Issuu on Google+


f\ -^j£


*


Digitized by the Internet Archive in

2012 with funding from

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

http://archive.org/details/picassotoreroswiOOsaba


PICASSO: TOREROS


PICASSO

:


SABARTES

JAIME

TOREROS WITH FOUR ORIGINAL LITHOGRAPHS

NEW YORK GEORGE BRAZILLER MONTE-CARLO ANDRE SAURET -

-

LIBRARIES UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


'

Translated from the French by Patrick Gregory

Library

of

Congress

Catalog

Card

Number 61-16860

PUBLISHED 1961 BY ARRANGEMENT WITH ANDRE SAURET. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NO PART OF THE CONTENTS OF THIS BOOK MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE PUBLISHERS, GEORGE BRAZILLER, INC., NEW YORK

PRINTED IN FRANCE


1

he four original lithographs

by Pablo Picasso

were executed especially for this boo^


**-\

6>lUt<

I


&g

********


fr'3,fel*MJ

.


6rJ*\)\'XV_


A,

_LL true "aficionados" are

the

same

passion

" diestro, " the his

see

matador of

admiration

fervent

aficionado

to

:

himself.

boldness, or

drawn to the

Each of them

irrepressible enthusiasm.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

his

torero

often

Perhaps

is

it

the "muleta"; or quite simply, perhaps his

profile.

precedes the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

I

kill,

am that

" torear, "

for reasons it

referring

to

bull-ring

it

his

being

quite

his is

skill

the

that gesture

moment of supreme

desire,

one and only

who commands

unknown

matador's

the is

by the same

prey to the same

his predilection, the

courage; perhaps

his

is

to

the

elegance,

his

with the cape or

way

that he projects

which immediately

anticipation,

the

final


drama

scene of that tragic

to cheer the best

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and

him

sense,

their

he

from

aficionados

the

man of

to bid

the

and death.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even

their choice

him Good Courage

derisive

sun

This

if

is

the latter

are

still

tor

all:

is

the

not

he

still

arena at

his

make

commands

behind him, even when

whistles of other

shines

what drives

to

for the next ordeal; to

their applause, that

and that they

admiration,

for

life

homes and brings them

by the vigor of

provokes the

shout,

of

their

toreros

spectators.

or

the

Clap and

public,

stock

breeders or promoters.

These

phrases

can

give

the individual aficionado.

emotional

state

little

And

idea

of the emotional

they can give

of the great multitude

that

state

of

no impression of

the

overflows the

arena.


On have

into

Here

spectacle.

one

"sunny side" of the arena the

the

settled

has

nado, the only

shares the

places

man who

of bulls

is

all

takes shape

flames

no

gets under

own

opinion

his

about.

And

it

way

as

dyed-in-the-wool

the

is

really

here,

soon

as

aficio-

knows what

where each

man

rush.

worthy of

this

excitement, that the

crowd

vibrant with exultation, quick to react, ready to burst

of passion.

Those whose is

in

show

find

same excitement and the same conviction that he has found

the only place in the arena

into

you

Here

regulars, the real public,

long before the beginning of the

in the "bleachers," the

down.

sat

this business

their

seats

They

are

arrive

And

the

on

the

at

their

sun burns bright above

them.

shady side straggle

There

own

leisurely

in.

pace and are thus


succumb

slower to

some fever

sort of pretext

mounts

as the

of the sun's hot

on

the

more

foot of the

to

found to

one

is

with

all

of the arena. sorts

ingly

the

people together; that

tiers

the

a

That is

of

is

little

"corrida"

why

the

is

importance

that

promises

hope that has

they accept ungrudg-

proximity of foreign

on the shady

here than

beginning, one

of inconveniences: the prodding

commencement o(

uncomfortable

Certainly the

At

The

for the absence

more comfortable

scarcely

be worthy of one's expectations. these

not long before

is

conversations flowing.

start

neighbour seated behind you the

it

crowd grows denser and, except

plebeian side

awaiting

brought

But

excitement.

the

is

rays,

puts up cheerfully

while

to

side appear to

knees and

elbows.

be somewhat calmer.


/

*tfp


\\V

<,

-U

v

r.

v

*

« >^A

_—^«j_i^>

Kr""'

I


,

...

*-5f-X


«.* <$]•


"**sfe~™

IK Ay

€'

'


<*fe

« T

e

^

«-

*•


But

there,

too,

crowd

the

or enthusiasm at the

The only rests

in

real

a

its

preparing to unleash

difference

between

The

the price of the tickets.

same temper, ready to

is

impulses.

at

the

slightest

two

the

indignation

entire

not been

world apart: they have passion,

of the arena

sides

crowd now

provocation to give

Except, of course, for the tourists.

aficionado's innate

its

pretext.

first

driven

to

They

the

shares the free

arena by

but have merely come to

play

constitute

see

the

"some-

thing new," something they have heard or read about and which, in all

likelihood, they will never see again.

will,

perhaps,

contribute

"be with the crowd," and

to

the

applause

that's

all.

It

is

as tourists

that they

or protestations; just to

And among

their

numbers

will


undoubtedly be

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

loyal

members of some Society But then,

Animals.

on

few swooning ladies and indignant gentlemen

a

it

takes

With

these reservations,

earth

more propitious

The

than the bull-arena.

all

we

for the Prevention

sorts are

of people to make up a crowd.

convinced that there

for the propagation tiers

circular;

are

beginning nor end; and every spectator

from the scene of

action.

"All social

all

classes,

common said. And in

birth

to

a

sexes,

ages,

forgetfulness of their it

is

wild

true.

is,

and

from

all

is

that

no place

has neither

his seat, equidistant

come

together here.

ranks mingle together

daily cares,"

The proof

is

of mutual affection

the circle

All sorts of people all

of Cruelty to

the

as

somebody once

barest

trifle

gives

outburst of whistles or applause, with the entire


arena

common

partaking of the

giant caldron boil over.

hot tempers, In this to

the

it

book of tauromachian drawings as

with

bullfights,

comes from one of

his

of lentils,

of wine,

plaza.

"A

Now

slice

sides

of the

the wine

Picasso takes us directly

important events those

sadness there

no

a goatskin

both

he was taken there as a child, hand in hand

What

And what

him!

afternoons

as

caldron that the arena most resembles.

a

plaza, just

with his father. for

is

excitement

Indeed, what with the flaming sun and

is

is

in those

with

trips

memories of "Sunday

nothing!"

prose-poems, and

is

must have been

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;That

preceded by:

a circular stairway."

transformed into soda

But

water....

phrase

"An aroma

this

is

not the

Let's see.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

of melon that the jew's-harp ignites and that the torero's


cape

drags through

its

sponges the

belle for sagacious sprees,

"...semen of

on

lilies,

the horse's

whom

the bull, into

it

sire,

cork, departing with his

"The

wounds."

stars

thrusts

from the cloak of

home

This obsession with bulls haunts Picasso's to this

translated

this

And

arena

is

beauty..."

And

most

into

are

his

vivid

memories of the personal

thanks

bull-ring

impressions;

and

part, to the glory of the Picador.

crowded with thousands of expectant

thousands more

these pages.

Here

book.

drawings,

into

dedicated, for the

The

memory.

and

obsession we can accompany him, hand in hand, by turning

pages of

the

and capers

his will

places banderillas of grace

light."

will witness the action

spectators.

of the corrida through

Thousands upon thousands of aficionados, united by


I.

M** " 1

1

''


the same

fervor,

the

same enthusiasm; ready to

let

themselves be

carried away, to shout their approval or protestation of the same

performance "

by

a

war

its

defiant

That cry "a able it

Sunday."

this

los toros!" in

Its

is

not

much by to

all

a statement,

deep

the

those

essence; but since

he

are

who

he

first

contains

it

not aficionados.

but especially from

one has seen since childhood,

shouts

awoke on

provocation springs from the

" aficion, "

against.

but rather an exclamtension

who

some

contains something exceptional, inconceivits

up within him

love for the that

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

as

challenge

and indefinable

swelling

bulls

cry,

favor of a gesture, a torero,

in

Vamos a los toros!"

ation, as

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;some

summer

a sight in

the

a

it

has

felt

"bullfight

sun,

of the bulls

from

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

company of

a

those one's


Jft-

t$

%.

%

n


The dawn of

father or one's friends. for

a

full-scale

of

flame

the

One warms

fiesta.

Aficion

"aficion."

a "bullfight

one's a

:

day"

is

the signal

enthusiasm at the sacred

word

that

the

aficionado

bears blazoned within his consciousness in bold, exclamatory letters.

Since we are attending the corrida in the

we

will

have no difficulty

but above

No displays creatures,

all,

one

becoming

thanks to the bulls

has

him.

in

seen

His

vibrant

a

bull

bulls

with

life

are

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

that

exactly real

as

he

translated

from the

Picasso,

Thanks

to him,

has taught us to

Picasso

sees

him,

bulls,

not

oxen;

bulls;

see.

as

he

wild

and with incalculable strength; proud,

courageous animals with ferocious impulses bull,

company of

aficionados.

artist's

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

memories of

the

all

true

image of

a

the bullfights that


he has witnessed. to

share

rhythm of

Picasso

impressions.

his his

The

pictures

tauromachian lyricism,

drawings which

are

not

memories and obliges us

evokes these

strictly

permit us to follow the

of

first

narrative

all

by means of those

works

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;many

having been drawn before going to the corrida and

memories of previous corridas his

admission

engravings, those

us

theme, they are

figure

in

arena.

lithographs,

before

Here

the

to

this

known

as

today; all

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; drawn, Picasso

linoleum

and though

distinctly

Picasso has said, to earn

as

has cuts, all

made many and

paintings,

drawings

of them

have

the

like

same

different.

volume, the principal personage the Picador.

of them

made up of

is

that yellow-clad


I


Let figure

arena

;

be

it

in

said,

however, that the picador

There

bullfight.

a

picador

the

man on

the

is

arena immediately following

the

is

not the principal

important people

several

are

horseback.

He

to

this

us

that,

volume for

element of the this,

we can

seems that Picasso

it

him

at

fight.

scarcely

least,

And fail

the since

to

his

pike,

as

the

and outside the

artist

has

seen

the

picador

kill.

attempting to prove

is is

the

most important

he appears to be convinced of

agree.

Picasso shows us the picador in

the

cape-work; and the "third

initial

of the pikes" precedes that of the banderillas and the In

in

enters

many him

In

this

collection

of washes

diverse roles; in action with in

arena, in the side-streets,

many

bullfights,

coming out of

the corral;

a

great


home, engaged

or

at

in

the

bosom of

domestic pleasures, or simply resting

in diverse

his family,

somewhat

ill

at ease, tired perhaps,

when

he does not seem to be downright bored.

do not think

I

he

sees

as

with more this this

is

at all possible to

it is

has

really

clarity, that

seen

becomes

which merits

upon

them with

his personal attention.

where bullfighting

evident,

for

Picasso

these spectacles with a passionate eye

his

aficionado

strikingly

compare our

anterior

by

visions

tradition,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

by

vision to

no one can imagine what

Picasso undoubtedly sees better,

it.

true in almost every case, but

fact

to look

an

he

that

Indeed, as he has said,

that of Picasso.

visions

of

blood,

and by

a

has

is

Certainly

concerned,

never ceased

and to compare

lifelong artistic

aficionado,

devotion.


If- <L g & .


V- £ .4 #>


'

?->->'ÂŤ

'& tit


V.

/


Above

Picasso

all,

than any other man. ardor,

what

skill

has studied

How

Bull with

the

permits him

to paint

as

it

three-quarter

face;

charging

or

at

a

he pleases?

him

the bull as a highly personal thing: he sees

more perception

What

this creature?

does he envisage

halt;

He

treats

in profile, full face

leaving

drunk, defying the sun, plunging his horns into

a

the

or

"toril,"

void; galloping

or at a slow jog; stricken by a pike, driven to fury by the pain of the "puya"; or seeking to

embed

flanks of a horse (at the time

covering). risks,

Today, shielded by

but he has

less liberty

his horns, at

when a

any

strong mat, the horse runs fewer

of movement.

He

seems to have reverted

to his former role in the medieval jousting matches.

64

price, into the

horses did not have protective

Picasso, a true


t^-L.fo


/


-Z-7'Z^o

az:

V


aficionado, detests this matting which, in his childhood, he saw only at burials.

The

bull

is

the heart of the corrida: without

him

would

there

be neither toreros, nor arenas, nor "aficion."

While

awaiting

anxious anticipation.

Without

the bull's

entrance,

He becomes

actually being present, he

the is

the

crowd

idee fixe

vibrates

with

of the multitude.

already there

that

is

to say,

he seems to occupy the centre of the arena even before his arrival. It is

this

waiting for the bull that arouses the emotions to such an

inexplicable

by

little

The

bull

little

72

and paralyzing pitch

of

— tremulously—making is

a

excitement.

The

the air quiver with fear

fever

rises

and hope.

wild beast that must meet his fate head on, that


£?-2-V*


must never of is

power and

his

Everyone

himself with

bull

the

is

strength and majesty, of passion and blind

from him, from

his pride.

The

never recoil from danger.

flinch,

fearlessness,

It

valor, that every aficionado draws

associates himself with his bravery,

And more

importance.

his

symbol

effort.

than

his

and endows

bravery,

it

is

the bull's nobility that counts.

"The

bull

five years old, the

And

the refrain. bull's weight,

and

is

it

such

is

must be around

five

by the

hundred

at the required age, the wild bull

his hide

is

smooth and

brilliant,

arrogant, his legs short, his

tail

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

so goes

As

for the

torero five and twenty"

the age fixed

is

regulations.

With

kilos.

that weight,

robust and nervously

his eyes sharp,

delicate, his

his

horns

alert;

neck broad and

finely pointed,

his

77


v«v


W*" iSB^TP'

.

.-•


hooves round and small that

they

At

the

pierce bull's

the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and

turf as

entrance,

so hard, as B. Ibanez has remarked,

though they were made of

the

breathless

silence

transformed into an enormous sigh, crowned

by thousands of

breasts

and culminating

in

of the

steel.

crowd

is

by an Ah! emitted

sustained applause.

"History maintains a profound silence concerning the circumstances

which surround the

notes Santos

Lopez

Pelegrin,

first

combats between men and

known

as

Abenamar,

Until the reign of Alphonse

of the Bullfight.

bulls,"

in his Philosophy

VI

these spectacles

were reserved for the nobility; everyone seems to be in agreement with the fact that called the

it

was the famous Ruy, or Rodriguez Diaz del

Cid Campeador, who was the

first

to

dismount

Villar,

in

the



^>to


I<.0


t>{.ll*>


arena and to confront the bulls with his the

bull

fiesta

was

already

lance....

widespread,

a

and

In the year

noo,

Spanish

typically

institution.

If the bull fiesta

began

the starting point

horseman's exhibition,

a

as

agreed that "picar," which

must be

it

comes from "lancear," thus

represents

of the torero.

Let us pursue further Santos Lopez Pelegrin's commentary on the origins of the "picar," since the picador, by the will and grace

of Picasso,

mounted

is

the hero of this work.

combat were

Gregorio

Gallo,

Santiago,

and

squire

who

the to

We

Count of His

invented

Majesty

the

observe that "famous in

Villamediana,

and

'espinillera'

to

as

the

to

well

as

Order of

protect

the


*Ml!


\

a

,'i

:

\

1

$

ci

Un

'J

'\

)l


riders'

legs

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;which

known as 'gregoriana,' and now employ under the name of 'mona.'"

which the picadors In

his

very

first

he dubbed "Lefty."

worked

the

henceforth

were

engraving Picasso depicted This picador was so

engraving

as

though

it

were

a

a

regular

the

image

in reverse.

led

first

me

I

was

this

engraving

to accept the possibility that there were left-handed

engraving permitted all

out the

it

drawing on

or whether such creatures really had existed and Picasso's

picadors,

In

do not know whether

whom Picasso

would reproduce

paper, forgetting that the impression of the plate

that

picador

named because

me

to tolerate their existence.

the "rulebooks,"

bull,

face

on,

as

it

far

is

as

stated that the picador

must seek

mark of

the arena.

the

one-third


U.W.:


b-b0-\\[_


?,

I A ,

\


<>Uo


•""•

I

^m


"The morning of the

distant

a

in

arena,

with

concentric

clearly

the

color,

distinguishable

'barrera'

and

the

latter

are

not

permitted

from

on

(depending

from

Picadors

on

the corrida, there will be traced

cross

to

five

the this

a

to

size

the sand of

circumference seven

meters

of the

arena).

when executing

line

the 'suerte.'" J.

Ma

de Cosio, in his

work The

Bulls, continues to initiate the

unenlightened reader to the mysteries of the bull-ring: "The picador

must approach is

the bull in such

always on his right."

conventional picador.) reason.

108

It

(It is

"This

a

way

that the 'valla' or 'barrera'

understood that he rule,"

is

referring to the

he adds, "is not without

emanates from the fact that the picador holds

its

just

his pike


L^ j#

J

4

S I ^ V

<

fl

J


in his right

charge,

hand.

Thus, whenever the bull takes

by simply giving

his

upon himself

it

half turn, the picador will be in the correct defensive position

be able to

will

execute

acquired by the cape

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

the

'suerte.'

'suertes' in

We

know

already

who

is

especially

In

modern

of the fight the toreros on foot become

the bull's ardor.

to

horse a quarter turn, or at most, a

spite

of

the

and

autonomy

bullfighting, in this part

auxiliaries

of the picadors."

that the object of the pike-"suerte

"

is

to quell

This fact accounts for the interest of the breeder,

concerned with the stamina of

his

animal

;

and the

instrument chosen to mortify the bull will depend on the quality of the animal's performance.

way

in

The "espada" too

which the bull endures

his

is

interested in the

treatment, for the risks that he


must run But the

harm

in

executing his work will depend on the

bull

must not be

excessively

his effectiveness in the final third

aware of Is it

bull's

Such

fatigued.

of the contest.

condition.

fatigue

can

Everyone

is

this fact.

the fear of seeing the picador stick the bull too energetically

or incorrectly that prompts the crowd to whistle at the horseman?

This seems more than

hoots and whistles.

And

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and

yet, the

adheres to the rules of the

118

in

check

at

the time, the picador has

the air

is

picador

is

game; and

The picador cannot withdraw him

Most of

likely.

only to make his appearence

acts

immediately

too

in his

own

before the charging bull; he

any cost; and

if

filled

with

blameless since he only

he does so in

a

defence.

must hold

somewhat

evasive


IBM

(so-

l)


manner,

and

The at

it

is

probably to keep himself covered, to protect himself

his horse.

picador's profession

bay with

his

profound knowledge of

mind

his exact role in

to the breeder,

is

said

a very

that bulls

the

course

terrifying death

124

of

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

if

Finally,

he must

In general, he began

seldom

his

To

keep the bull

Moreover, he must always keep

bulls.

picadors.

kill

horse constitute a terrible danger. in

hard one.

physical strength as well as a in

the conflict, his obligations to the "espada,"

and to the public.

the rules of his trade. It

is

requires great

pike

career,

he does not

the first

in

But the

After enduring

picador

can

know by

heart

the bull pastures.

from

falls

many such

expect

lapse into insanity.

a

his falls

sudden,


Il(\t>

w


1


When a

between corridas,

the picador,

not obliged to attend

is

"tanteo" or an "encierro," he must look after his horse and, time

permitting, after himself. clad

figure

For the picador

on horseback, wearing on

iron

shields

who

drags his feet

his

legs;

he

is

a

also

is

not simply

a yellow-

"castoreno" on his head and a

work-wearied

when he walks because of

human

being,

the heavy weight they

have to support.

Thanks

to the drawings in this book,

examine the picador's

harrowing work, of life

that

lassitude

is

spent

his

more

life;

his

we can

apparent calm

is

easily envisage

and

the product of his

continual contact with bulls and horses, of a in

the corrals than in the family circle; his

and profound indifference to

his

surroundings, his distant


bull,

of the breeder, of the

and of the public. from any

sort

All this

of domestic

The apparent calm of

He

calm. life's

around him

everything,

to

relationship

leads a

life

out by

can a

to his weary

The

i

36

it

of the

be tranquil or stormy.

picador could be termed

the

Oh, what does

wife, girl friend

his tear

of the horse, of the promoter,

whether

life,

man of

frenzied flutter of skirts, swirling

dancing-girl!

due to

combines and conspires to cut him off

apart, in the very

How

intrusions.

torero,

are

it

midst of

his

life,

and

a

restless

in spite

of

nature be affected by the

upward from

the

body of

matter to him whether he

a

is

tavern

sought

or daughter, since they are only phantoms

mind!

truth

is

that for the

picador,

who

never knows the exact


JIL


11 3». '

' 1


and height of

time, place,

his inevitable

last

like to possess

Such a

man

at

his family,

war with

and with

Looking

the

at

and elsewhere,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; much

as

is

he would

it.

the picador as

is

everything that

fall,

not himself can never entirely belong to him

I

find

himself, with life

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and

drawings

him

in Picasso's drawings.

is

without caring for any other things.

and washes reproduced

discern a great difference in the

I

He

the bull, with the "aficion," with

portraying the torero: handsome, covered with

in

artist's

silks

this

book

manner of

and Branden-

burgs, agile in the arena, flashing his cape, placing his banderillas,

working the at the

bull

with the "muleta," making the

applause of the crowd.

kill,

and smiling


"The a

of this art. in

of

art

the

torero was handed

popular song of the

We

only

the distant past.

last

know that it exists today and that it existed know it for an art that, like other arts,

We

requires great "maitrise"

But when

this

down from Heaven," runs do not know the origin

We

century.

art

is

and we admire

reflected

believe in the origin attributed to

it.

by the it

art

of Picasso, then we

by the old song: "The

art

the torero..."

JAIME SABARTES

of


LIST

OF ILLUSTRATIONS


The end-papers are from a wash executed by Picasso on July

6,

1919

1

-

CORRIDA AT ARLES

Wash

2

-

PICADOR AT TABLE

Ink and Wash

-

PICADOR ON HORSEBACK

Ink Drawing

-

THE PICADOR'S ENTRANCE

3

4

Wash

19

19

9/10X2S

4/i"

11-7-59

20x25

4/;"

H-7-59

9/10x25 4 /s"

19 9/10

25 4/5"

-

PICADOR STANDING IN THE ARENA

Ink Drawing

17

6

-

THE PICADOR

Ink Drawing

171/10X1*7/10'

5

MATADOR AND WOMAN

3/10V12 4 /i"

-

7

-

PICADOR,

Wash

20X2J 4 /s"

8

-

CAPE-WORK

Wash

19 9/ IO>.'25 4/i"

-

9

-

CAPE-WORK

Wash

19 9/10 x 25 4/s"

-

10

-

TOREROS

Wash

22XM

23-8-59

1

-

PICADOR IN THE ARENA

Wash

12

-

THE PICADOR

Wash

13

-

BULL CONFRONTING PICADOR

Wash

19

7/l°X2j 9/10"

14

-

CAPE-WORK

Wash

19

9/IOX25 9/10"

1

-

THE THRUST

Wash

19

9/IOX26"

16

-

BEFORE THE THRUST

Gouache and Wash

15

I/IOX2I 4/;"

17

-

THE THRUST

Gouache and Wash

5

I/.0X22"

.8

-

BEFORE THE THRUST

Gouache and Wash

.5

J/IOX22"

IJ

5

IJ

19

-

BEFORE THE THRUST

Gouache

-

BEFORE THE THRUST

Wash

9

21

-

BEFORE THE THRUST

Wash

IO

22

-

THE THRUST

Wash

23

-

24

-

25

-

DOUBLE THRUST THE OVERTURNED HORSE THE PICADOR'S FALL

1/10"

l/ioxil 4/5"

22X1,

20

22-8-59

,/,0"

li-n-59

12-11-59

-

1/.OX22"

7/10x13 7/10"

7/IOXI4

9/IO" "

IIXI4

9/'

Wash

IIXI4

9/IO"

Wash

.OI/5XI2

Wash

O

,/2"

1/5XIZ3/5*

18-.2-59

-


26

-

CAPE-WORK

27

-

THE THRUST

28

-

THE MONK AND THE PROSTITUTE

Wash and Ink

29

-

A FRIENDLY CHAT

Wash and Ink

30

-

IN

THE BULLRING

Wash

7x9

31

-

IN

THE BULLRING

Wash

7x91/2"

32

-

IN

THE BULLRING

Wash

33

-

IN

THE BULLRING

Wash

34

-

IN

THE BULLRING

35

-

IN

36

-

37 38

93/5x13

Wash Wash and

20X

Pencil

20

4/5"

27 4/5"

x 27

9/10"

19 9/10 x 27 9/10" 1/2"

7x9

1/2"

7/10x9

1/2"

Wash

7x9

1/2"

THE BULLRING

Wash

7x9

1/2"

IN

THE BULLRING

Wash

7

x9

1/2"

-

IN

THE BULLRING

Wash

7x9

1/2"

-

IN

THE BULLRING

Wash

7x9

1/2"

6

39

-

IN

THE BULLRING

Wash

40

-

IN

THE BULLRING

Wash

41

-

IN

THE BULLRING

42

-

IN

THE BULLRING

43

-

IN

THE BULLRING

44

-

PICADOR AND PROSTITUTE

U-'Wj

45

-

THE ARENA

Wash

46

-

CAPE-WORK

Wash

14 3/5

x

18 7/10"

47

-

BEFORE THE THRUST

Wash

14 3/5

X

18 7/10"

48

-

THE BANDERILLAS

Wash

.4 2/5 x 18 9/10"

49

-

CAPE-WORK

,0

-

BULL CONFRONTING PICADOR,

11

-

BEFORE THE THRUST

18 9/10

Wash

9 3/5 x 12 1/5"

Wash

(two-page spread)

TWO TOREROS

i/z"

9 2/5 x 12"

Wash Pastel and

x 24

9 2/5 x 12 2/5"

9 z/;x ii 1/5" 18 7/10 1

1

4/5

x 12

1/5"

x 30 1/10"

Wash

15

Wash

18

7/10x28

1/2"

Wash

18

7/10x28

1/2"

7/iox 23"

IJI


;

2

s

3

5

4

j

j

-

BULL CONFRONTING PICADOR, ONE TORERO

-

PICADOR AND PROSTITUTE

-

PICADOR AND

WOMEN

lnkDrawingandWash

-

PICADOR AND FIGURE

InkDran'iugand Wash

.

WOMAN

Wash

187/10x28

1/1'

1-6-60

Wash

19

7/IOXIZ

4/5"

4-6-60 "

4/5x24

9/ 10

7/10x12

4/)"

4/5/6-6-60

19 19

56

-

PICADOR AND

yi

-

TOREROS

8

-

PICADOR AND

Wash

24 9/10 >, 8 1/10"

59

-

PICADOR

Wash

19

60

-

PICADOR SMOKING AND

Wash

209/10X177/""

61

-

PICADOR, GUITARIST

62

-

63

-

64

-

PICADOR AND VALET

65

-

PICADOR AND DANCING

66

-

PICADOR AND

67

-

PICADOR AND

68

-

PICADOR AND

69

-

PICADOR AND

70

-

WOMAN DANCING ON

71

-

PICADOR AND DANCING

72

-

HEAD OF A PICADOR

73

-

PICADOR AND

lnkDrawingandWash

25 9/10

74

-

PICADOR

lnkDrawingandWash

25

9/10.203/10"

75

-

A MEETING

Wash

25

9/10x20"

76

-

FIGURES

77

-

PICADOR AND

i

WOMAN AND WOMAN WOMAN

AND DANCING WOMAN

HEAD OF A PICADOR (verso of no. PICADt )R AND DANCING WOMAN

WOMAN DANCING WOMAN WOMEN DANCING WOMAN DANCING WOMAN

WOMAN AND WOMAN

A TABLE

WOMAN

61)

.

Wash

31

1/1XII

4/5"

4-6-60

lnkDrawingandWash

19

4/5x24

9/10"

5-6-60

9/10x17

2/5"

-

Ink Drawing

18

7/10x249/10"

Ink Drawing

18

7/10x24

9/10"

-

Ink Drawing

20I/.0X2,

9/,0"

6-6-60

Wash

203/10x25

9/io»

-

Wash

20 j/io> 25 9/10"

Wash

20X2,

9/.0"

Wash

203/10x2,

9/,o"

Wash

20 1/10X2, 9/1°"

Wash

203/^0x25

9/'°"

Wash

2O1/.0X25

9/10"

-

20x25

9/.0"

7-6-60

9/lOXlO

1/10"

8-6-60

Wash Ink Drawing

lnkDrawingandWash

WOMAN

5-6-60

Wash

2,

:•

203/10"

203/10x25 20

9/10x14

9/io" 3/5"

-

.0-6-60

-


WOMEN

-

PICADOR AND

-

PROFILE OF SPANISH LADY

-

PICADOR AND

Wash

20 4/5 x

4 3/i"

Wash

20 4/5 X

4 3/5"

-

WOMEN PICADOR AND WOMEN

-

SKETCH SHEET

-

VILLAGE SCENE

Wash

-

PICADOR AND FIGURES

II

-

PICADOR AND FIGURES

Wash

,

97 /,ox

zj 4/5"

-

PICADOR AND

WOMEN PICADOR AND WOMEN PICADOR AND WOMEN

Wash

I

7 J/I0>

»

Wash

169/IOX

Wash

.6 9/.

-

-

(verso of no. 81) ...

WOMEN

.

Wash and

Pencil

H

x

2/5"

Wash and

Pencil

4 7/.OX

z/j"

Wash and Ink

ash

-

PICADOR AND DANCING

-

DANCING WOMAN AND LADY

Wash

-

PICADOR AND FIGURES

Wash

-

PICADOR AND DANCING

-

SKETCH SHEET

-

PICADOR AND FIGURES

-

SKETCH SHEET

-

GIRL

-

SKETCH SHEET

-

-

-

-

WOMAN

.

.

(verso of no. 96) ...

MONK AND OLD WOMAN PICADOR AND WOMEN OLD WOMAN AND GIRL PICADOR AND TWO WOMEN

-

FOUR HEADS

-

NUDE FIGURES

4 7/IOX 22 2/5

Wash

Wash and Ink

20

1/5

3/5

2, 9/10

Wash and Ink

X

Wash

.

16-6-60

I7-6-60

7 7 7

./5"

3/5 >

'/!"

3/'°

171/10

7 i/io> '3 4/i"

19

-

,7/20-6-60

13 4/5

3

-

7/10

13 4/5 K

Wash and Ink

25 9 /.o

1-6-60

3

>} 4/5

Wash and Ink

»

1

20 X 25 ,/io

Wash

Wash

2. 4/5"

20 J/IOX 2, j/.o

17 1/5

Wash and Ink

4/5"

20 X 2, g/.o .9 9/10

Wash and Ink

Wash and Ink

...

ox

-

2/,"

,0 I/IO'

20 X 25 9/.0

Wash

.

X

19 9/10 X 25 7 /,o

Wash

AND OLD WOMAN

3/5

10-6-60

9/10X

*3 4/i"

20-6-60

22/23-6-60

20 3/.0X 25 9/10

24-6-60

29 1/2"

26-6-60

2,

J/,

153


THE PRINTING OF THIS BOOK WAS COMPLETED IN SEPTEMBER 1961 BY DRAEGER FRERES. THE FOUR ORIGINAL LITHOGRAPHS,

ONE OF WHICH IS IN TWENTY-FOUR COLORS, WERE PRINTED BY MOURLOT FRERES.

PRINTED

IN

FRANCE


LAD 3

IZhS 0M2QQ 2T0b

PSSY5

«» P>



Picasso: Toreros