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DECEMBER 2019

amarillomagonline.com

S ugar $5.95 US AMARILLO MAGAZINE

UPC (A) General Company: GateHouse Media

s a m t -Coated Chris SHESHE CAKES


CONTENTS 10 CONTRIBUTORS/ONLINE 14 OUT & ABOUT

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20 ANDY’S WORLD 22 REALITY CHECK DRESS CODE 24 SEASONAL SHIMMER 26 PERM ARTIST

In salons and on the catwalk, the past year has marked the return of the perm.

HOME 32 GIFTS FOR COOKS

A cookbook allows the recipient to continue the giving process each time they prepare a favorite dish.

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COVER STORY 34 SUGAR-COATED CHRISTMAS

Amarillo bakeries make the holidays sweeter.

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KOOSH ARTISAN BAKERY

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45 THE ANNEX

INSPIRE 42 WHERE THERE’S SMOKE

Writer Marcy McKay’s harrowing experience with a house fire changed her life.

WHAT’S COOKING? 45 WINTER COCKTAILS

Still Austin shares winter cocktail recipes.

49 LET’S EAT 71 EVENTS 76 RETRO REWIND

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78 20 QUESTIONS

78 DON ADAMS

ON THE COVER

PHOTO BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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Contributors

JONATHAN BAKER

JASON BOYETT

DARREN HENDRICKS

Jonathan’s copywriting has appeared in Esquire, Men’s Journal, and Popular Mechanics, and he reports on the Texas and Oklahoma Panhandles for High Plains Public Radio. In his spare time, he writes crime novels.

Jason has written more than a dozen books and is the host and creator of “Hey Amarillo,” a local interview podcast. Visit heyamarillo.com and jasonboyett.com.

Darren is a graphic designer who has worked with newspaper, publication, website and advertising clients around the country for more than 20 years. He lives in McPherson, Kansas, with his family. See his work at dviso.com.

SHAIE WILLIAMS

ELLIE BOYETT

Shaie is a professional photographer born and raised in the Amarillo area. Shaie enjoys telling stories through photography. His work ranges from editorial to portraiture with both film and the latest digital processes. See Shaie’s work at williamspics.smugmug.com.

Ellie is a Media Communications student at West Texas A&M University. An award-winning photographer, she is employed by Cerulean Gallery and is pursuing a career in public relations.

Writer

Writer

Photographer

FOLLOW US

Designer

SHANNON RICHARDSON Photographer

Shannon has been photographing commercial/advertising work for more than 20 years. See Shannon’s work at shannonrichardson.com and route66americanicon.com.

Creative Consultant

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Editor’s Letter

Regional Director of Specialty Products/Editor Michele McAffrey 806.345.3256 mmcaffrey@amarillo.com Regional Designer Kayla Morris Contributing Designer Darren Hendricks Contributing Writers Jonathan Baker Jason Boyett Andy Chase Cundiff Rick Treon

Contributing Photographers Shannon Richardson Shaie Williams Creative Consultant Ellie Boyett

General Manager/Advertising Director Belinda Mills Account Representatives Arien Canales Sharon Denny Jaime Pipkin To advertise in Amarillo Magazine or on amarillomagonline.com, please contact Belinda Mills at 345.3373.

Regional Executive Editor Jill Nevels-Haun Regional Distribution Director David Morel Regional Accounting Manager Sheryl Rycerz

600 S. Tyler St., Suite 2300, Amarillo, TX 79101 806.376.4488 • amarillomagonline.com Amarillo Magazine is a monthly publication of AGN Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written consent. Letters to the Editor are welcome but may be edited due to space limitations.

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I

It’s hard to believe that we’re about to celebrate the beginning of a new decade! As 2019 comes to a close, it’s rewarding to look back over the past year and remember all the wonderful people we met. We know that the city’s people are the reason Amarillo is a wonderful place to live. We truly enjoy telling their stories. As Christmas nears, we can’t help but think about the sweet treats that permeate every holiday gathering and office party. Most of the people in our office have their favorite go-to treats that they bring to our annual Christmas lunch. Some like to bake and others crave a little something special from a local bakery. And there is an abundance of fantastic home-owned bakeries in Amarillo. So this month, we feature a small collection of some of the city’s finest bakeries, with a view toward introducing you to a few classics and also a few new faces in town. As often happens when our staff gathers for a photo shoot, we are … encouraged … to sample the wares of the person we’re featuring. It’s kind of a hazard of the trade. So while we were producing our holiday-themed sweets issue, our AGN staff was deluged with treats – more than a month ahead of the Christmas season. That’s what you call getting into the holiday spirit! They happily feasted on cookies, cakes, cupcakes, éclairs, and cheesecake. We can assure you that everything you see in our cover story, “Sugar-Coated Christmas,” is absolutely delicious. On a recent visit with the talented Beto Acevedo, he was telling me how perms were back in style and how many people were consulting him about getting one. Of course, as someone who had a hideous perm in the ’80s, I cringed at the thought of tight-knit, huge hair making its way around again. But he assured me that the modern perm was much more flattering and versatile. He was kind enough to agree to a feature showcasing some of today’s most fashionable looks. See his salon’s work beginning on page 26. Throughout my years with Amarillo Magazine, I have had the privilege of getting to know many outstanding people. Writer Marcy McKay is one of them. She shares her harrowing tale of a house fire that she survived a couple of years ago in our “Inspire” section on page 42. Right after Marcy lost her home, we met for lunch. I haven’t ever forgotten our conversation that day – Marcy’s strength in the face of extreme stress, her sense of humor through the worst of it, her inspiring character, and immense relatability. I think you’ll find her story inspiring, and a great reminder about what’s really important this holiday season. Merry Christmas!


Out & About

Best of Amarillo

Best of Amarillo was held on Oct. 22, at the Amarillo Civic Center Complex. The annual event recognizes the top award winners in AGN Media’s Best of Amarillo Competition. PHOTOS BY SHANNON RICHARDSON AND SHAIE WILLIAMS

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DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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Out & About

1.

Beans & Cornbread Luncheon On Oct. 28, the annual Beans & Cornbread Luncheon was held at the Amarillo Civic Center Complex. The luncheon serves as the kickoff for the Interfaith Campaign for the Homeless.

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PHOTOS BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

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5. 1. Jeanine and Chris Powell, Laura Scott, and John Paul Athanasiou 2. Petra Kommavongsa and Samantha Calcote 3. Jolene Barreras, Alexis Roberts, Susan Nottingham and Vaughn Worcester 4. Katie Corbet, Leanne Dunn, Amanda Weatherford and Eboni Sanders 5. Leslie Massey, Courtney Booth, Marian Batenhorst and Phyllis Elsey 6. Mirna Corral and Erin Budd 7. Jody Reynolds and Sarah Silva 8. Jimmy Huddleston, Mary Louise Rusk and Donna Christy 16

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6.

40th Annual Christmas Roundup

The 40th Annual Christmas Roundup was held Nov. 1-3, at the Amarillo Civic Center Complex. The annual Christmas shopping event supports the Amarillo Museum of Art Alliance.

1. Beth McKinney and Gina Dowdy 2. Kato Robinson and Desiree Gonzales 3. Jeanne Reynolds and Elyse Espino 4. Andrea McKinney, Lillie Farris and Lauren Hickmott 5. Lynsey Gabert and Jana Lantz 6. Tammy Kerr, Monica Makie and Mandy Castilow 7. John and Colleen Byron 8. Annie and Jeb Hilton

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PHOTOS BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

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DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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Out & About

Dr. R.W. Jones Freedom Fund Banquet

2.

On Nov. 2, the NAACP presented the Dr. R. W. Jones Freedom Fund Banquet was held at the Amarillo Civic Center Complex. This year’s theme was “A Community in Unity,” and the event featured Thomas D. Sands, pastor of Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church.

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PHOTOS BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

3. 4. 7.

5. 1. Deana and Patrick Miller 2. Durlene McCowen and Addie Pride 3. Robin Malone and Ethen Rattana 4. Joel Miller, Alma Swain and Lillie Miller 5. Idella and Michael Jackson 6. Tanya Roland and Ruth Ellen Lynch 7. Kim and Wes Reeves 8. Miriana White and Alzea Dean Smith

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National Philanthropy Day Luncheon

The annual National Philanthropy Day Luncheon was held on Nov. 14, at the Amarillo Civic Center Complex. The luncheon celebrated philanthropy by honoring local benefactors.

1. Kalee Bodey, Ron Phillips and Maxine Rodriguez 2. Brad Thompson and Haley Bell 3. Rosie Santos, Stephanie Schumacher and Sabrine Sisneros 4. Kenneth Crossland and Mike Connor 5. Jacy Jenks and Tim Bynum 6. David Doan, Arthur Castillo and Jeremy Bradford 7. Stephanie Goins and Shannon Davis 8. Claudia L. Britten and Kim Richard

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PHOTOS BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

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DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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Andy’s World

That One Winter G

rowing up during the Cold War, my family (property of the United States Air Force) was put in a few unusual places, not the least of which was a small “common defense installation” just south of Istanbul, Turkey. We had spent the previous two years in the city of Ankara, Turkey’s capitol. Because of some local terrorist activity that more or less threatened us directly, we were sent to this base on the Marmara Sea with a perimeter fence and base housing. In those days, Ankara was a hotbed of intrigue, and the scenes that you see in the James Bond movies shot in Turkey probably at least had something to do with what was really going on there. Embassies electronically eavesdropping on one another, diplomatic immunity car tags and badges from many countries all over the city, and politics. Complicated local, national and international politics that always seemed to shift and change. The remote bases in Turkey were a different story. They were mostly “listening posts.” Generally, their mission was to intercept signals in and out of Russia – signals of all kinds – radio, microwave and the then-top secret satellite signals. Some bases were so remote that only airmen or – women – were stationed on the base, no wives, husbands or children. We occasionally visited a couple of those bases, up on the cold Black Sea, and the G.I.s there, on “isolated tour” (no family) seemed to be well-adjusted but glad that their tours were short, usually less than 24 months. Happily, our Marmara Sea base, KCDI (Karamursel Common Defense Installation) was NOT an isolated tour base. Our entire immediate family was there together. In fact, it was like a vacation in Cozumel to us kids. We went to our little beach in the summer, hunted and fished, played baseball and football, and actually enjoyed school. It was kind of like a small American town dropped right into a spot in the Middle East. A lot of our teachers were sharp, adventurous souls who applied for work with the DOD to see the world, and I believe they became great educators that way. Turkey, to me, was actually a wonderful place to be. The Turkish people are very hospitable, friendly and warm. They were, and are, U.S. allies, despite the twists and turns of politics. Their culture and art is rich, ancient and deep. The food is delicious and widely varied. Most of us here in the states, I’m afraid, do not appreciate what a great country Turkey is. Because of the temperate breezes off the Sea of Marmara, we normally had hot summers and mild winters, precipitation was mostly in the form of rain. One winter, however, a freak storm came right up

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the Straits of the Dardanelles and dumped three feet of snow right on our little air base. Reminds me of the weather in my favorite town, Amarillo, Texas. As a result of the heavy snow, the electricity went out in an instant, and like a classic comedy, we were stuck. It was right around Christmas; we were 5,500 miles from home. It was cold, because our heaters were electric. It was dark, because it was nighttime, and it felt, well, surreal. My father is made of stout stuff. His people, my people, had moved into Louisville, Kentucky, a generation or two before his in order to work as cops, firefighters and factory workers. Mom was the daughter of a Navy man who had served at Pearl Harbor, then as a fire chief at Fort Knox. My folks were not put off by our mini-emergency in Karamursel, Turkey. It was just another day in the Air Force, as far as they were concerned. They had purchased some steak, either at a Turkish butcher or at the BX on base. We had a hibachi, and a back porch. Armed with a trenching tool shovel and a broom, we cleared off the porch, set up the grill, and prepared for a family dinner to be remembered. We had several oil lamps for just such an emergency, as well as a battery operated radio. All these were placed around the dining room with a lamp in the middle of the table. As we brought in the meat from the grill, the aroma wafted through the house just like summertime, and we turned on the radio to listen to an overseas broadcast of the Grand Ole Opry, recorded live and lovingly delivered via Armed Forces Radio from the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville. I don’t remember exactly which songs were played on the Grand Ole Opry show that night, or the particular artists. I don’t remember which cut of meat we had for dinner. I don’t even remember whether it was 1971 or 1972. But I do remember the warm glow of the oil lamps, and the sound of Dad asking the blessing over our meal, and the silliness of giggling and teasing among us kids. I do remember feeling on a winter night across the Atlantic, Mediterranean and Marmara seas that I was, precisely and exactly, home.

ANDY CHASE CUNDIFF Andy is a local artist, singer and songwriter, and has called Amarillo home for more than 20 years. He plays at a variety of live music venues throughout the Panhandle. Contact Andy at 376-7918.


        

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Reality Check

Technology changes, but tradition remains

A

t a monthly gathering of writers earlier this year, I read a selection from a piece of speculative fiction I’d written, that was set roughly 16 years in the future. At one point, the protagonist remembers the first time she watched “The Sandlot” on cable television. It was meant to date the character. Another writer in our group liked the strategy, pointing out that his own young children – and by extension the young adults in my story – will never experience cable television because of the advent of streaming devices. I probably should’ve taken credit for this stroke of genius, but I was just recounting my own first experience with the classic 1993 movie during a summer in my youth. And there are many other movies I remember watching on cable for the first time with my family. “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” the first installment in the Indiana Jones franchise, is another. I have fond memories of many Thanksgivings with my family, gathered around the TV, watching it. It wasn’t until I was in my 20s that I realized I’d never seen the entire movie. I found myself alone on a weekend watching it and coming to what I thought was the end. Then the movie kept going. Only then did I realize I must’ve fallen asleep in a post-Turkey coma every single time we’d watched it. For Christmas, our favorites are “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” and, perhaps more importantly, “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” – the original, not the unnecessary, invalid remakes that I will never see simply out of principle. My parents’ tradition of watching movies with their children dates to at least 1989. Just after my third birthday, I was with them watching Super Bowl XIII. (You may not consider Super Bowl Sunday a holiday, but we do.) I obviously don’t remember this. But I know it happened because my mother still calls me “Boomer” from time to time. When I asked why as a child, she told me the story of seeing quarterback Boomer Esiason play for the Cincinnati Bengals during that game. I was a towhead as a young boy, and Esiason is famously blonde. So, to this day, I will respond to my nickname, Boomer. As the years passed, the television remained a centerpiece of our holiday celebrations. Though I am relatively young and part of the Millennial generation, I fully remember having only one standarddefinition, box-shaped television in the house. And it was around that TV that we gathered during holidays.

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Since then, families seem to have become more fragmented. Most people have more than one television in the house, with more than one cable box. Then came the affordability and compatibility of DVD players. It became much worse when streaming content rose to dominance. Now all that content was available on our smart devices. During causal, daily visits, I often find adult friends of mine and their children watching their own cellphone playing videos from Netflix, YouTube, Facebook, and myriad other services. Sometimes, that video watching is happening in the same room with a working television. I am just as guilty. Many nights, I fall asleep watching streaming TV. Sometimes it’s on the smart TV in my room. More often, though, it’s on my cellphone – in the same room with my television. And yet, when the gatherings are more formal during a holiday, that dynamic changes. First a meal is eaten by my parents, sister, and our longtime friends and their own families. Then we will settle in for person-to-person conversation. But first, we’ll choose a family-friendly movie so we can all focus when the iconic scenes come on. The tools we use are different now than when I was younger. The television is more than 50 inches. The remote control is an Amazon Fire Stick and the movie will have no commercials, which means bathroom and second-helping breaks will require the pause button. And, obviously, we will never again own tube-based televisions, or get rid of all the extra TVs while we also watch videos on our phones. But it warms my heart that no matter what technological changes come or how fragmented our attention can be, the tradition of coming together during the holidays persists. And I know it will continue for at least one generation. Though I have no children of my own, my friends and their children – who range from about 11 to 1 – still gather at my parents’ house. And I know on Christmas Eve or Christmas, we will all find a place to sit in the living room, eating one more bite of food while we watch The Grinch carve up Whoville’s Roast Beast. RICK TREON Rick is an award-winning suspense novelist and former managing editor of the Amarillo Globe-News. His debut novel, “Deep Background,” is available in paperback, Kindle, and audiobook on Amazon.com. Learn more at ricktreon.com.


Dress Code

Lash Star Visionary Lashes $28, Dillard’s

Anastasia Moon Child Glow Kit $40, Dillard’s

Seasonal Shimmer

C

hristmas is party season, and that makes it as good a time as ever to glam up your look. From deep reds and vibrant greens to shimmery sparkles, there are plenty of shades, styles and techniques to make your features a fa-la-lala-lot more festive. And if there’s ever a time to try something new, the holidays are it. Here are a few of our favorite partyready beauty products from local retailers. Dash away, all! PHOTOS BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

Stila Glitter & glow liquid eyeshadow in Smoky Storm and Gold Goddess $24 each, Dillard’s

M.A.C. Kiss of Stars lipstick in Starstruck $20, Dillard’s

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Jane Iredale Lip Fixation lip stain/gloss $35, Awaken Spa


Dress Code

m r Pe t s i t r A I

n salons and on the catwalk, the past year has marked the return of the perm. Once a prominent staple of late ’80s fashion regret, chemically curled hair is on the comeback. “A lot of it is like with anything in fashion,” says Beto Acevedo, owner of Ugly Press, a salon at 3608 Mockingbird Lane. “If you wait long enough, somebody’s going to find it interesting again.” He speculates that the youth who loved perms 30 years ago now have their own kids, and that new generation is discovering this change of pace from straight hair. “It’s old to us but new to them,” he says. But this time around, the tight curls are gone. Patrons wanting perms are after a much softer, looser look. “In the ’80s, they wanted it to be big and voluminous – the bigger the better,” Acevedo says. “Now it’s more about changing the texture of the hair. It’s not as frizzy. It’s more refined.” To give us an idea of stylish looks for every day, Acevedo and Ugly Press stylists Erika Vela and Madison Fisher showed us a variety of perm styles and options. PHOTOS COURTESY OF UGLY PRESS

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irst, Acevedo says it’s important to understand the visual differences between naturally curly hair, hair styled with a curling iron, and permed hair. In this photo, nail artist Amber Morgan’s naturally straight hair has simply been curled with a curling iron. “You see people with curly hair and sometimes think a perm can achieve that look,” Acevedo says. “ Realistically, perms can never approach natural curls or a curling iron. You can get close, but it’s not the same.”

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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Before

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n this shorter cut, a perm gives the model much more body and movement on top using orchidcolored perm rods (9/16 of an inch). Acevedo describes this as more of a commercial look, the kind short-haired clients might prefer in a professional setting. Even so, he always warns clients before getting a perm. “If you’re a control freak, you don’t want a perm. Every curl is going to be different every single time you style it,” he says.

LITA CLINE

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T

o achieve this model’s look, Ugly Press alternated rod sizes, using tangerine perm rods (3/4-inch) and green rods (1 1/8-inch). “Most people today either have bobs or really long hair,” says Acevedo. “This shows what her hair would look like if you didn’t go too tight or too loose.” He says the relaxed perm results in a beach-y look, which gives the hair more body. “When you use a curling iron, it helps the hair hold the texture.”

MADISON FISHER

Before

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his much edgier style is perfect for clients with an undercut – longer hair on top with the sides shaved or cut close. This perm alternates tangerine rods (3/4-inch) and sandcolored rods (11/16-inch) to achieve a broken-up look. Acevedo cautions that this approach, as with any perm, can sometimes be frustrating in the Panhandle wind. “Curly hair is temperamental,” he says. And while bleached or brightly colored hair is also edgy, it shouldn’t be permed. “Anybody with bleached hair or color services that require bleach should not get a perm,” insists Acevedo. That combination of chemicals is just asking for brittle, dry or “fried” hair.

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JAIDYN ROOT

Before


P

erms for men? Absolutely. “A lot of guys are getting perms,” Acevedo says. “They’re probably more interested in perms than the girls are now.” From athletes wanting their mullets curled – yes, it’s a trend – to regular guys desiring to add more visual interest to their hair, men aren’t shy about asking for artificial curl. This look used 3/8-inch gray perm rods to add some wave to a popular haircut influenced by television shows like “Peaky Blinders.”

ISAIAH RODRIGEZ

Before

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Home

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Gifts for Cooks

ooks of any kind make wonderful, personal Christmas gifts. But for friends and family who are comfortable in the kitchen, a cookbook goes even further – especially when catered to their culinary interests. More than just a thoughtful present, a cookbook allows the recipient to continue the giving process each time they prepare a favorite dish. That’s why we are passionate about cookbooks as holiday gifts. Here are a few of our locally available favorites. PHOTOS BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

For the baker: “How to Build a Better Pie” $24.99, Two Loons Warehouse

For the cocktail enthusiast and music lover: “Booze and Vinyl” A Spirited Guide to Music & Mixed Drinks $25, Reserve Amarillo

For the vegetable lover: The Forest Feast “Gatherings” Simple Vegetarian Menus for Hosting Friends & Family $35, Purpose+Passion

For the collector: Vintage Cook’s Essentials “Christmas” $6, The Nat Antiques

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Cover Story

a s m t s i r h C d e t a o C r a g Su

by Jonathan Baker

PHOTOS BY SHANON RICHARDSON

CROUQEMBOUCHE, GIRASOL CAFE & BAKERY

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his time of year, you can be forgiven for being consumed by visions of sugar plums. During these cold days, we bring our families and friends closer – and often, that means gathering around a plate of cookies, an apple pie, or a red velvet cake with lots of white frosting. As we prepare for another holiday, sweet treats remind us that life is about more than the work grind; it’s about more than eating clean and frequenting the gym. Sometimes, we find happiness in the sweeter things: keeping our loved ones close, watching old movies and sipping hot tea – and, yes, indulging in a slice of pie with plenty of whipped cream on top. This month, we’re thrilled to bring you a selection of some of Amarillo’s finest sugar purveyors. To make things even better, not only are these establishments filled with happiness and deliciousness, but they’re all locally owned. So, pull up a chair and settle in with a slice of cheesecake, as we introduce you to the best sweets our city has to offer. Oh, and don’t forget the eggnog.


C e a k h es S e h S

S

heSheCakes owner Sherry Heeter opened her brick and mortar shop on Sept. 3 of this year, and she says things have been going swimmingly. Before hopping into the cheesecake game, Heeter worked for AT&T for eight years. But the corporate grind was wearing her down – and what better remedy than to turn her attentions to the crafting of immaculate cheesecakes? “I wanted more of a work-life balance. I prayed about it and talked to my family. My daughter said, ‘Mom, everybody loves your cheesecake. Just make the cheesecake.’” So, around Valentine’s Day, Heeter began making four-inch red velvet cheesecakes – baking after work and on the weekends. “I bet a sold a hundred of those things!” she says with a smile. SheSheCakes claims its gourmet cheesecakes are “sent from heaven,” and we’re not about to disagree. This locally owned shop bakes fresh daily, and keeps its “mini” and “midi” cakes on hand – so you can drop in anytime and sample one of these divine delicacies. SheShe also offers “maxi”-sized cakes available for order, with a week’s notice. SheShe especially excels at the classics, like New York Style, Turtle, Ultimate Chocolate, Red Velvet and Salted Caramel. But there are also specialty flavors available, like White Chocolate Raspberry and Lemon Blueberry.

7535 Canyon Drive 341.0980, sheshecakes.com

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A

respiratory therapist by trade, Tumbleweed Farm owner Patti Cole decided to open a healthfriendly bakery after being diagnosed with arthritis three years ago. “It basically got so I couldn’t work anymore, because of the arthritis.” Cole says she’s passionate about the idea that folks with health issues still have a right to eat sweet treats. “That’s why I started [Tumbleweed].” Tumbleweed Farm has now been open for a little over a year, and its success has prompted a recent move to a new location at 34th and Western. “We do [Silicone] Valley, Keto, Vegan and Paleo,” Cole says. “And everything we do is gluten-free.” So if you’re looking to satisfy your sweet tooth in a gluten-free, sugar-free, low-carb way, Tumbleweed Farm has got what you need. The list of available treats is staggering: from “Kiki Bars” (almond crust, peanut butter center, topped with chocolate), to “Keto Crack” (roasted pecans in a “delicious sauce”), to

cookie flavors like Pecan, Chocolate Chip and Almond Shortbread, to truffles and low-carb/high-fat “fat bombs” in peanut butter, chocolate walnut, and chocolate caramel flavors, to stunning cinnamon rolls in plain or pumpkin spice options. The list goes on. Tumbleweed also offers pies and cakes, as well as muffins and cupcakes. Heck, they even sell Italian parmesan dinner rolls, if you’re hankering for something savory. In addition to selling baked goods out of its 34th Avenue shop, Tumbleweed also provides treats to Center City Shakes and Bakes – a nutritional protein shake shop in downtown Amarillo. Tumbleweed also provides catering services and a full lunch and early dinner menu.

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4137 SW 34th Ave. 223.6523, tumbleweedbakery.com

ALMOND SHORTBREAD COOKIES, KIKI BARS AND CHEESECAKE AND PEANUT BUTTER BROWNIES


ALMOND CROISSANTS

BLACK FOREST GATEAU

PAIN AU CHOCOLAT

y r e k a B e& f a C l o s a r i G

S

ince opening three and a half years ago, Girasol has developed a fiercely loyal following among Amarilloans looking for local fare made with care. This southwest Amarillo spot is one of the city’s hidden gems, tucked away behind a gas station on Coulter Street, next to West Texas R/X. While many stop in for lunch or the amazing bread (baked fresh daily), it’s Girasol’s sweets that have become the stuff of legend. A taste of Girasol’s croissants or homemade coconut cream pie has been likened by some to a religious experience. “Amarillo has really welcomed us,” says co-owner Jessica Higgins. “We’re doing great!” On the sweet side, year-round favorites include blueberry scones and peanut butter sandwich cookies. Girasol also offers treats for the gluten-intolerant, including gluten-free brownies and gluten-free Love Bars. But Higgins says the bakery is happy to take advance special orders, accommodating whatever dietary needs locals might have, including “gluten-free, sugar-free, and dairy-free.” Girasol also makes all of its breads in house. The shop has long been known as a breakfast and lunch spot, but Higgins says Girasol is currently working to make its space available for evening catered events, including Christmas parties. Girasol has also put together a holiday special-order menu, which is currently available. What’s more, Girasol will be making croquembouche (a traditional French dessert consisting of choux pastry puffs bound with threads of caramel) this holiday season, so place your orders early!

3201 S. Coulter St. 352.8089

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ake B m o t s u C a y k s o ’ B e y i gg Cook i P . s M & e p Shop

A

n Amarillo institution, Ms. Piggy’s has been serving up sweet treats in the region for 33 years – and it’s been installed in its location on 33rd for 28 years. Owner Linda Herrera says Ms. Piggy’s specialty is its signature soft sugar cookies, decorated with creativity and careful attention. But the shop also makes a wide variety of other traditional cookie varieties, like peanut butter, chocolate chip and snickerdoodle. In addition, Ms. Piggy’s makes cinnamon rolls, brownies, banana and pumpkin breads, giant cookies, wedding cakes and cookie “bokays.” “Everything is custom made,” says Herrera, “And we never use any preservatives.” During the holidays, Ms. Piggy’s sets up a table in the bakery covered with “Christmas trays, filled with assorted breads and pies, gingerbread cookies, gingersnaps, all sorts of goodies.” Not to mention the Christmas cookies, decorated to look like Santa Claus, Christmas trees and the like. Herrera was careful to note that the treats featured in our spread were part of a custom order. “Those have to be ordered ahead of time,” she says. Above all, Herrera underlines the importance of supporting local businesses like Ms. Piggy’s. “It helps keep our doors open. We’re not a big bakery, but we try to keep up!”

6030 SW 33rd Ave., 353.9983 mspiggyscustombakeshoppe andcookiebokays.com 38

AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019


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e’ve heard of folks leaving Amarillo and setting out for the bright lights of New York City. It’s not as often that we hear of someone leaving New York for the somewhat subtler pleasures of the Texas Panhandle. But that’s exactly what AJ Cunha – otherwise known as “AJ the Baker” – did. And today, Cunha has made a true home for his family in the Yellow City, while taking Amarillo’s baking game to a whole new level. Cunha’s operation, Koosh, officially started in June 2018, and since then AJ has appeared at community markets and special events throughout the High Plains. Koosh specializes in artisanal breads, rich in flavor and high in nutritional value. Cunha, who originally hails from Venezuela, says he fell in love with traditional European styles of baking while living in Brooklyn. And now, he’s brought these ancient traditions to the Panhandle. These are rich, full-bodied breads, “tan and crusty and full of flavor,” as Cunha says. To achieve this richness, Koosh exclusively employs organic flour, often turning to sourdough cultures and spelt. Cunha is an evangelist for traditional baking methods, and he’s happy to talk to you about the harmful nature of mass-produced baked goods. “We use the least amount of sugar possible,” he explains. “And we use super dark, rich sugars, almost molasses-like.” The result: darkly baked treats, wherein those sugars caramelize. There’s nothing quite like Koosh’s products in Amarillo. “We use rye and spelt, we use pumpernickel, lots of things

besides just wheat,” says Cunha. “Our gluten-free customers can eat many of our breads. We are trying to prove that it’s the process that upsets people’s systems – it’s not always the gluten.” Cunha jokes, “We have the best gluten in town!” For the holidays, customers can enjoy Koosh’s spectacular sourdough cinnamon rolls, or the spelt chocolate chunk cookies. “Our cookies have 84% fat content,” says Cunha. “You eat one or two and you’re full. They’re almost a meal. And made 100% out of spelt,” a grain that Cunha says is far superior to wheat. “Super water soluble, super digestible.” Furthermore, Cunha and the Koosh crew are deeply dedicated to Amarillo. “I’ve been listening to people, tweaking my recipes,” says Cunha, “in an effort to give this community what they want – while still maintaining the highest level of craftsmanship.” And Koosh’s dedication to the High Plains goes even further. “We’ve been pairing with local charities, trying to educate, and to give back to the community. And we never throw anything in the trash – we give [our leftover breads] to the homeless.” Koosh doesn’t currently have a storefront, but that may be coming in the future. In the meantime, Cunha takes orders through phone and text, social media, even email.

516.508.3360

SPELT CHOCOLATE CHUNK COOKIES, ALMOND AND ORANGE TOASTS, MADELINE BUTTONS, CHOCOLATE GANACHE BABKAS, AND SOURDOUGH CINNAMON ROLLS

Koosh Artisan Bakeshop

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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C u d p e l f f u R The y & Sweet Sh Cupcaker oppe

F

ounded nine years ago as “Amarillo’s first and finest cupcake bakery,” this sweetshop offers up a cornucopia of sugary goodness. The Ruffled Cup is best known for, well, cupcakes. But the term doesn’t quite do these tiny masterpieces justice. Everyday flavors like Ruby Red Velvet, Va-Va Vanilla, Salted Caramel, Wedding Cake, Chocolate Obsession, Peanut Butter Cup, Ruffled Truffle, German Chocolate and Sassy Strawberry have created a fierce following of fans on the High Plains. Then there are the specialty flavors, like Holy Cannoli, Lemon Blackberry, Grasshopper, Mimosa, Gingerdoodle and “Coffee and Donuts” – so you’re guaranteed a unique experience on any given visit. Owner Deanna Hurt says her most popular flavor, for both cakes and cupcakes, is “The Marilyn,”an almond cake with raspberry filling and cream cheese frosting. Also big with locals: the Ruffled Truffle, “Our namesake cupcake, chocolate cake with chocolate ganache in the middle, with vanilla cream on top died Tiffany blue to match our theme color.” Beyond cupcakes, the shop is known for its cream-cheese sugar cookies, cheesecakes, “safe to eat” cookie dough, homemade ice cream, brownies, and French macarons. For the holidays, expect the Ruffled Cup to pull out all the stops. The shop has a full panoply of yule-themed sweets available this holiday season. During the holiday season, says Hurt, “Cookies kind of take over. We sell thousands and thousands of cookies. Wreaths and Christmas trees and Santa Clauses and reindeer … They just fly out the door. We make new flavors like peppermint, and we try to make everything super festive.” One new treat that’s been garnering a lot of attention this holiday is The Ruffled Cup’s éclairs. “We wanted to do something you can’t find in Amarillo,” says Hurt, “and we wanted get really creative with flavors. The éclairs are made completely from scratch, so finding a perfect recipe was important. We love experimenting with new fillings and toppings since we have access to all the ingredients; we have pumpkin, lemon cream, butter toffee, strawberry, key lime, salted caramel – the list goes on and on! And, of course, we have our “classic” éclair, which is filled with our signature custard and topped with chocolate ganache.” Hurt says the Ruffled Cup serves five to seven different flavors of éclairs every day.

3440 S. Bell St., Suite 100 318.3961, theruffledcup.com

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AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019


BUTTERLOVE’S DECADENT CHOCOLATE GRAVY

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE

e Biscuits v o l r e l t But

A

s the Ruffled Cup gained popularity and began to outgrow its space, it moved into new digs around the corner from the original shop on 34th and Bell. With her newfound space, owner Deanna Hurt decided to expand her operation into new realms. “Our wheels started turning,” she recalls, “and we started doing some research into restaurant concepts around the United States that were starting to be popular. We came upon the idea of a biscuit brunch place. Everybody’s obsessed with brunch! Both in Amarillo and across the U.S., so we thought, Let’s do something like that.” With Hurt’s background in baking, the idea seemed like a perfect fit. “I’m still learning the restaurateur side of things, but baking is something I’m super comfortable with.” And while the savory options at Butterlove bring in a lot of traffic, the cafe doesn’t shy away from the sweeter side of things. “Our most popular biscuit is our blueberry biscuit,” Hurt says. “It’s delicious! A sweet blueberry biscuit

with a glaze on top. We can hardly keep them stocked.” In addition, Butterlove offers other sweet options including strawberry shortcake and a seasonal pumpkin biscuit. On the sweets menu, the most popular option is chocolate gravy. Here in the land of cream gravy, the idea might seem unexpected – it certainly did to Deanna Hurt. “I had never heard of chocolate gravy before! It’s kind of a Southern staple, like a chocolate custard that goes over a sweet biscuit. It’s really decadent and rich.” For those with a huge sugar craving, Butterlove has taken things up another notch with its s’mores biscuit: the sweet biscuit and chocolate gravy, with marshmallows, marshmallow cream, and graham cracker crumbles. Epic.

3440 S. Bell St., Suite 130 418.8966,butterlove.com

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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THE DAY OF THE FIRE

NICK AND GYPSY

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARCY MCKAY

Inspire

Where There’s Smoke by Marcy McKay

I

was home alone when it happened. Friday, Aug. 25, 2017. I sat at my desk, working on my next novel (which wasn’t going well, thank you). Our smoke alarm went off, so I cautiously walked barefoot through all our rooms and discovered … Nothing. No smoke. No fire. No burning smell. “Should I call 911?” I hollered into the phone over the screaming alarm to my husband. “Yes!” I didn’t. (Insert knife-to-the-chest guilt No. 904,825,763). I wandered into our den where Nick the pug was holding court in his usual – Wait, no. Nick stood frozen on the couch, staring toward our backyard. The fire alarm kept wailing. I decided to check on our yellow lab, Gypsy, so Nick followed me through the kitchen, then outside. Gypsy was racing laps around our backyard. That’s when I turned and saw it. Smoke rising from our roof like ghosts. It’d been less than three minutes since the alarm first sounded. I called 911 at 3:57 p.m. Three minutes.

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AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019

My legs wobbled as I ushered the dogs inside and shouted the details of our emergency to the operator. A flame SHOT at me through the ceiling vent over the kitchen stove. I shrieked and raced to grab our family’s birth certificates and passports (one husband, two teenagers and me). The doorbell rang and the policeman helped us out safely. Firetrucks rushed from both ends of the block. I felt off balance. Out of kilter. Standing by our giant elm tree with the dogs, I watched the nightmare play out and repeated to myself like a mantra. It’s not that bad. It’s just smoke. It’s not that bad. More fire trucks. My husband and son came home (daughter was at college). Neighbors checked on us. The rest is a blur. Turns out, our attic had old, faulty wiring and the kitchen exhaust fan had been running. The alarm had long since been turned off, but I still heard it. Insurance gave us money to buy clothes as our old ones were desmoked. Everything seemed off. I wasn’t in my house. I wasn’t wearing my clothes. I didn’t feel like me. People kept asking if I was alright and if there was anything they could do. I didn’t know how to respond expect to slap on a smile and say we’re OK. It reminded me of 30 years earlier when my father died. I tried to


be normal when life was anything but. Insurance offered to house us long-term in a motel on I-40. Luckily, my in-laws offered their cabin outside of town at the Palo Duro Club. My husband had countless happy childhood memories there, so it was perfect. Going back to the house for anything (to meet the insurance adjustor, water the yard) worsened my anxiety. It cranked up my now internal alarm. If I’d only called 911 immediately! One month passed by, then two, then five. Please note, anything that could go wrong – did. We just learned to laugh about it. Except I wasn’t getting better. If fact, I felt worse. The good news was they saved more than 90% of our belongings, though we couldn’t decide whether we wanted to rebuild and go back, try a new part of town, or move halfway across the country. The possibilities were endless. The choices felt overwhelming. I don’t recall when I first went to therapy. It didn’t help. I’d been to counseling before, so I know counseling works, but you have to find the right person. Someone who understands your weirdness. The Reader’s Digest version is that I found a life coach online who taught me that this wound outside (feeling lost since the fire) correlated with a wound inside (from my childhood) that needed to be healed. For me, my larger-than-life father (6-foot, 3 inches, 300 pounds) had larger-than-life emotions. Since I never knew if Happy/Moody/Angry Dad would come home, I became hypervigilant. I never realized how panicked I always felt until I got better. I connected the dots back further. My father died alone in his hotel room while visiting me in college at Baylor. Normally, I spent the night

with him, but didn’t because I had a late-night study group (knife-in-thechest guilt No. 8,7562). My father died on my watch. We lost our house on my watch. Do you feel my pain? With life coaching, it wasn’t just exploring the messiness of me during our sessions, but I’d email in the moment when I felt triggered (thus the term – coaching). That ongoing support helped change my patterns. That inspired me to enroll in a coaching program. I now love helping others get unstuck, find their mojo and create the life they deserve. If another therapist or psychiatrist is better suited, I say so. Ten months after the fire, we moved our 663 boxes from our old life into our new home out in Sunday Canyon (1.6 acres on the rim of Palo Duro Canyon). It’s heavenly and my second novel comes out this month. Everything about my world has changed: my address, my marriage, who I am as a person. All for the better. The worst thing that happened to me turned out to be the best thing to happen to me. I still hear that alarm sometimes. It’s softer now and doesn’t frighten me anymore.

MARCY MCKAY Though Marcy has survived a house fire, raising two teenagers was worse. She’s a life coach, as well as an award-winning author. Her debut novel, “Pennies from Burger Heaven,” has more than 260 reviews, while the sequel, “Bones and Lies Between Us,” is for sale now. Marcy and her husband live on the rim of Palo Duro Canyon, while their grown kids are off making this world a better place. Connect with her at marcymckay.com.

NORTHWEST IS

MY

HOSPITAL

NORTHWEST IS HOSPITAL! OUR

Jessica Blaser and her son, Duke Northwest Orthopedic Patients

When it comes to orthopedic care, the Northwest family takes care of the Blaser family. Jessica put her trust in Northwest Texas Physician Group orthopedic surgeon, Blake Obrock, DO, for a second opinion on possible hip surgery.

To schedule an appointment, call 806-398-3627 or book online at nwtpg.com/ortho

After Duke fractured his collarbone, they turned again to Dr. Obrock and Northwest Surgical Hospital for an outpatient procedure. “If I do need hip surgery in the future, I’ll be at Northwest,” Jessica says. “And Duke is great. He’s been back at football training.” Get social with us

Northwest Emergency on Georgia is Now Open We are ready to serve you and your family, 24/7. Most patients will be seen in 15 minutes or less. Call 806-351-7700 or find us at 4121 S. Georgia Street in Amarillo.

Physicians are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Northwest Texas Healthcare System. The system shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. For language assistance, disability accommodations and the non-discrimination notice, visit our website. 190018-6479 8/19

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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What’s Cooking

l i k ta

S

till Austin is an Austin-based independent distillery, and its newest bourbon whiskey release has a local connection: It’s made using local grains and its CEO, Chris Seals, lives here in Amarillo. Since good cocktails are critical at holiday parties, we asked Chris to supply us some of his favorite winter cocktails using Still Austin products. “Our spirits are very high quality,” Seals says. “We picked a few [recipes] that dress them up a little bit with a focus on what makes us different.” For instance, the Encore Bijou is traditionally made with bourbon. “[The ingredients] chartreuse and vermouth tend to go well with bourbons

s

oc

C

W

inter

that are a little more spicy. Ours has a high rye component from rye grown here in the Panhandle, and it tends to really pop. The balance is just wonderful and shows off a little of what we grow here.” Local ingredients also feature prominently in the Bee Still My Heart, which features Still Austin Gin and can be made using local honey. “I’m a beekeeper and so is my daughter,” says Seals, who likes to harvest his own honey for the drink. Chris compares this gin-based drink to the classic Prohibition-era Bee’s Knees, only elevated by the presence of Creme Yvette, a liqueur made from berries.

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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Elevage Old Fashioned 2 ounces Still Austin bourbon ½ ounce Liber & Co. Demerara gum syrup 2 dashes Angostura bitters 1 dash Bad Dog Sarsaparilla bitters Combine ingredients, stir, and strain. Serve on the rocks in rocks glass. Garnish with orange/lemon peel and a cherry. Makes 1 serving

Encore Bijou 1 ½ ounces Still Austin gin ¾ ounce Green Chartreuse ¾ ounce sweet Vermouth 2 dashes orange bitters Combine ingredients, shake with ice, and strain. Serve up in a coupe. Garnish with lemon peel. Makes 1 serving

1 ½ ounces Still Austin gin ¾ ounce honey syrup ¾ ounce lemon juice ¼ ounce Crème Yvette Combine ingredients, shake with ice, and strain. Garnish with a lemon rose. Makes 1 serving

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AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019

PHOTOS COURTESY OF STILL AUSTIN

Bee Still My Heart


Meet the Mixologist Chris Seals of Still Austin

S

till Austin CEO Chris Seals has a deep family connection to farming. He was born in northwest Missouri, where his great-great-grandfather homesteaded a farm north of Kansas City. That farm has remained in the family for nearly 130 years and gave Seals an appreciation for locally grown products and the supply chain that connects consumers to the land surrounding them. Seals moved to Texas in second grade and spent most of his childhood in the Metroplex area before attending the University of Texas at Austin. It was there – working as a barista – where Seals met the renowned economist Ray Duch, who is now a fellow at the University of Oxford. The friendship with Duch sent Seals, who’d earned a degree in English, into the world of economics. He returned to school to study finance and business with a focus on statistics and quantitative methods. After a brief stint at J.P. Morgan in Houston, Seals had the opportunity to help Duch establish a consulting practice – Raymond Duch and Associates. Eventually that work brought him to Amarillo, and for 15 years, Seals worked as an economist assisting clients like AT&T, Research in Motion, ECO Canada and prominent tourist destinations. “When you’re an economist, you have to be a jack-of-all-trades,” he says. “It was a hodgepodge of different stuff. I did a lot of feasibility studies. Those can be pretty broad: What do you need to do to make something work?” Then, a few years ago, his retired father came to Seals with an idea. “I want to start a craft whiskey distillery. Would you help me?” his dad asked. Seals was skeptical. “Putting on my hat as an economist, I thought this was one of the worst ideas I’d heard in my life. Risk assessment is a big part of feasibility, and I couldn’t think of a project that I considered more risky than this one. It was likely to fail,” he remembers. At the time, alcohol production in Texas was tightly regulated. You could spend thousands of dollars making barrels of bourbon that might sit in a warehouse for a decade before ever seeing the market. “It seemed like a long shot,” Seals admits. But he saw that his father wanted to spend time with him and jumped at the chance for them to pursue a hobby together. The two began taking classes, visiting distilleries and investigating whether a craft whiskey distillery could work despite the state’s highly restrictive laws. Then, in 2013, Texas eased its distillery regulations. Suddenly the Seals’ craft whiskey idea became much more realistic and the two men jumped in with both feet. Still Austin opened six years ago, funded by the family’s friends and colleagues in Amarillo, Austin and throughout the state. The craft distillery took on a grain-to-glass

concept, building relationships with Texas farmers so it could produce high-quality spirits made with 100% Texas-grown grains. Released this fall, its limited-edition High Rye bourbon whiskey release features grains grown in Sunray, Texas.

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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[ ADVERTISEMENT ]


Let’s Eat!

Restaurants • Food • Spirits

The Annex

P

alace Coffee Company’s Annex in the FBSW Tower lobby opened earlier this year, and caters to the downtown breakfast and lunch crowd. In addition to Palace’s popular coffee and tea options, the Annex’s expanded menu includes a variety of items with a focus on healthy, fresh ingredients. Warm up on a chilly winter morning with a bowl of hearty Umpqua oats and a latte. The lunch menu includes wraps, sandwiches, soup and salad made fresh to order. Snack items are available all day. The Annex also caters office meetings and large to-go orders to downtown locations.

600 S. Tyler St. 476.0111, ext. 5 palacecoffee.co

PHOTO BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

Open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

PRICING GUIDE $ most entrees less than $10 $$ most entrees $11 to $20 $$$ most entrees more than $21 NEW New to Let’s Eat! UPDATE

Updated entry

THE LET’S EAT! GUIDE IS A READER SERVICE COMPILED BY THE AMARILLO MAGAZINE EDITORIAL STAFF. THE MAGAZINE DOES NOT ACCEPT ADVERTISING OR OTHER COMPENSATION IN EXCHANGE FOR A LISTING. THE GUIDE IS UPDATED REGULARLY. TO CORRECT A LISTING OR RECOMMEND A RESTAURANT FOR CONSIDERATION, CONTACT MICHELE MCAFFREY AT MMCAFFREY@AMARILLO.COM.

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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Amarillo 575 PIZZERIA

Head cheese and meat, a generous salad, or a tasty bowl of soup. 3301 Bell St., 353.5985, bagelplace.net $

Toppings runneth over at 575 Pizzeria, not to mention the specials that rotate every month. (Check the board when you walk in.) 575 is family-owned and family-friendly, so it’s a great Friday night dinner choice. 2803 Civic Circle/7320 Hillside Road, 322.5575, 575pizzeria.com $$

BANGKOK TOKYO

ABUELO’S

BAR 3

The authentic atmosphere and generous portions make for an enjoyable lunch or fun evening out. If you’re stumped by all the choices, try the Enchiladas de Cozumel, three crepes filled with guacamole and topped with bountiful seafood, fresh spinach and roasted peppers. As a rule, always get the queso. 3501 W. 45th Ave., 354.8294, abuelos.com $$

THE AÇAÍ BAR

For those pursuing the clean-eating trend, The Açaí Bar can keep you on track. Choose from filling bowls or smoothies as an alternative to a fast food breakfast or lunch. Each menu item is made fresh with mostly organic ingredients. The customer favorite Monkey Bowl – an açaí blend topped with granola, pineapple, bananas, strawberries, mini chocolate chips, coconut shreds and honey – will keep you satisfied past the daily 3 p.m. slump. 7306 SW 34th Ave., Suite 9, 367.9724, theacaibaramarillo.com $ NEW

THE ANNEX

Palace Coffee Company’s downtown Annex in the FBSW Tower lobby serves breakfast and lunch items during the workweek. You’ll find Palace’s popular coffee and tea along with healthy items like wraps, salads, sandwiches and snacks made fresh daily. 600 S. Tyler St., 476.0111, ext. 5, palacecoffee.co $

ALDACO’S TACOS

This casual, quaint place is often packed, so visit for an early dinner or a late lunch. Try the crispy chicken with basil or the Bangkok Tokyo fried rice. Neither disappoints. 2413 S. Western St., 353.4777 $$ Located at Preston West Golf Course, this hidden gem serves a limited bar menu for lunch and dinner. Savor comfort food like smoked pulled pork sandwiches, pork shank, and hearty hamburgers, made fresh to order. Wash it down with an ice-cold beer or let the staff help you choose something from the drink menu. 9101 S. Coulter St., 353.7003 $

THE BIG TEXAN STEAK RANCH & BREWERY

Everyone knows about the 72-ouncer, but did you know the breakfast buffet is only $14? Every morning from 7-11 a.m. you can pile your plate high with pancakes, sausage and skillet potatoes. Top it off with a trip to the Omelet Bar before leaving completely satisfied. 7701 I-40 East, 372.6000, bigtexan.com $$

BLUE FRONT CAFE AND OYSTER BAR

With its remodeled interior and menu – and a non-smoking environment – we think there’s a favorite breakfast contender downtown. Try the tasty hot cakes or Texas Omelet for breakfast, classic pulled-pork sandwich for lunch, and fill up on fresh Blue Point oysters and seafood on the weekend. 801 SW Sixth Ave., 372.0659 $

BURGERFI

Located on historic Sixth Street you’ll find this small, authentic Mexican restaurant. The wait staff is friendly so it’s easy to have fun at Aldaco’s, especially on live music nights. Try not to fill up on the homemade chips and salsa so you can enjoy the rest of the delicious food. 3623 SW Sixth Ave., 374.4945 $$

BurgerFi features craft beef and veggie burgers, made-from-scratch fries and onion rings served with house-made sauces, and hot dogs – all with a commitment to hormone and antibiotic-free meats and fresh ingredients. You’ll also find shakes and custards, and a well-rounded local craft beer and wine list. 4413 S. Soncy Road, 576.0712, burgerfi.com $

BAGEL PLACE

BURRITO STOP

Whether for breakfast or lunch, the Bagel Place offers a wide variety of cream cheese and bagel flavors. Zip through the convenient drive-thru for a great, lazy morning take-home breakfast. For lunch, try the bagel sandwiches made with Boars 50

AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019

Tacos Garcia restaurateurs’ downtown grab-and-go eatery doesn’t just offer fromscratch burritos on homemade tortillas for breakfast or lunch. In addition to its hearty fare and vegan options such as soy chorizo and spinach tortillas, Burrito Stop boasts

trained baristas that serve Roasters Coffee & Tea Co. beverages. 114 SE Ninth Ave., 418.2705, burritostop.com $

BUTTERLOVE BISCUITS

Eye-popping big biscuits are the draw at Butterlove Biscuits. And we’re not exaggerating – these things are gigantic. Comfort all of your cravings with savory and sweet biscuits, grab-and-go biscuits, waffles, and perfect brunch-inspired cocktails. 3440 S. Bell, Suite 130, 418.8966, butterlove.com $$

CAFE MARIZON

Cafe Marizon serves up great, homecooked taste with consistently delicious specials of the day. Go early so you can have a piece of the homemade pie or cake. 6151 Hillside Road, 352.2046, cafemarizon.com $$

CALICO COUNTY RESTAURANT

An Amarillo favorite for decades, the homecooked taste keeps people going back for more. You can’t beat the petite cinnamon rolls dripping in butter, the squash casserole and the chicken-fried chicken. Be sure to try the excellent waffles, too. 2410 Paramount Blvd., 358.7664, calicocountyamarillo.com $$

CASK & CORK

You’re in for a treat when you visit Cask & Cork. Ingeniously crafted menu items, which range from flatbread pizza and pasta to rib-eyes, quail and seafood to sandwiches and salads, will make choosing only one item a challenge. 5461 McKenna Square, Suite 101, 410.1113, caskncorkamarillo.com $$

CECIL’S LAST CHANCE BAR AND GRILL

Burgers with all the fixings, chicken-fried steak, chili and sandwiches round out the menu at Cecil’s. Located just outside the I-40 East and US 287 junction, it’s your “last best chance for a great burger.” 12800 S. US 287, 335.1938 $

CHIPOTLE MEXICAN GRILL

What began as a small gourmet burrito shop in Denver in 1993 has grown into a chain with more than 500 locations. Known for its efforts to use naturally raised meat and organic ingredients, the much-anticipated Amarillo location offers the same highquality burritos, burrito bowls, tacos, salad and chips. We’re crazy about the bowls – chock full of rice, black beans, corn, and your choice of meat – it’s a fast, filling and


delicious lunch or dinner option. 2414 S. Georgia St., Suite 200, 576.0764, chipotle.com $

CITY CAFE

Tucked in the basement of the Amarillo Police Department, this cafe is open to all. A full breakfast and lunch menu keeps downtown visitors going back for more. Start your day with a breakfast burrito, sandwich, omelet or pancakes. 200 SE Third Ave., 378.6104 $

CRAZY LARRY’S FINE TEXAS BBQ

A visit to Larry’s isn’t complete without an order of Frito pie – make it a “moose” with the works. The authentic Texas-style barbecue is finger-licking good, and everything on the menu is delivered with some of the friendliest service in town. The prices are reasonable, too. 4315 Teckla Blvd., 359.3176, crazylarrysbbq.com $$

CRUSH WINE BAR & GRILL

Crush’s excellent tapas, sandwiches, entrees and desserts are a big enough draw. Add an extensive and impressive wine list, a rooftop and street-side patio, and excellent service, and you’ve got one of the city’s premier hang-out spots. The Saturday brunch is hard to beat, too. 627 S. Polk St., 418.2011, crushamarillo.com $$

DAVID’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Locals rave about David’s fresh, flavorful Mexican food. Feast on traditional favorites like street tacos, tamales, burritos, and fajitas. Keep up with the tantalizing specials of the day on the restaurant’s Facebook and Instagram profiles. 400 E. Hastings Ave., 418.6333 $

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT

806-680-6456 • mgroupama.com •

Dickey’s serves its original slow-smoked meats alongside homestyle sides like macaroni-and-cheese and jalapeño beans, fresh rolls, and plenty of ice tea. Founded in Dallas in 1941, the national franchise also gives back – its foundation, Barbecue, Boots & _MGroup_Best_of_Ama_Ads_2019_Mirna.indd Badges, benefits law enforcement and firefighters in the local community. 6015 Hillside Road, Suite 100, 322.0127, dickeys.com $$

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11/15/19 2:55 AM

DONA JUANITA RESTAURANT

If you’re in the mood for traditional Mexican dishes, give Dona Juanita’s a try. The guacamole is made fresh daily and the ceviche is some of the best in Amarillo. 2208 Amarillo Blvd. East, 220.2610 $

DOUG’S HICKORY PIT BAR-B-QUE

For a quick, tasty meal, stop at Doug’s and try the chopped beef sandwich. The menu is reasonably priced and the barbecue sauce is tasty. 3313 S. Georgia St., 352.8471 $

THE DRUNKEN OYSTER

Open Monday through Saturday 11 a.m.-2 a.m. and Sunday 11 a.m.9 p.m., The Drunken Oyster features Louisiana-style cuisine in a unique and sophisticated setting. Fill up on fresh oysters, crawfish etouffee, gumbo, jambalaya, po’boys, and plenty of shrimp entrees. Craft cocktails and an excellent wine list ensure you’ll stay awhile. 7606 SW 45th Ave., Suite 100, 418.6668 $$

THE EATERY ON ROUTE 66

A glance at the baked goods and lunch items on The Eatery’s Facebook page will get your mouth watering. Choose from a rotating menu of soups, salads and sandwiches Monday through Saturday, with weekly specials and half-price desserts on Tuesdays. 3208 SW Sixth Ave., 322.0828 $

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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EL CARBONERO RESTAURANTE Y PUPUSERIA

This hidden gem specializes in authentic Salvadoran cuisine. Discover pupusas, a fresh-made masa cake (much like a pancake) filled with your choice of ingredients like queso and loroco (an earthy, green vegetable), pork and cheese, or zucchini and cheese. Traditional options like fajitas, fried fish and asada abound. 1700 Amarillo Blvd. East, 373.1973 $

EL GIRO

The traditional Mexican food taste will keep you going back for more at El Giro. A taqueria-style eatery, El Giro offers authentic dishes like tacos, flautas and chile rellenos. Order a party taco box, filled with more than a dozen tacos, to feed a crowd. 1800 Bell St., 318.3859 $

EL VAQUERO

Customers rave about the breakfast burritos at El Vaquero. The filling burritos, served with beans and papas, are a steal. In business since 1999, the restaurant opens early for breakfast and serves lunch until 2 p.m. 2200 SE Third Ave., 376.6585 $

FAB FOODS

Fab Foods serves straightforward, homestyle meals with busy families in mind. Dine-in, call ahead, take-and-bake, delivery and catering are available for breakfast and lunch. And choose from a rotating daily menu of sandwiches, wraps, salads, hot entrees, and desserts. With those kinds of options, you’re guaranteed to please the whole family – no matter how large. 5901 S. Bell St., 398.3663 $

FAVS

Conveniently located close to downtown, FAVs (which stands for Fruits And Veggies) offers salads, smoothies, soups and snacks chockfull of fresh vegetables, fruits, seeds and nuts – perfect for grab-and-go early morning fuel or a midday lunch. The healthconscious diner will also appreciate protein shakes, fresh muffins, juice and more. 706 SW 16th Ave., 803.9171 $

FRUTILANDIA

Find a colorful snack or light lunch just around the corner from bustling downtown Amarillo. Stop into FrutiLandia for fresh fruit cups, gazpacho, shrimp cocktail, ceviche, or flavorful elote en vaso (corn in a cup). The large portions and fresh ingredients are sure to keep you going back for more. 1010 SE 10th Ave. $

FUDDRUCKERS

This fast-casual chain bills itself as making the “world’s greatest hamburger.” Fuddruckers lets diners choose the size of their burger, how they’d like it cooked, and which toppings they’d prefer. The Amarillo location also has a full bar and an in-house bakery with fresh cookies and pastries. 8158 I-40 West, 358.3450, fuddruckers.com $

FURRBIE’S

You’ll find old-fashioned grilled onion burgers and an array of sandwiches, salads, seafood and ice cream treats at Furrbie’s. Hot dog enthusiasts will love the famous Nathan’s Hot Dogs, the originals from Coney Island, New York, made with 100-percent kosher American beef. Looking to cool off ? Choose from fruityflavored ice treats or ice cream. 210 SW Sixth Ave., 220.0841 $

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AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019


fastER,24/7

Northwest Emergency at Town Square and Northwest Emergency on Georgia provide comprehensive 24/7 treatment backed by the full resources of Northwest Texas Healthcare System.

HOW TO FIND US

»

Convenient locations

Northwest ER on Georgia: 4121 S. Georgia Street, Amarillo, TX 79110 (I-27 and Georgia)

»

On-site laboratory and imaging services

806-351-7700

»

Most Insurance plans, including Medicare, Medicaid, and most Blue Cross Blue Shield plans of Texas, will be accepted.

»

Direct admission to Northwest Texas Healthcare System or a hospital of your choice.

»

Most patients seen in 15 minutes or less

Northwest ER at Town Square: 8960 Hillside Road, Amarillo, TX 79119 (Hillside and Soncy)

806-351-6987

SCHEDULE YOUR APPOINTMENT USING ER RESERVE. LEARN MORE AT

NWTHS.COM/ER

> Bonnie Burnett Northwest ER at Town Square Patient

*ER Reserve should be used only if you decide your care can wait until the time you select. Do not wait if your symptoms or conditions worsen or if you need immediate care immediately since delays may complicate your condition. If you are unsure of your condition or if your condition worsens, then please go to the nearest emergency room or call 9-1-1. Some insurance plans may not cover an ER visit if it is deemed urgent care or may apply a different copay. Please check your covered benefits with your insurance provider for details. Physicians are independent practitioners who are not employees or agents of Northwest Texas Healthcare System. The system shall not be liable for actions or treatments provided by physicians. For language assistance, disability accommodations and the non-discrimination notice, visit our website. 190018-6902 8/19

GET SOCIAL WITH US

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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GEORGIA STREET TAPHOUSE

Whether in the dining room or inside the spacious bar area, there are plenty of big screens to keep you entertained at Taphouse. Sample typical pub fare and enjoy daily drink specials inside or on the covered patio. 2001 S. Georgia St., 803.7000 $$

THE GOLDEN LIGHT CAFE

As the oldest operating restaurant in Amarillo, The Golden Light has been in business since 1946, all in the same location. For a great burger and fries, this is the place to go. 2908 SW Sixth Ave., 374.9237, goldenlightcafe.com $

GOONEY’S

You won’t get bored with Gooney’s menu. This downtown eatery and lounge cooks up pretty much every Asian dish you can think of – egg rolls, lettuce wraps, the always-reliable Charlie’s Special, chow mein, curry wings, even hot-off-the-grill rib-eyes and steak kabobs. 705 S. Polk St., 367.9585 $

GRILLS GON’ WILD

At Grills Gon’ Wild, you can expect a good time. You’ll find fresh food, made to order, with aged hand-cut steaks and daily specials like chicken alfredo, baby back ribs, or fish tacos. Open early for breakfast, as well as lunch and dinner, there’s plenty of options to keep you going back for more. 5120 Canyon Drive, 418.6001, grillsgonwild.com $

THE HOBO HOUSE TEXAS DINER

Open for lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and dinner from 5 to 9 p.m., The Hobo House features American classics on its limited menu. Choose from appetizers, sandwiches, salads and burgers. The Bad Moon Burger caught our eye: it’s a half-pound beef patty smothered in blue, cream and Monterrey Jack cheeses, topped with caramelized onions. Where’s the napkins? 7200 W. McCormick Road, 622.9814 $

HOUSE DIVIDED

Open for lunch and dinner Monday through Sunday, House Divided splits its interior into a dedicated bar area and separate dining room (hence the name). But you’ll see a “divided” theme in its menu as well, with popular Texas college rivalries set on opposing pages. The diverse menu is full of plenty of pub grub, steaks, Texas-style entrees, pizza, Italian and Mexican food, salads, sandwiches and burgers to make a return trip a necessity. 7609 Hillside Road, 350.4377 $$

HUD’S

Open early every day for fans of the hearty breakfast burritos, Hud’s has been satisfying locals’ cravings for decades. The faithful return again and again for Hud’s fountain drinks (try the cherry limade), chicken dinners, fried okra, and burgers, all made fresh daily. 7311 Amarillo Blvd. West, 351.1499/4411 Bell St., 331.4837 $

ICHIBAN NOODLE BAR & ASIAN CUISINE

With the inner workings of its kitchen on display, Ichiban makes you feel like you’re right in the middle of a bustling noodle bar on a street in Asia. Endless choices of cold noodles and hot dishes make your dinner decision a tough one. 3309 Wimberly Road, 355.5031 $

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AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019


FOR VOTING US

FOR VOTING US

AND AND

3440 BELL ST. | AMARILLO, TX

34TH AND BELL AMARILLO, TX

AMARILLO GLOBE-NEWS AMARILLO GLOBE-NEWS AMARILLO GLOBE-NEWS AMARILLO GLOBE-NEWS AMARILLO GLOBE-NEWS AMARILLO GLOBE-NEWS

BEST BEST BEST BEST BEST BEST 2014 2015 2017 2018 2016 2013 OF AMARILLO OF AMARILLO OF AMARILLO OF AMARILLO OF AMARILLO OF AMARILLO

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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INDIAN OVEN

The moment you enter Indian Oven, you’ll be enveloped by the fragrances of cardamom, ginger, anise, garlic and chili wafting from the kitchen. Start your meal with a generous portion of naan as you work your way through the extensive menu. Select a chef special such as chicken tandoori or chicken tikka masala or try a little of everything on the lunch buffet. Finish up with the to-die-for rice pudding. Don’t leave without sipping the mango lassi. 2406 Paramount Blvd., 335.3600, indianovenamarillo.com $$

J’S BAR AND GRILL

Most of the entrees on J’s menu are priced at $10, and range from burgers and sandwiches to pasta and chicken. Enjoy fresh, handmade food at affordable prices. 3130 S. Soncy Road, Suite 100, 358.2222, jsbarandgrilamarillo.com $

JERSEY MIKE’S SUBS

3801 Olsen Blvd., Suite 9, 352.5050, ilovelabellapizza.com $

4101 Hilllside Road, 350.1400, moondoggyspizzadowntown.com $$

THE LAZY GATOR

NORTH HEIGHTS DISCOUNT & CAFE

Get your Cajun fix at The Lazy Gator. The menu is brimming with pasta, seafood, fresh oysters, frog legs, burgers, po’ boys, and plenty of drink specials to wash it all down. We’re ready to tackle the peel-andeat shrimp and creamy creole alfredo. 6103 Hillside, Suite 200, 418.6768 $$

LEAL’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Leal’s serves dishes that blend the traditional flavors of Mexico with a few twists that will delight you. Try excellent, non-traditional items such as salmon or roasted tomatillo enchiladas along with delicious desserts. Let’s not forget about the fresh-squeezed lime margaritas, some of the best around. 1619 S. Kentucky St., 359.5959, myleals.com $$

Jersey Mike’s brings a taste of the Jersey Shore to the Panhandle. The franchise stands behind its high-quality, premium meats, cheeses and fresh-baked bread. Try a cold sub like the Famous Roast Beef and Provolone, a hot sandwich like Jersey Mike’s Famous Philly, or make any sub into a wrap or salad for a low-carb option. Order in-store or online and pick it up for a quick and tasty meal. 2311 Georgia St., 731.0731, jerseymikes.com $

MACARONI JOE’S

JOE TACO

METROPOLITAN-A SPEAKEASY

Great atmosphere and a variety of Southwest favorites make Joe Taco a great place to sit and relax, especially while enjoying a signature margarita. Soak in the sun on the patio when the weather is nice. 7312 Wallace Blvd., 331.8226, joetaco.net $$

KABUKI ROMANZA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR

Who says you can’t enjoy fresh sushi aboard a boat in the heart of the Panhandle? Kabuki Romanza serves teppan-style cooking and fresh-sliced sushi in a dining area that resembles a boat, surrounded by special effects that add to the tropical feel. 8130 I-40 West, 358.7799, kabukiromanza.com $$

LA BELLA PIZZA

With an expanded dining area and bar, the Olsen Boulevard location of La Bella Pizza gives diners more options than takeout. Fill up on Sicilian-style pizza, subs, burgers, calzones, pasta, gyros – the list goes on and on – the hefty menu even includes seafood. 56

AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019

Macaroni Joe’s isn’t just a place to eat a great meal. The Tuscan-inspired rooms are the perfect place for creating memories. Whether for a first date, the start of a new life together, or celebrating important milestones, the restaurant offers excellent service and an exquisite food and wine menu. It’s at the top of our list. 1619 S. Kentucky St., Suite D1500, 358.8990, macaronijoes.com $$-$$$

Start your day with a coffee and pastry at Metropolitan. If a midday lunch with colleagues is in order, impress them with Metropolitan’s twist on classic favorites like a BLT. Or celebrate the end of a productive workday with a classy cocktail, savory small plate, or scrumptious homemade dessert. The menu changes frequently so check the club’s Facebook page for updates and special menu offerings. 9181 Town Square Blvd., Suite 1201, 242.0117, metroofamarillo.com $$

MOONDOGGY’S PIZZA AND PUB

Great daily Happy Hour specials, fun interactive events, live music, and solid cuisine make Moondoggy’s one of downtown’s most popular hangouts. In addition to the specialty pizzas, we recommend the Moondoggy meatballs, and Pasta Your Way. (Choose the rich and creamy alfredo sauce!) 626 S. Polk St./

Part convenience store and part neighborhood eatery, North Heights Discount & Cafe serves made-to-order soul food every day but Sunday. Portions are huge at Discount, but can you ever have too much smoky ribs, fried catfish, french fries, or mac-and-cheese? We don’t think so. 1621 NW 18th Ave., 418.6751 $

NU-CASTLE DINER

Patrons gather at Nu-Castle for classic American cooking. The small, downtown breakfast and lunch spot stays crowded with regulars. You can’t go wrong with a chicken-fried steak breakfast or a Dusty Burger. 518 E. 10th Ave., 371.8540 $

OHMS CAFE & BAR

Set in downtown Amarillo, OHMS serves a buffet-style lunch then switches to wait service in the evenings. The chef features specials each week that range from seafood and smoked duck to beef tenderloin. Start with daily Happy Hour and give the Bar Burger a try. (It’s not on the menu, but it might be the best burger in town.) Excellent cuisine and service make this a delightful place to linger. 619 S. Tyler St., 373.3233, ohmscafe.com $$-$$$

PAN-HANDLERS CAFE

Kick your lunch experience up a notch at Pan-Handlers. Settled in the basement of Amarillo National Bank Plaza One, this family-run restaurant supports the community by using farm-fresh produce. With a list of daily specials ranging from Mexican to seafood and cleverly concocted sandwiches (try the ANBLT on ciabatta bread), your dining experience will be anything but bland and boring. 410 S. Taylor St., 352.2590, thepanhandlers.com $

RAIN PREMIER SUSHI BAR & LOUNGE

Rain lights up Polk Street with its sleek, energetic ambience and exceptional menu of contemporary Asian cuisine. Grab the gang for an evening of flavor and fun. 817 S. Polk St., 331.1155, rainamarillo.com $$

ROOSTERS RESTAURANT AND CATERING

Roosters offers more than just a good cup of Joe. Stop in and plan on staying for a hot breakfast pastry or one of the delicious


lunch specialties. It’s the perfect place to relax with friends for lunch. 3440 S. Bell St., Unit 110, 353.7309, silver-fork.com $

SAIGON RESTAURANT

If you’re in the mood for authentic Vietnamese cuisine, this is the place to dine. Even the pickiest eater can find something they like at Saigon. The extensive menu, which consists of traditional Vietnamese favorites such as pho, spring rolls and Korean barbecue ribs, is vegan-friendly, too. 2909 I-40 West, 373.3456 $

SUNDAY’S KITCHEN

Open for lunch and dinner Tuesday through Friday, and lunch only on Saturdays, Sunday’s Kitchen cooks up Gulf Coast and Cajun cuisine with a West Texas twist. During lunch choose from nachos, salads and sandwiches, like the popular pulled pork grilled cheese. For dinner, hearty entrees fill the menu. We’re drooling over the Atchafalaya Alfredo and classic shrimp and grits. 910 N. Fillmore, 418.6477 $

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AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019

SUSHI HOUSE

You’ll see Thai, Lao and Japanese influences on Sushi House’s ample menu. Start with one of the many sushi offerings or choose an appetizer like marinated short ribs. Feast on filling teppanyaki entrees (the fillet mignon and scallops caught our eye), or choose a traditional Thai favorite like fried rice. With most menu items priced at less than $10 each, it’s the perfect place to grab a tasty lunch or dinner. 2630 Wolflin Ave., 803.9470 $

TAQUERIA EL COMAL

This little shop’s homemade gorditas are always a delight. The building is easy to pass by, so slow down and keep your eyes peeled; you don’t want to miss out on this treasure. 1210 Amarillo Blvd. East, 373.7090 $

TASTE OF THAI

Taste of Thai serves traditional Thai cuisine and a variety of chef specials for lunch and dinner. Enjoy fresh-cooked taste and friendly service. 1900 SE 34th Ave., Suite 1100, 373.9995 $

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE CAFE

More than just a smoothie bar, national chain Tropical Cafe serves pressed sandwiches, grilled-to-order quesadillas, bowls, salads, and wraps. Smoothie offerings change with the seasons, and are bursting with flavor. 4820 S. Soncy Road, Suite 100, 353.1010/1909 S. Georgia St., 770.821.1900, tropicalsmoothiecafe.com $

WESLEY’S BEAN POT & BBQ Loyal customers return again and again to Wesley’s. The atmosphere is friendly and the barbecue is genuine Texas style. The baby back ribs and brisket The baby back ribs and brisket are customer favorites. 6406 River Road, 381.2893 $

YCSF CRAFT

YCSF Craft serves its popular gourmet eats for lunch and dinner. The diverse but limited menu boasts burgers, tacos, and daily specials, and features craft beer and a well-rounded wine list. 2916 Wolflin Ave., 353.9273 $


DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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[ SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION ]

Holiday Gift Guide 2019


Holiday Gift Guide

100 Westgate Parkway 355.9874 www.BarnesJewelry.com


Holiday Gift Guide

Large selection of stocking stuffers!

2819 Civic Circle 356.5068 cbboutique.net


Holiday Gift Guide

7306 SW 34th Ave., Suite 10 418.6647 championbbqsupply.com


Holiday Gift Guide

3701 Olsen Blvd., Suite I 351.2634 goodinsjewelryamarillo.com


Holiday Gift Guide

Merry Christ mas

!

2611 Wolflin Village 331.2002 marcellafurs.com


Holiday Gift Guide

3269 Commerce St. 356.0579 needusbarkus.net


Holiday Gift Guide

2636 Wolflin Ave. 353.2404 randysshoes.com


Holiday Gift Guide

4000 SW 51st St. 418.8962 theurbangiraffe.com


Holiday Gift Guide

1930 Civic Circle 372.7511 theworkboot.com


PHOTO BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

Events | December 2019

T

Christmas in the Gardens he Amarillo Botanical Gardens’ annual Christmas in the Gardens opened Nov. 30, and holiday revelers can enjoy the dazzling Christmas light display this month from Dec. 1-22, from 6-8:30 p.m. The gardens are bedecked with more than 300,000 lights, and guests can visit with Santa, sip on hot chocolate and coffee, and listen to carolers as they walk the garden paths. A stroll through the gardens is the perfect way to enjoy the spirit of the holidays.

Amarillo Botanical Gardens 1400 Streit Drive 352.6513 amarillobotanicalgardens.org

VIEW AN UPDATED LISTING OF EVENTS THROUGHOUT THE MONTH AT AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM. To have an event listed on the calendar, email details to mmcaffrey@amarillo.com.

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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Arts & Entertainment

DEC. 15

DEC. 6

2 p.m. and 6 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Auditorium, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK 5-9 p.m. Barnes Jewelry, 100 Westgate Pkwy. West, 355.9874

DEC. 7

SECOND ANNUAL MESSIAH SING-IN

11 a.m. Presented by Amarillo Opera. First Presbyterian Church, 1100 S. Harrison St., 372.7464

DEC. 8

AMARILLO YOUTH CHOIRS PRESENTS “SONGS OF THE SEASON”

3:30 p.m. Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts, 500 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

DEC. 12

TASCOSA POPS CONCERT

6-9:30 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Heritage Room, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

DEC. 13

LONE STAR BALLET PRESENTS “THE NUTCRACKER”

We’re everywhere!

8 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Auditorium, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

DEC. 14

THE EDGE WINTER DANCE RECITAL

2:30-5 p.m. Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts, 500 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

LONE STAR BALLET PRESENTS “THE NUTCRACKER” 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Auditorium, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

Start at amarillomagonline.com. Find us on Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram!

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AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019

LONE STAR BALLET PRESENTS “THE NUTCRACKER”

DEC. 21

AMARILLO SYMPHONY PRESENTS “HAPPY HOLIDAY POPS”

2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts, 500 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

Benefits & Fundraisers

DEC. 2-7

TOGETHER WE CAN

9 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Hosted by Market Street United. To benefit High Plains Food Bank. Market Street United, 2530 S. Georgia St., 350.1427

DEC. 7

PANHANDLE POTTERS’ HOLIDAY SHOW

10 a.m.-5 p.m. Amarillo Art Institute, 3701 Plains Blvd., Suite 117, 354.8802

DEC. 14

CHRISTMAS AT THE RANCH

5:30-9 p.m. Event will include dinner, a hayride, live music by the The Purple Hulls and a raffle. Hidden Falls Ranch, 3699 County Road 4, Wayside, 764.3466

DEC. 20

HERRING HOLIDAY BALL

6-11 p.m. Funds will benefit Kidd’s Kids. Herring Hotel, 311 SE Third Ave., 340.7540

NORTH SIDE TOY DRIVE

7 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Heritage Room, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

DEC. 21

NORTH SIDE TOY DRIVE

2-5 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Heritage Room, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096


Music

DEC. 4

AN INTIMATE BLACKOUT WITH TAIL LIGHT REBELLION 9 p.m. Leftwoods, 2511 SW Sixth Ave., 367.9840

DEC. 6

LUNA JAZZ

9 p.m. Esquire Jazz Club, 626 S. Polk St., 350.4299

JORDAN ROBERT KIRK

9:30 p.m. The Golden Light Cantina, 2906 SW Sixth Ave., 374.9237

DEC. 7

JON YOUNG WITH TEXAS LOVE COMPANY

10 p.m. The Golden Light Cantina, 2906 SW Sixth Ave., 374.9237

DEC. 11

TONKIN’ ROUND THE CHRISTMAS TREE

9 p.m. Featuring Randall King, Bri Bagwell and Jake Worthington. Hoots Pub, 2424 Hobbs Road, 356.7548

DEC. 5

AMARILLO COLLEGE CREATIVE MIND SERIES

7-8:30 p.m. Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts, 500 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

DEC. 5-8

ZOOLIGHTS SAFARI

6-8 p.m. Amarillo Zoo, 700 Comanchero Trail, 381.7911

DEC. 6

PPHM’S CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE

6-9 p.m. Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum, 2503 Fourth Ave., 651.2244

CENTER CITY ELECTRIC LIGHT PARADE

6 p.m. Downtown Amarillo, 372.6744

DEC. 7

SANTA’S JOLLY JAMBOREE

10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Don Harrington Discovery Center, 1200 Streit Drive, 355.9547

PPHM’S CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE

DEC. 13

1-5 p.m. Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum, 2503 Fourth Ave., 651.2244

6 p.m. Polk Street Eats, 614 S. Polk St., 376.4700

CHRISTMAS IN CANYON COMMUNITY CELEBRATION

FRANK DEMOS

MONARCH BAND

7-10 p.m. Vaquero Tacos and Tequila, 2300 Bell St., Suite 9, 418.6880

DEC. 27

THE DANNY WHITE BAND 7 p.m. Copper Fire Grill, 2800 Civic Circle, 803.9432

Special Events

DEC. 1-22

CHRISTMAS IN THE GARDENS

6-8:30 p.m. Amarillo Botanical Gardens, 1400 Streit Drive, 352.6513

All day. Historic Square in Canyon, 655.7815

DEC. 8

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE FIESTA

2-6 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Heritage Room, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

DEC. 14

WTAMU WINTER COMMENCEMENT

10 a.m. and 2 p.m. First United Bank Center, Canyon, 651.2044

DECEMBER 2019 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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WREATHS ACROSS AMERICA 11 a.m. Llano Cemetary, 2900 S. Hayes St., 376.4538

DEC. 20

APD POLICE ACADEMY GRADUATION 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Grand Plaza, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

AMARILLO COLLEGE GRADUATION

7 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Coliseum, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

DEC. 31

NOON YEAR’S EVE

9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Don Harrington Discovery Center, 1200 Streit Drive, 355.9547

Sports & Recreation

DEC. 1

CHRISTMAS CASH BARREL RACE

9 a.m. Tri-State Fairgrounds Amarillo National Center, 3301 SE 10th Ave., 376.7767

DEC. 7

AMARILLO BULLS YOUTH HOCKEY TOURNAMENT

11:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Coliseum, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

DEC. 8

AMARILLO BULLS YOUTH HOCKEY TOURNAMENT

10 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Coliseum, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

DEC. 13-15

AMARILLO BULLS VS. NEW MEXICO ICE WOLVES

7 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Coliseum, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

DEC. 31

AMARILLO BULLS VS. NEW MEXICO ICE WOLVES

7 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Coliseum, 401 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

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AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019


[ ADVERTISEMENT ]


Retro Rewind

RAILROAD WATER TOWER

A

IMAGE FROM AMARILLO PUBLIC LIBRARY ARCHIVES

marillo’s history is directly tied to the growth of railroads across the Texas Panhandle, and for its first few years some of the tallest buildings in the fledgling city were the water towers and coal chutes that served steam locomotives. Around the turn of the 20th century, trackside water towers kept these steampowered trains moving. Coal chutes were also necessary to replenish the burning coal used keep the water boiling. This photo shows one of Amarillo’s water towers in the foreground, with a coal chute behind it. Though no signage is present, it likely depicts Amarillo’s Tower 75 – the city’s “East Tower” – located at the junction of three main lines near where the current Ross-Mirror overpass crosses the railroad tracks. This photo is undated, but the East Tower was authorized in 1908 and replaced with a concrete tower in 1927. That concrete tower served the railroad until 1986 and was demolished in the 1990s. 76

AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019


20 Questions

DON ADAMS What is the best advice you received when you were beginning your career? Be honest. How do you use social media to grow your network? We let customers know more about Barnes Jewelry, along with giving the client an in-store experience to see that Barnes is a different place to shop. How do you maintain balance? Faith, family and friends, in that order. That’s what is important. Everything else will fall in line. What has been your wisest investment? Investing in people. A good leader will always surround themselves with smarter people. I am one person and I cannot do everything; if I have a capable team we can accomplish great things. How has your past work experience shaped you into a leader? Wins teach you what to do right and make things better. The losses show what not to repeat and how to do things differently. Both wins and losses, if looked at correctly, will mold a better future. What is the best part of your job? It goes back to the Barnes Jewelry tag logo ... Celebrate Your Moments. I truly love to help people celebrate all their special moments. How has mentorship made a difference in your professional and private life? To never forget your beginnings, remain humble, genuine and compassionate, and always give God the credit. Which living person do you most admire and why? In the early years, Frank McPherson. He was a humble, caring man that took time out of running a multibillion-dollar company to teach young adults in our Sunday School Class. In later years, Warren Buffet. Working within his company instilled values to run Barnes Jewelry with ethics and integrity. Which over-used word or phrase makes you cringe? “Like.” What is your business philosophy? Ethics and integrity and to under promise and over deliver. Which quality do you most value in an employee? Someone who is genuine. What personality trait has helped you succeed? Patience and compassion. Who is your favorite author? Mark Twain. You can’t beat the great quotes and life was just simplistic back then. What did you learn from your best boss? How to make people feel valued. Your worst? How not to motivate through intimidation. How can Amarillo improve its business environment? To aggressively seek out new businesses to come into our community. Most important tech tool: Smartphone. Best time management tool: My wife … she keeps me on point. I can’t live without my: family. They are my encouragement, backbone and sounding board. My favorite thing about Amarillo is: the friendly, caring nature of its people. Most unusual job or task: Working at Pantex. I would tell you about it … but I can’t.

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AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • DECEMBER 2019

PHOTO BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

OWNER/CEO, BARNES JEWELRY


Land Cruiser The peak of capability and comfort.

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Beautiful, rare and responsibly sourced, Beautiful, rare and responsibly sourced, Forevermark diamonds are a gift from nature.

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Featuring the Forevermark Tribute™ Collection

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© Forevermark 2019. Forevermark®,

Featuring the Forevermark Tribute™ Collection

© Forevermark 2019. Forevermark®,

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Forevermark Tribute™ and

Forevermark diamonds are a gift from nature.

are Trade Marks used under license from De Beers Group.

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are Trade Marks used under license from De Beers Group.

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Profile for Amarillo Magazine

Amarillo Magazine | December 2019  

Amarillo Magazine | December 2019  

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