georgia spouse name unknown children

John bn. c.1755

David bn. c 1756 N.C.

Henry bn. 1757 N.C.

William bn. Georgia c.1758

Catherine bn.

What information is now sought? What is sought is the linkage to the place in Europe202 from which they originally came? It is true the DNA work has identified the Irish ancestry for Group 2 and 3 as a whole but without showing the ‘journey’, ‘the paper trail’. Walter Anglin suspected their journey might have been through England. There are three relevant historical facts: 1.

colonisation of Ireland

2.

the colonisation and early period of Virginia203 and its neighbouring areas

3.

the coloniser England

Progress will be achieved in following the linkage of these three. So the study of Bristol’s trade, (tobacco, slavery, and seafarers), her trade routes and the presence of Anglins in Bristol might give the link. It is worth examining whatever records may be available in Bristol.204 (There is also a vague possibility they came via Spain: this has not been researched). The story of these early Anglins after their arrival in the USA The American Anglins are keeping up their study of the various family trees and while at times the identification of the descendants faces stages of flux, progress is being made. As regards the very early years they seem to have exhausted the possible documentary information available in the local American (e.g. Virginian) and national records205, though the recent find of group 3’s Adrian’s will and debentured status shows information may still lie hidden. 204 205 202 203

For the moment I am omitting the possibility of the link being through France David Selleck of Boston merchant to pass Irish children to Virginia No Anglin in the Ellis island records give their origin as Bristol I make no effort to record again the work they have already done

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History History tells us Irish people entered the Americas via Europe, particularly France e.g. Irish soldiers fighting in the US linked to France. The question arises were any of these Anglins? The linkage of US Anglins to US Anglims Presently this work is along parallel lines. It would be good to see the work of Chris Anglin enter the main stream of the Anglin story.

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Part B The later immigrants Little need be written on the period of the very late206 1700’s to the very early 1900’s, as the story has been well publicised over the generations. Knowledge of this Irish migration is centred on the great Irish Famine of the 1840’s. Who came? From the early years of this period many Irish, Protestant and Catholic, from north and south, came to the US. Some came to experience greater freedom, religious and political, in their lives; others to seek a better future; and others in order to assist financially other family members still in Ireland. With the famine this changed. There was a massive influx of the same types of Irish but this time to survive, sadly helped in many cases by landlords who put the tenants off the land so they could better improve their own lot. While the famine came slowly to an end in the 1850’s, the lot of the people remained difficult as the ‘land issue’ continued and so migration continued. Their arrival The Irish arrived to the northern ports of the USA and of course Canada too; today’s replica ships the Jennie Johnson and Dunbrody typifying the story. The numbers increased as the 1800’s passed and among them were some Anglins too. By the 1840’s the arrivals had become a small flood. As years passed many of these Irish moved away from the port towns even some moving southward as well as westward, and so the Anglins moved too. The arrival stage in the later years of 1800 and early 1900’s is well documented, as rules for ships manifests were coming into effect. Much Information about them can be gleaned in Ellis Island records, the documents, census and naturalisation papers of the various states of the USA, as well as information on Irish soldiers in various American regiments, including the Irish regiments of the Civil war. It is there the story of the Anglins can be researched again. The Anglin story The story of these later Anglins within America is a matter for American Anglins and is outside the intended scope of this report. Judging from the work of the DNA team the family tree element of the story is progressing. But where are the Biographies? One aspect of the USA Anglins not much in evidence as yet is short biographies of worthy individual Anglins of the past. Genealogical work is more than surnames and dates, it is people. There is information on the two Anglin Country Singers and the Escapees from Alcatraz, Clarence and John Anglin but I am sure there are many worthy of being remembered.

From the French Revolution period

206

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Material searched •

The DNA project team shared information they unearthed plus information present in the books of Evelyn Williams and Walter Anglin

Irish American Associations early years by David Beers Quinn: Gave history only

The complete Book of Emigrants in Bondage 1614-1775 by Peter Wilson Cobham: no Anglins

The complete Book of Emigrants by P.W. Coldham (GPC 1987—1993)

Kings passengers to Maryland and Virginia by Peter Wilson Cobham. (Check William Anglin to Maryland in 1742)

King Joseph ‘Ireland to North America; emigrants from West Cork’ no Anglins vols 1-4

The Encyclopaedia of the Irish in America. By Michael Glazier Notre Dame Press. No Anglins

The shipping records at New Orleans gives many Anglins arriving from the West Indies

Ellis island site. Ellis Island covers late 1800’s and early 1900’s many Anglins

J. F. Kennedy Trust; shipping information ‘Dunbroady’ includes Anglins

The following is from one of the ‘Manuscript Sources for the History of Irish Civilisation’ Vol 1 Persons’ Edited by Hayes. Genealogical Office Manuscript ms 111H Folio 55: •

‘The Grant of Arms to descendants of William Anglim of Rosegreen County Tipperary and to his grandson Clifford C. Anglim of Richmond, son of Patrick Anglim of Napa both in California son of Matthew Anglin of Rosegreen Co. Tipperary granted 11/2/1956’ Rosegreen is a townland in Tipperary South Riding Barony is Middlethird Parish Tullmain P. L.U. Cashel Vol 2 p 33 Census 1851

Other material worthy of research •

Assisted passage Records to colonies at National Archives England and the Guildhall Library London

‘Child Apprentices in Virginia, America from Christ’s Hospital, London 1617-1778 (gpc 1990)

In Class T 47/9-12 in the National Archives London is a list of emigrants to the Americas

‘Ulster Emigration to colonial America 1718—75’ By Dickson

‘Original Lists of Persons of Quality emigrating to America 1600- 1700’ by J. C. Hotten

‘Irish Schoolmasters in the American colonies 1640-1775’ by John C. Lenihan

‘Irish Settlers in America by M. J. O’Brien

Filby, P William & Meyer, Mary K. ‘Passenger and immigration lists bibliography 15381900

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McGinn Brian ‘Virginia’s Lost Irish Colonists’

Ireland to America by John c. Lenihan

The Irish Diaspora by Donald Harman Akenson Toronto 1993

The Irish Diaspora by Andy Bielenberg Ed Cork 2000

The Westward Enterprise by Liverpool University Press

The Journal of the American Irish historical society Articles207:

‘Irish pioneers in Maryland’ 14 (1915) 207-19 by M.J. O’Brien NLI IR 973 a 1

‘Irish builders in North Carolina’ 10 (1911) NLI IR 973 a 1

‘Grantees of Land in Virginia’ 13 NLI IR 973 a 1

‘Irish Settlers on the Opequan’ 6 (1906), 71-4 NLI IR 973 a 1

‘Some Irish Settlers in Virginia’ 2 (1899), 161-66, NLI IR 973 a 1 by J. Lawless

John Lenihan Early Irish Settlements in Virginia 4 (1904) 30-42 NLI IR 973 a 1

Historical Papers reprinted from the Journal of the American Irish historical society208: •

O’Brien M.J. The Irish in Charlestown, South Carolina’, (1926) NLI GR 2240 Vol xxv

O’Brien M. J. ‘Lymerick Plantation’ Berkeley County South Carolina, (1926) NLI GR 2240 Vol xxv

O’Brien M.J. ‘Pioneer Irish Families in Virginia, Meades and Sullivans’ (1926) NLI GR 2240 Vol 25

An addendum on the Maryland Anglins209 Besides the work of Evelyn Williams, knowledge of these Anglins comes from an unpublished book by Walter Anglin called “Anglins of Colonial America”, which can be accessed through the Anglin DNA team. Here is what Walter Anglin wrote in his book on the Anglins who were in Maryland. Typed exactly as given to me by the DNA team: Earliest Anglin individual on Maryland records Eleanor Anglin of 1688 Eleanor Anglin arrived in Maryland as a passenger on a ship reaching there in 1688. Most settlers entering Maryland at that time were from England. Eleanor's surname, Anglin, was Irish. Did she come from Ireland? Possible, but we cannot be certain because some Anglin families, likely from Ireland, were already living in England. What Happened to Eleanor? I did not find any later records pertaining to Eleanor. No family was shown for her on the passenger list. Earliest Anglin family William Anglin of Maryland William Anglin born 1659. This William Anglin family was the earliest Anglin family in America according to colonial records pertaining to the early The references mentioned are to books of the National Library Ireland in Dublin Op. cit. 209 I include material on these here as the line seems to have died out and yet it may be helpful in the link to Bristol. Be aware Bristol England is on the River Severn and Arundel is a place in England 207 208

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settlements. This William Anglin can be traced in Maryland as follows. William had arrived in Maryland in 1689. (He stated in a deposition in 1721 that he had lived in Maryland for 32 years. That would make his date of arrival as 1689.) William Anglin is on a record showing him in Arundal County, Maryland in 1696. On the deposition mentioned in Paragraph 1, above, William gave his age as 62. He was therefore born in 1659. We do not know his place of birth. (Most church and court records of that time did not mention place of birth). Since he had an Irish surname, he likely was born in Ireland but we cannot be certain. In 1724 a 60-acre tract of land in Maryland called "Anglin's Discovery" was sold. Considering William's age, the land was probably sold after William's death. Comment

An early William Anglin is identified in Hanover County (Va) in 1734. That William Anglin was supposedly a brother of Philip Anglin from France. But it is possible that he was a descendent of this first William Anglin of Maryland. The William and Sarah Anglin Sr (of Maryland) family chart William Anglin Sr. b. 1659, married Sarah (maiden name unknown) probable children: a) William Anglin Jr born about 1695 married Ellis Taylor, a widow on July 22, 1725 b) John Anglin born about 1697 married Mary Uneth on May 21, 1734 c) Cornelius Anglin Sr born about 1700 married Barbara (maiden name unknown) their child was Cornelius Anglin Jr, born about 1729 d) Mary Anglin born about 1709 married Robert Gardner In addition to Cornelius Anglin Jr (above) other probable grandchildren were: e) Nathan Anglin f)

Sarah Anglin married John Wamsley in 1744

g) William Anglin: Catherine Anglin h) Hannah Anglin Comment

The above listed "probable grandchildren" were each named on one or more early Maryland records. Dates and/or other clues indicated that each of them likely belonged to the next generation. (i.e., grandchildren of William & Sarah Anglin Sr). I could positively identify only one of them to actual parents (i.e., Cornelius Anglin Jr).

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Note

Paragraphs below correspond to the designation of each respective child shown on the above family chart. a) William Anglin Jr: Born about 1695 William Anglin Jr and Ellis Taylor were married in St. Anne's Parish, Anne Arundal County. In 1724, the year prior to their marriage, a William Anglin is on a tax list of Somerset County, Maryland. That was likely the same William. In later years this William Anglin is on Maryland records with the "Jr" designation dropped from his name. b) John Anglin: Born about 1697 This John Anglin and Mary Uneth were married in All Hallow's Parish, Anne Arundal County, Maryland. John was born during the same period of years as William Anglin Jr and Cornelius Anglin Sr. Since there was likely only one Anglin family in the Maryland colony at that time, all were likely sons of William & Sarah Anglin. c) Cornelius Anglin Sr: born about 1700 Cornelius Anglin Sr and Barbara, his wife, christened their son, Cornelius Jr, in St. Paul's Parish, Baltimore County on June 4, 1729. Cornelius Sr. apparently died early since Maryland records in 1738 indicate that Barbara Anglin was then a widow. Comment

Note in Section Three the frequent use of the given name Cornelius among the children and later descendents of the William Anglin family from Louisa County, Virginia. Where they connected? Possible. d) D. Mary Anglin: born about 1809 Like William Jr above, the records clearly identify Mary Anglin as a daughter of William and Sarah Anglin Sr. When christened in 1709 in St. Anne's Parish in Anne Arundal County, the record identifies her parent's as William and Sarah Angling. There was a May Anglin who married Robert Gardner on January 5, 1728, in St Paul's Parish. She was apparently this Mary Anglin. Comment

In subsequent Section Three (Chapter VIII) a William Anglin is identified who went from Louisa County, Virginia, to North Carolina. That family line perpetuated the name Cornelius profusely through several generations. They may have descended from this line of Maryland Anglins. There is no proof. Another Anglin of early Maryland There was a Zachariah Anglin on the Maryland census of 1800 with children. His marriage to Jane Cobern in Baltimore January 6, 1811, appears to have been a second marriage.

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What happened to the early Anglin Families of Maryland? Some Possible Explanations:

If the William Anglin Sr family was the only early family, it may have declined rapidly in numbers due to deaths, a majority of female children, or other such events

Some may have migrated to Virginia or elsewhere

Like some of the early Virginia Anglins some may have changed their surnames to Anglia, Angle, Angel, etc. (See the examples/indications of such changes in later sections of his book.)

Maryland Anglins found on various indexes of the U.S. Censuses 1790:

None

1800:

Nat Anglin 20010-10201 Anne Arundel Co, pg. 67, and Zachariah Anglin 10010-01010, pg 63

1810:

Agnatius Anglin (likely Nat of 1800), Anne Arundal County, pg. 494

1840:

Charles Aggeling (Anglin?) Baltimore County, pg. 243, and Gotliess Anglin, Baltimore County, pg. 323

Comment

Among the hundreds or more places of birth checked on censuses of 1850 and later none stated, "born in Maryland"! Among the hundreds of Anglins and Anglin descendents checked on censuses of 1880 none stated as having a father "born in Maryland"!

Postscript The following piece of information comes from Karen Parker: 1756:

Athanasius Anglin deserted (25- y/o planter, Anne Arundel Co., MD

1759:

John Anglin deserted at Annapolis (age 18, born on Severn R., MD)

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Chapter 14 The Canadian story Introduction The migration of the Anglins to Canada in the early 1800’s occurs much later than the Anglin migration to the USA. There is therefore a greater possibility of finding appropriate records about their migration due to the lessening of tensions within Ireland, both at civil and religious level. People in the 1800’s were now willing to complete the normal records of civil life. Ports on the south Coast of County Cork maintained commercial trade with Canadian ports for some generations before 1800 and so it is no surprise Anglins from Bandon and Clonakilty would emigrate to Canada, rather than somewhere else. These trade links also existed between Bandon,210 through Colliers quay three miles from the town, to St. John and Quebec in Canada. It is not clear why the particular individual Anglins choose to leave Ireland. Some had actually moved before the Irish famine of the 1840’s. Maybe one day the reasons will be understood. But whatever the reasons for their departure they have prospered in their new homeland. There are two major genealogical lines of Anglins in Canada, which I refer to as the ‘Protestant Canadian Anglins’, and the ‘Catholic Canadian Anglins’ merely by way of identification. Available evidence shows both groups come from West Cork and their being of different religious persuasions is not unusual, as in the 1600’s there were members of both religious traditions in County Cork211.

Sources of information on Canadian Anglins Both Canadian lines have done major work in building family trees. Bill Anglins family line is in DNA Group 2. The Canadian Catholic line has not been tested. Detailed information on the Canadian Protestant line is available on the Internet on the ‘Bill Anglin’ site (http://www.billanglin.com/story1.1.html). This site gives the story of his line in Canada but also records their links to Ireland and even to a group of Anglins in Australia. The number of Anglin university graduates within this line is fascinating, truly carrying on the desire for learning that is so important in Irish traditions. Bill Anglin212 also makes reference to the other line of Anglins, ‘The Canadian Catholic Anglins’213. They too have done detailed studies of their own story in Canada and their link back to Clonakilty Ireland. Information on them can be gained by contact with the Anglin DNA project team. The presence of this Anglin line in political, juridical affairs and in the theatre is of note.

212 213 210 211

Bandon was originally Bandon Bridge as the town grew up around the bridge that was placed over the Bandon River I believe the Protestant tradition is mainly Methodist, but I am open to correction I take this opportunity to thank Bill for his work, but also the help he has given me in searching the detail Frank LeVey seems to have most information on this line and his family have gone into writing on it

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Besides these two major lines other unrelated Anglins have entered Canada over the years, but no research has gone into them.- one is of the ‘Glanmire Anglin’ line

Other information There is information on movements of Canadian Anglins in Passenger records. There is a place called ‘Anglin Drive (and Promenade Anglin en Francais)’ in St John, NB Canada. Internet reference is: http://ca.maps.yahoo.com/maps_result?addr=anglin+cr&csz=st+john%2C+nb&country=ca&new =1&name=&qty Information on Canadian Anglins in the military and naval records in Canada and England can be found through their respective National Archive Web sites. The English www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline gives these names: Name G. L J.C.

Surname Anglin Anglin

Rank Corporal Private

Regiment Canadian Infantry E. Ontario Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Inft. (East. Ontario Regt.)

Date of Death 9/04/1917 4/06/1916

Individual Anglins in the public arena There are books on: •

Timothy Warren Anglin by William m. Baker

Margaret Anglin; A Stage Life by John LeVay

Timothy Warren Anglin was involved in politics and Journalism. Margaret Anglin was involved in the Theatre and Francis Anglin was involved in the Judiciary.

The Canadian & Australian link of the Anglins An important aspect of Bill Anglins work is the establishment of a link between his line of Anglins and some of the Anglins in Australia. This is important as it brings together Canada, Ireland and Australia by documents.

Postscript It is quite amazing the amount of effort these Anglins have obviously expended on the story of the Anglins of Canada. On reading their work one can only offer praise. I make no effort to add to the record of this living people. This chapter is included to publicise the Canadian Anglin story to Anglins of other countries. This writer is aware what really would please the Canadians is if someone could complete the initial Irish phase of their story with documentary evidence. That is being attempted but paucity of records for that period is a problem.

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Further developments on Chapter 14 Introduction In researching Waterford as a stop on a possible ‘Shipping Corridor’ for Anglin emigration, I became aware of the work of Dr. Mannion. Dr. Mannion’s work shows the presence of an Anglin in St. John Newfoundland. He also spoke of the shipping corridor linking the west country of England, Waterford and Newfoundland. Awareness of the Bristol Anglins and of Wills of Anglins in Waterford, demanded closer research into what is available in the local studies departments of Libraries in Bristol, Waterford and St. John’s to put flesh on this Anglin migration. This emigration of a few individual Anglins to Newfoundland differs from the emigration of the two main Anglin lines in Canada, whose origin lies in the Bandon / Clonakilty area of West Cork.

The Evidence of Anglins on this Waterford corridor a) Quotation from a letter from Dr. Mannion: “I have only two references to Anglins in Newfoundland. A Joseph Anglin was sued by Timothy Flannery for L19. 8. 6, Oct. 27, 1820, St. John's. Flannery was a shopkeeper /publican/trader from Stradbally, Co. Waterford, in St. John's. He won the case ‘by default’. Usually means Anglin did not appear in court. The debt is substantial. Anglin may have been an artisan, supplied by Flannery. G.N.2/1/A, Oct. 27, 1820. St. John's Court Records. No other reference to Joseph. He likely moved on. On October 30, 1842, James Anglin of Tallow, Co. Waterford m. Margaret Purcell of St. John's in the Old Chapel, St. John's. Tallow was a fairly important source area for Newfoundland migration. Near the tidal limits of the River Bride/Blackwater. (See my map in ‘Tracing the Irish’). He would have sailed from Youghal. Source: Basilica R.C.Marriage Registers, St. John's. No other reference. He may have lived outside the Parish of St. John's. Apart from a tiny area around Youghal - east to Cloyne - Cork was a minor source for Newfoundland migration. The name, as you note is rare in the hinterland of Waterford.” b) An entry for 1894 directory of St. John’s Newfoundland: Francis Anglin shoemaker 6 Brazil Square. c) There are Anglins in Bristol from at least early 1800 cf. the family tree of the ‘Bristol Anglins’. d) There are wills of Anglins in Waterford in the 1700’s: •

John Anglin Knockatimore, County Waterford - probated 1730

John Anglin Ballylaffin, County Waterford - probated 1779

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John Handlin, H.M.S. The Cornwall - probated 1749 (English Ship) – note spelling!!

John Hanglin, Ballynhally County Waterford - probated 1750

e) A ‘Glanmire Anglin’ Patrick went to Canada after World War 2 and married Genevieve in St. John New Brunswick, Canada; his son died 1970.

Some of the documents examined in the preparation of this Chapter: •

Dr. Mannion’s work is available on the Internet.

First reference: ‘Tracing the Irish: A Geographical Guide’: http://www.inp.ie/?q=node/40

And another reference containing a map: http://www.heritage.nf.ca/society/irish_newfoundland.html

I contacted the Cobh Shipping museum but no Anglins in their records. I also contacted the Cork Harbour shipping records, but they go back only to Independence. Earlier records are in Kew, London.

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Chapter 15 The Anglins of the Caribbean The Aim of this Chapter is: a) Simply to put down the information encountered to date

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Introduction Some research has been done, but this story is a project in itself, and would require time spent in records within the churches and archives of the various Caribbean Islands. It is not a simple story. So I give an introduction and then record the information and sources uncovered and leave it to another, younger than I, to do the research. To properly record the story of the Caribbean Anglins it would be necessary to tell the movement of Anglins from Ireland to the islands. Was it directly, was it via England or was it via Europe214? So many questions! Part of this story must include whom they were, where they came from and state what their intentions were in going to the Caribbean. Having begun, then their story within the islands would also be told, including their ‘work’, their marriages, their children and in that process speak of the slaves, Irish and African, indicating how was it, individuals of African extraction came to have the surname Anglin. The dying or departure of these ‘white’ Anglins from the Islands would also be part of the story as they are no longer there today. We have Anglins going into the islands from England, and we have at a later date Anglins arriving in England from the islands. We have evidence of white Anglins and we have evidence of black Anglins! This story is quite different from all the other Anglin stories of the Diaspora. It is our story.

Sources and known information Jamaica plantation Anglins •

There are the brothers Anglin, Phillip who died in 1748, and William

There is Philip Anglin’s will source215

There is the marriage of William Anglin and Mary Dehany married 30th July 1710. She was the daughter of David Dehany of Jamaica who died 1655. He was of Dutch origin. Mary died 15th Dec 1722 aged 50. Their children were: •

Phillip Anglin b. 25 June 1711: Mary Anglin b. 24 Jan 1714: Elizabeth Anglin b. 13 Dec 1714: William Anglin b. 15 Jun 1719: Elizabeth Anglin (again) b. 9 Jan: Martha Anglin b. 24 Mar. 1726

The Madeira or Hickling Anglins arrive in the US via the Portuguese colony of Madeira RGO/SpTw Liber 27;1748-1749. It was recorded in 1748 and is in the List of all Testators whose will are on record in the office of the Island Secretary, Jamaica, from 1731 to 1750 (Inclusive)) (Add.Ms. 21,981,Brit. Mus.) This will is not at the Island Sec. in Jamaica

214 215

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Then there are the Anglins linked to the Scarlets by marriage. In the Caribbean records is the following: - Among the early Plantation holders of Jamaica were the Anglin, Dehany, Lawrence, and Scarlet families. It appears two brothers William Anglin and Philip Anglin are in the records. Mary Lawrence, daughter of John Lawrence of Fairfield Estate was the wife of Philip Anglin of the Paradise Estate, Jamaica. She was born after 1700 and married in 1720. Their grandson became the first Lord Abinger. A Mrs. Robert Scarlett was the daughter of Phillip Anglin of Paradise Estate and Mary daughter of John Lawrence of Fairfield Estate, a great granddaughter of Henry Lawrence, President of Cromwell’s Council. Robert Scarlett and wife named one son Phillip Anglin Scarlett Philip was born in 1767. Philip died in 1823.and another William Anglin Scarlett.

Schoolmaster Anglins •

There is a Philip Anglin who arrived 1776, Jamaica, a schoolmaster from Church of England216

The above Anglins seem to have an English link and were of a Protestant Tradition

Military records English National archives http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline give Naval and Military Records of Anglins from the West Indies and West Indian regiments. Examples are H. B. Anglin, Lance Corporal and British West Indies. The following is a list of Anglins named in these war records, Philip, James, Daniel, Charles, William Alexander, Samuel, Lambert, Earnest, Benjamin, Beresford, Nathaniel, Thomas and Obadiah. Surely someone must tell their story? The Convert Rolls Edited by Eileen O’Byrne, The Convert Rolls mentions a will relating to Margaret Anglin and relates her to the Island of Dominica and to Spike Island in Cork Passenger lists Passenger records show Anglins arriving from Kingston into New Orleans

Today There are Anglins in various islands of the Caribbean. Their names can be found in Passenger arrivals in New Orleans from Kingston, in phone books of various islands, in wills, etc. There are Anglins in England and the USA who are immigrants from Jamaica. There are Anglins from the Caribbean islands in the military records of West Indian regiments of the British Army. But the primary question remains, when and how did the name Anglin enter those islands.

Reference: Ministers and schoolmasters of the Church of England who went to western colonies in return for a bounty from the King. From the Rawlinson MSS. Receipt Book of Secret Service Money, April 20, 1689, to June 1691, in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, England

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When did the name arrive in the Caribbean? In the early 1700’s (or is it earlier) we find Anglins as plantation owners, we find them linked and married into the Scarlett Family of Jamaica and England and we find them as teachers.

The return to England? The Anglins who came to England from the Caribbean after World War 11 were ‘Black Anglins’. This raises the question what is their genealogy and pedigree? In this context I am reminded of reading articles on the ‘Black Irish’ and also of how Irish people were taken as slaves to the Caribbean.

Irish History related to the Caribbean The following are a few points of history linking the Irish to the Caribbean. If explored they may give us information on another aspect of the Anglin Diaspora: •

Irish people were shipped to Barbados from Drogheda. The ports of departure for transportation was Bristol /London. Particularly after 1651

The Munster campaign under Ireton, led in 1651 to Waterford being cleared of Irish people. But to where?

Then in 1652 Irish were sent from Waterford to merchants, Robert Cann, Robert Yate and Thomas Speed of Bristol. The latter took them to Barbados

It is at this time some Irish traders moved to continental Europe and were involved in general trade not only within Europe but also with the West Indies and South America

1652: Henry Hazard and Robert Immans of Bristol took Irish from Ireland to the Caribbean

1653: Irish children transported via England. Names mentioned in documents in the transportation are Joseph Lawrence, merchant, Sir John Clotworthy

Lord Broghill in Cork directed to give Irish people to Mr Selleck and Mr. Leader and by Captain John Vernon for transportation to West Indies

1654: Irish soldiers (the leaders were O’Dwyer and O’Brien) held on Spike Island; Cork to be transported by a Charles Andrews and a Mathias Browne of Dublin

The worst years of transportation were 1655 and 1656, but the effort had been going on for thirty years

Historical information on individual Caribbean Islands The islands have to be treated individually in relation to the Irish presence, as the Irish were linked not only to England but also to France Spain and the Dutch at this time. •

Barbados The Irish went as labour later replaced by African labour

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Antigua There are Anglins in Antigua. Antigua drew Irish labour but via Spain. Antigua colonised by Thomas Warner from St. Kitts, He sent protestant settlers from St. Kitts

Neavis Drew Irish labour but via Spain

St. Kitts 1690 St. Kitts taken from French by British. Thomas Warner faced riots between Catholics and Protestants and he sent Catholics to Montserrat and kept Protestants in St. Kitts

Montserrat Drew Irish labour but via Spain etc.

Material researched •

Peter Wilson Cobham’s writings e.g. The Complete Book of Emigrants in Bondage 16141778)

The Periodical ‘Studies’; Articles by Gwynn (Rev. Aubrey) S.J.: •

Early Irish emigration to the West Indies (1612—1643). (Studies. Vol. XVIII, Sept., Dec., 1929)

A history of the Catholic Church in Jamaica by Francis X. Delaney, B.J., reviewed by. (Studies, Vol. XIX, pp. 512—14, Sept. 1930)

Cromwell’s policy of transportation. (Studies. Vol. XIX, Dec., 1930, Vol. XX, June, 1931)

Whence the “Black Irish” of Jamaica? By Joseph J. Williams, S.J. reviewed by. (Studies, Vol. XXI, p.694, Dec., 1932)

• •

Indentured Servants and Negro slaves in Barbados (1641-1650)

Wills: •

Cf. English National archives (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline). Wills of: •

Sir William Anglin Scarlett chief Justice of Jamaica

William Anglin of Westmoreland Cornwall Jamaica 10/6/1843

Philip Anglin Morris of St. James Cornwall Jamaica

16/9/1843

Philip Anglin Scarlett of St. James Jamaica

20/4/1825

31/7/1832

Material worthy of research •

‘Irish Schoolmasters in the American colonies 1640-1775’ by John C. Lenihan

Filby, P William & Meyer, Mary K. ‘Passenger and immigration lists bibliography 15381900

The Westward Enterprise by Liverpool University Press

Irish Slaves in the West Indies by MacInery M.H.

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Whence the ‘black Irish’ of Jamaica. By Williams Joseph

‘The population of the British Colonies’ p 212-213,261-296 written in 1975

C. E. Yeo’s book ‘The British overseas; a Guide to Records of their Baptisms, Marriages and Deaths and Burials in the UK’

Fothergill, Gerald A List of Emigrant Ministers to America, 1690-1811. London: Elliot Stock, 1904. 65p. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1965

Passenger records •

Assisted passage Records of persons going to colonies are at the National Archives England and the Guildhall Library London

Periodicals and Articles •

Information on book sources can be obtained from Hayes’ volumes on Irish manuscripts articles

Irish Monthly •

Russel (Rev. Matthew) S.J. Irish exiles and West Indian slaves. (Vol. XXX, pp. 265—9, May, 1902)

Brownlow (Rev. S. R.) Canon: ‘Lectures on slavery and serfdom in Europe” reviewed with references to Irish in West Indies. Vol. XX, p. 331, June 1892)

Irish Ecclesiastical Record •

The sales of the Irish to the Plantations. 5th Ser. Vol. IV Aug 1914 Pp 163-184 Hehir (D. Noel) S.J.

Murphy (Rev. D.) S.J.: Deportation of the Irish to the West Indies in the seventeenth century. 3rd Ser., Vol. XIV, July, Aug., 1893)

Williams (Rev. Joseph J.) S.J.: Whence the ‘Black Irish” of Jamaica. (Reviewed by J.W.) 5th Ser. Vol. XLIII. June 1934. Pp. 670—671)

The Irish Sword •

Robins (Brig. C. G.), Note on The Irish Brigade in the West Indies. Vol. II. No. 9, p. 374, Winter, 1956)

L. (G. M. de): Note on A letter from the West Indies (from H. D’Lacherois July, l762) Vol. VII. No. 27, pp. l73-4 Winter, 1965)

The womenfolk of the Wild Geese in the Vol 5(1962) pp135-136

Misc. Journals •

Townshend (Dorothea) p The Irish in the West Indies In the 17th end 18th centuries, (Cork Hist, and Arch. Soc. Jo. Ser. 2, Vol. XV, p. 147, l9o9).

FitzGerald (Lord Walter): Monumental Inscriptions, relating to Irishmen, from the Cathedral Jamaica.

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With note by 0, J. Hewson. (Roya1 Soc. of Antiq. of Ireland Jn., Ser. 5, Vol. VII, pp. 75—6, 2145. 1897), Williams (J.L): The Regicides in Ireland III

Ultoniensis (pseud.), Queries concerning Irish people banished by Cromwell to the West Indies and the time the first watermill was established in Ulster. Note by Scnex. (Ulster Jo. of Arch. Ser. 1, Vol. III, p. 83. 1855, Vol. IV, p. 275, 1856)

Mac Eoin (Gearoid): Black Irish. Illustr. (The Capuchin Annual, pp. 80—88, 1949)

Fanning (Rev. Hugh) 0.P. The Mission (of Irish Dominicans) to St. Croix in the West Indies, 1750—69. Documents from the Archives of San Clement, Rome. (Archivium Hibernicus, Vol. XXV, pp. 75—122, 1962)

Irish Schoolmasters in the American Colonies. The Catholic Bulletin vol. 29 784-788 NLI 942 I

Gwynn A. ‘Documents relating to the Irish in the West Indies with accounts of Irish settlements, 1612-1752 Annalecta Hibernica Vol 4 140-286

Historical characters colonising Companies •

Sir Thomas Warner

The Royal African Company

The Virginia Company were in charge of that area

The Royal Company of Adventurers later known as the Royal African Company became a supplier of slaves

Church and Government records •

Some people needed licences to travel to the colonies in the 1500 and 1600’s Cf. National Archives classes E 157 and CO2171 and again in FO218 610. cf. http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline

Colonial papers (CO 1) and Board of Trade minutes 1675-1704 (CO 391) are calendared and indexed in the Her Majesty Stationary Office

Calendar or State papers, colonial, America and West Indies 1574-1738 in the National British Library London

Assisted passage Records of persons going to colonies are at the National Archives England and the Guildhall Library London

Anglican records of the colonies in the Lambeth Palace Library, Guildhall Library and the National Archives

Some births marriages and deaths in colonies are found in foreign Office in National Archives London (http://www.catalogue.nationalarchives.gov.uk)

In Class T 47/9-12 in the National Archives London hold a list of emigrants to the Americas

CO = Colonial Office FO = Foreign Office

217 218

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Many towns, churches founded by the emigrants in the Caribbean may have good historical archives including material from the first settlers, maybe names, maybe their origins, maybe the port of embarkation

There are treasury Board records in the National Archives in Britain in class T1 containing many references to emigrants

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Further developments on Chapter 15 The Caribbean The Fulham Papers comprise the archive of the bishops of London transferred from Fulham Palace, the former residence of the bishops of London. The collection includes correspondence on the administration of the diocese of London, and on the churches, particularly in America and the West Indies, which came under the bishop's jurisdiction before the founding of separate episcopates in those countries. It also includes a series of visitation returns. Anglin, Philip FP XXXVIII. 1, 63, 93 [Lambeth Palace Library, Fulham Papers] Date range: 1626 - 1822. Source: Access to Archives (A2A): not kept at The National Archives Anglin, Philip FP XXIX. 147 [Lambeth Palace Library, Fulham Papers] Date range: 1749 - 1793. Source: Access to Archives (A2A): not kept at The National Archives Anglin, Philip FP XVIII. 239 [Lambeth Palace Library, Fulham Papers] Date: 1740. Source: Access to Archives (A2A): not kept at The National Archives Another site referring to the Irish in the Caribbean is: http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/pages/history/story0058.htm

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Chapter 16 Links between the countries of the Iberian Peninsula and the Anglin Story The Aim of this Chapter is: a) Simply to begin to examine the relationship of Iberia and the Anglins (This material was originally added as a supplement to the original Research Report on O’hAngluinn - The Surname ‘Anglin’. It is now moved to the main body of this Report.)

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Introductory comments In view of the quite massive inter-country movement of individuals in the second half of the 20th Century and now into the 21st Century and a movement in which Anglins, whatever the spellings of their surname are involved, it behoves me to add something further on the much earlier historical movement of the surname Anglin to the European mainland in the 16th to 18th Centuries and to their colonies in South and North America. To grasp the Anglin Story correctly these two movements must not be confused.

Some Historic European Connections and Background The links of Gaelic Irish to the Celtic/Gaelic area of Northern Spain goes back beyond a thousand years; historically some suggest they may be of the same race. In the period of 1500 to 1800 these links which formerly had been traditional and trade related grew into something much more serious due to political, military and religious factors involving Spain, France219, Flanders, England and Ireland. The political and military relationships between Spain and England in the 16th and the 17th Centuries were fraught and Ireland was at the centre of those difficult times. In this period thousands of Irish went to Spain, some as military personnel, some as merchants, some for educational reasons, some temporarily some to become permanent residents and among these were Anglins. This migration of the 16th-18th Centuries has been discussed in the main body of the report. The article ‘Irish émigré group strategies of survival, adaptation and integration in 17th and 18th Century Spain’ by a Spanish author, Oscar Recio Morales, is available on the Internet. While only dealing with some issues it is very helpful (cf. below for Web site.) At the same time as this movement of Irish people to the Iberian Peninsula was taking place the Iberian Countries of Spain and Portugal were establishing colonies particularly in Central and the South Americas, indeed there was a period when Texas and Florida in the USA were Spanish. It is possible the O’hAngluinn / Anglin surname could have entered those colonies in those days.

Today In the Telephone directories of Barcelona in Spain220 and of Buenos Aires in Argentina, and also in information available in the USA, I argue that there is evidence of the presence of O’hAngluinn / Anglin surname. The spelling in those telephone directories is Hanglin. This is one of the spellings of the Gaeilge O’hAngluinn found in the Elizabethan Fiants of the 16th Century. (This data is presented in Chapter 2 of this Report.) From the Spanish ambience of the first names of these individuals, they must have been there for generations.

To date I have been unable to identify any Anglins who took up residency in France in the 16th and 17th Centuries. Francisco Perales Hanglin.

219 220

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Incidentally the surname is also present in Lisbon Directories, but in this case the spelling is Anglin. In the Web site of familysearch.org there is a group of Anglins associated with Portuguese Colonies of Madeira and the Azores. I refer to these as ‘Hickling Anglins’. This line traces their origin to County Cork in the late 18th Century. Their links seem to be though England rather than through the Iberian migrations.

The Surname Angli in Modern Spain This is quite a specific issue and needs extensive research. Firstly the known facts: a) There are today in Barcelona many Spanish people with the surname Angli as their first or second Surname.221 b) In Gaelic Ireland there were two surnames O’hAngluinn and h’Angli that may be relevant to the Spanish/ Portuguese Anglin story. In the main body of the study I made clear the Anglicised surname Anglin came from O’hAngluinn and also, based on the work of scholars, I rejected the possibility of the surname Anglin evolving from h’Angli. cf. Chapter 2. c) This ancient Gaelic Surname O’hAngli is present in MacFirbis Genealogies and seems to be related to County Cork. d) The current research work of scholars on the migration of Irish people to Spain in the 16th and 17th Centuries identifies an Irishman named William Angli, that is the spelling in the official Spanish documents of the time. He was a soldier present in Flanders and Spain and pensioned in 1657. Yet this person’s surname is spelt Anglin in the work of Irish Scholars today cf. the spelling given in the National Library Exhibition in Dublin in 2008. In other words these historians interpret Angli as the Spanish spelling of the Irish surname Anglin.222 Research required It is now necessary to trace the historical origin of these Angli’s of Barcelona223. This is research work for another person. Such research should be possible through official church documents of birth marriage and death, and also through examination of Spanish official documents of that period. Unlike Ireland there are Church and civil records of the people at that time224. Why is this Angli surname in Barcelona an issue?

In modern Spain the mothers and the fathers surnames are part of the child’s name. Such a view is fully tenable when one examines, historical Irish Spanish factors, including the factor of Spanish Identity by the Irish. 223 The only problem with looking Angli up is that it is also the word for Anglos or Angles in many languages. 224 While the reference historically here is to Barcelona, other Celtic areas e.g. Galatia etc. should be examined. 221 222

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It is my view these Barcelona Angli’s have originally an Irish origin and if my view is correct then these Spanish Angli’s are part of the Anglin story. The dropping of the ‘n’ being due merely to a quirk of Spanish linguistics. Besides historical research, DNA studies may be of benefit here too.

Argentina plus Old Spanish colonies Now moving to Argentina, a one-time colony of Spain, there are a number of persons with the surname Hanglin in Argentina. Judging from first names of some of these Hanglins of Spanish origin now in the USA they must have entered the English speaking new world via Spain. These too merit further examination.

Conclusions It can be expected that two forms of the surname Anglin will be present in Spain’s old colonies, one derived from the Gaelic form O’hAngluinn giving us Hanglin and the other derived from the Anglicised/ Spanish form of the surname Anglin giving us Angli. Migration of either of these spellings can have brought the surname via this Spanish journey to the USA. This is quite a different journey than that that through the Irish English story. It seems DNA profiling of these two groups would be valuable. Caveat: There are recently arrived Anglins in Modern Spain whose origin lies more recently in Ireland and are not descended from earlier migrant Irish Angli(n)’s to Spain, these new arrivals to Spain spell their surname Anglin. I wish to express thanks to my nephew Brendan Anglin for his assistance with this supplement.

Some Introductory References

Books: •

‘The Irish in Europe 1580-1815’, edited by Thomas O’Connor

‘Irish Migrants in Europe after Kinsale’, edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Anne Lyons

‘Irish Communities in Early modern Europe’, edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Anne Lyons

Internet: •

Rolando Hanglin: www.clarin.com/diario/2006/11/17/espectaculos/c-01310790.htm - 33k

An article by Oscar Recio Morales on Irish émigrés to Spain: http://www.irishinspain.org/archivos/libtoconnor_oremo.pdf

Barcelona Directories

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Further developments on Chapter 16 An examination of the Web site www.familysearch.org indicates the presence of the Anglin surname in Hanglin form in England and the US, but also in Gibraltar, Chile and Spain in the 1800’s. The same Web site shows the surname in the Angli form present in the 1700’s and 1800’s in Spain, Argentina and Mexico. Again, countries related to Spain.

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Bibliography Section 1: The Anglins of Ireland Best Source: National Library, Kildare St., Dublin

Material searched •

‘Irish names and surnames’, by Patrick Woulfe

McLysaght’s various books on Irish surnames particularly his Supplement

The ‘Annals of the Four Masters’

Griffiths Valuations of 1851

Ellis Island records for the place of origin of Anglin immigrants

English Census of 1881 for the Origin of Anglin immigrants

Waterford Augustinian Records

Military and Naval Records at Kew London

Tipperary Families Hearth and poll records

The Gospel of Matthew by Michael Mullins section on Genealogies

Hayes’ volumes listing periodicals and manuscripts

‘Acallamh na Senorach 1’ ‘Colloquay of an Old Man’ cf. Internet

‘The Atlas of Irish names and Surnames’ by Dr. W. Smith of UCC cf. Internet

‘The History of Clonakilty’ by O’Rourke (a local historian) cf. Internet

‘Lectures on Manuscript Materials of Ancient Irish History by Eugene O’Curry (Four Courts press) specifically chapter X ‘Books of Genealogy and Pedigrees’ O’Curry

‘MacFirbis Book of Genealogies’ compiled from earlier sources in 1650-1660

The Tudor Fiants particularly Elizabeth’s: Reference for National Library Dublin is 1r941p8

The Pipe Roll of Cloyne (in Latin) English translation available

The Annals of Ulster

Book of Ballymote – problem is getting a translation

The Miscellany of Celtic Society by John O’Donovan published in 1849

Histories: Of Bandon, Clonakilty, Skibbereen, Rosscarbery Diocese of Cork’s history whose centre was the town of Ross Carbery also Corca Laoighdhe taken from various sources

The History of Bandon by George Bennet

Petty’s Census of 1659

The Presentments of the Corporation of Kinsale vols 1-3

Marriage Licence Bonds of Church of Ireland

Roman Catholic Registers

Church of Ireland Registers esp. Bandon area

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Irish Flax Growers list 1796 for County Clare

Irish Wills 1700+ Diocese Cork and Ross and also Cloyne diocese

A Calendar of wills of the diocese of Waterford and Lismore 1645 to 1800

The Convert Rolls by Eileen O’Byrne and part 2 by father Clare

The Protestant Census 1766

Women In Early Modern Ireland edited by MacCurtain

Genealogical and Heraldic History of The Commoners of Great Britain And Ireland Enjoying Territorial Possessions or High Official Rank: But uninvested with Heritable Honours. History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland. O'Donovan, of the County of Cork. Lineage. V. Honora , m. Dermod Anglin, d. in 167

Annals of Innisfallen (Ms. Rawlinson B 503) Translated and Indexed ny Sean Mac Art especially pages 444-509

An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800 Mary Frances Cusack 'The Nun of Kenmare'

A Concise course of Irish History by Moody and Martin

Church and Parish records of the united dioceses of Cork, Cloyne and Ross, Cork NLI IR 274145 c1 347

William Smith O’Brien petition of 1848/9. Ruth Lawler has put (www.originsnetwork.com) a transcription on the Net containing 90,000 signatures – no Anglins

The Irish in Europe 1580-1815 ed. Thomas O’Connor

Irish migrants in Europe after Kinsale by O Connor and Lyons

Periodicals ‘Irish Genealogist 1956-1980 also 82,84,85 others still to be searched

Narrative History of Ireland by Micheal O Siochfhradha ISBN 1-903497-21-3 published by Aubane historical Society Millstreet Co. Cork

Family Names of county Cork by Diarmuid O’Murchadha Glendale Press

Leabhar Muimhneach (the Book of Munster) ed. by O’Donoghue 1904 Dublin

Material worthy of further research •

Periodicals ‘Irish Genealogist 1956-1980 also 82,84,85 others still to be searched

Macroom O’Kief vol. 8 and 1965 Vol 14 Gravestones

Cullen Barony of Kinsale JCHAS vol. 94 1989 Gravestones

Survey of Houses in Cork City, listing Tenants and possessors: ‘Quit Rent Office Papers’ NAI

1753 Householders of St. Nicholas Parish NAI MFCI 23,24,25, M6047

Census 1834 NLI ms 675 Ballymoden Parish Cof. I

1641 Depositions or Cromwell Certificates

John O Donovan’s The genealogies of Hy Fiachrach

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The manuscript Ui Maine

The Book of Leinster year 1130

The Book of Lecan year 1416

1576 the County Cork Presentments

Irish Court of Chancery documents 1600+

An Inquisition in 1578 Tudor times

Calendars of state papers of Ireland 1588-1592

The Munster Plantation: English migration to South Ireland (1583-1641) by MacCarthy Morragh (Oxford 1986)

Ireland under the Commonwealth and Protectorate (164-1656) 2 Vols. by Dunlop (Manchester 1913)

The History of Cork by Dr. Smith written in the early 1800’s

Books of Survey and distribution 1641 Proprietors and Grantees NLI Mss 966-967 no Anglins

1790-1880 Official Papers, Petitions NAI in two sections 1790-1831 and then 1832-1890 they often include long lists of names or signatures

1793 Householders in the Parish of St. Ann Shandon 1793 + JCHAS Vol 47,pp 87-111

Hearth Tax Records 1641 by Laffin – Tipperary

Duhallow heritage Project 1725-1924 NLI IR 720 n10 88 p

Navy lists 1814,19,27-79,185 et seq. 35905 NLI Top floor

A Naval Biographical Dictionary 3 Vols NLI 9235 0 1 /3b 2676-8

In pursuit of Seafaring ancestors Frank Murphy Decies 16 NLI IR 9414 4 d 5

Census 1834 NLI ms 675 Ballymoden Parish Cof. I

1700-1752 Freemen of Cork City NAI m 4693

1761 Militia List of Co. Cork NAI

The Munster Plantation: English migration to South Ireland (1583-1641) by MacCarthy Morragh (Oxford 1986)

Ireland under the Commonwealth and Protectorate (164-1656) 2 Vols by Dunlop (Manchester 1913)

The History of Cork by Dr. Smith written in the early 1800’s

Pierre Gouhier “Irish mercenaries in the service of France (1635-1664)” in French

The Irish Sword periodical 7 1965 p 58-75

“Etat et Rolle des Irelandois Catholiques habituez in Bretagne 1666” in the Acrhives du Ministere des Affaires Etrangeres, Paris Ms 1508 ff329-336

Archivium Hibernicum

Prosopography by Brockliss and Ferte

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Section 2: The Anglins of the Diaspora Material searched Material relevant to each country of the Diaspora is placed also in that chapter’s bibliography •

Kings passengers to Maryland and Virginia by Peter Wilson Cobham. recheck William Anglin to Maryland 1742

King Joseph ‘Ireland to North America; emigrants from West Cork’ NLI IR 942 k7 p.124 (no Anglins) vol. 1 of 4

‘Ireland and America, early associations 1500-1640’ by David B. Quinn. Not really about names, and no Anglins

The Complete book of Emigrants in Bondage 1614-1775 by Peter Wilson Cobham (only England) – no Anglins

The Encyclopaedia of the Irish in America by Michael Glazier Notre Dame Press – but no Anglins

Irish American Associations Early Years by David Beers Quinn

In Search of Anglins by Evelyn Williams unpublished research

Anglins of Colonial America by Walter Anglin unpublished research

Anglin DNA project material

Early history and trade of the USA states of Carolina, Virginia, North Carolina to 1780

Trade history of Bristol England to the USA

Articles by Gwynn (Rev. Aubrey) S.J.: •

Early Irish emigration to the West Indies (1612—1643). (Studies. Vol. XVIII, Sept., Dec., 1929)

A history of the Catholic Church in Jamaica by Francis X. Delaney, B.J., reviewed by. (Studies, Vol. XIX, pp. 512—14, Sept., 1930)

Cromwell’s policy of transportation. (Studies. Vol. XIX, Dec., 1930, Vol. XX, June, 1931)

Whence the “Black Irish” of Jamaica? By Joseph J. Williams, S.J. reviewed by. (Studies, Vol. XXI, p.694, Dec., 1932)

• •

Indentured Servants and negro slaves in Barbados (1641-1650)

Wills – Scarlett and Anglin families of Jamaica

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Cf. English National archives (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline). Wills of: •

Sir William Anglin Scarlett chief Justice of Jamaica

31/7/1832

William Anglin of Westmoreland Cornwall Jamaica

10/6/1843

Philip Anglin Morris of St. James Cornwall Jamaica

16/9/1843

Philip Anglin Scarlett of St. James Jamaica

20/4/1825

Family Trees of Protestant and Catholic lines of Canada

Transportation of Convicts from Ireland to Australasia

Shipping on the Web: for Ships ‘Anglin’ and Captain Anglin in New Zealand Whaling

Strangers and Citizens an exhibition on Irish Migration to Europe at the National Library Dublin

The Irish in Europe 1580-1815 ed. Thomas O’Connor

Irish Migrants in Europe after Kinsale edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Ann Lyons

Irish communities in Early Modern Europe edited by Thomas O’Connor and Mary Ann Lyons

Material worthy of research •

Filby, P. William & Meyer, Mary K. ‘Passenger and immigration lists bibliography 15381900 NLI RR 387 p

‘Ulster Emigration to colonial America 1718—75’ By Dickson NLI IR 9411 d 22

The Westward Enterprise by Liverpool university Press

‘Original Lists of Persons of Quality emigrating to America 1600- 1700’ by J. C. Hotten NLI

‘Irish Schoolmasters in the American colonies 1640-1775’ by John C. Lenihan NLI IR 942 r 9, p.31

‘Irish Settlers in America by M. J. O’Brien NLI IR 942 0 23

McGinn Brian ‘Virginia’s Lost Irish Colonists’ IR no.4 (1994) 21-24 NLI

Ireland to America ..West Cork by John c. Lenihan NLI IR 942, k7 124 p

The Irish in Europe 1580-1815 edited by Thomas O’Connor

Hibernicum published annually at Maynooth

Etat et rolle des catlolique Irelandes 1660

Pierre Gouhier “Irish mercenaries in the service of France (1635-1664)” in French

The Irish Sword periodical 7 1965 p 58-75

“Etat et Rolle des Irelandois Catholiques habituez in Bretagne 1666” in the Acrhives du Ministere des Affaires Etrangeres, Paris Ms 1508 ff329-336

Periodicals Irish Genealogist 1974-1979 and 1980-1985

Prosopography by Brockliss and Ferte

The Irish Diaspora edited by Bid???

Akenson, ‘If the Irish ran the world’

O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

Page 138 of 191


Assisted passage Records of people going to the colonies are at the National Archives and Guild Hall London

Child Apprentices to Virginia From Christ’s hospital London 1617- 1778 gpc 1990

In class T e7/9-12 in the national Archives London are a list of emigrants to America

The Journal of the American Irish historical society articles:

Irish pioneers in Maryland 14(1915) 207-19 by MJ O Brien NLI 1r973 a 1

Irish Builders in North Carolina 10 (1911) NLI ir973 a1

Grantees of Land in Virginia 13 NLI IR 973 a1

Irish settlers on the Opequan 6 (1906) 71-4 NLI IR 973 a1

Some settlers in Virginia 2 (1899) 161-66 NLI IR 973 a I by J. Lawless

John Lenihan early Irish settlement in Virginia 4 (1904) 30-42 NLI IR 973 a1

The Irish in Charlestown South Carolina (1926 NLI GR 2240 vol. xxv)

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APPENDIX 1 Research data showing location of Anglins in Ireland (updated 2010) In this appendix when dealing with County Cork I have sought to link individuals to the nearest town. For other counties, having noted the place, further division would add nothing to the understanding due to the smallness of numbers.

In this year 2008 •

Few Anglins now live in Ireland; most live abroad. Anglins are present in: •

Belfast – these are ‘Glanmire Anglins’

Kilkenny – ‘Glanmire Anglins’

County Kildare – ancestors came from South Co. Tipperary225

Cork City – only one identified and from County Tipperary226

Fethard – this is County Tipperary

Limerick – the City

Wexford town – these are Anglims

In the past These tables show the division: Cork Baltimore Bandon Boherbue Britway Castlelyons Clonakilty Cork city Crookstown Dunmanway Glandore Glanmire Kilworth Kinsale Leap Macroom Mallow Middleton Skibbereen

Tipperary Ardfinan Cahir Clogheen Cloneen Clonmel Fethard Rosegreen

Limerick Abbeyfeale Limerick Newcastle

Wexford Wexford

Waterford Dungarvan Lismore

A group who live around County Kildare. Their origin is South Tipperary An Anglin in Cork City told me he was born in South Tipperary

225 226

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Kerry Glin Tarbert

Clare Feakle Killalo Kilrush Scariff

Kilkenny Ballyragget Freshford Kilkenny Ossory Tullaroan

Belfast Bangor Belfast Drumbeg Lisburn

Misc. Donegal Dublin Leix Mayo

The County of Cork227 Cork City The absence of Anglins in the records for the 17th century is quite noticeable; while few are mentioned in Cork City in 1826 and 1851 in the Griffith’s and Pigot surveys of people of property, the Church and civil data shows a different story. They were there from certainly the last quarter of the 18th century. This apparent increase is explainable as Cork City industry and government controlled by the New English needed labour for trading and manufacturing. The population would also increase due to famine in rural areas. So I feel (just an opinion) a varied numeric presence of Anglins in the city is normal if the Anglin ‘homeland’ as a rural Gaelic people lay in the County of Cork. Year 1762 1764 1771 1777 1796 1796 1799 1803 1805 1808 1808 1809 1814 1816 1818 1826 1835 1840 1845 1851 1851 1851 1851 1851 1851 1855 1855 1864 1864 1864 1864 1864 1864 1864 1865 1865

Surname Anglinn Anglin Anglim Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglam Anglan Angling Anglim Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglon Anglin Anglin

Forename Ellen James Denis Daniel Patrick Daniel Ellen White Ellen Patrick Francis Jeremiah Benjamin Francis Daniel Samuel Denis Elizabeth John John Samuel Michael John Timothy John Catherine Ann John William Catherine Johanna Anne Denis John Ann John

Age Daniel Sweeney Sps Mary Stockdale Honora Sullivan Mary Ahern Parent Dan? Ellen Twomey Catherine Holland Joanna Callaghan Mary Mc Carthy Mary Gess Mary Sullivan Mary Hayes Catherine Dempsy Julia Mahony James Forest Hannah Murphy Meat Market Lane St. Marys Shandon Kyrl’s Ct. Shandon St. Lynches’s Ct. Shandon St Thomas Green

21 76

60 44 19

Source Of Information North Parish RC Cork City North Parish RC 134924 North Parish RC140048 Cockpit lane Cork 4788/9 North Parish RC 201242 North Parish RC 16/67/26 North Parish RC North Parish RC 227741 North Parish RC 225950 North Parish RC231197 North Parish RC 61143 North Parish RC 613761 North Parish RC 616341 Pigotts dir North Parish RC 636480 North Parish RC North Parish RC 649326 Griffiths Valuation Griffiths Valuation Griffiths Valuation Griffiths Valuation Griffiths Valuation Griffiths Valuation Civil registers 22/1/1855 North Parish RC 3/193/5 Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers 11/10/1864 Civil registers 23/1/1864 Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers

Event Place Md. 23/1/1762 Mld & land deed Md. 26/5/1771 Md. 26/5/1771 b. o/8/1796 sp. Delaney Md. 9/4/1818 Md. 25/8/1799 Md. 23/9/1803 b. Md. 25/4/1808 Md. 5/4/1808 Md. 7/11/1809 Md. 2/11/1777 Md. 9/1/1816 Md. 12/6/1814 88 Gt. Britain St. wool Md. 27/6/1835 Md. 20/?/1840 Md. 4/9/1845 Holy Trinity

Md. to Md. 24/7/1855 Md. ref. 15/142 Md. ref 15/83 d. 20/80 d.5/118 b. Md. ref 5/204 d. 5/213 d. 10/90 d.20/67

In the following the source of information is given. I stop at c. 1890. More recent data can be found in the sources mentioned

227

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Year 1866 1866 1867 1867 1868 1868 1868 1869 1869 1873 1874 1875 1875 1875 1875 1875 1875 1876 1876 1877 1877 1877 1878 1878 1879 1880 1880 1881 1882 1886 1888 1889 1889 1889 1891 1892 1893 1914

Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin G Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename Henry William john Catherine Samuel John Denis John Margaret Margaret Ann Margaret James f. John & Son John Samuel & son Samuel Ellen John John William William Samuel Michael Florence Ethel Elizabeth Hannah Mary Mary widow Julia Dora John Jeremiah Annie Eliza Ruby Robert George Mrs

Age

21 34 48 70

56 27 Sundays Wel Rd 55Shandon St. 36 Western Rd. 21 Winthrop St. Gd. Parade Mkt 56 36 29 34 18 60 71

65 had md. James 62 79 34 35 32 68 74 35 Research entry

Source Of Information Civil registers 19/6/1866 Civil registers 24/9/1866 Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers 30/11/ 1864 Civil registers Civil registers Cork city resident Cork city resident Wool Cork city resident clerk Cork city resident Cork city Resident Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers 3/10/1876 Civil registers 5/114 Civil registers 15/81 Civil registers 10/131 Civil registers 5/95 Civil registers 31/5/1878 Civil registers 5/99 Civil registers 29/3/1880 Civil registers 26/5/1880 Civil reg. daughter Ellen Civil registers 5/78 Civil registers Civil registers 5/115 Civil registers 5/152 Civil registers Civil registers 5/154 Civil registers Civil registers 5/84 Civil registers 5/65 Guys postal directory

Event Place b. b. Md. ref 10/90 d. 15/79 d. 10/97 d. 2/483 d. 20/96 Md. ref.15/92 Md. ref 20/61 Md. ref 5/`119 d.10/1128

Italian Warehouse Templeacre House d. 5/125 d. 5/131 b. d. d. d. d. b. d. b. b. d. 174 Barrackton? 5/66 d. d. d. d. d. d. d. d. d.

County areas of Cork Some necessary administrative Jargon on Civil areas while searching: reference is Lewis

Clonakilty: County Cork wr; Barony East Carbery (ed.) Parish Kilgariff Poor Law Union 1857 Townlands 1851 Vol. 2 Page 129

Dunmanway: County Cork Barony East Carbery(wd) Parish Skull Poor Law Union 1857 Townlands 1851 Vol2 p 131,132

Kanturk: County Cork Barony Duhallow; Parishes Kilbrin and Clonfert

Boherbue: County Cork Barony Duhallow Parish Kilmeen

Newmarket: County Cork Barony Duhallow Parish Clonfert

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Bandon: Parishes Kilbrogan, Ballymodan, Barony Kilanmeaky and East Carbery

Carrignavar County Cork er: Barony of Ballymore; Parish Dunbulloge; Poor law union Cork 1857: townland census 1851 Carrignavar in part 1 Vol. 2 page 54

Glanmire County Cork er: Barony Cork; Parish Rathcooney . Poor law union 1857; Townland Census 1851 Vol. 2 p. 65

Kilworth County Cork: Barony Clongibbons, Cork also Condon

The towns in West and South West County Cork Baltimore Year 1883

Surname Anglin

Forename James

Age

Source Of Information Eleanor Bateman, Kinsale

1914

Anglin

James

Guys Directory

Event Place Md. to Ellen Hutchinson ships chandler Shopkeeper research entry

Bandon

Historical material. This town only came into existence in very early 1600’s through Lord Boyle using English planters from Somerset England. There is no evidence any were Anglins. Settlers need assistance from ‘locals’ to build the new town. The town history is helpful cf. the ‘Presentments of the Corporation of Kinsale’ by way of parallel. Year 1755 1866 1866 1867 1871 1876 1879 1879 1887 1891 1892

Surname Hanglen Anglin Hangan Hanglan Anglinn Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename William Robert Edward Thomas Honora Timothy Mary Ellen Ellen Elizabeth James

Age 70 81 61 76 64 62 80

Source Of Information Irish wills Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers 5/2 Civil registers 5/17 Civil registers 5/11 Civil registers 5/11 Civil registers Civil registers 5/18??

Event Place Ardclugg Md. ref 15/7 d. 15/11 d. 10/14 Md. ref5/15 d. d. d. d. d. d.

Forename Dermot

Age

Source Of Information Burke’s pedigrees

Event Place Md. to Honora O’Donovan of Drishane

Forename John Francis Whyte Rachel Francis Jeremiah

Age Sp Winespear

Source Of Information Lismore papers tenant Lismore papers lease Family Tree TW Anglin Land deeds MLD Irish Wills Irish wills

Event Place Clonakilty Clonakilty Clonakilty Clonakilty Clonakilty

Bantry Year 1650 c.

Surname Anglin

Clonakilty Year 1695 1704 1737 1742 1742

Surname Hanglin Hanglin Anglin Hanglin Hanglin Hanglin

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Year 1743

Surname Hanglin

Forename Will

Age

Source Of Information Lismore Papers rent

Event Place Clonakilty

1743

Hanglin

Robert

Lismore papers rent

Clonakilty

1754

Hanglin

John

Irish wills

Clonakilty

1771

Hanglin

William

Irish wills

Clonakilty

1793 1799

Anglin Hanglin

Francis Jeremiah

b. 1736

d. d.

1822

Hanglin

.

1846

Anglin

Timothy Warren Robert

Kilgariffe grave md. Obrien Family Tree md. Ann Dammer Church Register Slaters 1846

1846

Anglin

Timothy

Slaters 1846

1851 1851

Anglan Anglin

Robert John

Griffiths Valuations 4 times Griffiths Valuations

Tawnies up & l.

1851

Hanglin

Ellen

Griffiths Valuations

1852 c. 1854 1864 1867 1869 1873 1875 1876 1876 1877 1881

Anglin Anglin Hanglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

James Francis Hanna Robert Eliza John William Ann Francis Mary Jane Brothers

Source Eleanor Bateman Family Tree 7/11/1854 Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers 15/48 Guy’s dir. Cork 1875/6 Civil registers 10/50 Civil reg. Md. Anne Warren Civil registers 15/42 Slaters 1881

Md. to Ellen H. d. d. 5/53 d. 5/64 d.5/58 d. d. d. 10/51 d.

1881 1882 1883 1888 1892

Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

William John Eliza William Research entry

Slaters 1881 Civil registers 5/47 Civil registers 5/53 Civil registers 5/48 Hurleys family papers

d. d. d.

Sovereign St. Carpente Sovereign St. School New Chapel St. Boyle St, (Scartagh) Patrick St, (Tawnies) 62 76 34 16 New Chapel St. 43 76 43 New Chapel St. Carpen Chapel St Builder 84 76 75 Farmer (Protestant?)

b. Clonakilty

Kinsale

It is a port town. ‘Presentments of the Corporation of Kinsale’ are an aid to historical background. Year 1676

Surname Hanglane

1832

Anglin

1877 1914 1914

Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename David 2/10/1676 Mary sp. Chris. Browne Catherine Thomas T.J.

Age

Source Of Information Kinsale Grand Jury Pres.

Event Place No.30

O’Kief

Baptism 13/10/1832

75

Civil registers 20/271 Guys Postal Dir. Guys Postal Dir

d.

Forename James

Age

Source Of Information Petty’s Census Titulandoe

Event Place Lisnnacurry

Source Of Information Church of Ireland Bond Eliza Mills Griffith’s Valuations Civil registers Civil registers

Event Place Md place doubtful ?

Parish Desert Surges Parish Year 1659

Surname Hauglin

Dunmanway Year 1681

Surname Anglin

Forename Francis

Age

1851 1867 1872

Anglin Anglin Anglin

John John Jerry

29

Fanlobus d. 10/203 Md ref 5/266

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Macroom – should this be North West Cork? Year 1829 1871 1878 1887 1893

Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename Michael Edmond Francis Ellen Margaret

Age 1 77 68 45

Source Of Information C of I records Mary Rupell Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers 5/323 Civil registers 5/290

Event Place Md d. 5/399 d. d. d.

Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename John Mary Maria

Age 54 20

Source Of Information Civil registers 10/113 Civil registers Ellis Island

Event Place md. d. 6/613 To New York

Surname Anglin Anglin

Forename Ellen Nellie

Age 21 31

Source Of Information Ellis Island Ellis Island

Event Place To NY To NY

Forename Nevan m’Dermodie Dermodie m’Teig

Source Of Information Fiants 6469 Fiants 6486 6469?

Event & Place Girrqanfiene Pallice

Source Of Information Parish Reg. Killeigh dioc. Kildare Bap. Parish Reg. Killeigh dioc. Kildare bp.

Event Place md. Cullen sp. Dan Buckley 4/3/64 Md 17/2/1864 sp Joana Riordan

Skibbereen Year 1846 1873 1908

Leap Year 1873 1923

The towns of North / North West County Cork Area on Cork Kerry border Year 1600 1600

Surname O’hanglen O’hanglen

Boherbue Year 1864

Surname Anglon

Forename Nano

Age

1864

Anglon

Jeremiah

Surname Anglin

Forename James

Age

Source Of Information C. of I. records 5/5/1743

Event Place md to Mary Lindsay

Surname Anglam Anglam Anglin Anglond Anglin

Forename Timothy Jason Ann Timothy Thomas

Age 44 3 27

Source Of Information Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers

Event Place d. 10/129 d. d.

Surname Anglin Anglin

Forename Catherine James

Age 60 50

Source Of Information Civil registers 10/455 Civil registers 5/461

Event Place d. d.

Age

Source Of Information Civil registers 4/417

Event Place Md to

Doneraile Year 1743

Kanturk Year 1851 1851 1864 1864 1865

Mallow Year 1872 1876

The towns of East County Cork Carrigaline Year 1846

Surname Anglin

Forename Robert

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Castlelyons Year 1851

Surname Anglim

Forename Jane

Age

Source Of Information Griffiths

Event Place

Surname Anglin

Forename Francis

Age

Source Of Information Church of Ireland Rec. Eleanor Bateman, Kinsale

Event Place Md to Margaret Amelia Hallam

Surname Anglin

Forename Ally

Age

Source Of Information

Event Place B

Surname Anglin

Forename Mary

Age

Source Of Information Graveyard entry

Event Place d.

Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename Catherine Bart Ellen John

Age 60

Source Of Information Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers

Event Place Md ref4/1081 Md 9/371 Md ref4/948 d. 9/536

Surname Anglin

Forename William Francis

Age 34

Source Of Information Civil registers

Event Place d.

Castlemartyr Year 1852

Kilworth Year 1866/8 /4

Killeagh Year 1885

Middleton Year 1867 1868 1868 1867

Youghel Year 1880

Glanmire area Glanmire and Carrignavar

I have not entered many names here but I am aware in R.C. records numbers are relatively large second to North Parish Cork. Year 1830 1851

Surname Anglin Anglin

Forename Daniel John

Age

Source Of Information Catholic Registers Catholic Registers

Event Place Md to Md to

Other areas of Ireland Belfast City / County Down Northern Ireland

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Besides this data there is further data in Ellis Island records to be considered. Year 1851 1868 1869 1902

Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

1906 1907 G 1913

Anglin Anglin Anglin

1915

Anglin

1921 1926 1932 1937 1939 G 1942 1942 G 1958 G 1990

Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename Francis Jane Isabella Francis Francis Henry Frank Andrew Francis Henry Elizabeth + children A A Pat Pat Jessie Pat A. J Donal Matthew Kennedy

Age 65

Source Of Information Griffiths valuations Death Death Registers

Event Place Drumbeg Lisburn Co. Antrim Drumbeg md wife Elizabeth

Street directories Street directories Ellis Island

Carmel St. Alexander Pk. Ave.

35

Ellis Island

90 Agincourt Ave

Street directories Street directories Street directories Street directories Street directories Street directories Street directories Street directories Research entry

Grove Cott. York Rd Stratheden St. Rosapenna St. Lothair Ave 6 Malone Ave 228 Limestone Rd 65 Cavehill Rd Dunmore Cres.

I have indicated by a ‘G’ the Glanmire Anglins, whose family origin is Cork

This data is reducible to three family groups

County Tipperary Year 1763 1779 1811 1859 1864 1869 1870 1897 1914 1916

Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Auglin Anglin Anglem Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename Mary John Mary John ?? Margaret Alice Ellen Ellen John

Age 60 60 30 53

Source Of Information Mormon records Irish Wills Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers 4/452 Civil registers 19/372 Ellis Island Ellis Island Civil registers

Event Place b. Cahir Ballylatin Brownbog b Clonmel b Fethard b Clogheen d Clogheeen d Clogheen Clogheen Cahir d

Other entries for 1851 for South Tipperary are in Appendix 8 E Griffiths Valuations

Family groupings among these names have yet to be researched

County Clare: Note Kilrush is a small port just opposite Tarbert in Kerry Year 1753 1796 1796 1801 1806 1827 1827

Surname Hanglam Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

1842 1851 1851 1851

Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglim

Forename Timothy John Timothy Timothy Mary Mary Timothy Joseph Ann John Jeremiah Anne

Age

Source Of Information Diocese of Killaloe Flax growers list Flax growers list Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Diocese Kuillaloe

Event Place Md to Selia Kileen Killaloe b Killaaloe b Md to Md to mother Mary

Civil registers Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations

Kilkishen b Kilmurry Kilrush Kilrush Kilmurry Kilrush

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Year 1851 1851 1851 1851 1851 1851 1851 1851 1851 1851 1864 1864 1864 1865 1865 1865 1866 1866 1866

Surname Anglim Anglim Anglam Anglim Anglim Anglim Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename John Jeremiah Michael John Patrick John Jeremiah John, Jnr John, Sen Thomas Suzanne John Winifred Johanna Tim Mary Ann Martin Bridget

Age

Source Of Information Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers

1867 1867 1867 1868 1870 1872 1873 1877 1879

Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Ann Michael Anne Mary Thomas Catherine Catherine Catherine Francis

Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers

Event Place Keelderry Tulla Kilmurry Kilrush Killofin Kilmurry Kilrush Kilmurry Kilrush Mountrivers Kilmihil Kilrush Kilmihil Kilrush Kilmihil Kilrush Kilmihil Kilrush b. Tulla Md to Craggaknock b Feakle b Kilmihil b b. b. Bridgetwon Obriensbridge b b. b. b. b. b. b. b. b. Bauroe b

Family groupings among these names have yet to be researched

County Kerry The Kerry Anglins were all in Tarmons Hill Tarbert Co. Kerry. The Glanmire Anglins were in Tarbert, Donegal, Mayo, and Belfast at various times. So the presence of the name here may not have been permanent. Year 1843 1851 1851 1879 1881 1883 1885 1886

Surname Anglin Anglim Anglim Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

1887 1889 1891 1893 1895 G 1895 1852

Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglon

Forename Julia Michael Edmond Margaret Hannah Edward b Timothy Timothy Joseph Michael Daniel Katherine Nell Catherine Mary Law

Age

Source Of Information Civil registers Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers

Event Place b. Kilnaughtin Kilnaughtin b. b. b. b. B

Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers Civil registers R.C. register Killarney

b. b. b. b. B b. b.

Family groupings among these names have yet to be researched

O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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County Limerick Year 1838 1847 1851

Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename James Samuel Michael

Age Anglesboro

1851 1851 1851 1865 1880

Anglim Anglin Anglim Anglin Anglin

Jeremiah John James Hanora William

Source Of Information Civil registers Civil registers Griffiths Values (5 Michaels) Griffiths Values Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Values Civil registers 9/5/1865 Civil registers 27/6/1880

Event Place b. b. Barony. Mitchelstown Ballykeny Newcastle Newcastle west Monagay Newcastle b. Abbeyfeale b.

Family groupings among these names have yet to be researched

County Waterford Year 1730

Surname Anglin

Forename John

Age

1791

Anglin

Patrick

Source Of Information Carrigan Manuscripts & Wills Augustinian Order

1851

Anglin

Thomas

Griffiths Valuations

1851 1851

Anglam Anglum

Catherine John

Griffiths Valuations Griffiths

1851

Anglum

James

Griffiths

1851

Anglum

James

Griffiths

1851 1851 1851

Anglum Anglum Anglum

James Patrick Thomas

Griffiths Griffiths Griffiths

1879

Anglin

Alice

80

Civil registers 4/617

Event Place Knockatimore 8/4/12930 Prior 1791-1802 Dungarvan Glentaunatinagh Lismore Butter Lane Dungarvan Coolbeggan west nr Youghel Knocknahoola Dungarvan Reanviddoge Dungarvan Reamanagh East Knockafrehane Reanaviddoge Dungarvan d.

Family groupings among these names have yet to be researched

County Wexford Year 1792

Surname Anglin

Forename William

Age

1837 1846 1851 1851 1851 1851 1865

Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglim Anglim Anglim Anglin

William Sarah Mary James Robert Jane John

16

1865 1875 1881 1886

Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Catherine Robert James Mary

77 75 75

Source Of Information Ferns marriages licences .a book To Lancs Civil registers 10/693 Grifffiths Valuations Grifffiths Valuations Grifffiths Valuations Grifffiths Valuations Cork Examiner ship 6/4/1865 Civil registers Civil registers 9/707 Civil registers 4/451 Civil registers

Event Place md. sp Alison Mary b. Md to St. Iberius Parish St. Iberius Parish St. Selskars Parish Maudlintown Parish d. Md 15/7 d. d. d.

Family groupings among these names have yet to be researched

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County Kilkenny Year 1766 1853 1864 1866 1868 1872 1877

Surname Anglin Anglin Auglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename William James Harrietta Teresa Jane Oliver James James Bridget

Age 51 46

Source Of Information Osssory Dioc. Freshford Tullaroan Ballyragget Kilkenny Civil Registers Civil registers 8/435

Event Place b. b. b. b. b. d. d.

Source Of Information Discharged w.o.97/568 served 41st Foot Military records UK Mayo Research entry Carlow Quakers Reg. 29/9/1894 Quakers Reg. 21/12/1897 as above

Event Place Born Rosemailles Leix

Dublin City and other oddments Year 18251839

Surname Anglin

Forename John

Age 31

1844 1862 1879 1894 1897

Anglin Anglin Angle Anglin Anglin

Thomas Arthur H. Patrick Samuel Arthur H

80

d. b. d. Md to Md to

Other data covering 1573 to 1890 for Cork is known, but as the town is not yet identified it is placed in Appendix 8F

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Further developments on Appendix 1 Any further information names gained will be placed in the appropriate group.

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APPENDIX 2 Searching Ireland for Anglin ancestors The Anglin name has various spellings ! But beware is it Anglin?

Records accessible within Ireland Guidance An aspect of unearthing past Anglins was the difficulty in finding sources, particularly for earlier years. Due to the relative anonymity of Anglins, the rarity of the name, Ireland’s troubled history, the destruction of records and the unwillingness of churchmen to keep records within Ireland228, relevant sources once found need to be treasured. So having unearthed some sources within Ireland I include their names and where they may be consulted. Pre 1700 there are few substitute registers so archival, family or historical documents are sought and explored for Anglins. A further issue was identifying appropriate guide and reference books. I found it necessary to purchase two guidebooks:229 •

‘Tracing your Cork Ancestors’ written by Tony Mc Carthy and Tim Cadogan

‘Tracing your Irish Ancestors’ by John Greenham

But I also found it necessary to consult the following three on various occasions: •

‘Typographical Dictionary of Ireland’, by Samuel Lewis. A technical book giving information on towns and parishes in Ireland including often a brief history etc.

Census of Ireland prepared in 1861 from 1851 data. This is an alphabetical index to the townlands, Towns, Parishes and Baronies of Ireland

‘Irish Records-sources for family and local history’, by J. G. Ryan. A guide to finding and using old records and documents

An introduction to records Societies, particularly modern societies, recognise the major landmarks in the life of its people, namely Birth/Baptism; Marriage and Death. They have a system to register these events. Such registers give a brief resume of an individual’s life, and of their families. The best of such registers speak of: It is recorded in the Bishop of Elphin’s report to Rome in 1770 that there was still danger of renewed outbreaks of persecution and pastors were afraid to keep parish registers. This information is taken from an illustrated history of Diocese of Elphin prepared by Francis Beirne 229 They give you the details within the records that exist namely, the dates they cover, where they are to be found, parish names etc. State records of all births, marriages and deaths only started in 1864 and for non Catholic marriages 1845 228

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Birth/Baptism Its place, who the parents are, the date

Marriage The names of the couple, place and witnesses of the event and parents230

Death/Burial the why, where, date and ‘person reporting’

Modern society has Censuses, which can fill gaps between major events Birth/Baptism, Marriage and Death in a person’s life. The recording of census date, dwelling place, occupation and children’s names, makes possible the retracing of a person’s life journey. Ships Manifests exist of the movement of goods and people between countries. These Passenger/Manifest lists are a valuable source for genealogy recording names, dates and ports of embarkation and destination. These records, Registers, Census and Passenger Lists are the cornerstone of genealogy and pedigree research231. Due to Ireland’s troubled history, the very basis of genealogical study is damaged due to the absence, corruption or destruction of these records from earlier centuries232. So in the absence of these basic tools, ‘Registration Substitutes’; ‘Census Substitutes’ Substitutes for Passenger lists must also be sought out and prized.

What genealogical and substitute records exist ?233 Registers •

Civil Records

Church of Ireland Records234 Earliest record 1643 earliest Anglin 1681

Roman Catholic Records235 Earliest record 1742, earliest Anglin 1762 North parish Cork City

Other Denominational Records

Substitutes for registers •

Graveyard lists

Newspapers Death Entries

Clandestine Marriages London

It was not until the very late 1800’s that it became standard to include the names of the parents of the spouses Since marriages usually took place in the parish of the girl; so old church records do not indicate the origin of the man, so while building a family tree it is customary to follow the male line, it is the female family members pre marriage that is the indicator of residence 232 In the centuries pre the fall of the clan system such records were not used for the rank and file 233 Be prepared for real problems when dealing with Church records, of whatever denomination, pre 1864. Take guidance from one of the guide books or from a major library 234 The Church of Ireland was the established church and only marriages performed under their approval were legally valid in civil law. Most Catholics ignored this but other protestant denominations registered their marriages with the Church of Ireland. This regulation basically ceased in 1870 235 Until late 1800’s rarely were parents names of bride and groom entered in records…sadly 230 231

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Irish Census •

1901 and 1911 Census

Cork Census 1659 Pender/Petty (includes Poll Money Ordinances 1660-1661)

Substitutes for Irish Census •

Occupation lists e.g. Irish Flax Growers list for 1796

Military and Naval Records from Kew London

Griffiths Valuation c.1852 for Munster

Estate Records e.g. The Pipe Rolls of Cloyne

Land Deeds

The Fiants 236 of Elizabeth I. (Reference for National Library Dublin is 1r941p8)

Directories: •

Pettigrew and Oulton Directory of Dublin 1830

Slater’s Directory of Ireland 1846 and 1856

Pigot’s directory of Cork 1824

Telephone Directories

Passenger lists •

J. F. Kennedy Trust;

Ellis Island

Substitutes passenger lists •

1635?? Anglin Ruth

To Virginia cf. O’Brien evidence from USA

Shipping records •

The following is taken from an Internet reference: http://www.islandregister.com/ship_data1a.html

On the 29th of June 1809 the ship named ‘Anglin’237 P.E.I. sailed for Liverpool, G. Britain

Information is on Customs records ‘From PAPEI RG9, Collector of Customs Outward:’ 29 June, 1809 - "Anglin" of 214 tons, Capt. Jno. Bell, for Liverpool [GC]

On the 1st of September 1812 the ship named ‘Anglin’ P.E.I. sailed for Belfast, Ireland

Information is on Customs records ‘From PAPEI RG9, Collector of Customs Outward:’01 Sep., 1812 - "Anglin" of 214 tons, Capt. Thos. Johnston, for Belfast, Ireland [CG]

Woulfe states the double names of a person, or the double structure of some of the names that are in the fiants occurred quite regularly in those days 237 Why was this ship called ‘Anglin’?? 236

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A Book: ‘The Old Whaling Days: A History of Southern New Zealand from 1830 to 1840’ •

This speaks of Capt Anglin cf. http://www.nzetc.org/tm/scholarly/teiMcNOldW-t1-body-d1-d6.html

Miscellaneous sources •

Manuscript and historical books: •

The Annals of the Four Masters

The ‘Acallamh na Senorach 1’

The History of Clonakilty

The Convert Rolls

Hayes

Estate records: •

Maps: •

Pipe Rolls of Cloyne

e.g. Anglin Drive in St John, NB Canada

Wills: •

Indexes to Irish Wills e.g. 1723 Anglin Mark

English National archives

(http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline)

Convert Rolls wills by Eileen O’Byrne

Cork and Ross Wills

The Welply Will abstracts in RCI Library for Munster from 1682

Heraldic material: •

Anglin crest of Clifford Anglim

American evidence: •

DNA Research Groupings on Anglins

Mormon Records

Caribbean evidence: •

Jamaica Anglins

The Scarlett of Jamaica

Dominican Island Records

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Location of the genealogical and substitute records? Church of Ireland records The best source for Church of Ireland records is RCIB Library, Dublin. The National Archives Dublin and the National Library Dublin have complete lists of these records and the dates they cover, but only some of the actual records. Catholic records These are in Parishes and in microfilm in National Library Dublin. But there are no indexes. North Parish Cork City records are in Cork County Library in book form. Civil registers The General Register, was Joyce House, Dublin for research; now changed to Irish Life building. Marriage licence bonds Of the Church of Ireland: in National Archives Dublin Irish wills National Archives, Dublin The National Library, Dublin •

Irish Surnames List in Griffiths and in the Applotment rolls. Many Anglins and variations on name

Hayes: Two sets of reference books

Pipe Rolls of Cloyne (reference IR 94145 c1) I used the 1918 ed. & page 63 gave Simon Anglyn

Pigots Directory of Cork

Pettigrews and Oulton’s Directory of Dublin gave one Anglin

Petty’s Census of 1659 edited by Plender: This is a partial document. …James Hauglin

Transport records of prisoners to Australia show an Anglin convict Thomas

Slaters Directories of Cork 1846 and 1856 . various Anglins

Special Report on Surnames in Ireland by Robert E, Matheson Anglin data available elsewhere

The Fiants of Henry 8 through to Elizabeth 1 gives very valuable information IR 941 p.8 on Anglins

The Book of Ballymote in Irish also NLI ref. 1lb 89162 – I need an English translation

Supplement to Irish Families by Edward MacLysaght (Anglin name discussed)

The Annals of the Four Masters: Angluinne who died in 1490

O’Kief NLI IR 94145 c12 Lots of Anglins Slieve Luchra NW Cork and east Kerry 1850 and later

The Annals of Ulster: Samuel Angli

The Great Book Of Genealogies by Mac Firbis gives Anglonn also O’hAngle etc

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The Protestant Census 1766 of Cloyne Diocese only partial – no Anglins

The Convert Rolls a book edited by Eileen Byrne – Margaret Anglin

The complete Book of Emigrants in Bondage 1614-1775 by Peter Wilson Cobham no Anglins

Irish American Associations early years by David Beers Quinn

Irish Names and Surnames by Woulfe – Anglin surname

Irish names and Surnames . The Supplement by MacLysacght re Anglin surname

Kings passenger to Maryland/Virginia by Peter W. Cobham – there is one Anglin

The Encyclopaedia of the Irish in America. by Michael Glazier – no Anglins

The Calendar of Kinsale Documents: Grand Jury Presentments p. 1988 Ed. Michael Mulcahy Vols. 1 1658-1699, Vol. 2 1700-1719. Vol. 3 1720-1730: David Hanglane

Miscellany of Celtic Society by O’Donovan – no Anglins

National Archives, Dublin •

Marriage licence bonds various Anglins238

Wills Some Anglins

Some Church of Ireland records Anglins

Etc.

The General Register •

For research (was Joyce House Dublin) now Irish Life building Dublin

Lots of Anglins here: dates 1864 ff.

Civil registers for research ph 01 671 1000 (hrs 9.30-12.30 am from indexes)

Church of Ireland marriages 1845-1864

All marriages deaths and Births after 1864

Cork County Library Model Farm Road Cork •

This contains a lot of local Cork material (in the Local studies section).

Bennet’s History of Bandon

Marriages of the North Cork Catholic Parish in book form – Anglins present

Etc.

The Cork Ancestral Project •

This is a major work but is not as yet available to the public – Anglins present

Boole Library University College Cork •

This is of major value. It has a very large quantity of material for historical research. (cf. Internet for detail.) But you have to spend time in Cork!!

It is important here to be aware that the Church of Ireland was the established Church of Government at this time. All marriages were to be registered with the C. of I. Almost all Catholics just ignored this regulation, but a few did have the marriage bonds made and so it is possible that some of these marriage bonds were of Catholics.

238

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The Omagh Heritage Centre Northern Ireland •

Emigration matters particular to America

Libraries in general •

A Concise course of Irish History by Moody and Martin

The Illustrated History of Ireland by C. F. Cusack (Nun of Kenmare) written in 1860’s

The Irish in Europe 1580-1815 ed. Thomas O’Connor etc.

The Irish Genealogist

Royal Irish Academy •

Mac Firbigs Book of Genealogies Etc.

Genealogical Office, Dublin and Manuscript Room & Heraldic Office •

Clifford Anglim’s of California Crest

Cork City and County Archives Institute, Cork City •

Presently changing its site in Cork

Catholic Library, Dublin •

Historical material e.g. Irish Slaves

Periodicals e.g. Studies, Irish Monthly, Irish Ecclesiastical Records, Irish Sword etc

No real genealogical material

The Linehall Library, Belfast •

Slaters directories of the mid 1800’s

This library is old, the 1700’s, it deals mostly with the Northern Ireland

Presbyterian Records Fisherwick Place, Belfast Society of Friends Offices, Dublin Methodist records •

These are difficult as originally they were in Church of Ireland parishes

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New developments Local County Cork Towns historical societies •

These are recent and are in each of the local West Cork towns

The Internet •

The Anglin DNA Project gives lots of Anglin names: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~kmparker/AnglinDNA/index.html

The Mormon Site: www.familysearch.org

This site gives its sources: www.failteromhat.com

The shipping records

Ginni Swanton: www.ginnisw.com/corkman.html/

Paul Turner: www.paulturner.ca (Ballymoney/Kinneigh/Bandon)

Ellis Island site

Bill Anglins Site: http://www.billanglin.com/story1.1.html (Canadian Anglins)

History of Clonakilty

History of Bandon

The phone directories of individual countries

A volunteers site of Margaret Grogan: www.sci.net.au/userpages/mgrogan

This is a British Government site: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline

www.jamaicafamilysearch.com

An historical walk through the Town of Clonakilty by Tomas Tuipear

A Note on the use of the Internet

Google.ie brings you into the Irish domain

Lots of sites with scraps of information. ‘Good research material’ is scarce.

Fruitful sites listed above. Repetitive use of information. A lot of hearsay and false information. Be careful.

New historical work •

A lot of work is now going on researching old documents in Ireland and abroad

This work is been carried by the universities e.g. The Irish in Europe Project based in NUI Maynooth Co. Kildare

Other American related work is going on at the Centre for Migration studies at Omagh, Co Tyrone

Work going on in ‘UCC has been referred to earlier

Work is also being done in Limerick University and Trinity college Dublin

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Further developments on Appendix 2 I have contacted the Cobh Cork museum on their shipping records, the name Anglin does not appear. I also contacted the Shipping office for Cork City harbour. Their records commence 1921. Earlier records would be in the Public Records Office, Kew, England.

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APPENDIX 3 Searching records outside Ireland for Anglin ancestors Records held outside Ireland This is just an introductory listing and really each country has its own records •

Military and naval and Coastguard records in Kew London (also available on the Internet)

American Evidence by contact with Anglin DNA Project Team

Walter Anglin’s manuscript

Evelyn Williams Book

The Irish in Europe Project and the books etc associated with it

Various books published by the Genealogical Company of Baltimore America

On the Internet •

Family Trees

DNA Anglin Project site: http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~kmparker/AnglinDNA/index.html

Griffiths valuation (Munster Anglins)

Some Graveyard material

Caribbean evidence

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/documentsonline

Passenger Lists Ellis Island

J F. Kennedy Trust

Australian Passenger lists

Wills: •

National Archives of Britain, USA and Canada

Censuses of various countries

European records This is really an unexplored area. •

Records of Catholic religious congregations

Military records of Irish Regiments in Europe

Records from the 40 Irish Colleges in Europe 1550-1800

Merchant shipping records

Birth marriage and death registers in towns of Brittany France and other places. Read the history to find where

England’s records •

Birth marriage and death records particularly in the Bristol and London areas

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Bristol shipping records

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APPENDIX 4 American history page (years pre-1774) The purpose of this list of events, which is not exhaustive, is to set a context for the Story of the Early Anglins in the USA

Background There were tobacco trade links from Virginia to Bristol England in the 1600’s and 1700’s. There were trade links between Cork ports, the port of Bristol and ports of the Virginia area. The colonisation of Virginia was contemporaneous with the colonisation of Ireland and often with the same English leaders. The Anglins were in Bristol before 1800 – how early is the question?

The Early Anglins to the USA •

Ruth Anglin debentured servant arrived by ship 1635, based in Virginia.

Eleanor Anglin arrived by ship 1688 the year of their presence in Maryland

William Anglin arrived on a ship pre 1689 the year of their presence in Maryland

James Anglin (gp. 4) evidence of presence in 1751 in ?????

Adrian Anglin (gp. 3) evidence of arrival 1717 Virginia as debentured servant

William Anglin (gp. 2) evidence for his presence in 1733/4 in ???

Some relevant historical events 1606:

The London Company sponsors a colonizing expedition to Virginia

1608:

In January, 110 additional colonists arrive at Jamestown. In December, the first items of export trade are sent from Jamestown back to England and include lumber and iron ore

1609:

Native tobacco is first planted and harvested in Virginia by colonists. Bristol England was the home of the big tobacco company Wills

1616:

Tobacco becomes an export staple for Virginia

1619:

Twenty Africans are brought by a Dutch ship to Jamestown for sale as indentured servants, marking the beginning of slavery in Colonial America

1620:

The first public library is organized in Virginia books donated by English landowners

1624:

The Virginia Company charter revoked – Virginia is declared a Royal colony

1629:

Charles I of England dissolves parliament, many leave for the American colonies

1634:

First settlement in Maryland as 200 settlers, many of them Catholic, arrive in the lands granted to R. C. Lord Baltimore by Charles I

1640-1659: English Civil War erupts. 1649 Charles I is beheaded. England becomes a Commonwealth and Protectorate ruled by Cromwell 1660:

The English monarchy restored under King Charles II

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1660:

The English Crown approves a Navigation Act requiring the exclusive use of English ships for trade in the English Colonies and limits exports of tobacco and sugar and other commodities to England or its colonies

1663:

Charles II establishes colony of Carolina and grants territory to eight loyal supporters

1663:

Navigation Act of 1663 requires that most imports to the colonies must be transported via England on English ships

1672:

The Royal Africa Company is given a monopoly in the English slave trade

1673:

The British Navigation Act of 1673 sets up the office of customs commissioner in the colonies to collect duties on goods that pass between plantations

1682:

French explorer La Salle explores the lower Mississippi Valley region and claims it for France, Louisiana

1685:

Protestants in France lose their guarantee of religious freedom as King Louis XIV revokes the Edict of Nantes, spurring many to leave for America

1688:

In December, King James II of England flees to France after being deposed by influential English leaders

1690:

The beginning of King William's War as hostilities in Europe between the French and English spill over to the colonies

1696:

The Royal African Trade Company loses its slave trade monopoly, spurring colonists in New England to engage in slave trading for profit. In April, the Navigation Act of 1696 is passed by the English Parliament requiring colonial trade to be done exclusively via English built ships. The Act also expands the powers of colonial custom commissioners, including rights of forcible entry, and requires the posting of bonds on certain goods

1699:

The English Parliament passes the Wool Act, protecting its own wool industry by limiting wool production in Ireland and forbidding the export of wool from the American colonies

1702:

In March, Queen Anne ascends the English throne. In May, England declares war on France, to stop the union of France and Spain

1702:

In Maryland, the Anglican Church is established as the official church, financially supported by taxation imposed on all free men, male servants and slaves

1705:

In Virginia, slaves are assigned the status of real estate by the Virginia Black Code of 1705

1711:

Hostilities break out between Native Americans and settlers in North Carolina after the massacre of settlers there. The conflict, known as the Tuscarora Indian War will last two years

1712:

In May, the Carolina colony is into North Carolina and South Carolina

1718:

New Orleans is founded by the French

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1730:

Baltimore is founded in the Maryland colony

1739:

England declares war on Spain. As a result, in America, hostilities break out between Florida Spaniards and Georgia and South Carolina colonists

1756:

England declares war on France, as the French and Indian War in the colonies now spreads to Europe

1757:

In June, William Pitt becomes England's Secretary of State and escalates the French and Indian War in the colonies by establishing a policy of unlimited warfare

1764:

The English Parliament passes a measure to reorganize the American customs system to better enforce British trade laws, which have often been ignored in the past

1764:

The Currency Act prohibits the colonists from issuing any legal tender paper money

1764:

Boston merchants begin a boycott of British luxury goods

1765:

The Stamp Act. The American colonists quickly unite in opposition, led by the most influential segments of colonial society - lawyers, publishers, land owners, ship builders and…

1766:

In March, King George III signs a bill repealing the Stamp Act after much debate in the English Parliament

1773:

Tea Act. It also gives the British East India Company a virtual tea monopoly American history site: http://www.historyplace.com/unitedstates/revolution/revearly.htm

1778 –83:

The American Revolution

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APPENDIX 5 The Anglins of Australasia Introduction I have not carried out direct research into the presence of O’hAngluinns /Anglins in either Australasia or the South American Countries. But in carrying out the study elsewhere I unearthed material referring to these. Each of these areas is a study in itself and should be researched. I hope someone else will attempt it particularly in reference to Argentina someone with knowledge of Spanish. I record the sources of Australian material I came across.

Australasia •

There is shipping evidence of Anglins from Ireland going to Australia

There are shipping records of Anglins moving from New Zealand to Australia

The movement of Anglins to Australasia came a little later than the entry into the North America. Usually it was by choice or assisted passage but there is certainly one example of a Thomas Anglin who was ‘transported’ there

Some research has been done by Anglins of Australia / New Zealand

There is definite evidence of the Irish Australasia link of Anglins at an individual level239

Some sources of information •

Some passenger details are available on the Net

Birth marriage and Death Registers in Australia and New Zealand

Bill Anglin’s Web site

There is a Ships Captain Anglin of a whaling enterprise: http://www.nzetc.org/tm/scholarly/tei-McNOldW-t1-body-d1-d6.html

With the bicentenary of Australia a lot of official work including passenger list research was done on the links between Ireland and Australia. Some of this is available on the net. Hearsay has it the Glanmire Anglins have links to Australia, and Bill Anglins line claim a link also

239

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APPENDIX 6 Pre-1800 O’hAngluinns / Anglins /Hanglins of Ireland Notes •

Where family tree known, not all descendants are listed beyond patriarch and first children

Date is an event for which there is evidence

Birth? – might be an assumed or accurate date

MLB = Marriaage Licence Bonds these are all in the County of Cork

NAD = National Archives Dublin

The original contents have been updated August 2009

Date

Surname

Forename

Source & Place

Birth?

600? 1586 1586 1592 1600 1600 1600 1601 1601 1620 1659 1670 1676 1681 1681

Anghlonn O'hanglin O'hanglyn O'hanglen Anglyn O'hanglen O'hanglen O'hangelen O'hanglen O’hanglainn Hauglin Anglin Hanglane Anglin Anglin

??? Fynyn Margaret Teig Grany Nevan Dermodie Nevan Dermot Dermuid James Dermot David Francis Francis

Mac Firbis Conall Anghlonn Flynn M’Dermody O’hanglin 4619 Elizabethan Fiants Margaret ny M’Dermody O’Hanglyn in Cork county 4619 Elizabethan Fiants Husband of Elizabetan Fiants 5508 Wife of Philip fitz Davy oge Barrie of Rathinclare Faints 6465 Nevan M’Dermodie O’hanglen of Girranfiene 6469 Elizabethan Fiants Dermodie M’Teig O’hanglen of the Pallice 6469 Elizabethan Fiants Nevan M’Dermody O’ hangelen or Ballinacoursie 6516 Elizabethan Fiants 14 may xliii Dermot O’hanglen, late of Rathdahiffe in county Cork 6486 Elizabethan Fiants Poet Bardic Poem Royal Irish Academy Dublin. Date approx. Petty’s census Lisnacurry Burkes Pedigrees marriage of Dermot to v Honora O'Donovan of Drushane Kinsale Grand Jury Presentments MLB NAI Elizabeth Mills Cloyne b 1656? Md MLB NAI Margaret Hallam Cloyne

?? 1580 1580 1572 1580 1580 1580 1580 1580 1640 1656 1656 1681

1695

Anglin

John

Clonakilty Lismore papers

1700

Anglin

Rachel

MLB NAI John Winespear Clonakilty Cork

1700

1706

Anglin

Mary

North Catherdal Cork Marriage

1690

1715

Hanglin

Elizabeth

MLB John Clark

1723

Anglin

Mark

Index of Irish Wills 1909 Vol. 2 p151 Cork and Ross 1548-1800 Probated

1723

1726

Anglen

Cicely

Index of Irish Wills 1909 Vol. 2 p151 Cork and Ross 1548-1800 Probated

1726

1729

Anglin

Francis

MLB NAI spouse Elizabeth Cottrell

1729

1730

Anglin

John

Index of Irish Wills vol. 2 p151 Waterford and Lismore vol 3 p 1151 1645-1800

1730

1735

Anglin

Margaret

1705

1736

Hanglin

Francis

Wills and the Convert Rolls by O Brien cf. file Dominica link cf. wills file Md name White Kilgarife Graveyard died 29/3/1793 57 years

1737

Hanglin

Robert

Elizabeth Arnell MLB

1742

Hanglin

Francis

Cork and Ross Wills probate

1743

Anglin

James

MLB NAI 1743 spouse Mary Lindsay Cloyne death 1778 Wilkes Georgia

1723

1750

Hanglin

John

Waterford and Lismore wills probates

1751

Hanglin

Ann

MLB NAI spouse Charles Clark

1751

1752

Hanglin

Francis

MLB NAI. Christian Hopkins

1752

1752

Hanglin

Margaret

MLB NAI. spouse George Hosford

1752

1753

Hanglam

Timothy

MLB NAI spouse Selia Kileen Co. Clare

1753

1754

Hanglin

John

Cork and Ross wills probate

1755

Hanglen

William

Welply Papers, a will, Willaim married Mary Ann Payne Inishowan CoCork

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1736


Date

Surname

Forename

Source & Place

Birth?

1756

Anglin

James

MLB NAI Suzanne Glover Cloyne

1731

1761

Hanglin

Mary

MLB NAI Davies Cotrell

1761

1762

Anglinn

Ellen

1762

1763

Anglin

Mary

1763

Hanglin

William

North Cathedral Catholic marriage Registers Cork spouse Daniel Sweney date 13/1/1762 ref Cahir Tipperary b 1763 died 20/7/1813 in Canada spouse Patrick Obrien m 17751801 Welply Papers, Lease of Dwelling

1764

Anglin

James

MLB NAI Mary Stockdale

1764

1766

Anglin

William

Birth Ossory Diocese Kilkenny

1766

1766

Anglin

Owen

Aglishdrigeen Charleville 1766 Protestant Census

1771

Anglim

Denis

1771

1771

Anglin

Francis

North Cathedral Catholic marriage Registers Cork spouse Hoinora Sullivandate 26/5/1771 ref 134924 MLB NAI Catherine Geary

1771

Hanglin

William

Cork and Ross wills probate

1774

Anglan

Elizabeth

MLB NAI and O’Kief spouse John Kennan

1774

1775

Anglin

Robert

Gp 2 DNA Canada Bill Anglin born County Cork spouse Sarah Welply died Ireland

1775

1776

Anglim

Margaret

BirthReg Tipperary South

1776

1776

Hanglin

Philip

1766 Census

1776

1776

Anglim

Edmond

Birth Reg Limerick

1776

1777

Anglim

Johanna

Birth Reg Limerick

1777

1777

Anglin

Daniel

1777

1778

Anglim

Margaret

North Cathedral Catholic marriage Registers Cork spouse Mary Ahern date 2/11/1777 ref 140048 Birth Reg Tipperary south

1779

Anglin

John

Index of Irish Wills vol. 2 p151 Waterford and Lismore vol 3 p 1151 1645-1800

1779

1779

Hanglin

Ann

MLB NAI spouse Richard Waugh

1779

1780

Anglin

Samuel

Gp 2 DNA Canada Bill Anglin born County Cork died Canada md Ann Bass 1806

1780

1783

Anglin

James

Index of Irish Wills 1909 Vol 2 p151 Cork and Ross 1548-1800 Probated

1783

1783

Anglin

Daniel

Birth Reg Tipperary South

1783

1783

Hanglin

Ellen

Marriage Reg North Cathedral Cork

1767

1783

Anglim

Thomas

Marriage Reg North Cathedral Cork

1767

1783

Anglin

James

Birth Reg Limerick

1783

1783

Hanglin

Ann

MLB NAI spouse Charley Eddey

1783

1784

Anglim

Johanna

Marriage Reg Tipperary south

1768

1784

Anglim

Marian

Marriage Reg Tipperary south

1768

1786

Anglin

Index of Irish Wills 1909 Vol 2 p151 Cork and Ross 1548-1800 Probated

1786

1786 1787 1789 1789 1790 1791

Anglim Anglim Anglim Anglim Hanglin Anglin

Mary widow Helen Elzabeth Johanna John John Patrick

Birth Reg Limerick Marriage Reg Limerick Birth Reg Limerick Birth Reg Limerick MLB NAI spouse Ann Wagstaff Augustinian Prior Dungarvan Waterford

1786 1767 1789 1789 1790 1770

1791

Anglim

Catherine

Birth Reg Tipperary south

1791

1702

Anglin

William

Ferns Marriage Reg sp Alison Mrry

1685

1792

Anglim

James

Marriage Reg Limerick

1778

1793 1794 1796 1796 1796 1799

Anglin Anglum Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglam Anglin

Robert Elena John Timothy Patrick Eleanor Ellen

Welply Papers md. Sarah Welply Marriage Reg Tipperary South Flax Growers lists Killaloe Clare Flax Growers lists Killaloe Clare Birth Cockpit Lane Cork 4788/9 Birth Reg Kilkennt North Cathedral Catholic marriage Registers Cork date 25/8/1799

1777 1778 1776 1776 1796 1799 1786

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1763

1771

1778


Further developments on Appendix 6 Important Note In view of the adjustments and new material unearthed, the list above replaces the list in Appendix 6 of the August 2009 report. Do note that the title now includes Hanglins.

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APPENDIX 7 Pre-1800 Anglins of the Diaspora Notes •

Where family tree known, not all descendants are listed beyond patriarch and first children

Date is an event for which there is evidence

Birth? – might be an assumed or accurate date

CAN = Canada

CAR = Carribean Islands

Date

Place

Surname

Forename

Source & Place

Birth?

1568

Spain

Anglin

William

1635

USA

Anglin

Ruth

1635

USA

Anglin

Ruth

1670

UK

Angelin

Anne

Strangers to Citizens exhibition re Irish Regiments in Spain rank Sergeant years 1568-1653 Place: Virginia. Source publication code: 2772. Primary immigrant: Ruth Anglin. Annotation: Includes 25000 names from records of the Virginia state Land Office. Excerpts of the Irish Names from the Greer list were published in no.6258, O’Brien, ‘Early Immigrants to Virginia’…Source Bibliography: Greer, George, Cabell. Early Virginia Immigrants 1623-1666. Richmond (Va):W.C. Hill Printing company Co. 1850 1912 Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co. Baltimore 1978 Repr. 1982 Place: Virginia. Source publication code: 2772. Primary immigrant: Ruth Anglin. Annotation: Includes 25000 names from records of the Virginia state Land Office. Excerpts of the Irish Names from the Greer list were published in no.6258, O’Brien, ‘Early Immigrants to Virginia’…Source Bibliography: Greer, George, Cabell. Early Virginia Immigrants 1623-1666. Richmond (Va):W.C. Hill Printing company Co. 1850 1912 Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co. Baltimore 1978 Repr. 1982 marriage 25/12/1670 mormon

1688

USA

Anglin

Eleanor

1660

1688 1689

USA

Anglin

Eleanor

USA

Anglin

William

1689 1705

USA

Anglin

William

USA

Anglin

William

1706 1710

France CAR

Hanglin Anglin

James William

Joan Bulach email First Anglin in Maryland name on passenger list cf. notes EV Joan Bulach email First Anglin in Maryland name on passenger list cf. notes EV Joan Bulach email Second Anglin in Maryland name on passenger list cf. notes born 1659 EV Joan Bulach email Second Anglin in Maryland name on passenger list cf. notes born 1659 EV Karen Parker email re. headright granted 1705 came as one of 11 due to William Jones. Origin unknown What DNA Gp? EV Parish baptism records St Germaine France (Jacobites) DNA Team

1711

CAR

Anglin

Philip

DNA Team

1711

1714

CAR

Anglin

Mary

DNA Team

1714

1714

CAR

Anglin

Elizabeth

DNA Team

1714

1717

USA

Anglin

Adrian

1693

1719

CAR

Anglin

William

Arrives Virginia Debentured servant cf. Gp 3 DNA Patriarch born 1693? Wife 1 Elizabeth wife 2 Mary Thornhill; Born ??? Died 25/4/1777 EV DNA Team

1720

CAR

Anglin

Philip

DNA Team

1700

1724

CAR

Anglin

Martha

DNA Team

1726

1724

CAR

Anglin

Elizabeth

daughter of William b. 9/1/1724 no.46 EV

1724

1620

1620

1650

1660 1689 1689 1685 1690

1719

O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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Date

Place

Surname

Forename

Source & Place

Birth?

1726

CAR

Anglin

Elizabeth

1741

1732

USA

Anglin

William

email Karen Parker and Scarlett family daughter of Philip no. 43 married Robert Scarlett d 27/8/1828 EV Gp 2 DNA patriarch Gp. 2 DNA Hanover Spouse Ann EV

1733

USA

Anglin

William

Gp. 3 DNA son 30 wife Suzanna born 31/3/1733 EV

1733

1742

USA

Anglin

William

1742

1742

USA

Anglin

Philip

Place: Maryland. Source publication Code:1229.10. Primary Immigrant: William Anglin. Annotation: Date and Port of arrival or date of conviction for transport and port of arrival. Date and place of felon runaways are also provided. Name of ship and other genealogical and historical information may also be provided. Source Bibliography: Coldham, Peter Wilson ‘The Kings Passengers to Maryland and Virginia’ Westminster, MD: Family Line Publications 1997 450p page 97 Gp. 3 DNA son 30 b 20/12/1742 died 1837 Va EV

1751

USA

Anglin

James

1720

1752

USA

Anglin

Adrian

Gp 4 DNA patriarch Father with land records assumed born Bandon 1720 died 7/4/1778 Wilkes Georgia EV Gp. 3 DNA son 30 b. 28/4/1752 Va died 1818 EV

1755

USA

Anglin

Cornelius

Son of 34 Gp 2 DNA EV

1755

1756

USA

Anglin

David

Gp. 4 DNA Son of 28 Wilkes Georgia EV

1756

1757

USA

Anglin

John

1757

1761

USA

Anglin

Adrian

1763

UK

Anglin

Anna

1765

USA

Anglin

William

Gp 2 DNA son of 34 born 1757 md Elizabeth Carver Louise Va EV Greenbriar Va b.16/11/1761 md.21/6/1797 spouse Mary McClurg mormon b16/2/1763, bapt.27/2/1763 father Guiliemi and mother Sarae Mormon Gp. 2 DNA son of 34 EV

1765

USA

Anglin

Aaron

Gp. 2 DNA son of 34 born 1765 Louise Va died 1850 EV

1765

1774

Belgium

Anglin

Thomas

1775

CAN

Anglin

Robert

1776

CAR

Anglin

Philip

1776

UK

Angeline

Caralina

Strangers to citizens exhibition: Louvain student 1774-1777 native of Waterford and Lismore Diocese Gp 2 DNA Canada Bill Anglin born Bandon spouse Sarah Welply died Ireland Place Jamaica Source Publication code 2144. Primary Emigrant: Philip Anglin. Annotation: Ministers and Schoolmasters of the Church o f England who went to the Western Colonies in return for a bounty from the King. From Rawlinson MSS Receipt Book of Secret Service Money, April 20 1689, to June 1691, in the Bodleian Library England. Source Bibliography: Fothergill, Gerald. ‘A list of Emigrant Ministers to America, 1690-1811’. London: Elliott Stock, 1904. 65p Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co. Baltimore 1965 page 11 Born 11/1/1776 bap 28/1/1776 mormon

1780

CAN

Anglin

Samuel

1780

1785

Madeira

Anglin

John

Gp 2 DNA Canada Bill Anglin born Bandon died Canada md. Ann Bass 1806 Familysearch.org bn. Cork, md 1803/1810 in Madeira died Madeira

1732

1742

1752

1761 1763 1765

1775 1756

1776

1785

O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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APPENDIX 8 Miscellaneous information on the Anglin surname A Source: Mormon Records for Finland Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename Paul John Anders Jacob Johannes Andreas Eva Caisa

Date Of Birth 14/12/1763 19/9/1834 25/10/1836 25/7/1809 6/4/1797 7/11/1799

Event Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism

Place Pudasjarvi, Oulu, Finland Oulu, Oulu, Finland Sysma, Mikkeli, Finland Sysma, Mikkeli, Finland Sysma, Mikkeli, Finland Sysma, Mikkeli, Finland

B Source: Mormon Records for British Isles Indicating variations in spelling, in some a different name !! Surname Angeline Angelon Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Angling Angling Angling Angling

Forename Caralina Benjanin Bart Anna Charles Benjamin Agnes Anne Elizabeth Alfred Alice Adelaide Louisa

Date Of Birth 28/1/1776 12/3/1715 27/2/1763 2/6/1833 13/10/1809 0/0/1843 27/3/1870 23/4/1856 2/4/1837 2/7/1848

Event Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Marriage Baptism

Place Saint Pancras, Old Church, London, England London, St. Bride Fleet St. London, UK Holborn, Lincolns Inn Fields-rc, London, England Southwark, Saint Saviour, London, England Stepney, St. Mary Whitechapel, London, UK 1843 London, London, England Deptford, Saint Paul, Kent, England Kidderminster, Worcester, England Bermondsey, Saint James, Surrey, England Bristol, St. Philip-Jacob, Gloucester, England

C Source: 1881 British Census Indicating spread of Irish born Anglins in 1880's in England Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename Maurice Samuel T John Mary Ann Mary Margaret Samuel m. Benjamin Julia James Mary A William

Date Of Birth 1816 1849 1855 1857 1834 1813 1821 1854 1854 1858 1843 1838 1860 1837

Event Birth Birth Birth Birth Birth Birth Birth Birth Birth Birth Birth Birth Birth Birth

Origin Bandon Cork Cork Cork Cork City Ireland Ireland Ireland Ireland Ireland Kerry Limerick Waterford Wexford

Census Middlesex Lancashire Northampton Lancashire Gloucester Lancashire Middlesex Middlesex York Middlesex Middlesex Middlesex Lancashire Lancashire

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D Source: St. Mary’s R.C. Records Barony of Duhallow 1833-1864 Year 1365 1573 1573 1585 1600 1600

Surname Anglyn Anglound Angyllonte Angyllen Anglyant Anglyant

Forename Simon John Fitz William Thomas Ynory ny Ellen Thomas

Source Of Information Pipe rolls of Cloyne Fiants 2269 sp Dermot M’Teighe yeoman Fiants 2251 Fiants 4752 Fiants 6407 sp Dermot M’Teige carpenter Fiants 6407 sp. Katherine ny Teig m’Shane

Event & Place Castlelyons Kilmanehyn Dromore

Anglands: Includes the surnames in the Faints who held an earlier form of the Angland surname Surname Angland Angland Angland Angland Angland Angland Angland Angland Angland Angland Angland Angland Angland

Forename John John Malachi Mary John John Julia John John John John Timothy Edmund

Date Of Event 11/11/1844 12/9/1853 13/10/1858 13/2/1848 18/8/1863 19/61855 20/4/1835 22/4/1838 28/10/1833 29/6/1863 30/5/1863 1864 1851

Father Timothy Timothy John Maurice John Michael Maurice John Timothy John John

Mother Mary Fitzgerald Mary Sullivan Norah McAuliffe Julia Breen Elizabeth Murphy Nora Lane Julia Breen Ellen Carver Margaret Corkery Norah McAuliffe Margaret Hickey

Angland

Patrick

1851

Angland Angland Angland

Jerry Mary Margaret

1864 1866 5/2/1843

John

Mary Fitzgerald

Event Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Baptism Civil Regs Griffiths Valuations Griffiths Valuations Civil Regs Civil Regs Baptism

Place Boherbue Boherbue Boherbue Boherbue Boherbue Boherbue Boherbue Boherbue Boherbue Boherbue Boherbue Kanturk Kanturk Kanturk Kanturk Kanturk Boherbue

E Griffiths Valuations 1850 in Ireland •

Repetition of names in the same area may suggest the same person renting in different places

Griffiths Valuations of 1851 for County Tipperary; South Riding covering Anglin and Variants

Note the variation in spelling of surname

Surname Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum

Forename Patrick John James Edmund Edmund James Edmund Margaret Michael Patrick Patrick

Lessor Bagwel John Bagwel John Bagwel John Vis Lismore Armstrong Bagwell John Chaters William Glengall Earl of Glengall Earl of Glengall Earl of Glengall Earl of

Parish Tubbrid Tubbrid Tubbrid Tubbrid Tubbrid Tubbrid Tubbrid Tullaghorton Tullaghorton Tullaghorton Tullaghorton

Townland Ballylaffin Ballylaffin Ballylaffin Ballynomasna Killinure Magherareagh Roosca Miles Ballinhalla Ballinhalla Ballinhalla Ballinhalla

Poor Law Union Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen

Barony Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa

O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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Surname Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglin Anglum Anglum Anglim Anglim Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglam Anglam Anglam Anglim

Forename Thomas Edmund Ellen James Edmund William Matthew Johanna Eleanor Bridget Patrick Mary Anne William Patrick Matthew

Lessor Fennessy Thomas Glengall Ealr of Waterpark Lord Tithe default Glengall Ealr of Newingham Quinn Watson Solomon L.Clutterbuck Glengall Earl of J. Lindsay J. Lindsay R. Hobson B. Pennyfather C. Ryall Quinn

Parish Tullaghorton Tullaghorton Tullaghorton Tullaghorton Tullaghorton Tullamain St.Patrick rock Inishlounaght Ballybacon Caher Cloneen Cloneen Colman Knockgraffan St. Patricks Rock St. Patricks Rock

Townland Ballinhalla Ballinhalla Ballyhistbeg Lowesgreen Castlegrace Rosegreen Blackcastle Ballingarrane N. Kilgrogymore Garnavilla Tullowcossaun Tullowcossaun Colman Knockgraffon Blackcastle Blackcastle

Poor Law Union Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Clogheen Cashel Cashel Clonmel Cashel Cashel

Barony Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Iffa &Offa Middlethird Middlethird Iffa &Offa Middlethird Middlethird

Griffiths valuations of 1851 for County Waterford covering Anglin and Variants Surname Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglum Anglam Anglin

Forename James James Thomas James Patrick Catherine Thomas

Lessor DeDecies Devonshire Duke DeDecies DeDecies Rich Keane Devonshire Duke Devonsire Duke

Parish Ardmore Ardmore Ardmore Ardmore Lismore& Mo. Dungarvan Lismore & m.

Townland Knocknahoola Reamanagh E. Reanaviddoge Reanaviddoge Knocknahrehane Dungaravan Glentaunatinagh

Poor Law Union Dungarvan Dungarvan Dungarvan Dungarvan Coshmore C. Dungarvan Cosmore c.

Griffiths valuations of 1851 for County Limerick covering Anglin and Variants Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglim Anglim Anglim Anglim Anglim Anglim

Forename Michael Michael Michael Michael Michael Michael Ellen Robert Jeremiah Jeremiah Jeremiah James

Lessor D. Gallagher J. Gallagher M. Gallaher D. Gallagher J. Gallagher M. Gallagher Earl of Devon A. Russel

Parish Galbally Galbally Galbally Galbally Galbally Galbally Newcastle S. Michales Killeedy Killeedy Killeedy Monagay

Townland Anglesborough Anglesborough Anglesborough Anglesborough Anglesborough Anglesborough Gorthboy Priorsland Ballykenny Ballykenny Ballykenny Rathcahill Es.

Poor Law Union Mitchelstown Co. Cork Mitchelstown Co. Cork Mitchelstown Co. Cork Mitchelstown Co. Cork Mitchelstown Co. Cork Mitchelstown Co. Cork Newcastle Limerick city Newcastle Newcastle Newcastle Newcastle

Griffiths valuations of 1851 for County Kerry covering Anglin and Variants Surname Anglim Anglim

Forename Michael Edmond

Lessor R. Lesie R. Lesie

Parish Kilnaughtin Kilnaughtin

Townland Tarmon Hill Tarmon Hill

Poor Law Union Glin Glin

Griffiths valuations of 1851 for County Wexford covering Anglin and Variants Surname Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Forename Jane Mary James Robert

Lessor W. Hughes A. Hughes Ebeneszer Jacob J. Colfer

Parish Maudlintown St. Iberius St. Iberius St. Seslkar

Townland Maudlintown Wexford town Wexford town Wexford town

Poor Law Union Wexford Wexford Wexford Wexford

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Griffiths valuations of 1851 for County Clare covering Anglin and Variants Surname Anglin Anglin Anglim Anglim Anglim Anglim Anglim Anglim

Forename Jeremiah John Anne Jeremiah John Patrick John John

Lessor

Parish Kilmacdune Kilmacdune Kilmurry Kilmurry Kilmurry Kilmurry Killuran Killard

Townland Cloonwhite St. Cloonwhite St. Cloghauninchy Cloghauninchy Cloghauninchy Cloghauninchy Keelderry Mountrivers

Poor Law Union Kilrush Kilrush Tulla Tulla Tulla Tulla Tulla Kilrush

Griffiths valuations of 1851 for County Down covering Anglin and Variants Surname Anglin

Forename Francis

Lessor Mary McCoy

Parish Drumbeg

Townland Drumbeg

Poor Law Union Castlereagh

Griffiths valuations of 1852 for County Cork covering Anglin and Variants (spelling seems to change) Surname Anglim Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglan Anglan Anglan Anglin Anglin Anglim Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Hanglin Hanglin Anglam Anglam Anglane Anglum Anglum

Forename John Jane John Catherine Edward John Robert Robert Robert Robert John Redmond Samuel Michael Timothy John John Thomas Ellen Timothy James Francis John Thomas

Lessor C. Cox Issac Dalton E. Heron M. Kane R. Goode J. Fitzpatrick Earl of Shannon Earl of Shannon Earl of Shannon M. Spillar J. Hosford J. Lee F. Rowland D. Engain C. Penrose W. Connor Wm.c.Nelligan Patrick St. J. Scanlon J. Scanlon C. Downey R. Hennis R. Leahy

Parish Fanlobus Castlelyons Holy Trinity Kilbonane Kilbonane Kilgarriff Kilgarriff Desert Desert Kilgarriff Kinneigh Mogeely St. Mary Shandon St. Mary Shandon St. Mary Shandon St. Mary Shandon St. Mary Shandon Kilgarriff Kilgarriff Clonfert Clonfert Clondrohid Ightermurragh Subulter

Townland Dunmanway n Kill St. Ann S. Meat lane Kilbonane Rathard Scartagh Tawnies Lower Tawnies Lower Tawnies Upp. Tawnies Upp. Farranmareen Grange Garranbraher Kyrl's Lynche's ct. Shandon St. Shandon St. Tawnies Upp. Tawnies Upp. GortKnockaneroe GortKnockaneroe Ardnacrushy Knockglass Subulter

Poor Law Union Dunmannway Fermoy Cork city Bandon Bandon Clonakilty Clonakilty Clonakilty Clonakilty Clonakilty Bandon Middleton Cork City Cork City Cork City Cork City Cork City Clonakilty Clonakilty Kanturk Kanturk

F Still working on this material to identify location: seems to be County Cork Year 1591 1587 1587 1601 1601 1681??

Surname O’hanglen O’hanglin O’hanglyn O’hangelen O’hanglen Anglin

Forename Teig Fylyn Margaret ny Dermodie Nevan m’Dermodie Dermot Francis

Source Of Information Fiants 5508 husbandman Fiants 4619 Fiants 4619 Fiants 6516 Fiants 6486 Sp. Elizabeth Mills

Event & Place Cork county Cork county Ballinacaoursie Rathdahiffe md. Bond Cloyne C. of I.

O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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Year 1729 1751 1752 1752 1753 1756 1761 1771 1774 1779 1780

Surname Anglin Hanglin Hanglin Hanglin Hanlan Anglin Hanglin Anglin Anglan Hanglin Anglin

Forename Francis Ann Francis Margaret Catherine James Mary Francis Elizabeth Ann Samuel

Source Of Information Sp. Elizabeth Cotrell Sp. Charles Clarke Sp. Christian Hopkins Sp. George Hosforth Sp. James Williams Sp. Suzanne Glover Sp. Davies Cotrell Sp. Catherine Geaary Sp. John Keenan Sp. Richard Waugh

Event & Place md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cloyne C. of I. md. Bond Cloyne C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. Kileolman

1783 1790 1802

Hanglin Hanglin Anglin

Ann John Nino

Sp. Charley Eddey Sp. Ann Wagstaff

md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. Cloyne

1806 1806 1815 1820 1825 1825 1829 1832 1834 1834 1837 1840 1842

Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Hanlan Anglin Hanglin Anglin Anglin Hanglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Samuel Samuel Hester Samuel Catherine Nano John Suzanna Mary John John William William

Sp Ann Bass Sp. Thomas Kingston James Williams Sp. William Breen Elizabeth Buttimer Sp. Robert W. Porter 1881 census, Gloucester Sp. Alice Morgan Sp Sarah Duke 1/8/1840

Md md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cloyne C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. b. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. b. Md

1842 1844 1845

Anglin Anglin Anglin

William John Samuel

Sp. Elizabeth duke Sp Ann Dale

md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. Md

1845 1846 1849 1850 1850 1852 1855 1857 1869 1871 1871 1874 1875 1876 1876 1877 1880 1880 1895

Anglin Anglin Anglin Auglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin Anglin

Samuel Norry Samuel Eliza Auglin Arthur H Francis T John Elmore Mary Anne Mary Anne James Lizzie John John Bartholomew James Julia Samuel Clarke

Sp Elizabeth Jeffcott 24/2/1846 1881 census Lancs 1881 census Somerset 1881 census York Sp. Maragaret AHallam 1881 census Middlesex 1881 census Lancs

md. Bond Cork Ross C. of I. md. Inchigeelagh b. b. b. md. Bond Cloyne C. of I. b. b. b. b. b. b. md. Abbeystrowry b. Kileolman b.

G Current family trees being researched Patriarch

DNA

Assigned Name

Tree

Patriarch William b c1733: Patriarch:Adrian b c.1693?':

Gp .2 DNA Gp. 3 DNA

Caswell Co. NC Anglins: Buckingham Co.Va Anglin

Family Tree Family Tree

O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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Patriarch:James b c.1720': Gp. 4 DNA Patriarch:William 1721 Nil Patriarch:Robert:18?? Gp. 2 DNA Patriarch:Francis b.1736 Nil Patriarch:John b.1786 Cork Unlinked DNA Patriarch:Thomas pre1892 Nil Patriarch:John1850 Gp. 2 DNA Patriarch Gp 2 DNA Patriarch: ??? Unlinked DNA Patriarch:??? Leap Gp. 2 DNA Patriarch:William/Philip1700 Nil Patriarch: ??? Unlinked DNA Patriarch John Cork 1785 Nil Patriarch John Belfast Gp. 3 DNA Patriarch: Jeremiah c1841 Gp.2 DNA There are other Anglin Groups still under research

Wilkes Co. Ga Anglins Maryland Anglins Canadian Protestant Anglins Canadian Catholic Anglins Bristol Anglins Bridgewater Anglins Glanmire Anglins Anglims Limerick Chris Anglim Wexford Anglims Clonakilty Anglins Jamaica Plantation Anglins Caribbean Anglins Madeira Anglins Bangor Anglins County Down Macroom Anglins

Family Tree Line Died ? Family Tree Family Tree Family Tree Family Tree Family Tree Family Tree Nil Nil Nil Nil Family Tree Nil Family Tree

H The Irish colleges in Europe in 16-18th centuries •

Some Colleges were small and some lasted a short time, Students studied for priests, medical and Law mostly

Jesuits ran a number of the secular colleges

Name Louvain Prague Vielan Capranica Lisbon Louvain Rome Rome Charleville La Rochelle Aix-la-Chapelle Potiers Vaalladolid

Country Belgium Italy Portugal Belgium Italy Italy France

Opened 1607 1631 1645 1656 1659 1626 1620 1656 1620 1665 1667 1674 1605

Order Franciscans Franciscans Franciscans Franciscans Dominicans Dominicans Dominicans Augustinians Capuchins Caramelites Caramelites Jesuit

Name Salamanca Cmpestella Paris Bordeaux Rome Lisbon Rouen Toulouse Nantes Seville Madrid Alcala de Heneres Douiai Antwerp Lille Tournai Louvain Rome Lisbon

Country Spain Spain France France Italy Portugal France France France Spain Spain Spain France France Belgium Italy Portugal

Opened 1592 1605 1592 1603 1677 1620 1612 1645 1689 1612 1629 1649 1594 1600 1610 1616 1624 1627 1590

Order secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular secular

O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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APPENDIX 9 Final findings These are based on the evidence within the report: 1.

The Original surname was O’hAngluinn, a Gaeilge epithet surname.

2.

Its origin probably flows from the epithet ‘anglonn’ being applied in times past to particular individuals due to their valour.

3.

The major anglicised forms of the surname are Anglin, Anglim, Hanglin.

4.

The origin of the name lies in Ireland.

5.

Judging from the early occurrences of the surname as indicated in the appendices, this origin is in South West Cork, particularly in the Clonakilty area. But there is the possibility the epithet was also applied to a person in the North West Cork area.

6.

No creditable evidence was unearthed indicating a non Irish source.

7.

The early holders of this surname were ordinary people, there is no evidence of them being landed people. However a feature of the research is how successful the descendants were having left Ireland.

8.

An individual person of this name is initially identified in 1490 and is rare in documents in Ireland prior to 1700,

9.

The occurrence of the surname outside Ireland commences in the late 1500’s. It surfaces in the early stages of its diaspora in continental Europe and then later in those south American countries linked to the continent. In the 1600’s it is linked to English colonies beginning with Maryland, Virginia and the Caribbean.

10. The scatter of the surname follows the same pattern as Irish emigration in general including the vicissitudes of their lives 11. While originally those with the surname were Catholic, it is clear at an early stage there grew an important segment who were of the reformed faith. 12. During the 1800’s the surname in Ireland became Anglin or Anglim, the Hanglin form having died out. The presence of the Hanglin form abroad is reasonably common and would indicate the original emigrants who carried this form abroad would have left Ireland pre 1800. 13. While the Hanglin/Anglin/Anglim surname has been passed down through the male line, there are instances in Irish records of females whose maiden name was Anglin passing their maiden name Anglin to their male progeny. For the descendants of such individuals there is no doubt of their Irishness but there are real implications for the DNA research in these instances.

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APPENDIX 10 4th Edition supplement This Appendix includes some new material since the last update in September 2010.

Corrections and Additions An English translation of the verse lines 272-279 of the 8,000 line Gaelige text ‘Acallamh na Senorach’ written in the late 12th century referred to in Chapter 2 page 29 of the project under the sub heading ‘Irish mythology’ is now given below with the Gaelige original. It is taken from the translation entitled’ Tales of the Elders’ prepared by Ann Dooley and Harry Roe. This particular narrative tells of the names of the warriors who had particular special horses. Cailite made the enumeration. Acallamh na Senorach

The Colloquy of the Ancients

272 Francan ocus Luth Re Srian da ech

272 Frenchman and Agile with bridle, for

thaisigh scuir na bh—fhian

the masters of horse of the Fiana

273 Luth ac Scuirin, codhnaibh gal is

273 Scuirin had Agile, fury of chieftains,

Francán ac Dub Druman

Frenchman, the steed of Dub Drummann

274 Gerr in Oir, Gerr in Arcait maraen do

274 Golden Gelding, Silver Gelding, together

cinndis carpaid,

the chariots ran

275 da ech do bhi ag Aillmi ann ag ingin

275 They the horses of Aillbe, daughter of

aird-righ Eireann.

the high king of Ireland

276 Dub Esa is Duhb Thuinne da ech

276 ‘Black stream and Black wave, warlike

Aenghuis Angluinne240,

Aengus’ (Aengus Angluinne) steeds,

277 Cáilti is Oisin amach maraen teigdis

277 Calite and Oisin together, rode to eac

gach n-aenach.

assembly

278 Each Guill meic Morna don muigh fa

278 The horse og Goll, son of Morna, the

faire do b(ui) a Maenmhuigh,

watchman in Moinmoy

279 tan do—leicthe ar sliabh no an muigh

279 Through mountains and plains, swift as

fa comhluath r(e gaeith) n-erruigh.

the winds of spring

The last two lines appended to the Gaelige text in the project have now been deleted along with footnote 53.

I assume, without proof, that Angluinne is the genitive case of Angluinn so ‘Aenghius of Anglonn’

240

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MacFirbis gave us Conall named as a Warrior (Anglonn) now we have another individual Aengus descended from a Warrior (Angluinne). The way the epithet is used here has moved on, indeed coming closer to the spelling of our surname in Gaelige.

New Information County Wicklow Anglins There was a presence of the surname Anglin at the end of the 1700’s in County Wicklow which is just south of Dublin. They are no longer there. They may be three different families. Their journey needs to be explored. The present information available is: •

Francis bn 6/9/1878 C of I, Wicklow town Father William mother Alicia

Joseph bn 13/4/1781 C of I, Wicklow town Father William mother Alicia

William bn 25/4/1802 C of I, Wicklow town Father William mother Alicia

Other children could be Alicia bn 1787; Mary bn 1792; Susan bn 1795; Elizabeth bn 1798; John bn 1799

Elizabeth Anglin married James Hall on 1/6/1805 in Wicklow town; they were Catholics

There is also a Joseph Anglin bn 1801 in Wicklow

There is also a William Anglum in Rathdrum county Wicklow bn 1802

Some Anglins in Cork City during 1700’s From biographical Notices Collected from Newspapers, compiled by Rosemary Ffolliott: •

3 June 1757: Advertisement: Joseph Anglin of the city of Corke gunsmith who formerly lived in Tuckey Lane…now removed next door to the house wherin Mr John Ireland deceased formerly lived in Tuckey Lane

14 Aug 1764: at St Nichloas Church Cork Mr Hanglin to the widow Stockdale (MLB James Anglin and Mary Stockdale)

21 Feb 1771: Yesterday morning, Mr Christopher Hanglin of Watergate Lane was drowned (details supplied)

6 Nov 1771: died a few days ago in Corke the relict of Mr Willam Hanglin who unhappily was drowneds some months since

1 Aug 1793: Advertisement: Daniel Anglin licenses pawnbroker has taken the concern in Brown Street. Late occupied by Mr Walker

3 Apr 1827: At Cove on the 31st Ult lady? of Dr Anglin of a dau.

From Land deeds on Hanglins/ Anglins:

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The registry was formed in 1705 particularly in relation to issues that might become legally contentious, following the land confiscations of Cromwell and William of Orange. Only those of 1700’s recorded.

Francis Hanglin ref 176 270 118838 this is a deed of conveyance. Francis was a clothier in the southeastern part of Cork city and has died. It is his son John Hanglin clothier who is who is ‘selling’ the house to a Matthew Smith. The date of the memorial is 1st December 1754.

James Anglin refs. 238 280 154475 and 252 201 162447. These two memorials seem to overlap. Their dates are 1st January 1765 and 11th April 1765. James Anglin was a gent living Cork City and was married to Mary Stockdale (cf Marriage licence bonds). He is transferring land in the Hammons Marsh area of Cork city to a John Burnell.

Consolidation of Clonakilty Material The earliest evidence of O’hAngluinn, Hanglin Anglin(m) surname in County Cork. Introduction The earlier research on the O’hAngluinn, Hanglin Anglin(m) surname has led me to accept the source/origin of the various lines of this surname is in County Cork Ireland, irrespective of the vicissitudes in the journey over the generations. This is research and as such is and must be open to correction where genuine contrary evidence is unearthed. The documentary evidence to date places the source in West Cork around Clonakilty. (A feeling remains, and it is still just a feeling, that there may be another source in North West Cork.) I start with the Clonakilty area of West Cork. (The focus in this section is on documentary evidence of our surname in the early years in west Cork up to approx. 1750.) In order to encourage readers to focus attention on the detail in this data, I commence by saying I was quite amazed when I realised the male first names of these early Clonakilty Hanglin(m)s were John, Francis, William, Robert, James and Jeremiah, the very names that are the Patriarchal names for the earliest male immigrants to the USA, Canada, England, and also of the Ireland Anglins, and of the Anglins living in the Clonakilty area to this day. Documented Sources The land stretching from the west section of county Waterford through East Cork and into west Cork on the arrival of the New English following King Henry VIII, was taken over by these new English and became the Lismore estates of Lord Boyle and his successors. He rented the land back to Irish people in those areas but also to new comers brought in from England. (This last was particularly the case with Bandon.) Consequently ‘Books of rent payments’ exist and are available for genealogical research covering those early years.

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(Some Lismore papers commencing c. 1700 are available in national Library Dublin, others are still in private hands.) During the tenure of Lord Boyle his descendants and his associates some new towns with a corporation were established e.g. Bandon in 1604. In other cases towns were formed from already existing settlements eg. Cloughnakilty. It was also given a corporation (in 1613). (There are a series of articles in the Cork Historical and Archeological Journal called “Notes from the Council Book of Clonakilty” by Dorethea Townsend. The book is in the possession of the Rev. J. Hume Townsend, the Cork Historical and archeological journals are available in National Library and commence c.1690). These corporations have left minutes of meetings which again give documentary evidence. Catholic Church records of births marriages in this area of Ireland only commenced in 1780 earliest while The church of Ireland records (the reformed church) records only exist in this area from 1770 so in this context both sets are of no assistance. Petty’s Census is incomplete but took place in 1659. Probated Wills. An index of such wills exist but not the wills I have examined, I hope all, of this documentation, including the Elizabethan Fiants, for those early years and I now draw the findings together. Now the Details The first use of a name is highlighted. 1637 •

In the council records of Sir Walter Rayleigh’s Youghel, a port town in the south east of county Cork there is reference to a Daniel Hanglin, agent, as a freeman in 17 March 1637. While Youghel is not near Clonakilty by road I include this data as there is an anecdotal suggestion in the story of the Canadian Catholic line of Anglins that they may have had connections with Youghel

1659 •

Pettys Census: James Hauglin in Desert Serges nr. Clonakilkty

1692 •

Borough of Cloughnakilty. At the court held on 21st February I692 Mr Robert Salmon, Mr Francis Hanglin, Mr Daniel Carty and Mr Philip Pyne and William Hodnett were sworn freemen of this corporation before Bryam Townsend, sovern.

1695 •

Borough of Cloughnakilty. At the same court Francis Bitchell was sworn serj. At the same court Stephen Holmes was continued Marshaller, Francis Hanglin being bound for his fidelity

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Lismore Papers: John Hanglin is listed 3 times paying rent in Clognakilty in 1695/6

1696 •

Lismore Papers: John Hanglin is listed 3 times paying rent in Clognakilty in 1695/6

1700 •

Borough of Cloughnakilty. The general sessions of peace held for the said borough the 15th of 8ber 1700 before Richard Cox, suffrain and burgesses. Jurors names: James crooke, Filmy Carty, John Bennet, John Hanglin, James Barry Stephen Holmes, Francis Hanglin, Philip Pyne…Willm Hanglin, Daniel Colerman John Hanglin Charles Carty. (From here on I will not list all jurors just Anglins) (Page 455 note added says Hanglin was parish clerk Clonakilty in 1858)

1700 •

Borough of Cloughnakilty. The general sessions of the peace held for sd. Borough the 25th day of February 1700 before Richard Cox esq suffrain the recorder and burgesses Nomina jury Robt Travers, Francis Hanglin, John Bateman, John Hanglin etc

1701 •

Borough of Cloughnakilty. General sessions of the peace held for said borough 15th day of Xber 1701 before etc. nomina jury Thomas Warner, John Hanglin, Francis Hanglin

1702 •

Borough of Cloughnakilty. General sessions of the peace 4th day of 9ber 1702 Jurors names… Francis Hanglin…John Hanglin snr…John Hanglin jun.

We find and present that John Mead, John Hanglin and James Spiller or either of them are fit persons to serve as constable

1704 •

Borough of Cloughnakilty. General session of the peace 31st day March 1704 Juros names…John Austin…John Hanglin etc

At same session John Bennet, John Hanglin, James Spiller etc. appointed to restore an ancient pathway

Lismore Papers: Francis Hanglin mentioned a number of times paying rent 1704 for the Millington Plot in Clognakilty. He had a 21 year lease beginning Lady Day 1704.

1706 •

Lismore Papers: Francis Hanglin paid rent in 1706-1707.

“Francis Hanglin for Millington Plot built a handsome house and a good malt house which cost him as he alleges 150. Now we learn he has a lease of 21 years granted him by Lord Castleton from 1719 and afterwards proposed for a lease of 3 lives. This rent is again paid in 1731 by Francis Hanglin. He is still there 1731 and 1735 and he is still there in 1737 and 1738 paying rent for Millington Plot. (I have been unable to identify this Millington plot)

1709

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Borough of Cloughnakilty. General session of the peace (in Latin) 14th day January 1709. Nom grand jury Francis Hanglin, Willam Hanglin Clonakilty Corporation records page 560

1719 •

Lismore papers: Francis Hanglin paying rent

1724 •

At the court held 22nd April 1724 (there is a lot of detail here which I summarise) These court minutes make clear Francis Hanglin was surreptitiously removed from his office as weight master for the town. There were protests and appeals to higher authority etc. and he was re appointed to his position and a Robert Anglin was also appointed as his deputy

1731 •

Lismore Papers: Francis Hanglin paying rent on Millington Plot

1735 •

Lismore Papers: John Hanglin in 1735 is paying rent in Clougnakilty

Lismore Papers: Francis Hanglin paying rent on Millington Plot

1737 •

Lismore Papers: Francis Hanglin paying rent on Millington Plot

1738 •

Lismore Papers: Francis Hanglin paying rent on Millington Plot (I have been unable to identify Millington Plot today)

1740 •

Land deed: Rachel Hanglin ref. 99 197 68609. This is a marriage settlement. Rachael was a widow and from Clonakilty, the husband to be is John Winespar (cf Marriasge licence bonds) He was also from Clonakilty and was a mariner. The memorial date is 29th April 1740

1742 •

Wills: A will of a Francis Hanglin Francis Clonakilty probated

Will: Jeremiah Hanglin from Clonakilty probated 1742

1743 •

Lismore Papers: Wil Hanglin paying rent for a dwelling area is ‘Cloghnikilty Manonrs’ in 1743 – 1751

Lismore Papers: Robert Hanglin paying rent in 1743, 4 and 5 In Clonakilty

1754 •

Will: John Hanglin Clonakilty probated 1754

1755 •

Will: A will in 10 Nov. 1755. Wm. Hanglen of Ardclugg near Inishannon

1771 •

Will: William Hanglin Clonakilty probated 1771

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What does this information suggest? While I have found the surname in Cork City (data given later) and also an occasional presence of the surname in other places e.g. Kinsale corporation records, the quantity of material in the Clonakilty area is of a different level. Birth dates of these Hanglins has to be at least 20 years earlier than the dates in these documents as Jurors and people who rented land would have to have been adults. The dates assigned by family researchers in USA and Canada to the patriarchs (Maryland William arrival USA 1689: Canadian Catholic, Francis bn 1736: Canadian Protestant, Robert birth 1775: Ganmire Anglins, John 1850)(Detailed Information available through the DNA research team) corresponds in a manner with the dates given in these official documents. By ‘in a manner’ I am not suggesting they are the same persons, but the correspondence does suggest those early settlers abroad could have originated in this West Cork/Clonakilty area. I find the close similarity of dates and male first names is not just coincidence. (Sadly to date I am unable to find the children of these early Hanglins of Clonakilty.) (Incidently in GP 3 DNA Adrian sons include William and John two of these Clonakilty names and also Elisha which unusually is used in Cork to this day as a first name. This type of ‘coincidence’ occurs in the other lines as well.) Other information General points

Clonakilty is also called Kilgarrife and Cloughnakilty.

In the original report, for reasons stated, I rejected O’Rourke’s view in his History of Clonakilty that Anglins were ancient leaders in this area, I have now to admit he really may have been correct but not from the evidence of his presumed source.

As you move back in time our surname will be in the Hanglin form, e.g documentation shows Timothy Warren Anglin was baptised Timothy Hanglin later changing his surname from Hanglin to Anglin.

In view of the fact that an Anglim from England/Tipperary and one from Limerick/Cork by DNA tests are related to Anglins whose origin is Clonakilty, there has to be an onus on researchers to now seek a documentary link between Chris Anglim’s (USA) work and this research. In other words prove now by documentary evidence that Anglin and Anglim are not just the same surname but of the lineal descent.

Land deeds

In the Land registry in Dublin there are land deeds in the late 18th century regarding Hanglin/Anglins, one of these is of Rachael Hanglin (1740) of Clonakilty the others are Cork city. O’hAngluinn – The Surname ‘Anglin’ (October 2011)

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Family trees

A short family tree prepared in Canada by Timothy’s son Arthur Whyte Anglin: •

Francis H Anglin bn c.1736 , d.29/3/1793 in Clonakilty md an O’Brien had a son

Jeremiah Anglin bn ?? d.1799 md. Anne Dammery 9 (she died 1800): A contractor and owner of the Myrtle Housing Estate at least one child

Francis Anglin (East India Company) d.1875 in Clon. md Anne Warren (d 1868). Two children

Whyte Anglin( nothing known to Australia?)

Timothy Warren Anglin bn 31/8/1822 Clonakilty first marriage1853 St.John NB d 3/5/1896 Toronto

Julia Anglin md Denis O’Brien 17/4/1860 d. 1/4/1875

The early members of the Canadian Protestant line: •

Family Tree: Robert bn 1775 Bandon md Sarah Welply in 1800 d Cork

Family Tree: Samuel Anglin bn 1780 Bandon d.1851 Cork md Margaret Welpley

Grave yard

The Anglin Monument in Kilgariffe cemetery gives: "erected by Jeremiah Hanglin in memory of his father Francis who departed this life March the 29 1793 aged 57 years" •

Jeremiah Hanglin 1769

Anne Anglin 1800

Joanna Anglin 1868

Francis Anglin 1875

Julia O'Brien (nee Anglin) 1875

Church registers

Baptism: In the Clonakilty RC parish registers for 31st August 1822 there is this entry. Timothy son of Frank Hanglin and Johana Warren sponsors Ellen Hanglin and nnnn not legible. (Spelling here is as in the register.)

Marriage: White Anglin md Catherine Holland 29/9/1803 in North Catholic Parish Cork City. (I include this as I believe Timothy Warren Anglin had a brother Whyte Anglin)

Marriage: 6/3/1821 Michael Warren to Calhounnon? (Difficult to read) Hanglin witnesses Francis Hanglin and Anna White

Baptism: In the Clonakilty RC parish registers for 26 September 1819 there is an entry: Joanus NNNN not legible and sponsors were Jeer,iah Hanglin and Marie Donovan (I presume Jeer,iah is Jeremiah)

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Civil registers

Some random information retained because of the first names: •

Death: William Francis Anglin Youghal 1880 he was 34. so born c.1846. Who is this!

Death: Francis Anglin Chapel Street Clonakilty on 10/4/1876 widower, gentleman, 76 years, David O’Brien present at death Illness phthisis could be 15 years certified death registered 28/4/1876. I think this is Timothy Warren’s father stated on gravestone as dying 1875.

Death: 19/11/1867. Anne Anglin widow of a farmer husband William Anglin address Chapel Street Clonakilty. These two deaths in Chapel Street raise a question. Is it two different houses and since Chapel Street was not farmland was this Anne Anglin now a widow now living in the same house with Francis, maybe her brother.

Death: ?/?/ 1876 Robert Anglin died aged 76 in Clonakilty - I did not get the certificate. This first name is often found in the Canadian protestant line and also in the line of Chris AngliM who is DNA related to Clonakilty Anglins.

Death: ?/?/1864 Johanna Anglin aged 76 died in Cork - I did not get the death cert. To date I could not find the death of Julia O’Brien (nee Anglin) on the suggested date.

Today: we know there are the families of the John Anglin and Jeremiah Anglin in the Clonakilty area to the present day

Other sources: •

http://www.clonakilty.ie/

http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/l/e/v/Frank-Levay-Ontario/WEBSITE0001/

Anglin Family Book June, 1946 (unpublished) by Arthur White Anglin, KC, son of TW Anglin

Innishannon: Is a town half way between Bandon and Cork But still can be considered West Cork. There is a Will abstract in the Welply Collection in notebook 22a page 186: “41. 173,465,128483. Agreement 10 Novr. 1755. Elizh. Payne. Wid. And Exectr. of Silvanus Payne late of Ardclugg near Inishonam, Co. Cork (i) Wm. Hanglen of Ardclugg, wool comber (2). Elizh. Had an interest in the lands of Ardclugg by virtue of a lease 2 made to Silvanus by Rev. John Moore decd. Wm. Hanglen had married Mary Ann Payne. of Elizh. Above. Wits. :- Robert Payne of Inishowan Co. Cork and John Cusick of the same, linen weaver. William Hanglin ref. 189 86 124703 wool comber. This deals with a transfer of land to a Thomas Corker. It deals with Ardclugg in Inishshannon. The names Sylvanus and Elizabeth Payne are mentioned in the memorial. The memorial is dated 20th April 1757” (Note: these names occur in the Welply papers and in the few will abstracts of Hanglins that still exist.)

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A Special Note on The Macroom Area of West Cork It is sensible that attention is paid to the Macroom area of West Cork. While Macroom is in West Cork it is quite a distance from Clonakilty and borders on the Gaelteach (Irish speaking of west Cork) and also is quite close to North West Cork where the Norman Irish name Angland is found. The following is sourced from O’Kief: •

In C of I. burial records for the parish of Macroom there are burials of Mary Hanglin on 27 February 1749 and of Eleanor Hanglin d.of Dermot Hanglin on 22 July 1750

Birth of Elizabeth Hanglin child of Jeremy Hanglin and Mary Hanglin on 27 Septhember 1747

There are land deeds of Philip Hanglin, gent, 1771 and in Crookstown again of a Philip Hanglin in 1769.

In the incomplete Protestant census of 1766 there is a John Hanglin, papist, in the parish of Iniscarra and Makeby and of a Philip Hanglin, papist, in the parish of Killigrahan both in the Barony of Muskerry. A DNA test was carried out on a descendant of a Macroom Anglin (cf. DNA project patrirach Jeremiah Anglin) and he belongs unsurprisingly to Group 2. While the male names of Jeremiah, John are present in the Clonakilty data and historically Diarmuid is also present in the Anglin Cork data and so is unsurprising, I find the use of the name Phillip is unusual among Irish Anglins. This Philip, gent, in 1769 and 1771 in Crookstown is worthy of note. It is the first use of the name Philip I have unearthed in the early years of the Irish (H)Anglin(m)s story. He is identified as a gent indicative of being considered a man of money/wealth/ position. Further this name, Philip, is also the name of the Anglin Plantation owners in Jamaica in the 1700’s. This Jamaica Philip was linked to the Cromwell story (cf Data in body of this report and on the Internet under Scarlett). Continued research in North West Cork Includes an examination of the relationship between the surnames (H)Anglin(m) and Angland. In view of the possibility that there may be an early line of Anglins in North West County Cork I include this rather disjointed data which may at a later date be of assistance to those doing further Hanglin(m) research in North West Cork. Geographical Area In the records this area of North West Cork borders on the counties of Kerry and Limerick. In historical terms it covers the Baronies of Duhallow, West Muskery, East Muskerry, Barrets and Orrey/Kilmore. This area in tradition is often referred to as Sliabh Luachra.

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Introduction to the Search The research in North West Cork is complicated as presently in this area there are no persons with the Anglin/Anglim/Hanglin (the Gaelige O’hAnglainn) surname. But there are quite a large group of the surname Angland (the Gaelige Aingleont). •

From O’Kief’s work, ‘O’kief Coshe Mang, Slieve Lougher and Upper Blackwater in Ireland’, compiled by Dr. Alert O’Casey, it is clear the Hanglin/Anglin name as well as Angland existed in 1800’s in that area. I find it hard to accept that the Hanglin/Anglin name just died out or all of them emigrated. It is necessary to go back a little in time to examine possibilities.

The Hanglin surname is Gaelige Irish in origin …Gaelige spelling O’hanglainn.

The Angland surname is Norman Irish in origin …Gaelige spelling Aingleont.

First record of persons of these two surnames is Fionn O’hAnglainn in 1490 and the Norman Simon Anglyn in 1364.

The two surnames are present in the Elizabethan Fiants i.e. c. 1600.

Hanglin/Anglin Year 1601 1586 1586 1591 1600 1600

Source Fiant (6516) Fiant (4619) Fiant (4619) Fiant (5508) Fiant (6469) Fiant (6469)

Surname O’hangelen O’hanglin O’Hanglyn O’Hangelen O’hanglen O’hanglen

Forename Nevan M’Dermody Fynyn M’Dermody Margaret ny Dermody Teig husbandman Nevan M’Dermodie Dermodie M’Teig

Source Fiant 6465 Fiant 6407 Fiant 6407 Fiant 2269 Fiant 2251 Fiant 4752

Surname Ny Anglyn Anglant Anglante Anglound Angyllont Anglyllen

Forename Grany Ellen Thomas John FitzWilliam Thomas Ynory

Angland Year 1600 1600 1600 1573 1573 1585

Other early examples for Hanglin •

RIA document: 1600+ Poet Diarmuid Ban O’hAnglainn ?

Land deed: Owen Anglin ref 295 308 196278. He is a Gent and is leasing land in Kilcrogan County Cork to Thomas Myles. The land seems to be in Ballydangan County Cork. The memorial is dated 14th November 1764.

Marriage licence bonds: 1681

There is Francis Anglin who married Elizabeth Mills

1743

There is James Anglin who married Mary Lindsay

1756

There is James Anglin who married Suzannah Glover

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Others early examples for Angland •

RIA document: 1772 Poet Michael Aingleont

It is during and after the reign of Elizabeth I i.e. late 1500’s and during the 1600’s, the anglicisation of the Gaelige names O’hAnglainn and Aingleont was enforced but it took time as many resisted change in Ireland.

A DNA test has been carried out on an Angland from Ireland. Their DNA was not related to the Hanglin/Anglin/Anglim profile. (My comment: not surprising as the name was Norman Irish.)

A serious suggestion as to why there are no Anglins in North west Cork today In North West Cork during this process some O’hAnglainns became Angland and some Aingleontes may have become Anglin. But since in north west Cork the more common name was Aingleonte/Angland then the anglicisation would be mostly from O’hAnglainn to Angland. I find even today people will say to you there are Anglins in North West Cork but they spell it Angland. I am suggesting the two Gaelige surnames have been at times confused as they were anglicised. The research question is can evidence be produced to support this hypothesis. Two approaches are necessary i) via the route of DNA testing and to date the testing of a single Angland indicates no connection to Anglin and ii) other is by examining original documentation to see have spellings changed by people who thought the two names were the same. Now other data relevant to research in North West Cork Documentary evidence of Hanglin and Anglands of North West County Cork: •

Today •

There are no Hanglins/Anglin(m)s in this area

There are a number of Anglands cf. Phone book

Census Data •

Data is available on the Internet

1901 and 1911 census

Hanglin/anglin(m)s: There is but one Hanglin/Anglin(m)s Michael Anglin in Castlecor (townland Subulter)

Anglands: There are a number but in a small area of DED’s (i.e. District Electoral Divisions) namely Newmarket (townlands Garraunawarrig, Liscongill, Newmarket), Meens (townlands Foilogohil, Knockyrourke, Knocknanagh east, Reanagashel), Kilmeen (townlands Knockeenaadallane, Glentanefinnane), Boherboy (townlsands Keel), Clonfert (townlands Croanrea), Barleyhill (townlands, Barleyhill, Clashroe, Meeneshall), Glencara (townlands Meetinny east, Curraduff).

Griffiths Valuation 1850

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Data available on the Internet: Hanglin/Anglin(m)s: There are 2 i)Anglam Jason Timothy in DED of Clonfert(townland Gortknockanroe); ii)Anglum Thomas in DED Subulter (townland Subulter)

Anglands: are present in Clonfert (Meeneeshal, Meenytinny east, Kilowen , Ballydunane South: Patrick Timothy Michael Patrick) Edmund and Florence) in Clondrohid (Ardncrushy Francis) Kilmeen (Follogohig Knocknanagh east, Gneeves, Knockyrourke; John,Maurice,Timothy)

OKief: 1868- 1870 •

In Vol 8, the birth records for 1868-1870 for the Barony of Duhallow i.e. roughly North west Cork. This information was found: i) one Anglin Margaret Anglin in Ballyrushen; and ii) two Anglims Mary and Ellen in Derryrogan.

In the same records there were many Anglands. Since this research concerns the story of the surname and not family trees, in looking at O‘Kief the focus was the place rather than names: Meens(Catherine); Laharan (David, John): Kiskeem (Ellen):Knocknarourke (Ellen, Maurice): Knocknacurrah (Honora): Folloghig(Johanna,Timothy,Patrick) Meentinny(Julia John Maurice): Clonfert (Margaret): Dromscarra(Mary): Ballyduane(Maurice), Boherbue (many Anglands)

Catholic Church Records •

Relevant parishes to the above are now listed with the microfiche number for NLI Dublin. Chosen on the information of Anglands/Anglins in North West Cork: •

Kanturk 5008, Newmarket 5010 & 5011, Meelin 5009, Castlemagner 5009, Buttevant 4998, Dromtariff 4264, Liscarroll 4999, Mallow 4997, Freemount 5008, Clondrohid 5002, Killshanig 5008: Ballyclough 5009, 5010, Boherbue 4265, 4266 Glantane 5008

• •

(I have no numbers for these:) Kilmeen, Drishane, Clonmeen

Estate Records •

Information can be gleaned from them as was done for the West Cork area

Lord Arden 1824-1830 NLI Mss 8652 covers civil parishes Bregoge, Buttervant, Castlemanger, Clonfert, Dromtarriff and Dungourney

Lombard Rev. Edmund: rentals 1795 nli mss 2985 covers townlands in civil parishes of Kilshannig and Kilmacdonagh

Postscript It is still necessary to pursue this line of research, as there are two groups of the DNA project - namely 3 and 4 - that are not yet linked to County Cork.

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The Surname Anglin  
The Surname Anglin  

A report of issues raised, findings uncovered and conclusions drawn from a study into the origins and scatter of the family name Anglin

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