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AHMED MORSI architecture

portfolio


Printed: March 2016 Cover page: photo by Ahmed Morsi


2012-2016

Academic + Extracurricular work


AHMED MORSI morsiahm@gmail.com +201007774771 3 Osama El Sadek st, Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt

2011-2016

The German University in Cairo

2015

Universität Stuttgart

1996-2011

The Egyptian Language School

Cairo, Egypt

Education

Stuttgart, Germany

B.Sc. Architecture and Urban Design Cumulative Grade: Excellent (GPA: 1.2) [German grading system] High Honours

Cairo, Egypt

Bachelor Thesis Thesis Grade: Excellent (GPA: 0.7) [German grading system]

IGCSE

Software AutoCAD Rhino3D Sketchup

Photoshop

Illustrator

Indesign

ArchiCAD Grasshopper

Languages Arabic

Native

English Fluent

Rome Florence Venice

Germany

Portugal

Netherlands

Switzerland

UK

London

Mecca Medina

Indonesia

Zurich Chur Vals

Barcelona Menorca

Italy

Amsterdam

KSA

Lisbon Cascais

Spain

Stuttgart Munich Cologne

Egypt

West Java Bali

Dual citizen (Egypt and USA)

Sharm AlSheikh Marsa Allam Dahab

Travel

Alexandria Aswan Luxor Hurghada

German Intermediate (B1)


Activities

2013

Participated in a summer design course for top ranking students

Project to design a hotel on a plot of land near Stuttgart’s Hauptbahnhof near the city center that would be one of many resulting empty plots due to the controversial “Stuttgart Einundzwanzig” project.

Participated in Ecotourism Cakrawala Project

2013

90-day program aiming to raise awareness about enviornmental issues and promote ecotourism in West Jawa’s ecological hotspots.

Work Experience July 2014

Training employees at the newly developed Urban with rampant post-revolution informal construction imizing Use Value” guide. The guide aims to help initiatives by the local community and develop

Intern at Shehayeb Consult

Upgrading Units (UUU) in Cairene districts to work with the previously developed “Maxprovide ways to recognize and legitimize selfa link between them and the local government.

Featured Work 2016|”Politics of Form”|Venice Biennale 2016|”Mapping Cairo”|Venice Biennale June 2016|”Designbuild Cairo-Malaab El Kobri”|”Hands on” Exhibition, TU Wien December 2016|”Mapping Cairo”|”Struggling Cities” Exhibition, Gezira Art Center December 2015|”Mapping Cairo”| www.Cairobserver.com

Competitions 2016|Science City, 6th of October, Cairo, Egypt|

in participation with Alya El Chiati, Casa Granturismo (Ricardo Camacho), Rowaa Ibrahim, Studio Meem (Manar Moursi)

Cairo, Egypt Caiscais, Portugal

Participated in “European Workshop Waterfront Urban Design (EWWUD)

7-day workshop aimed at analysing the current urban situation of the coastal town of Cascais 30 kilometres west of Lisbon and making a design proposition to tackle the several urban issues the recently thriving town faces.

Stuttgart, Germany

2014

Participated in “Designbuild” studio project

As the pilot project of the EDBKN program in Cairo in collaboration with the GUC, Dahab island, one of the protected Nile islands in Cairo, was chosen to design and construct a light-weight multifunctional public space beneath the Ring Road bridge. My team’s design was one of the two final designs chosen to be merged and I participated throughout the construction period. Construction was finalized in April 2015.

Bandung. Indonesia

2014-2015

Participated in “Mapping Cairo” workshop

Organized by “Studio Meem” in collaboration with the Japan Foundation in Cairo. Within the framework of a travelling exhibition about struggling cities in Japan, the aim of the 10 day workshop was to analyze and visually map and represent urban issues Cairo faces as a struggling city. The outcome was exhibited at “Gezira Art Center in Zamalek and in the Egyptian pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale.

Cairo, Egypt

2015


CONTENTS Projects

Jordan Pavilion

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Science City

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New Cairo New Villa

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Institute For Artistic Research in Stuttgart and New Cairo (Bachelor Project)

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Malaab El Kobry (Designbuild Studio)

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Mapping Cairo (Venice Biennale)

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Physical Model Building

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Hand Sketching

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Artwork

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Photography

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JORDAN PAVILION Egypt Expo ‘18

5th Year

Course: Design Studio VII Professor: Assoc. Prof. Hossam Salama Date: Spring 2015/16 Location: The German University in Cairo (Cairo, Egypt)

Throughout the 21st and 20th centuries, Jordan has been an active participant in the global effort to receive refugees; with about half of the population of Jordan being of Palestinian descent, receiving many Iraqi refugees in the nineties and recently with the multitude of Syrian refugees coming in. Due to its location in the Middle East, Jordan can be described as a haven in the midst of chaos. I decided to emulate this reality by finding ways to represent the qualities of refuge and containment architecturally. The pavilion mainly consists of two entities: the roof and the blocks. Seen from afar the helium-inflated flat roof held down by cables can be seen hovering atop, signalling some sort of refuge by creating shade and defining space. Monolithic enclosed blocks act as second level of refuge offering complete shelter in a more human-scale enclosure. Varying blocks with no dictated path allows user to freely explore different spatial configurations. A network of passages and stairs punctures through blocks allowing different perspectives of the same blocks as well as freedom to reach areas where roof and construction can be observed up close. Pneumatic Roof Structure -Compartments filled with low-density gas. (Helium) -Perforations to allow sunlight entry. -Grounded by steel cables attached to blocks. -Minimal construction. -Reversed load direction. -Easily and quickly detached and reassembled in different locations.

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Varying proportions of blocks with no dictated path allows user to freely explore different spatial configurations.


Interior Shot

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Roof inflated with low-density gas (Helium) using temporarily placed tanks.

Fully inflated roof held down using tension cables. Varying blocks now fully contained below one monomorphic roof: refuge.

The Roof 2


Helium-filled inflatable roof

Tension cables

Network of stairs and passages puncturing through blocks

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Varying proportions of blocks

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Parcel

Water surfaces + seating

Isometric Explosion 3


REFUGE

Outdoor Area

-Backside of block used for projections of works exploring refugee crisis and Jordanian efforts. -Movable seating elements on fixed rails provide numerous possibilities for seating situation.

Jordanian Street Art -Boom in recent years in refugee camps (particularly Za’atari Camp). -Jordan as melting pot for Arab street artists (Iraqi, Palestinian, Syrian...etc.) -Block used as canvas for artists working in Jordan shedding light on refugee crisis: inclusive participatory approach.

Petra

-Petra’s landscape and narrow valleys hinted at through narrow passageways between blocks and secondary passages carving through blocks. -Model of Petra exhibited in one block observed from bird’s eye view. 4


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RE-USE Unfolding of Blocks into different variations of platforms

New Cairo -Concept of refuge especially relevant in context of public space. Re-use of inflatable roof to activate large spans of green spaces in an effort to break exclusive nature of New Cairo by encouraging social mixing and act as a step to make New Cairo more pedestrian-friendly. Also as an attempt to raise awareness about the amount of resources used to maintain these spaces.

Collage 6


PRIVATE/ EXCLUSIVE

SCIENCE CITY PUBLIC

HILTON DREAMLAND HOTEL

HILTON PYRAMIDS GOLF RESORT

MÖVENPICK HOTEL

6TH OF OCTOBER EDUCATIONAL CITY

EGYPTIAN MEDIA PRODUCTION CITY

NILE UNIVERSITY (NU)

MALL OF ARABIA

ENGINEERS SYNDICATE CLUB

DAR AL FOUAD HOSPITAL CITY AUTHORITY

MISR UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (MUST)

6TH OF OCTOBER CLUB AL SARAYA HOTEL

6TH OF OCTOBER UNIVERSITY

6TH OF OCTOBER UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

AL ZOHOUR HOSPITAL CULTURE AND SCIENCE CITY

6TH OF OCTOBER YOUTH CENTER

6TH OF OCTOBER CENTRAL HOSPITAL

AL AHRAM CANADIAN UNIVERSITY (ACU)

Alya, Rowaa and I in cooperation with Studio Meem were responsible for thoroughly analysing the urban as well as socio-economic situation in 6th of October and ultimately coming up with a design concept that puts our intensive research on science and agriculture in the Egyptian context into use while still following the very precise specifications of the brief.

SERVICES

Competition initiated by the Bibliotheca Alexandrina to design a new science complex that includes an interactive science museum, research center, observatory and planetarium in the satellite city of 6th of October.

SHOOTING CLUB

CAIRO UNIVERSITY SHEIKH ZAYED CAMPUS

SMART VILLAGE

Team: Ahmed Morsi Alya El Chiati Rowaa Ibrahim Studio Meem (Manar Moursi) Casa Granturismo (Ricardo Camacho)

AGRICULTURAL

Date: June-August 2016 Site: 6th of October, Cairo, Egypt

NATURAL ELEMENTS

Competition

Diagrams shown in this spread were produced by me.

GATED COMPOUNDS

LAND-USE ZONING

MIDDLE-INCOME HOUSING

SOCIAL HOUSING

INDUSTRIAL

AGRICULTURAL

6th of October Urban Analysis 7


MUSEUM. RESEARCH. PARK?

SCIENCE CITY

PE P DE R FR O ST OM M E RI N A A N D MS E A

FORM DEVELOPMENT

SCIENCE CITY FORM DEVELOPMENT MAIN VE HICULA

R ACCESS

ACCESS TO SITE

PE P DE R FR O ST OM M E RI N A A N D MS E A

POSSIBLE FUTU CONNECTI ON TO RE AL-WAHAT ROAD

MAIN VE HICULA

R ACCESS POSSIBLE FUTU CONNECTI ON TO RE AL-WAHAT ROAD

ACCESS TO SITE

1 OVERLAYING OF GRID ON SITE + EMBEDDING OF FUNCTIONS IN LANDSCAPE

1. 1 OVERLAYING OF GRID ON SITE GRID OVERLAY+EMBEDDED + EMBEDDING OF FUNCTIONS IN LANDSCAPE FUNCTIONS

2 EXISTING TOPOGRAPHY EXAGGERATED TO ALLOW EMBEDDING, CREATE HIERARCHY AMONG ABOVE-GROUND-LEVEL FUNCTIONS

3 PUNCTURES TO ALLOW NATURAL SUNLIGHT INTO BELOW-ZERO-LEVEL SPACES + SUNKEN GARDEN

2. 3. 2 3 EXISTING TOPOGRAPHY EXAGGERATED TO PUNCTURES FOR TO ALLOWNATURAL NATURAL EXISTING TOPOGRAPHY EXAGGERATED PUNCTURES LIGHT ALLOW EMBEDDING, CREATE HIERARCHY SUNLIGHT INTO BELOW-ZERO-LEVEL AMONG ABOVE-GROUND-LEVEL FUNCTIONS ENTRYSPACES + SUNKEN GARDEN

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4. PLACEMENT OF EXPOSED MASSES

2. 3. CONNECTIVITY: NETWORK OF ROOFS, NATURAL ELEMENTS: COMMUNITY WALKWAYS, BRIDGES FARMING, ROOF TOP GARDENS...

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EGYPTIAN INTERPRETATIONS Manmade elements, artifcacts and trees along the promenade

Axonometric view

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Main plan + section

Bird’s-eye view 10


NEW CAIRO NEW VILLA 5th year

Course: Design Studio VI Professor: Assoc. Prof. Vlatka Seremet Date: Winter 2015/2016 Location: The German University in Cairo (Cairo, Egypt) Team: Ahmed Morsi Rowaa Ibrahim

Still stuck in a consistent loop of revival of neoclassical architecture, New Cairo -although only a couple of decades old- is saturated with ornamental niches and non-supporting Corinthian columns, seen by many as a sign of wealth and elegance. Given the task to design a villa on a neglected strip of desert land and also given a business person as the client, this project deals with 3 main aspects: -Counter-acting the dominance of neo-neoclassicism and New Cairo’s strict laws supporting it. -Catering to the ostentatious lifestyle of a wealthy client. -Reviving a neglected space tucked in-between New Cairo’s infamous gated compounds. Through the initial phase of the project we were constantly faced with the two juxtaposing facets of a business person’s life: having a visibly ostentatious lifestyle and the seizure of every opportunity to make profit. A pattern very common in New Cairo is where the owners live in one section of the villa and the rest rented out to other residents; visibly an extravagant villa, in actuality a 3-storey apartment building. We decided to express this dichotomy architecturally by having two juxtaposing entities existing in parallel contrasting in every aspect: form, materiality, function and spatial atmosphere. The core: a rough hollow concrete block seemingly part of the desert landscape and constituting the larger part of the footprint. This would potentially be rented out. Parasitic platforms attached to this core would make up the actual living spaces. This way both extravagance and profit would be achieved through the exterior perspective of a large scale villa, where in actuality the business person only lives on the relatively small platforms and the rest rented out for profit. 11

New Cairo Villas


Isometric Shot 12


-2.0m

The core, a large hollow space extending through the length of the villa would be used for an entirely different purpose. We decided to mirror the juxtaposing architecture functionally by allocating the most heterotopic use standing entirely out of context -right in the centre of a villa-: a nightclub. Although standing in unity seemingly interlocked, there is no point where the landlord would meet the users of the interior space through defining different access points and creating no visual or physical connection. A transparent envelope covers the entirety of the villa exposing the business person and in a way exhibiting their own life to the public as a showroom. It is also a play on New Cairo’s strict municipal laws prohibiting the use of bare concrete as a finishing material. The bare concrete finishing of the core, although technically on the interior would be visible from the outside and the actual stone cladding on the inside only experienced by the users of the space.

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The concrete core’s thick walls are carved out to make way for the site-specific functions required by the living spaces such as bathrooms, storage and a walk-in closet catering to the master bedroom. Interlocking but not connected would be a continuous void manoeuvring through the entirety of the wall oriented towards the interior of the core. The neutral spaces offering a variety of different spatial atmospheres would act as resting spots for the nightclub but also easily transformed for different make-shift needs in case the interior of the core ends up being used differently; whether it be a refuge for desert-dwellers that currently inhabit some parts of the site or simply filling the space with water to be used as a swimming pool reinforcing the initial concept which is to create maximum-use potential.

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Floor Plans 1:350 13


The Villa

Skin

Showroom

Master Bedroom Living

Guest Dining

Kitchen Office

Villa Elements

Reception

Core + Platform

Desert

Isometric Explosion 1:500 14


Alternative Uses of Core 15


The Core

Wall Voids

Voids used by villa Voids used by nightclub

Openings

Openings

Circulation Inside Wall

Isometric View 1:400 16


INSTITUTE FOR ARTISTIC RESEARCH IN STUTTGART AND NEW CAIRO Bachelor Project

Professor: Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Erwin Herzberger Date: Spring 2015 Location: Universität Stuttgart (Stuttgart, Germany) Given the task to design a work space for experimental artists and architects in Stuttgart and New Cairo, basic functional requirements were set. However, given the drastically different urban settings, the design approach and consequently the outcome were strikingly different. Three main urban aspects were explored and compared: land use, density and access which ultimately quite literally translated to visibility, scale and program or potential use of the space. The urban setting surrounding the site in Stuttgart could be described as an arrangement of dense clusters of additive elements. This, coupled with the conspicuous location of the site; on top of the roof of one of the two infamous “Universität Stuttgart” buildings right in the city center within walking distance from the main station meant that a strong gesture was a priority and was the point of departure of the design process. To achieve this, ideas of parasitic architecture were employed to contrast all elements in the vicinity of the site as well as create a dichotomy between the parasitic entity and the host building, in this case the K1 architecture building which is one of the most prominent examples of late modernism in Stuttgart. Due to the fact that the structure would be so visible, the public aspect had to be explored. The situation in New Cairo is entirely different. The site is located on empty desert land within the gated campus of the German University in Cairo. The site is not at all visible due to the fact that it lies on the outskirts of Cairo and is bordered from one side by the Petrified Forest Protectorate and all other sides by low-rise housing communities. Thus, the priority was to create an inhabitable space in a harsh site. Keywords such as atmosphere, prospect/refuge, functional connections were of higher priority than exterior gesture. Also building orientation and employment of natural cooling methods were of great importance due to the harsh desert climate. Land use, density and access ultimately translated into visibility, scale and space program. 17

STUTTGART

NEW CAIRO


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STUTTGART

Contrast Being one of the symbols of late modernism in Stuttgart, the attributes lending the K1 building this title were observed: -Cubic form -Logical stacking of levels -Rough bare concrete surfaces -Large glass openings -Flooded with light -Flauntingly orthogonal facade Observing these features and analyzing the existing building and abstractly pointing out the most conspicuous qualities provided an opportunity to create a visible and spatial juxtaposition: -Curvilinear -Plastic surfaces -Directed views -Controlled lighting -Stark unitary form 19

Visible and spatial juxtaposition


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Elevator no 6

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Workspace

Exhibition Space

Free/Performance Space

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Operable openings

Constructed in sections and assembled on site. horizontal beams connecting frames Cladding attatched

Additional steel pilotis to carry structure

Ve r t i c a l - a x i s wind turbines in between pilotis where wind speed is highest

Construction Used mainly in ship and aircraft fabrication, Monocoque construction is a type of construction where all the structural as well as live loads are carried in the shell and thus no interior construction is required. Due to its curvilinear form and lightweight requirements, monocoque was the most suitable method of construction, also due to the fact that lightweight aluminum is the most common material used in this method. Constructed in sections and assembled on site, aluminum frames are fabricated and connected by opposite beams. The loads are carried through to the reinforced concrete elevator shaft and a set of steel columns distributing the loads across the K1 roof. Operable opeenings allow the possibility to open up the space to the sky and landscape.

Elevator shaft as support

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NEW CAIRO Desert Environment The urban setting in New Cairo stands in stark contrast to that of Stuttgart: quiet desert land within a few hundred metres from vigorously active student life inside a gated university campus bordered on one side by vast amount of desert and on all other sides by housing communities, all laid out far from the center of Cairo. Design Approach This results in a distinct atmosphere that surely requires a very different design approach. Low density, limited use of surrounding land and limited access to the site grouped with the harsh climate of the desert meant an exterior architectural gesture was no longer the first priority. Rather a more pragmatic approach was employed to create an inhabitable space in a harsh site. Questions of building orientation, careful placement of openings, utilization of wind direction, privacy and functional connections are all vital to the actual usability of the space. Atmosphere A slow transition from the sun-flooded desert environment to the main working space and apartments was achieved through a long dark carved out network of passages leading to the main staying spaces. Subtle natural sunlight from the repeated courtyards and the main space at the end of the passage carefully hit the passage’s floor and walls coupled with gushing wind achieved through cross-ventilation result in an atmosphere standing entirely in contrast to the exterior environment; almost like walking through a carved out concrete mass: haven in the desert. 23


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Form Development This resulted in the formation of two blocks: .the main workspace: distinctively higher than its long access to create a visual and spatial distinction from the rest of the spaces. The space narrows upwardly to form an opening oriented to the North-West direction, where prevailing cool winds come from while simultaneously letting in diffused lighting creating an interesting lighting as well as spatial situation for an artistic workspace. .apartments, technical room, shared bathroom and kitchen: pragmatically and functionally attached. Three apartments encompassed by the service and technical rooms. With the passage facing south as a thermal buffer zone and the staying spaces facing north, the two blocks are attached through the formation of four secondary passages linking the apartments. This, in a way, directly connects the rooms to the main passage while still maintaining privacy, vital for the actual usability of these rooms. Courtyards Through this connection, 3 negative courtyards result, somewhat indirectly lighting the passages while simultaneously providing three decentralized meeting hubs: open, filled with light and soft landscaping serving as a respite from the shaded interior. To maintain the privacy of the apartments directly overlooking the courtyards, higher openings were achieved so that guests have the possibility to look into the courtyards but not vice versa. 25

repetitive courtyards


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“...re-experience the harsh surroundings in a different light� 27


Prospect/Refuge Observing the site, one would instinctively decide to block out the surroundings and create an introverted space. However, theory proves that human instinct is inclined to prefer staying in confined protected spaces and simultaneously have a panoramic view of the surroundings which is what I tried to achieve through opening up the north-facing walls of the main staying spaces, to in a way re-experience the harsh surroundings in a different light and simultaneously let diffused sunlight into the main working space. 28


MALAAB EL KOBRY DesignBuild studio 4th year Course: Design Studio V Professor: Prof. Dr. Cornelia Redeker Date: Winter 2014/15 Location: The German University in Cairo (Cairo, Egypt) Team: Ahmed Morsi Hana Sadik Peter Blodau Yasmin Mardini

As the pilot project for the EDBKN program in Cairo, the Nile island of Dahab was chosen to develop a multifunctional communal space for the residents of the island. Primarily farmland, the most sustainable choice for the site was a plot of underutilized wasteland under a bridge. Recycled scaffolding wood was chosen as the building material. Situated between two of the most bustling districts in Cairo -Giza and Maadi- and only accessible by ferry, the island is entirely void of services and any signs of technology. A participatory design approach was utilized, figuring out what the island’s residents lack in terms of public social space. Ultimately, we tried to integrate as many functions into the space while maintaining the inexclusive unhindered charm of public space (something Cairo lacks generally speaking). Functions such as an open classroom, wedding space and compost toilets made it onto the list after extensive research and observation. Our design was one of two designs chosen to merge for implementation, construction was initiated in January 2015 and the project was inaugurated in March. Video montage of the whole process filmed and edited by me in cooperation with Peter Blodau: https://vimeo.com/121036857

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Billboards Billboards

Built-up Areas Built Areas

b El Malaa Kobr y

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Green Parcels

Bahaereya Village


Dahab Island 32


Open Classroom

Enclosures

Bawab’s room

St or age

Seating

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Mesh Wire

Plans 33


Construction Period

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MAPPING CAIRO 10-day workshop

Coordination: Manar Moursi | Studio Meem Date: 21st November - 2nd December 2015 Location: Japan Foundation (Cairo, Egypt)

“Looking at Cairo from the eagle eye of Google Earth, one is struck by the diversity of urban fabrics encountered in this city. The street level view confirms and clarifies these variations. In the span of a hundred meters the pattern and texture of the city can change dramatically, as if the city was a gigantic patchwork of different fabrics: green islands, cliff-side settlements, cemeteries transformed into residential areas, old neighborhoods in medieval Islamic quarters, endless rows of raw red brick buildings developed along striped agricultural land, and gated communities with malls and wide highways sprouting out of the desert onto the outskirts. The workshop Mapping Cairo organized by Studio Meem in collaboration with the Japan Foundation Office in Cairo took place in November 2015 and was an attempt to analyze and understand the evolution of the city through visualization exercises. Participants worked with local architects, GIS experts, graphic designers and geographers to create original maps based on data on Cairo. The topics they studied ranged from economic activity, public space, transportation, land use, housing and population. Participants were encouraged to think of creative ways to visualize and document their data-sets correlating between different phenomena, therefore hinting at core problems and potential target areas that can be tackled in future plans for the city. The mappings and visualizations developed through the workshop contributed to the exhibition “Struggling Cities: from Japanese Urban Projects in the 1960s” which was held in the Gezira Art Center in December. This exhibition has traveled to multiple cities around the world in hopes that it will provide in each destination an opportunity to re-examine the issue of urbanization while grasping the current challenges and future directions of our ever-burgeoning cities in terms of specific relevance to each host location. The workshop was therefore developed within this framework with hopes that the results will open new questions on the urbanization of Cairo and plans for its future growth.” -Excerpt from Manar Moursi’s article for ‘Cairo Observer’ 35

Photos by Katherine Sombold


Final Publication 36


PUBLIC SPAMy work chose to focus on the wider realm of public space in the city. In an overall map of open spaces in Cairo, I attempted to highlight the scarcity of planned openly accessible green spaces. Further, looking at two adjacent neighborhoods - the informal Ezbet el Haggana and its formal counterpart Nasr City - I found that the planned district of Nasr City, though dotted with large spans of allocated green spaces; saw those spaces largely unused. This could be due to several reasons – lack of leisure time in a city with high demands and low incomes – or just a different understanding of what constitutes an ideal public space setting ie. not necessarily the western notion of a green park as prime public space. I also found, that unlike the unused parks of Nasr City and wasted resources of private golf courses in New Cairo, the streets of the informal Ezbet el Haggana were more actively used as public space with mastabas substituting for benches, and an efficient maximization in the use of scarce unbuilt space, with limited motorized traffic in the leftover streets and alleys, mixed use development and services located within walkable distances from housing. The mappings of the location of essential public services within a 1km radius of the center of each of the three neighborhoods I chose to compare, revealed an overall lack of essential public services in informal settlements: namely hospitals and police stations. Ironically, this lack was echoed in the more formal and upscale New Cairo, which in its 1 km radius revealed no services whatsoever, though for different reasons - strict segregation of functions, zoning for the automobile and clustering of private residential compounds. Meanwhile, Nasr City’s map of services exposed a lack of services provided by planners but an informal imposition from the people providing themselves with 42 mosques tucked in basements-corners and every possible residual space. 37


TY

Comparis areas, an

‫الـمـنـاطـق الـمـخـطـطـة الـمـخـصـصـة كـفـراغـات عـامـة‬

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CA IRO

OPENLY ACCESSIBLE DEDICATED OPEN SPACE ie. Parks, Urban Developments

SELECTIVE/EXCLUSIVE OPEN SPACE ie. Clubs, Gated Compouds ‫الفراغات المفتوحة والمخصصة للعامة‬ ‫مثل الحدائق‬

‫الفراغات الخاصة‬ ‫مثل النوادي و الكمبوندات‬

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N A S R ‫حدائق مخصصة في المناطق المخططة مقابل االماكن العامة في المناطق الغير مخططة‬

GREEN PA RK S A L LO CAT I O N I N FO RMA L A R E AS VS ST REET S

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‫استخدام الفراغات العامة في المناطق المخططة مقابل المناطق الغير مخططة‬

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“Frau” July 2012

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“Sunk Into Oblivion” August 2012

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PHOTOGRAPHY

Lisbon, Portugal March 2014

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Menorca, Spain August 2014

Downtown Cairo, Egypt April 2014

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AHMED MORSI | Architecture Portfolio 2016