Page 1

S?

N

IO

ST

UE

Q

2014 AWARD RECIPIENTS 2012 AWARD RECIPIENTS

ANA MATIJEVIC VINEET BHOSLE ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY AIAS MEMBER AIAS MEMBER PABLO DANI HILLMONCAYO

TALIESIN TALIESEN WEST AIAS MEMBER AIAS MEMBER

EEN NT

IAA A

RI ZO

N

04 .10 74.1 53

o wo Am c hem Q L e CPTE FSrta loeym mb all srumill yher Arbize htuitree ieevne IRUE HAR Aarn antke dbWer ers ubm feavse e onrsa o cscthu tsmo IM R i v f s e , P]T z L E itte at ac e thfeA oreo nAI N ULna odn Uloy rigo of r c M A l ER d sur esyw gIA ssci tsS T arpa ivned athSe ndivW hftA AI i e n o ] iVnpc roe egn e rssitcy a tatUe e rsigi SIcASh, AS, tudniog gs toher neArari hAorioz sftuAd ESN zo ols IA n t h t e i c e o U f l h n p 1 i l y T o V r t n n i p i o i u rojea e wyo punba nain. Stss S a isi sit d le ur1x f Ae nviev HSc o th th ec t e ebu lic, TAh atut wall o lont thetheing an ag1e 7 rizAorc errssit ehrob l oef a e ts. x sitr b , aar reiz dthe w th g A a d d p nah ityy oel Arc ar A am e, e ncdh 1o2n n w e w IA I b a to d Cit oH rogf rchi c .ar s it A A rie s pf o oe ef rA eA htec hi EEli te 0a0! ts c l t y pl htstpt w eim b h l o i u i f g e t r g A e c a r t a Cpar iibb b- m aizo ri reno stf se gteu erirzg Ihnit eucre c e : o / o a o s o /is rk pclotyu We t t Juea sh jpe lelec riitzta ll ona zonsumps a sle roef a enr a setcitt tupro tur h r s f w uu, a eres pr dgc rci t caa w e olsn thwe a eis o incg t Arre InsC urte regr e p e . n a c a e e e t es inhg o zes. ndn c b DE ent wifl ths wCil a iddiad an.od radr susitbewt eabndf yoleu pdawhiteecntcituotlelefg aftoTra aatmTsaarogr ork bomd ponthu nt to y st sia s AADD atiol bee s l bseh taeste g.ditio moi viesitegrapr mgeo1rks uroeur oreDo Dlieessin liet tshe am st it st ho + s p e w s a s i c d a n i , h t ud in s, w w n o LLIN n. onho wariz iwll al sio s o ic st 1x1in Lga sfigA gWne W at e v i en a n NE c i e n e r u n e s r l w n d Ju bo es l w for s abm iewxaim 7 plu dds canh atn, es the E ls, d w in i ts y d d t p t m d d c m d i i o FOO ginlocba toill an a . ndtta e p re f in ap tte t , A F a h s r t l o ion as f nt le ss f g a e uAb ce t he riz an RR g al ase AbIAe mom A i u at drdom riesof sve seleb rcmh rrtes Ar on k SU wil ctivd o S amw noetn w it p f c st c ri itit , +a ts a e l a e e BM MI be dAInA cmomabrde e rytaprry ww.iaonaast wromhooul dioteedfwpeecatusrein nd th , ia- l ininn papro p orrso gle e SSS on enmc rsdfr t izper ar foerrs st jecroj ks n e bep omo ifzoe IIOO izo mal w tsec al by ers t, Ae r tf N I na aot ng inn . t. chS hoeirr e lo . cla aA .or ionw er ca ri om stx PR f u t g. aith s, c e y d l I t GGO IZZ A , a hem eiop t E IA n sbc pt LD S SIL O r e i o o I d L h P m L r BBR VVE D$4 E em gr ooslsfr jencats ROON ERR 0 R a o l S be ph . m . ZNE $2 0 C C ZE$ 00 $ HHOO rs. ic 10 O 4 LL 0 $2 00 O $1 00 00

N

A NIO

TPP A RRO R OJE I JCE Z TCST O N C EC SC HI T C EL A TES OM Ce IG C [ O C G S e l I ppr eleb B TSTU PM mthe orofefse brarat IBILII [SDE E evan meb1 ssiosni eteth LTIY TUNT P TC IET fepa u erydw e e2rs00 oanl aa tehae TYR D turblic hem ofm rcl ha chaie ERQ ENH TIO M ing f repl AIe itrec cv EU M T A IT

STTU UDD

35 S

011

220

co UE nt STI ac ON t c S? ha co rn ntac iss t a ch m arn oo is re sa m | oo ch re ar | c AM ni ha ss rn A ER a@ is M IC s ai a@ ERAN a- ai ar aIC I izo ari A NS z na on NT .o a.o INITU rg rg ST TE or or ITU O 6 60 02 TE F 2. .25 25 2 OAR 2. .42 F CH 42 0 A I 00 0 RT

Q

AAI

WIN $400 CASH ENTER NOW

FOR MORE INFO VISIT: www.aia-arizona.org

LISA MARTINEZ MARCELA GRACIA UNIVERSITY ARIZONA UNIVERSITY OFofARIZONA AIAS MEMBER AIAS MEMBER

And remember, all recent NAAB-accredited degree recipients automatically receive a FREE 18-month Associate Membership to the AIA after graduation!


Kevin Kolden kkolden@asu.edu 480.688.7423 aias number: see email Arizona State University MArch 2016 ASU Hayden Library

Education: Arizona State University Master of Architecture (3+) 2013-2016 (expected) 4.0 GPA Existing confining

Arizona State University Bachelor of Music Performance (Orchestral Instrument) 2007-2011 magna cum laude Provost’s Full Academic Scholarship

Proposed liberating Diagram of program and new double height spaces

3

2

4

1 7

8

5

North-South section

9

16

10

E x t e r i o r

Built in 1964 the Charles Hayden Library was designed by Arizona architect Frank Henry. The building was paraised for its economy while responding the the future needs of the university as well as the students. Today the central library on the largest university campus in the nation is in a state of degradation. The original intent of the library to house books and provide students with a place of quite repose on campus has been systematically undermined by a series of architectural missteps. These missteps include changes with the original design as well as a 1986 addition. The driving force behind my design was to focus on the aspects of the building that are simply not working in their current state. Concept: Create a 21st century library that opens its doors to students, rather than retreat behind concrete walls. Walls become a metaphorical door, in order to presence the program of the library in the heart of the university.

I n t e r i o r

6

13

the maze 11

14 15

Section

the free plan

Details: existing waffle slab 1 rigid insulation >4” 2 photovoltaic panels 3 skylight 4 1” double insulated glass unit 5 tension rod 6 connection to steel column 7 rotated pre-cast panel 8 HSS canteliver beam 9 existing location of weld 10 plates 11 custom steel conteliver beam 12 low profile access floor 13 adonized alluminum flashing 14 insulation 15 wood suport 16 HSS round column 17

Plan

E x t e r i o r

I n t e r i o r

12


APPROACH FROM CARPORT TO CENTRAL SPACE

ARROYO BETWEEN EDUCATION CENTER

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CAMPUS

Amanda Schwarz anschwarz@email.arizona.edu (520) 870-3236 38118961

The massive walls, being of the earth, split to preserve and honor the arroyos. The roof planes, being of the sky, act as the mediator. The language shifts to a series of layered tectonics that extend and blend into the landscape while structurally demonstrating strength through unity. Each individual program channels water through the central gathering space where a series of terraces allow for small and large gatherings and an interconnected web of paths and nodes.

RAIN IN THE DESERT : STRENGTH THROUGH UNITY

OUTDOOR GATHERING SPACES

University of Arizona / 2016 Spirit of the Place : Unitarian Universalist Church Campus

learning center

approach towards courtyard AMANDA SCHWARZ | ARC 302 | P. REIMER | SPRING 2014

AMANDA SCHWARZ | ARC 302 | P. REIMER | SPRING 2014

University of Arizona 2011 - 2016 B. Architecture / Honors College GPA: 3.91 AIAS President Vice President Secretary Board Member

2011 - Present 2014 - 2015 2013 - 2014 2012 - 2013 2011 - 2012

Tau Sigma Delta

2013 - Present

AMANDA SCHWARZ| ARC 302 | P. REIMER | SPRING 2014

Rick Joy Architects 2014 / Summer Gymnastics Instructor 2011 - 2014

Project Location : Oro Valley, AZ Project Type : Church Campus Location Climate : Hot, Arid Squarefootage : 16,000 sq ft

genus loci : land ethic, understanding and respecting the spirit of the place The Unitarian Universalist church upholds respect for diverse philosophies. This principle is rooted to the Sonoran Desert and the phenomenon of the yearly monsoons. Capturing the spirit of the place, this campus nestles at the base of the hills, celebrating the beauty of desert rain that slowly carves through the earth, leaving behind arroyos as a memory and a promise.

scale

SITE PLAN

AMANDA SCHWARZ | ARC 302 | P. REIMER | SPR

SITE SECTION : SANCTUARY

DESIGN PROCESS + SITE ANALYSIS

SITE CHARACTERISTICS

TOPOGRAPHY + HYDROLOGY

TRIPARTITE PROGRAM

RESPECT EXISTING ARROYOS

FORM ADJUSTMENT

WATER COLLECTION ON ROOF PLANE


Samuel Martin smartin@taliesin.edu 206-419-5367 38346281 Taliesin, The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture Architectural Studio, University of Wisconsin - Madison

Resume M. Arch Candidate Taliesin, FLLW School of Architecture

Client Entrance View North-East at Noon

Reception, Inside Client Entrance View North in the Morning

Studio Terrace View East in the Afternoon

Libary Courtyard View South in the Morning

Structural Diagram

Reception, Level II

Successive walls of concrete connect to transverse beams. The rhythm of this structure resonates visibly outward. Familiar moments and volumetric relationships are reiterated and become playfilled, as the eye traces energetically in each space.

Plan, 4/125” = 1’-0”

B.S. Industrial Design Western Washington University, 2013 Internship Blank Studio, 2015 - Current Ideal, Carefully Curated Goods, 2011 Accolades The School Scholarship, Taliesin, 2015 Academic Excellence, Taliesin, 2015 Merit Scholarship, Taliesin, 2014 Session Speaker, IDSA National, 2014 Silver, Spark Awards, 2013 Leadership Vice President, Taliesin AIAS, 2014-15 Secretary, Taliesin AIAS, 2014 Senior Advisor, WWU IDSA, 2013 President, WWU IDSA, 2012 Threshold, Madison, WI Sited on Frautschi Point of University of Wisconsin, Madison, this proposed architectural studio is an investigation of transition. Taking its name from the traditional barrier of a doorway, Threshold is an investigation of the physical configuration of structural concrete, circulation of creative space, and transition within the hierarchy of an architectural practice. Tucked onto the brow of the hill, Threshold embraces this restored prairie, from natural landscape to deep tray green roofs with natural plantings. In the primary studio, interns sit to the north,closest to the library. As they gain tenure, move south. This is an homage to the Benedictine Monk Iconographers, in which each piece would move from an apprentice’s preparation of canvas to the eventual final touches applied by the master. In a conference room above, the client presentation space cantilevers over the studio below, representing all members of the practice sitting at the table of work being represented.

As a family of gestures, the structure is a generative, familiar series of moves, at once of Wisconsin, and yet new to it. The abduction of prarie style.

RECEPTION CONFERENCE

GALLERY

5 0

10

30

50

Studio, Level I LABORATORY

Plan, 4/125” = 1’-0”

UP

DOWN

LIBRARY

GRAND HALL

WAR ROOM

BREAK ROOM

MECHANICAL & STORAGE

STUDIO


Zhaohang Zhang ezio0203@gmail.com 480-284-9127 AIAS # 38406292

Arizona State University 2016

Main ideas

Education 2012 Fall - 2015 Spring Arizona State University, Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts Major in Architectural Studies, minor in Sustainability Cumulative GPA: 4.04 (By 2014 Fall) Honors 2012 Fall - 2015 Spring Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts Dean’s List 2012 Fall - 2015 Spring New American University Scholarships 2014 Fall Nomination for the Sean Murphy Prize and the Class of '77 Scholarships 2014 Spring Design Excellence nomination in Scott Murff’s Studio 2014 Fall Design Excellence nomination in Thamarit Suchart’s Studio

Along the memory

The Pioneers and Military Memorial Cemetery in downtown Phoenix was established in the early 1900s. It is the burial location for many notable city" s early settlers. The project seeks to remind people of that period history and reconnect the Pioneer' s Cemetery to current life in Phoenix by establishing a space for one historic center and one reflection area. The rest of space will serve as a public park that gives visitors an impressed introduction to the Panoramic site image Pioneers and Military Memorial Cemetery.

Overview

Lego study model

Between the walls

Along memory

Immerse into memory


Katie Roch

A

B

rochk@email.arizona.edu (406) 690-8119 38411071

LEVEL 5 68' - 0"

C

D

Summer

E

Winter

University of Arizona/2016

LEVEL 4 52' - 0"

G

F

Center for Innovation and Collaboration for the University of Arizona

16' - 0"

H

I

J

LEVEL 3 36' - 0"

3' - 2"

K

1' - 0"

exterior perspective from southern side

LEVEL 2 20' - 0"

University of Arizona 2010-2015 B.Architecture w/ Honors

M

2014 2015

Archon Prize Merit Award

2015

AIA SA Design Excellence 2nd Place _____________ Structures Grader/TA 2014-Current

collaborative hallways

shifted zones

N

17' - 6"

natural daylight

Tau Sigma Delta Honors Society Gordon H. Heck Memorial Scholarship

LEVEL 1 0' - 0"

section perspective cut through media lab looking east

Partial Section

SPEEDWAY BLVD

0’

2’

4’

8’

A. ALUMINUM COPING AT CURTAIN WALL PARAPET

2015

project description: The Center for Information and Collaboration serves as a hub for all disciplines across the University of Arizona campus. The CIC creates a transparency though its facade system and its orientation to visually connect to the campus. Its length situated east to west, the CIC takes advantage of natural daylight. Louvers on the south facade block direct sunlight during hot months. The Center for Information and Collaboration supports the University of Arizona’s learning environment by providing a space where students can meet and collaborate with peers from other disciplines. The grand suspended library provides quiet “living rooms” for small groups to work. “Hallway” areas surround the library and offer more dynamic, changeable space for individuals and groups, which are activated by circulation. Spaces within this linear arrangement were then shifted to create new, larges zones for exhibition and multi media labs. This act of shifted creates inhabitable, shaded exterior decks. A raised green roof, cafe, and additional all-hour work studios stretch along the north side of the campus in order to foster collaboration in a variety of environments and times of the day.

3' - 2 1/4"

L

B. RIGID BUILT-UP INSULATION C. ALUMINUM BRACKET D. VERTICAL ALUMINUM LOUVER CHANNEL E. COPPER LOUVER F. DUCT G. RECESSED LIGHTING

H. SUSPENDED CEILING I. EXTRUDED ALUMINUM MULLION J. DOUBLE PANE INSULATING GLASS WITH LOW-E COATING K. CONCRETE SLAB ON DECK OVER STRUCTURAL STEEL FRAMING L. OPERABLE WINDOW M. STEEL WIDE FLANGE STRUCTURE N. TILT-UP CONCRETE WALL

elevation details

elevations

partial section

Level 2.5

interior perspective from shifted zone looking into library

Community Meeting Room

LEVEL 5 68' - 0"

Electrical Room

Janitor’s Closet Photography Library

Large Gallery Summer

Server Room

Winter

MDF

site plan

LEVEL 4 52' - 0"

IT Conference Room Conference Room

Conference Room

2nd STREET

level 3 plan + typical library plan (above) Level 3

LEVEL 3 36' - 0"

LEVEL 2 20' - 0"

LEVEL 1 0' - 0"

section longitudinal

section transverse

Section A 0’

4’

8’

16’

LEVEL P2 -30’


GARTH A. LINDQUIST GLIND89@GMAIL.COM 860.490.3902 38346280 TALIESIN, THE FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE - SPRING 2016 SAAD SGARDNER ARBORETUM

RESUME Taliesin, The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture (M.Arch 2014 - present) AIAS Chapter President 2014 - 2015 Peer-Selected Presenter - Box Formal 2014 Green Mountain College (BA - Sustainable Design 2008 - 2012) Teaching Assistant to Lucas Brown (Environmental Design/ Build 2011 - 2012) DESCRIPTION Living and working between the Taliesin campuses nurtures an opportunity to observe and engage in ongoing preservation efforts of the built environment. The goal of this project in conjunction with Research Design Studio was to explore a series of questions surrounding preservation. Why do we preserve? How do we determine social and cultural value? Is the physical manifestation of a place or the idea of a place more important to preserve? Can one exist without the other? The result of this research is the Saad Sgardner Arboretum sited outside Madison, WI on a gentle north-sloping hill nestled in Picnic Point - a public park stewarded by the University of Wisconsin Madison. The project challenges notions of ecological ownership and preservation, creating a dialogue between restorative ecological research and privatized seed storage facilities. The circular geometry activates a strong core where native prairie species are actively studied and cultivated while the storage facility terminates underground at a tangential axis to the core.

01. aerial rendering

03. site section cut

04. courtyard rendering

02. ground floor plan


Multi-family Housing Project

Miles Foster

mjfoste5@asu.edu | 480-266-4022 38469451 Arizona State University | 2016 Architecture with a minor in Sustainability GPA: 3.99 Design Excellence Nominations: Fall 2013, Spring 2014 Design Excellence Winner: Fall 2014

Project Description

(Fall 2014)

C

Progression E

Uniit Diagram

The site for this project is located in Mesa, AZ just South of the downtown area. The plot of land is located in the arts district and the goal of this project was to help revitalize this downtown area and provide a place for artists and designers to live and work within the local community. The inspiration for my design came from the historic neighborhood across the street and Building Diagram the fill and void spaces that are created from the houses and front yards. I wanted to create a similar feeling in this multifamily housing project. I wanted there to be a gradual change in public to semi-public to private. The first point of contact for visitors are these metal panels along the sidewalk which showcase the art and direct the visitors to the gallery and art walk space. The most public of the spaces runs East-West down the middle of the site, which is the art walk. This lowered area is perfect for viewing art and holding events. I decided to raise the semi-public walkways a level to help distinguish the two zones. The front yards between the shifting building creates a semi-private community front yard and also acts as a buffer to the public art walk. Lastly the most private space is the units themselves, which have a central core acting as the buffer between private residences and the exterior B public. Overall this project was one of my favorites and I enjoyed thinking about a project at all scales and how it interacts with the larger context, especially at different times of day and year were very interesting to me.

D x8

3 bedroom 2 bedroom 1 bedroom Service Core

A

B

N-s Section

E-W Section D

A

Entrance/ Sidewalk C

Outdoor Gallery

Interior Public Gallery E

Art Walk/Gallery

Art Walk


patrick n. ceguera

individual work / study space typology doesn’t allow for interaction between students and strangers

open study / free circulation creates moments of interaction that lead to innovation

typical massing typology

programmatic coresc

irculatory vectors for collaboration opportunites

patrickceguera@email.arizona.edu 925.550.3741 AIAS Membership #: 38121863 The University of Arizona CAPLA, class of 2016 the co.laboratory - a center for information and collaboration

6” VERTICAL OPERABLE ALLUMINUM LOUVER CURTAIN WALL CONCRETE SLAB AND METAL DECKING

WOODEN SLATTED DROPPED CIELING

EDUCATION

OPERABLE WINDOW FOR AIR TRANSFER

University of Arizona CAPLA, 16’

DIAGONAL BRACING

AIAS Arizona Public Relations Chair

HONORS

ALUMINUM INSULATED PANEL

PRIMARY STEEL BEAM (12X36”)

ABA Portfolio Competition, 2015

LIGHT FIXTURE

AIA SA Design Excellence Nominee, 2014

Archon Prize Finalist, 2014

HORIZONTAL MULLION

Dean’s List w/ Distinction, Spr + Fall 2014

EXPERIENCE Gensler, Los Angeles CA - Summer 15’

18” RAISED FLOOR W/ CONCRETE FINISH

BWS Architects, Tucson AZ - current

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

3’ BAR GRATING CAT WALK DIAGONAL BRACING CANTILEVERED STEEL BEAM

18

0

35

0

35

0

CIRCULATE R L glass enclosed study rooms & main stair

intermingled collections / open study

CIRCULATE

staff & faculty spaces

INDIVIDUAL

CIRCULATE

CIRCULATE

COLLABORATIVE

CIRCULATE

INSULATED METAL PANEL DROPPED CIELING

CIRCULATE

The co.LABORATORY exists as an opportunity for innovative ideas to be born, and for advancements to be made in all fields. Innovation, however, relies on interaction with others in similar or related fields. While yes, spaces for both individual work and collaborative work are conducive to productivity, it is within the circulatory moments between spaces of work that true innovation can take place. Innovation relies on unexpected moments of collaboration. The design, then, reflects this need and attempts to foster innovative interactions via circulatory vectors. The program is organized into cores that hold main spaces of use; all the spaces around and inbetween become open space and opportunites for interaction. The three cores split the program up into the following spaces: a core for book stacks, a core for study rooms, and a core for administrative offices. On the ground floor, a plaza and shaded space is created by lifting the building, allowing for encounters between those shuffling from class to class. A grand staircase then breaks down from the cantilever, and becomes a point of entry from the plaza as well as an additional public space. The staircase acts as a lightwell through the building, and is surrounded by glass study rooms that allow visual access and become a way of appreciating the work being done in the co.laboratory.

1

35

0

35

0

35

0

35

0

35

0

35

0

35

2

3

4

5

6

0

Level 6

Level 6

80' - 0"

80' - 0"

Level 5

Level 5

68' - 0"

68' - 0"

Level 4

Level 4

52' - 0"

52' - 0"

Level 3

Level 3

36' - 0"

36' - 0"

Level 2

Level 2

20' - 0"

20' - 0"

Level 1

Level 1

0' - 0"

0' - 0"


Sho Ishida sishida@taliesin.edu 909-631-4455 38327855 Taliesin, the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture /2016 Moss in Architecture: Revitalizing human organisms and enhancing an educational environment.

Resume +B Arch., Tokai Unversity, Japan: - 3, 2012 +J Ishida Assoc: -9, 2012 +CPELI: - 9, 2013 +Taliesin: 10, 2013+ Internships: manys Programs for Project + Vectorworks 2015 + Adobe: Ps, Ai, Id + Cinema 4D + Ecotect Prime References + ASHRAE 2015 + Biophilic Design + Bryophyte Ecology + Circadian System etc. A goal of the hypothetical project, Moss in Architecture, was to design an educational arhictecture with Biophilic Deisng idea and Wholeness in Madison, Wisconsin. My approach was to incorporate passive design and natural saturation in order to activate or revitalize human’s organisms and enhance an educational environment in an architecture with bryophytes and umbriferous trees. The benefit to cultivate sphagnum moss in architecture is three features: no harmful in their surrounding ecosystem, heating by dissapating ultraviolet lights, providing a tactilice experience, and can grow under sceadu. Childrens in the elementary school will enhance their circadian system, concentration, senses, and health with the inside-out conditions. Also, the efficiency of O & M will be better than a planting base green wall system.


kelsey ayotte kelsey.ayotte@asu.edu (602)-565-2707 38415583

arizona state university 2017 moeur park, tempe - transect 7

education architectural studies (bsd) sustainability (minor) activities aias national society of collegiate scholars chi omega

n-s section/elevation 1/4”=1’

the design focuses on the preexisting elements. the concept is to provide a habitat that blendswith the natural landscape, as well as createan observation area that allows different perspective on the ash-throated flycatcher.

within this studio, we needed to choose a native bird to arizona and create a bird habitat along with a human observation area. we were assigned to work in a transect on moeur park, making the land use not only limited, but each had its own opportunities and constraints. i chose to work with the ash-throated flycatcher and designed an open space to observe the birds from. The elements on my site were best suited for this species, with dense vegetation close and power lines to perch on. i chose the most sustainable material for my building by using rammed earth for walls, and created a roof system that provides shade but doesn’t capture heat.

observation area 1/4”=1’

site plan 1”=40’

opportunities & constraints

drawings - different views with the surrounding elements in moeur park


Typical Wall Section Detail 1 1/2” = 1’ 0”

Lauren Bucher laurenbucher9@gmail.com 267.980.2639 38470897 Arizona State University / 2016

TEMPE

Coor Architonic

1

Vertical Aluminum Fin Louver (10 gauge) Laser cut in shop to profile specification

2

Welded Horizontal Tube (2”) Varies in length in accordance to fin

3

Existing Curtain Wall Glass and Mullion System

4

Aluminum Coping

5

Existing Parapet Wall Construction

6

Rigid insulation

7

Weatherproof protective layer

8

Horizontal Aluminum Shelf (7 gauge) for South Elevation

9

Slotted Angle Bolt Connection of Horizontal Shelf to Horizontal Tube

1

3

2

4

5

10 Steel Horizontal Tube (4”)

ASU

11 Stub Column with Fin Plate 12 Two Part Epoxy Bolted Connection 13 Existing Concrete Slab (12”)

Southeast elevation panorama showing the transformation process of Coor Hall’s appearance from an entirely solid mass into a thin drapery that allows the glass structure and art glass to be discovered.

Honors ASU Sun Angel Funk Architecture Scholarship (2015) Design Excellence Honor (ASU 2013, 2014)

Thesis

PRIVAT

Activities Desert Wood Phoenix, AZ (2014) Owner and designer of wood jewelry and products. Marketing consultant for Outland Furnishings company.

IC

BL

PU

GLA E MA S S SS

Antithesis

GA

OFF TH

ICE

Synthesis

COLLA

BORAT

Coor Hall’s Skin: Tectonic and Stereotomic Design The focus of this semester project is the renovation of Coor Hall, an Arizona State University office and classroom building located on the western edge of the Tempe campus. Parameters include building program, desert environment, and urban university conditions. To resolve Coor Hall’s paradoxical condition of exposed private and enclosed public, additive and subtractive techniques were implemented based on architect/ historian/ethnographer Gottfried Semper’s classification of the process of building procedures; the tectonics of the frame, in which light-weight, linear components are assembled so as to embody a spatial matrix and the stereotomics of the earthwork, formed out of the repetitious stacking of heavy-weight units. The result is a play on pedestrian perspective that allows for a private office condition with thin moments of discovery and carved public connections.

15 Foam Insulated Art Glass

Shade Fin Development

Shadow Box 16 Recessed Dull

North (West)

West

South (West)

South (East)

East

E North (West)

West

South (West)

South (East)

East

North (East)

North (Center)

Combining Solar, Contextual, and Programatic Impacts : The result is a complex, connective language that moves in accordance to the many factors that make up Coor Hall; solar expectations, urban context, program requirement, and curtain wall composition. From the many elements forms a single component. North (East)

North (Center)

ER

Coor Hall does not relate interior program with exterior context. The building needs to respond to urban conditions and different program spaces in alignment with the New American University’s aspirations for ASU to embrace its cultural, socioeconomic and physical setting. Coor Hall adapts to t he surrounding and user functions via a juxtaposition of tectonic and stereotomic techniques.

Shade Light Vertical Shade Vertical Light Horizontal Light Transition Shade Horizontal Vertical Transition Horizontal Northwest

West

Southw est

West

South (West)

Southeast

South (East)

Northeast

East

East

North (East)

6

Aluminum Backing

7

17 Typical Drywall

Construction 18 Built-in Attached Task

Desk (Particleboard, Melamine foil, Foil, ABS plastic 2”)

Light

North (West)

This Could Be PHX Phoenix, AZ (2014) Created plans and renderings for an envision project on 1st Street in downtown Phoenix to demonstrate possibilities of the street.

14 Steel Vertical Support Tube (3”)

8

11 9

10

12 13

14 19 Task Desk Leg (Steel,

Epoxy/polyester powder coating) 20 1” Insulating Glass Unit

North

North (Center)

15

North (West)

West

South (West)

South (East)

East

North (East)

North (Center)

16

18 17

19

20

The analytic from the southeast corner demonstrates Coor’s change from a closed object to a dynamic system both inside and outside. Instead of a grid of drywall, the furniture of Coor becomes the architecture. The office bookshelves divide each office creating a rhythm throughout the floor while the assistant desks become the exterior walls. The office desks and chairs are movable to allow for individual customization of one’s space and facilitates movement to other parts of the floor. This allows professors to meet with their desks in the open collaborative spaces.

Coor Hall’s original shadow box curtain wall created a super heated condition that radiated heat into the building resulting in a poor building performance. A single layer of aluminum panels replaced the shadow box and allowed for the attachment of the vertical fin system. The art panels remain are were filled with insulation.


ll co

di s

n tio ec

christopher ford

pe rs a

cjford@asu.edu 480-251-2048 38471658

c

on

cti

e oll

l

collection

the design school - arizona state university / class of 2016 cuenca del rio studio: ade 511 - core architectural studio I - fall 2013 (first semester of m.arch 3+ program)

Education: Master of Architecture Candidate Arizona State University

re ctu

m

roo

Bachelors of Science in Landscape Architecture Arizona State University Minor in Sustainability Summa Cum Laude

s oom ssr cla

le

educational gallery

sunken educational gallery

Work Experience: Logan Simpson Design Landscape Designer Office of the University Architect Landscape Architecture Intern

Concept: Cuenca Del Rio, meaning river basin in Spanish, allows the natural fluidity of collection and dispersal to shape its form and function, similar to a river basin. Driven by the ideas of ecology, education, and contextual appropriateness, the redesign of the Rio Salado Audubon Center provides a unique environmental experience through the changing of vantage points, within both the building and the site itself, that is intended to bring awareness to the vast work of the Audubon Society while inspiring a greater environmental and community ethic.

east/west site section

audubon center

central avenue

Awards: AZ ASLA Student Design Award (2013, 2014) AZ ASLA Student Achievement Award (2012, 2013) San Francisco Garden Show “Best In Show� (2013) ASU Design Excellence Award (F2010, S2012, F2013, S2013) Interdisciplinary Cluster Competition Winner (2012)

entry drive

erve g audubon pres

riparian scrub

ue mesquite bosq

building entry

ow

cottonwood/will

existin

raised walkway


Cathleen M Kebert ckebert@asu.edu 602.696.3250 AIAS #38121362 Arizona State University | 2015 Adaptive Reuse: Lucky’s Market Youth Center

Arizona State University Architectural Studies (BSD) Design Studies (BA) Coursework: Sustainability May 2015 | Current GPA: 4.0 Arizona State University Pursuing Masters of Architecture Degree Fall 2015 - Spring 2017 Service: Education Assistant Educated and mentored middle and high school students at Taliesin West for architecture-based camps Design Excellence Awards Lucky’s Market Youth Center Spring 2014 | Professor Marthe Rowen Emergency Response Station 55 Fall 2014 | Professor Phillip Horton Memberships/Affiliations ASU Architecture Journal | 2014+ Task manager, submission reviewer American Institute of Architecture Students | 2011+ Fourth-Year Representative (2014-15) Lucky’s Market Youth Center encourages young adults to experience all the resources and opportunities presented to them which are accessed by architectural promenades guided by light, materiality, and elevation changes. Two ramps linking all the programs are expressed on both the ground and upper floors. By utilizing transparent concrete blocks and copper mesh, the youths’ movements can be articulated. In addition, carefully placed light sources, tactile changes in materiality, and one’s relationship to the courtyard constantly changing drives user to explore the entire center.

Ground Floor Plan


Ramp main connection

CENTRO JUVENIL COLMENA TUCSON, ARIZONA THE CENTRO JUVENIL COLMENA: • Provides an innovative, 21st century dynamic teen learning space designed to inspire collaboration and creativity. • Provides a facility that respects, protects and extends Tucson’s rich cultural history and the uniqueness of its youth, the community, traditions, craftsmanship and place.


grobinson@email.arizona.edu 830-719-0877 University of Arizona, College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture / 2017 Gabrielle Matisse Robinson

Personal Skills Revit AutoCAD Rhino Adobe Suite SketchUp Fabrication Skills Tig Welding Mig Welding Finish Carpentry Work Experience Draftsman, CDG Architects Feb. 2015 – Present Construction documents and measurements for renovations Teaching Assistant, University of Arizona School of Architecture Aug. 2014 – Dec. 2014 Introduction to Design Fabrication Awards ARA Housing Competition, Honorable Mention Gertrude M. Thompson Memorial Scholar Cornerstone Building Award

The Lettino Chair was a semester long process from design to physical model. The chair was constructed from concrete and a 5x5 piece of ply wood. The concept behind this chair was to reuse the form work and have it double as the base. This decision was made to show the fabrication process behind the chair and have minimal waste when the chair was done. The first model was testing the limits of the material and experimenting with it’s form. The final form came from that experiment, it’s raw material has a comforting form. The monolithic seat hugs your body and leaves a cool touch to your skin and a lasting impression in your mind.


Carl Tomsen Kohut TALIESIN

Frank Lloyd Wright School Of Architecture

E | ckohut@taliesin.edu T | 603.986.8351 AIAS | 3347670

CONCEPT DIAGRAMS

Ampitheatre For Pierre Cardin Lacoste, France

EDUCATION SCAD | B.F.A. F.L.L.W.S.A | M.Arch 2ND Year EXPERIENCE Tianhua Architecture & Planning Commercial Office Shanghai, China X-Coop Resident Workshop Port-au-Prince, Haiti CONCEPT

Arriving in Southern France, I was surprised to discover the first sense of place not in the foreign chatter, or the clouds of cigarette smoke, but in the irregular rooflines composed of terracotta tiles. Discussiong with local tradesman I learned the tiles were originally fabricated along the legs of women. Creating a consistent form while leaving trace of each individual woman. Demonstrating a connection with regional construction and women figure, it seemed a fitting formal abstraction for the ampitheatre quarry of Pierre Cardin. Visiting the quarry, I found it had a weak focal perspective, drawing little attention towards the stage with it’s rectilinear form, so the secondary goal became strengthening the space’s focus towards the stage. Preserving the night sky are transparent flanking members that yield a sense of continuity with the original open air setting. The design shelters and expresses as though it was a functional and fashionable garment.iscussing with local masons I learned the tiles were

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

PLAN


Soham Shah sshah@taliesin.edu 480-242-7570 AIAS number : 38431852 Taliesin Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture S A U N T E R a liesurely stroll

Date of birth : 4 sept. 1988 Country of residence : India Education : B.Arch (2006-2011) Gujarat university, India Immersion program (October - December 2013) Taliesin west Frank lloyd wright school of architecture, Scottsdale, Arizona M.Arch (2014-2016) Taliesin Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture Work experience : Neilsoft ltd., Pune, India Junior Architect (07/2011 to 02/2012)

Entrance

Location plan

3

Ar. Sudhir Shah , Vadodara, India Senior Architect (02/2012 to 09/2013)

Saunter - A liesurely stroll A student lounge space designed on an existing site at Taliesin West, AZ. The space would account as a hangout place cum lodging space for guests along with having study nooks to hook up to for a more private experience. The idea was to design something playful. The shelters ,existing topography of the site and uninterrupted views of the desert pushed for playing with the levels and making the space as an experience in itself. The thought of raising the spaces from the ground was more to conserve the natural vegetation of the desert. Ramps became the catalysts towards achieving level differences.

1

4

2

5

Profile for AIA Arizona

AIA Arizona 2015 Student Project Competition  

AIA Arizona is celebrating the academic achievements of architecture students at each of the three professional schools in Arizona, offering...

AIA Arizona 2015 Student Project Competition  

AIA Arizona is celebrating the academic achievements of architecture students at each of the three professional schools in Arizona, offering...

Advertisement