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CONTENTS 5 CONTRIBUTORS 6 ANDY’S WORLD 8 CHIP’S CORNER HOME 10 WALL OF FAME COVER STORY 14 ‘YOU HAVE TO ADJUST’

How Amarillo’s arts groups are moving ahead in the COVID era.

FEATURES 20 STAGES OF HEALING

How the Amarillo Little Theatre helped a young actor cope with unimaginable loss.

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20 23 ARTIST DAVID CORBIN

WHAT’S COOKING? 23 HEALTHY HONEY 45 LET’S EAT! 53 EVENTS 54 PANHANDLE PERSPECTIVE 56 20 QUESTIONS

54 STEPHANIE PRICE, PANHANDLE-PLAINS HISTORICAL MUSEUM

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Editor’s Letter

Regional Director of Specialty Products/Editor Michele McAffrey 806.345.3256 mmcaffrey@amarillo.com Regional Designer Kayla Morris Contributing Writers Jonathan Baker Jason Boyett Chip Chandler Andy Chase Cundiff

Contributing Photographer Shannon Richardson

General Manager/Advertising Director Belinda Mills Account Representatives Sharon Denny Jaime Pipkin To advertise in Amarillo Magazine or on amarillomagonline.com, please contact Belinda Mills at 345.3373.

Regional Executive Editor Jill Nevels-Haun Regional Distribution Director David Morel Regional Accounting Manager Sheryl Rycerz

600 S. Tyler St., Suite 2300, Amarillo, TX 79101 806.376.4488 • amarillomagonline.com Amarillo Magazine is a monthly publication of AGN Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without prior written consent. Letters to the Editor are welcome but may be edited due to space limitations.

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We love our friends in the arts! We have long been committed to supporting local performers and artists in our pages, and to being a steady source of information about the arts in our area. As we looked forward to September, we were concerned about how we’d pursue our annual arts issue. With all the cancellations and postponements in the event world, we wondered if we should publish as usual or push an arts focus to next spring. But we couldn’t let the customary launch of the 2020-2021 arts season go by without celebrating our creative local arts entities. They’ve continued to inspire us throughout the pandemic in spite of strained (or nonexistent) budgets, dark stages, and closed galleries. This issue doesn’t follow our usual format of serving as a preview of the upcoming arts season; rather, it’s a way for us to offer our thanks to our friends in the arts for continuing to create, lift our spirits, share their gifts, and entertain us through the long, long days of lockdown. Our aim was twofold: first, to help readers see the crisis through the lens of local creatives, and second, to shed light on their ability to tackle the unforeseen challenges of COVID-19. We salute them! We also revisit a story that we first published in 2009. Actor Tré Butcher was part of a feature about young people in the arts. We were honestly moved to tears by Tré’s story, and he continues to be an inspiration 11 years later. Learn more on page 20. We hadn’t checked in with the good people at Creek House Honey Farm in a while and knowing that Paige Nester and crew have continued to expand the farm’s offerings, including delicious baked goods and even mead, we thought we’d ask Paige to share recipes that include Creek House’s delicious, healthy honey. Next on the to-do list is making her addictive honey roasted pecans! We look forward to a lifting of local restrictions, and vow to never again take for granted the ability to enjoy a live concert, play, musical or exhibit in the company of kindred art lovers. And when the city once again fully reopens, you’ll find our official arts preview on the stands, and see us out supporting the people who continually brighten our horizons and challenge our perspectives.


Contributors

JONATHAN BAKER

JASON BOYETT

CHIP CHANDLER

Jonathan’s copywriting has appeared in Esquire, Men’s Journal, and Popular Mechanics. In his spare time, he writes crime novels.

Jason has written more than a dozen books and is the host and creator of “Hey Amarillo,” a local interview podcast. Visit heyamarillo.com and jasonboyett.com.

Chip is a senior communications specialist at WTAMU. A Canadian High School graduate and awardwinning journalist, he has covered arts and entertainment in Amarillo since 1998. He is a member of the national GALECA critics group, has seen every Best Picture Oscar winner and watches way too much television.

Writer

Writer

Writer

SHANNON RICHARDSON Photographer

Shannon has been photographing commercial/advertising work for more than 30 years. See Shannon’s work at shannonrichardson.com and route66americanicon.com.

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Andy’s World

The Worst TV Commercials of 2020

S

ince it’s the time of year when the awards go out, and we have all had possibly a little too much TV time on account of the accursed pandemic, I thought it might be fun to say a few things about some of my least favorite TV commercials. I understand, and freely admit that I am fast becoming a cranky old man, but when you’ve seen as much ugly as I have in the world, well, you need a little distraction. And sometimes you don’t need so many interruptions from being distracted. Besides, I think I will make an excellent cranky old man. First, the “Honorable Mention” category: The Food and Restaurant commercials, where Col. Sanders, an actual historical person (I saw him at the old Standiford Field Airport in Louisville when I was a kid) is reduced to a creepy, idiotic vaudeville act with a dialect unknown to anyone in Kentucky. He shares the honors with talking candy. How do you alienate a lifelong M & M’s fan? I do not know, but I am one, and they managed to do it. It has a lot to do with making your product look so ridiculously juvenile that normal people have a distrust of it. This is a full category, mind you, where Ving Rhames’ vaguely threatening, “We have the MEATS!” is enough to give a vegan nightmares, and nobody out-pizzas the “Hut.” Hey, Pizza Hut, nobody calls you “The Hut” except your grossly overpaid ad agency executives. Next, in the “Runner up” category, are the ubiquitous Insurance Industry spots. So many to choose from, and such mind-numbing degrees of insult to my intelligence. There’s the bald guy saying flippantly, “We know a thing or two because we’ve seen a thing or two,” with the stupid “ba ba dump bump bump bump bump” jingle. They certainly must have burned up the budget for that one, just about on par with getting a room full of people to sing (in unison, no less), “Liberty, Liberty, Liberty – Liberty.” I think those are the same people that have an emu on their spots. With sunglasses. Really? Then there’s “Flo,” the under-informed, disillusioned, weird-makeupwearing, non-age-specific woman that looks as if she can’t decide whether to be a nurse, a Popsicle lady, or some sort of beautician, talking to Bigfoot, her family, other bizzaro insurance world characters, or anyone else that will pose an important life question. I would feel terrible if I left out that little animated lizard that irritates me nine ways from Friday. Makes me think of that song, “Mexican Radio,” by Wall of Voodoo back in the ’80s – something about a barbecued iguana. It makes me smile when I see that little green waste of my time. There is something about an unnecessary

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British accent that is not only annoying, but also just screams, “WEAK SCRIPT!” to me. Somewhere in this mix of lunacy is a bunch of half people/ half motorcycle creatures that seem to make absolutely no sense of any kind. I wonder what the creative team was drinking that day with their lunch? The winner in this category has to be any of the “Accident Forgiveness” commercials. The idea of paying for coverage on your car for 18 years and then having a fender bender on year 19 that could cost less to fix than 1% of what you have paid over all those years, and for the insurance company to condescendingly say, “We forgive you,” is a little too much for me to take. “Forgiveness,” I’m afraid, is a bit lofty a word for that situation. The No. 1 category, and to me it’s a runaway, is the 2 ½-minute spots for all those infernal medications. First of all, they belabor the point until your mind goes into denial that you were watching TV at all, retreating to that little hiding place that you set up as a child to escape tornadoes, earthquakes and algebra class. Secondly, each of the names for the new medications sound just like the last one you saw even though they repeat that name 174 times during the 2 ½ minutes. Somehow, they also run a list of side effects that literally make me laugh out loud, simultaneously offering a prayer of thanksgiving that I don’t need that drug. They often don’t even tell you what the drug is for, so you are left to believe that it may have something to do with a butterfly showing up in your bedroom, or becoming more competent at mini golf. The worst part of the medication commercials though, to me, is the idea that you are going to visit your doctor and say, “Hi, I know you have been to post graduate school for 8 to 16 years and continue to update your education pursuant to strict state and federal standards, and are a respected member of the medical community, but I just saw this commercial on TV …” I know – I need to get out of the house. ANDY CHASE CUNDIFF Andy is a local artist, singer and songwriter, and has called Amarillo home for more than 20 years. He plays at a variety of live music venues throughout the Panhandle. Contact Andy at 376-7918.


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Chip’s Corner

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s Amarillo arts groups begin to cautiously open their 2020-21 seasons (see the story beginning on page 14), entertainment options on a more national scale are still making the best of the new normal. Movie theaters largely still remained shuttered, at least here in the States, but TV shows are inching back into production. September is when we would ordinarily be seeing the premieres of fall shows and the start of the long drive to the Oscars. But 2020 is an evil, evil mistress, so the rollouts are still coming on painfully slow. Still, this month has more to look forward to than any since the start of the pandemic, so let’s take the joy where we can. Here’s a roundup of top entertainment options heating up the entertainment world as temperatures start to cool down. Everything’s subject to change, of course, because we’re not out of the woods yet (or even close).

Movies

“TENET”: Christopher Nolan’s secretive new film is widely seen as the biggest test-case for the possibility of movie theaters reopening. Its premiere has been shuffled numerous times, but at press time, the film will open internationally in late August and on a staggered approach across America beginning Labor Day weekend. No telling when it’ll arrive here, though. (Sept. 3 in limited release)

“MULAN”: One of the earliest major schedule changes of the pandemic

was the quick shuttering of the planned March premiere of this live-action Disney remake. Now, as American theaters largely remain closed for the foreseeable future, the film will hit Disney+ much earlier than anticipated – but unlike “Hamilton” in July, this one will cost you extra: a $29.99 rental fee. (Sept. 4 on Disney+)

“I’M THINKING OF ENDING THINGS”:

Charlie Kaufman (“Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind”) moves into the psychological horror realm with this timely tale of a woman (Jessie Buckley, “Wild Rose”) who’s snowed in with her boyfriend (Jesse Plemons, “Friday Night Lights”) when they go to meet his parents (Toni Collette and David Thewlis). (Sept. 4 on Netflix)

TV

“A.P. BIO”: This high school comedy starring Glenn Howerton (“It’s Always

Sunny in Philadelphia”) is a bit of a cult favorite, so it makes sense that, even though it got axed by NBC, it will live on – returning with a third season – at the network’s new streaming site, Peacock. (Returns Sept. 3 on Peacock)

“THE BOYS”: The raunchy

superhero satire about heroes who are revered as celebrities even when they abuse their powers returns for a second season. The first three episodes will drop at once, with further episodes premiering on Fridays. (Returns Sept. 4 on Amazon Prime)

“WOKE”: Lamorne Morris (“New Girl”) stars in this absurdist comedy about

an animator (based on Keith Knight) who finds his worldview shaken up after an intense encounter with the police. (Premieres Sept. 9 on Hulu)

“WE ARE WHO WE ARE”: Director Luca Guadagnino (“Call Me by Your

“COASTAL ELITES”: One of the first major pieces of art to grapple with the coronavirus is this all-star comedy by Paul Rudnick (“Addams Family Values,” “In & Out”). A shutdown-themed comedy, it was originally slated to be staged in New York, but it was reconceived as a 90-minute filmed work starring the likes of Bette Midler, Dan Levy, Sarah Paulson and Issa Rae. (Premieres 7 p.m., Sept. 12, on HBO)

“ANTEBELLUM”: Another big

disappointment of the early days of the pandemic was the pulling of this mysterious new thriller from the schedule. It’s finally back, only it’ll be released directly to streaming for a $19.99 rental fee. In it, Janelle Monáe is a successful modern-day author who’s strangely transported back to the 19th century, where

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she comes face-to-face with her slave ancestors. (Premieres Sept. 18 on most VOD platforms)

AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • SEPTEMBER 2020

Name”) comes to television with this eight-episode coming-of-age drama about “the messy exhilaration and anguish of being a teenager,” according to the official description. Stars include Jack Dylan Grazer (“It”), newcomer Jordan Kristine Seamón, Chloë Sevigny, Alice Braga and rapper Kid Cudi. (Premieres 9 p.m., Sept. 14, on HBO)

“PEN15”: This well-received middle school comedy (starring the adult Anna

Konkle and Maya Erskine as their 13-year-old comic avatars) returns for a second season, with first kisses, divorce and other traumas on the horizon. (Returns Sept. 18 on Hulu)

“RATCHED”: I’ve never heard anyone

beg to hear what made the twisted nurse in “One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest” become so nutty, but maybe that’s why Ryan Murphy got a $300 million deal from Netflix and I didn’t. The trailer looks like Murphy is going full campy horror again, and though his success there is spotty at best, at least he’s bringing Sarah Paulson back along for the ride. (Premieres Sept. 18 on Netflix)


THE 72ND EMMY AWARDS: Even in a pandemic, awards shows must

“WHEN NO ONE IS WATCHING”: Alyssa Cole’s latest thriller finds

“THE SIMPSONS”: Fox’s iconic animated comedy returns for a record-

“THE MIDNIGHT LIBRARY”: In this sci-fi book with a philosophical

go on. With any luck, we’ll see some valedictory awards for the dearly departed “Schitt’s Creek,” and thankfully, “Game of Thrones” won’t be sucking up all of the oxygen in the room again. (Airs at 7 p.m., Sept. 20, on ABC) shattering 32nd season (including a special 700th episode). Also returning are animated series “Bless the Harts,” “Bob’s Burgers” and “Family Guy.” (Returns at 7 p.m., Sept. 27, on Fox)

a Brooklyn woman digging into the mystery of why residents in her mostly Black neighborhood are disappearing as the area becomes more and more gentrified. (Sept. 15) bent, a depressed woman finds herself in a purgatory-like realm, offered the chance to rewrite her life by choosing between a book for the life she’s lived and one for the one she might have lived. (Sept. 29)

Music

“CHEMTRAILS OVER THE COUNTRY CLUB”: Ethereal singer Lana Del Rey follows up on her hit “Norman F---ing Rockwell” with this highly anticipated new album. (Sept. 5)

“THE SPEED OF NOW, PART 1”: Country star Keith Urban’s 11th album promises collaborations with Eric Church and more. (Sept. 18)

“STRANGER”: Americana faves The Band of Heathens promise their “most inventive release” with this new album, whose name evokes Albert Camus and Robert Heinlein. (Sept. 25)

Books

“THE UNRAVELING OF CASSIDY HOLMES”: Elissa R. Sloan

examines the fraught world of teen pop sensations in her debut novel. (Sept. 1)

SEPTEMBER 2020 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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Home

Wall of Fame How to Create a Gallery Wall

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ou’ve seen them in your favorite decor magazines. You’ve seen them on your favorite Instagram accounts. You may have lusted a ROSS MIDDLETON little over one inside the impeccably decorated home of That One Friend. (We all have those friends.) You’ve definitely seen them at museums. Gallery walls are big right now. While minimalism continues to impact the design world, creating a gallery wall – a large empty space containing a variety of matching or mismatched paintings, photos or other displays – remains on the to-do list of countless homeowners. They’re a creative way to fill an open space. They’re a great way to add color and pizzazz to a room. They’re ideal for showing off your

personality and what you love. But they’re also a little intimidating. Where do you even begin? For that answer, we turned to Ross Middleton, a Certified Picture Framer and the owner of The Right Angle in Wolflin Square. Not only does he help customers frame and mount their most precious pieces of art – from expensive paintings to children’s drawings – he used to work in the museum business. Middleton literally created museum gallery walls as the director of the American Quarter Horse Hall of Fame & Museum. Now he does the same thing for customers at The Right Angle. He offered us these tips between customers one weekday at the shop.

Collect and consider all your pieces. “I personally like to lay out every piece that I’m going to use on a gallery wall. Lay it out on the floor in a group, or against the wall in a group, and really look at how all those pieces fit together,” he says. Experiment. Rearrange. Consider spacing and visual balance. Find a focal point. This can be anything, from the largest piece in a collection to the most dramatic or colorful. “It should be a piece that epitomizes what you’re trying to do with a gallery wall,” Middleton says. “It has a particular meaning, size or color – something that can be the anchor for that wall. I like to hang that piece first.” He says the focal point doesn’t actually have to be in the middle of the wall. It doesn’t even have to be at eye level. “Take into consideration where the space is. What part of the wall do you see first when you enter the room?” he asks. That’s the visual “center” of the wall and where you want to hang your most important piece. “I try to make that focal piece draw your attention.” After establishing your focal piece, work around it. Whether you establish

an overall perimeter and work back toward the focus or construct the gallery wall from the center outward, arrange your art with a strategy. While there’s no particular rule, you should operate from a strategy. You might want to align the tops of every framed painting, drawing or photograph. You might want to line up the centers of each piece, or the base. “It depends on what the space dictates,” says Middleton. It also depends on the pieces themselves. Embrace a little chaos. Eclectic collections won’t all consist of nice, clean rectangles. “I just did one [gallery wall] that’s a combination of photographs and three-dimensional crosses, letters of the alphabet, and words,” he says. “That was a challenge, because you had a lot of different textures and shapes. Sometimes the walls that look the best have some randomness to it.” That’s why advance planning is so important – it may take some planning to land within the perfect amount of chaos. With that in mind, Middleton also advises flexibility. “I’ve gotten half a wall hung before and gone back and decided it needed to be [arranged by] the centerline of the pieces as opposed

O

riginally, The Right Angle belonged to Amarillo artist Candy Clark, who opened the business in Mayco Center in 1979. Ross Middleton bought it from Clark in 2003, envisioning it as a nice change of pace after retiring from a career in the museum world. “It was less about the framing and more about the opportunity to be around fine art – and not just one particular genre of art,” he says. “It was an industry I’ve always been interested in.” He loves getting to impact customers with the memorable products he creates. “It’s not always necessarily art. It’s family heirlooms, artifacts, children’s creations, the whole gamut. We frame pretty much anything that’ll lay still. Day to day, you never know what’s going to walk through the door. We’ve gotten to frame some fabulous art from nearly every genre, from incredibly expensive fine art to a really neat 4-year-old’s piece they did for their grandmother,” says Middleton. The Right Angle closed for nearly seven weeks during the start of the

pandemic, primarily due to supply chain issues. “Our suppliers closed. It made it impossible to get supplies. With our business, you can’t just run to Home Depot and get supplies.” Despite the closure, Middleton decided he would keep paying his two long-time employees – who shared a combined three decades of picture-framing experience – as long as the money was there. “They’re like family,” he says. “It’s a particular skill and a really personal business because you’re entrusting [priceless art or photos] to someone else. The quality of your employees is really important,” he explains. But despite the shutdown and economic uncertainty, his business didn’t decline much. “We’re seeing old customers come back and a pretty good flow of new customers,” Middleton says. “I really think it’s because people have spent more time than usual in their homes and want to spruce it up. We’ve actually heard from customers, ‘I’ve always disliked the way this looked and finally just got tired of it.’”

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to all the tops being equal.” Sometimes you have to let the process work itself out. Pay attention to subject matter. Don’t just look at the shapes and frames. Look at the art itself. “I always try to make sure we don’t have faces looking into doorways or animals running off the wall,” he says. When possible, you want any movement within your artwork to draw the eye toward your focal point rather than away from it. Think in groups. A collection of small 5- by 7-inch frames can carry the same visual weight as a larger piece of art, so look for opportunities to inject some size diversity into your collection. “Don’t try to group all the 8-by-10s together and all the 11-by-14s together, but three small pieces might act as a single piece in the layout,” he says. Start hanging. When you’ve decided on placement, begin mounting the art. “Always hang with two hooks,” Middleton insists. This helps the picture remain level and more secure. Don’t reuse hooks either. “I use new hooks every time,” he says. As a rule, he doubles the weight of the object. “If you have a piece that’s less than 10 pounds, use two, 10-pound hooks. Always use a hanger appropriate to the size of that piece of art.” Consider lighting. Few houses will have the budget to recreate museumquality lighting on a gallery wall, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t pay attention to how your wall is lit. As a rule, warm light works better for traditional artwork, and cooler light is preferred for modern art. “You don’t want to put a cold, harsh light on a Dutch master or a piece of Western art,” Middleton says. While dedicated, individual picture lights have been popular in the past, Middleton isn’t a fan of that approach. “They have their place, but they

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do nearly as much damage to the artwork as they help,” he says. You also have to deal with an electrical cord, batteries or other types of maintenance. The most important thing is to avoid harsh sunlight on the wall or artwork. “Any light source emits UV light, but the sun is the worst,” he says. Sunlight will degrade materials quickly, but good framing can protect against this destruction. “As a framer, that’s something you have to be aware of. You have to be able to analyze the material the art is on to understand how to preserve it.” Today, framers like Middleton can put art behind high-tech glass that filters out 99.9% of UV light. Keep it clean. “Take [the art] off the wall periodically and not only dust the front but dust the back as well,” he says. A professionally framed photo or artwork will have a dust jacket on the back “to make sure no critters are living in the back of the frame.” (As it turns out, spiders love the backs of picture frames. Other insects enjoy nesting among dark paper fibers.) But the dust jacket only protects the back. When it comes to the front, art behind glass needs to be cleaned with glass cleaner—but don’t spray the glass directly. “Apply glass cleaner to the surface of the rag. When you spray directly on the glass, it can run down into the lip of the frame,” says Middleton. This can damage the frame, and the capillary action of glass next to a hard surface will suck cleaning liquid beneath the glass and onto the surface of the art. Avoid that at all costs. Once you’ve collected, arranged, hung and cared for your wall, sit back and enjoy it. But don’t consider it finished. The possibilities of a well-curated gallery wall are endless, and with enough space your wall can continue to evolve as your collection grows.


How to Start Collecting Art S

ummer is generally a slow time for art sales, but Caroline Kneese of Cerulean Gallery – which has locations in Amarillo and Dallas – says the past few months have been unexpectedly steady given the national economic climate. “People are renovating their homes and fluffing their nests,” she says. As a result, many have been buying art. Kneese represents more than 30 local artists as well as dozens more from the Metroplex to Wyoming. For newbie art lovers who have considered starting a collection but are not sure where to begin, Kneese offers a few tips. Pursue art you like. “The most important thing is for the person to love the work of art,” she says. In other words, don’t buy something merely as an investment or because someone tells you it’s important. Don’t buy art like you’re placing a bet. Buy it because it brings you joy and reflects who you are. “Investment-wise, there’s never a guarantee of value in the future. You’ll be stuck with it, so you’d better love it.” Don’t limit your purchase to art that matches your current decor, either. Your relationship with a piece of art may last longer than your relationship with today’s furniture or design trends. “Most clients purchase because it’s a piece they love, not because they’re looking to fill the space over the sofa with colors that match pillows,” says Kneese. “They see themselves living with it for a long time.” Visit a gallery. Many artists sell their work personally or via Instagram, and Kneese says there are plenty of artists who don’t have gallery representation. However, a gallery can be a great starting point if you’re actively looking to start an art collection. Galleries will provide artist statements, an artist’s exhibition history, and a guide to other

images the artist has produced. This helps a buyer get a sense of the breadth of an artist’s career so far, or their future potential. “Everything you can find out is important from an investment perspective,” she says. Meet the artist. Go to openings. Attend art shows. If the artist is present, ask him or her about their art. “If the viewer has an opportunity to meet the artist, that’s an added perk,” she says. If you approach a gallery, you may also want to ask for a private viewing. “The more information you can get from the gallery on the artist, the better.” Ask questions. Galleries like Cerulean are interested in educating the public about artists, and are always willing to provide details beyond the price of a painting or print. “Ask the gallery for a history or record of [an artist’s] sales,” says Kneese. “What pieces have they sold? What sizes? How much?” Asking about everything from upcoming shows to the artist’s preferred materials helps you become comfortable with the product and its price before making the actual purchase. “If you’re spending a chunk of change, you want to make sure the value of the artwork is what it is actually worth.” Many galleries will also give potential buyers access to a piece of art “on approval,” which allows them to live with it in their homes for a period of time before buying. Insure your collection. Once you’ve taken the plunge, protect your investment. If you’ve bought art that has significant value, ask for an itemized invoice from the gallery and then add the artwork under your personal property insurance. “If it gets stolen or damaged, if your house burns up or a tornado hits your house, your insurance company will reimburse you for the current retail value,” says Kneese.

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Cover Story

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How Amarillo’s arts groups are moving ahead in the COVID era By Chip Chandler

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ever before has Allen Shankles been so happy to see houses that are less than half full at an Amarillo Little Theatre production. As it has in so many other ways, this year has upended all expectations. “Folks, how is 2020 working out for you?” Shankles asks, to groans, as he takes the stage in ALT’s Adventure Space to introduce a Sunday matinee performance of “The Humans,” the theater’s first, cautious step in August back to something vaguely resembling business as usual. Only there’s very little about this afternoon that’s business as usual. Patrons aren’t mingling in the lobby. They aren’t getting a pre-show cocktail. When the show ends, they aren’t lining up to congratulate the five-person cast on a job well done. And they’re all wearing masks and sitting, within their own groups, at a socially conscious distance from their fellow theater-goers. “Is everyone comfortable with your spacing?” Shankles asks 10 minutes before showtime. “We’re just glad to get to be here,” a woman in the back says, to appreciative laughter and a smattering of applause. “It’s been a tough month for ALT,” Shankles continues, “so we really appreciate your support. If we can make this work, it could be the fire we need to light the rest of the season.” ALT tentatively made the first move to open the 2020-21 arts season in Amarillo, and it’s not just another cycle of shows and concerts that Amarillo audiences have grown accustomed to. No, this season is different, the first back from the great pause, the coronavirus-induced shutdown that brought the city and the world to a stop in the spring. COVID-19 dashed plans for Lone Star Ballet’s dance revue “My Song, Your Song, Our Song” in April. For the annual Amarillo College and West Texas A&M University joint exhibition at Amarillo Museum of Art. For Amarillo Opera’s remounting of the iconic “The Barber of Seville.” For Chamber Music Amarillo’s massive “Missa Solemnis,” a huge collaborative effort to have been performed in May. For Amarillo Symphony’s “Hollywood Masters” pops concert featuring beloved film songs and scores. For ALT’s production of “Matilda,” the hugely popular musical based on the beloved Roald Dahl children’s book. For the entire season of “Texas,” making this the first summer since 1966 that singing cowboys weren’t dancing across the floor of Palo Duro Canyon. “I don’t know how the arts survive this,” confides Mary Jane Johnson, Amarillo Opera’s executive director. “It’s the worst thing that could ever happen to the arts.” Yet, she remains stubbornly optimistic. “People have to be missing seeing it as much as we’re missing doing it,” Johnson says, “and hopefully, when we’re all back together again and can make music and make dance and make art, their senses will come back to life and they’ll realize how important it is to have art in our lives.” As the seriousness of the pandemic became increasingly clear in March, Amarillo’s arts groups struggled to keep up with what, exactly, it all meant. “One minute we’re open, the next minute we’re shut down,” recalls Vicki McLean, Lone Star Ballet’s artistic director. Shankles was in the middle of rehearsing “The Humans” when the statewide shutdown went into effect. “We were about a week and a half away from opening,” he recalls. Pulling the plug was a particularly heart-wrenching decision. Shankles had seen the original Broadway cast of the Stephen Karam one-act drama in 2016, and was determined to stage it here before his approaching retirement. Like other arts leaders, Shankles thought he might be able to shift “The Humans” down the schedule a month or so, but as the virus continued to rage out of control, those hopes were lost. David Palmer, CMA’s artistic director, performed in his organization’s last spring concert on March 7. A couple of days later, he began seeing reports about choir rehearsals in the northwest

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that would later be termed a “superspreader” event. “I called [Amarillo Master Chorale Director] Nathan Fryml because we were supposed to have a rehearsal that night for ‘Missa Solemnis’,” Palmer says. “I said to him, I don’t think this is a good idea. He ultimately canceled that rehearsal, then he canceled all rehearsals until further notice. “Even though we didn’t have any diagnosed cases in Amarillo at that time, I really think we made the right choice — just to play it safe.” But shutting down meant that staff members at all of the performing arts groups were in danger of losing their jobs. Every arts group, some more reluctantly than others, said that they had received Paycheck Protection Program loans. “Oh yes, that helped keep us afloat,” McLean says. “We’re thankful for those funds,” says Andrew Hay, the Symphony’s executive director. “It saw us through some of those weeks and months that were trepidacious. I think we emerged stronger, in some ways, as an organization as a whole.” The transition from the steady pace of a season-in-progress to a complete halt was jarring for everyone. “Right after our last spring concert, there was a month-to-six-week period where I was just freaking out,” Palmer says. “I built four or five new seasons from scratch, but I’d finish one and within minutes, it would blow up in my face because everything kept changing and changing and changing.” That was true not just for performing arts groups, with audiences sitting next to each other and performers expelling aerosols with every declaimed line or every sung note. It’s true as well for the visual arts: AMoA put on its first all-digital exhibitions, featuring online displays of works by student artists throughout the region. It was a solution, but just an OK one, says Alex Gregory, AMoA’s curator of art. “We’ve always promoted the idea of seeing art in person, not in a picture,” he says. Other groups thrived online, particularly ALT, which mirrored theatrical performers around the world in bringing its art to virtual stages. “Jason [Crespin, ALT Academy director and Shankles’ announced successor] has done a beautiful job of keeping us current and present and visible,” Shankles says, citing a weekly series of cast reunions of beloved past productions, a fully online Academy production, virtual masterclasses with Broadway stars and more. Lone Star Ballet had to cancel all of its dance academy spring recitals, which feature hundreds of young dancers from around the Panhandle. As summer went on, dance instructors did virtual lessons. Some stepped back altogether, though. “I saw all the online stuff,” Palmer says, “and that’s great, but I was feeling pressure about how to keep up with that. But I saw something on Facebook that said ‘Don’t feel like you always have to keep up.’ That let me begin to step back and kind of evaluate things.” In the midst of the COVID crisis came another reckoning. Black Lives Matter protests, sparked by the deaths of Black men and women around the country, forced many in the nation to grapple with racial justice issues in ways that hadn’t been seen since the civil rights movement of the 1960s. As arts groups across the nation looked for ways to acknowledge the generations-long pain inflicted on people of color, some Amarillo arts groups announced that they, too, would try to diversify their offerings. The Symphony revealed plans to perform more works by Black composers and to recruit young Black musicians for its youth orchestras, among other initiatives. ALT announced a standing committee dedicated to formulating an action plan to address “diversity, inclusion, accessibility and outreach” issues. “We’ve had illnesses before, and we’ve had the riots and so forth across the United States in the ’60s and ’70s, but having them both on top of each other is unnerving and unsettling,”

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McLean says. “It makes for an interesting concept of the dance. Do we embrace and use what’s going on in society, use it artistically? Or do we divorce ourselves from that and go on and do our ‘Nutcracker’ and our ‘Cinderella’ and all the ones people love the most?” Amarillo Opera, for one, plans to tackle the pandemic head-on in an upcoming premiere performance of Michael Ching’s “RSBE (Remove Shoes Before Entering.)” “It’s made up of vignettes, and it starts out with a piece coming back from COVID,” Johnson says. “It’s a little edgy. It talks about every problem we have in the world today. It’s really going to be powerful.” Which brings us back to ALT’s “The Humans” and how it points the way forward for the other arts groups. ALT laid out detailed plans for every aspect of staging a show – backstage practices as well as audience expectations. In rehearsals, actors will be masked for the foreseeable future. On stage, they’re sans masks, but the audience is expected to comply with a mask mandate and social distancing requirements. “I count on people to socially distance, but if they don’t, I’ll take care of it,” Shankles says and, indeed, opening weekend of “The Humans” saw 100% compliance with masks. The Symphony and Lone Star Ballet will, as usual, stage their performances in the Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts, so its directors aren’t tasked with coming up with COVID-19 compliance plans; the Civic Center Complex management, with help from the city health department, is taking care of that. Plans call for a significantly reduced number of tickets to be sold – 400-something in the 1,280-seat Globe-News Center, 800-something in the 2,500-seat Civic Center Auditorium, McLean says.

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She says the ballet plans on a full season of dance, beginning in October with a revival of its original lycanthropic piece “Wolf,” followed by a temporarily reduced production of the perennial favorite “The Nutcracker.” After a planned visit from a touring company (to be announced) in February, the ballet hopes to close its season with a revival of its original revue “Timesteps,” featuring popular hit songs from the 1950s to the 1980s. Both “Timesteps” and “Wolf” were recorded, so dancers will be able to learn choreography via video. “That way, we don’t have to pull in big, huge groups to rehearse,” McLean says. “We can do individual groups, then put it all together in the end.” The same goes for “The Nutcracker,” though since the number of dancers who return each year is high, the steps are nearly ingrained at this point. “We have been talking about the possibility, which I hate, of cutting down the number of people who can dance in ‘The Nutcracker,’ but at least we’re having it,” McLean says. The Symphony, meanwhile, is hoping that conditions will improve in coming months to allow for more seats to be sold to better accommodate its subscribers and still offer two performances per concert weekend. That’s why they’ve recently announced that they’ll delay the start of their 2020-21 season until Dec. 19, forcing its annual Happy Holiday Pops concert to serve double duty as the season opener. The remaining season, reduced by one concert, will resume in January and stretch until June. “We’ve done that to buy us and to buy the public some time so we can safely gather in the hall,” Hay says. “Right now, it would be difficult to accomplish much in the Globe-News Center with an audience, so we’re trying to wait a little longer and see what we can do at the end of the year and next year.”


Before that, the Symphony plans to record three fall concerts. Plans call for subscribers to be given a private link to stream the full concert, while some pieces will be shared on the Symphony’s social media accounts. “It’s a new way to deliver art while we wait for the season to start,” Hay says. Even absent the current climate, this was slated to be a big year for the Symphony. Jacomo Bairos, who joined the orchestra in 2013 as its music director and conductor, will leave at the end of the season. “He and I obviously have been touching base very regularly as we’re shifting things around. He’s pretty excited about his final season here,” Hay says. “This will be a great way to send him off. The Symphony is doing more than it’s ever done, and that’s a testament to his vision and him bringing us to a place where we can accomplish some of these goals, for sure.” Amarillo Opera and Chamber Music Amarillo will be staging their performances in a variety of locales. “RSBE” will open the Opera’s season on Nov. 13 and 14 with two performances per night in AC’s Concert Hall Theatre. In lieu of a fundraising gala, the opera will host a private fundraising performance in February, then close out its season with an April 10 performance of “Hansel & Gretel” in a location yet to be announced. Palmer says he scrapped a CMA season that would have been one of its most ambitious ever in favor of a season that starts small. “I tried to line up the concerts that had fewer musicians first as part of the safety component, and our chamber orchestra concerts will be in January and April, in the latter part of the season,” Palmer says. “This year, it feels better to put the larger number of musicians on stage at the end of the season when a vaccine is hopefully in place.”

“Missa Solemnis,” however, is indefinitely on hold. “Because of the fact that it involves a chorus of 115 – and, all told, with orchestra and soloists, 185 people on stage – and because ticket sales are an integral part, we will do it at a time when the vaccine is out and people can gather without fear of infection,” Palmer says. AMoA will generally stick to its regular schedule of exhibitions, Gregory says, though its 12 x 12 art exhibition and sale will go online (and expand to a one-time-only 20 x 20 event, featuring artwork that measures 20 inches in all directions). And back to ALT: After “The Humans,” the theater will be quiet until October, when the fascinating drama “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time” is set to reopen the Mainstage, followed by (in an alternating pattern between the Adventure Space and the Mainstage) the Boston-set drama “Good People” in November, classic drama “Little Women” in January, intimate musical “Once” in February,” broad comedy “Always a Bridesmaid” in March, searing drama “Intimate Apparel” in April and “Monty Python’s Spamalot” in May 2021. “Matlida,” originally rescheduled from May 2020 to September, was recently moved again to December. This wasn’t at all what Shankles had planned. “I was hoping to have a couple of glorious seasons here, sort of reduce my workload and remain involved,” Shankles says. “I still have that goal, but right now, my goal is less about me and more about the theater and the people on our payroll.” That’s the goal for all of the arts groups – to survive this crisis. “You have to adjust,” McLean says. “You can’t stomp and pout. You have to adjust and move forward so that you don’t lose what you’ve built. You build on your background and history, and you adjust it and experiment with it and stay open-minded with it, and say little prayers that things work out well and people are safe and healthy.”

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How the Amarillo Little Theatre helped a young actor cope with unimaginable loss By Jonathan Baker

I

n September 2009, Amarillo Magazine featured the story of a 7-year-old actor who had, by that time, been performing with Amarillo Little Theatre for a couple of years. Clearly not your average second grader, Tré Butcher was driven and ambitious – traits that were even more astounding given that young Tré had experienced terrible heartache the previous year, when his mother died suddenly. This tragedy would be enough to set any child back, but the universe wasn’t finished with Tré. After his father remarried when Tré was 15, the young actor also lost his stepmother. So much loss in such a young life. And yet. Tré is a remarkably cheerful and kind young man, with clear thoughts and ambitions. He speaks openly about the travails he’s experienced. He speaks with compassion about his father – whom he calls his “best friend” – and he talks in endlessly generous terms about his fellow actors and students. So how, you might wonder, can a boy with such a troubled past find so much peace and joy in this world? The answer can be put into four

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simple words: The Amarillo Little Theatre.

Early Beginnings

When Tré Butcher was in kindergarten, he performed in his first ALT mainstage role, in “A Christmas Carol.” “My mom and dad at the time both had jobs,” Tré remembers. “So my mom was looking for somewhere I could go after school, just so they could watch me for a little bit while they finished up work. And she found the ad in the newspaper for Amarillo Little Theatre, when they were signing up for classes. At the time, I was about 5 years old.” Shortly thereafter, he landed a part in his first musical with ALT Academy: “Seussical the Musical.” “I was a baby Jaguar or something like that,” recalls Tré. “I remember asking Jason specifically, ‘Could I please be a baby Jaguar in this scene?’ So I got to choose my animal. I got to make my own costume and all that stuff. It was cute.” As it happened, that show was the first to be helmed by Academy Director Jason Crespin. The mentoring friendship between Crespin and young Tré Butcher has continued to this day, and that big-brother


TRÉ, RIGHT, IN “THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME” AS CLOPIN, 2019

PROVIDED PHOT OS

TRÉ IN “HONK!”, 2019 IN HIS ROLE OF UGLY

TRÉ AS JACK IN “INTO THE WOODS,” 2018

JASON CRESPIN AND TRÉ BUTCHER AT THE AMARILLO LITTLE THEATRE AWARDS IN JUNE 2018.

relationship played a huge part in how Tré made his way through grief and found a home in the theater. Upon graduation this year, Tré will hold the record for being the student that has been in the ALT program the longest – and Crespin is actively involved in helping Tré apply to college musical theater programs. “Tré’s story is one of inspiration for not only our ALT community, but for me as well,” Crespin says. “Every time I think of all the heartache Tré and his father have endured, I find myself wondering how they were able to still be a positive light in our community. Tré could have easily turned to so many negative things that kids his age are faced with. But for some reason, he didn’t want that in his life. He and his father knew that theater was something Tré was strong at – and luckily for us, he stayed at ALT for all these years. Through his time and dedication in our program, Tré was able to continue to grow as an actor and fulfill the dreams his mother had for him when she signed him up for theater classes so many years ago.” For his part, Tré Butcher has no doubt about his chosen occupation. “It is every ounce of me,” he says. “When people say Tré Butcher,

any of my friends, it’s related with musical theater, just that I’ve been doing it for so long. And I plan on continuing to do it for the rest of my life. This is what I want to do.”

Performing Through Tragedy

The hardest parts of Tré’s life are intimately tied to the best part: the theater. When his mother died, he remembers, “I was in the middle of a show, actually. We were at the rehearsals for ‘The Velveteen Rabbit’ and she just passed away. Jason, of course, gave me the option to opt out of the show.” But, as that original Amarillo Magazine feature recounts, Tré insisted on going back to the theater. “The Velveteen Rabbit” called for his first speaking role, and he wasn’t going to miss it. When asked if these memories are difficult to speak about, Tré is adamant. “Not at all. I love talking about it.” To prove it, he delves into the most difficult details of his mother’s passing. “They gave it some really big name. It was called a cardiac tamponade. Apparently super rare, has to do with this vein around her heart. It ended up bursting SEPTEMBER 2020 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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JASON AND TRÉ IN 2010, AND RIGHT, IN 2019

and her heart just stopped on her. So that was how she passed. And it’s something I know I have to get checked for. I have to go get my heart scanned sometime this year. This is the last time because my heart’s fully developed, and I guess it’s something that could be genetic, but they don’t think I’ll get it because they kept telling us it was very rare.” The feature from 2009 recounts how Tré fell silent after the death of his mother – until, that is, he asked his dad to take him back to ALT. The theater, said young Tré, was the place where he felt the safest. “Back then,” says Tré, “the theater was my escape. And it’s still my escape today.” So how exactly does that escape work? What is it about the theater that’s so healing for Tré? “I think it’s because there’s nothing like going to the theater and jumping on the stage and being somebody completely different from who you really are,” Tré says. “That’s always been my motivation, capturing an audience and telling the story. It helps me forget about what’s going on in the world. Just a good little pastime.” The healing has something to do with processing emotions through a character, Tré believes. “Doing shows for so long has made me very aware of my emotions because in theater you deal with tragedy and heartbreak all the time, even if you are just playing that fictional character. I think when you’re becoming those characters and you’re making these words on this page come to life, you’re living that person’s story.” But then, there’s also the flip side of that phenomenon; an actor processes emotions from his real life through these fictional characters. These characters have their griefs and their pain, and you experience that through them. For example, Tré is currently choosing monologues for his college auditions, and he’s frequently told to find something he can relate to in real life. “So I have a really dramatic monologue about death in my red book. I pull from [my past] all the time. And I think it also helps with authenticity and making it look real.” Tré’s father, John, has a very real understanding of how the theater has helped his son. “Theater deals with all the emotions we face in the real world. When a person is capable of understanding these emotions, it gives them an advantage. It certainly has given Tré a basic understanding of life’s ups and downs. Because of theater, he is not fearful of success or failure.” John continues, “Tré was put in a position, just as I was, to overcome the tragic death of his mom. We cried a lot early on, but we both seemed to understand the bigger picture – that she would never want us to stop living our best lives. I knew then that Tré felt home at the theater – it was part of his world. Turns out, because I could not shelter Tré, he gained a maturity from life that has helped him to understand the deeper messages depicted in the theatrical world.”

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There’s also the community aspect of the theater. “Everybody at the theater is so supportive,” Tré says. “Growing up, I did sports and the arts. I liked both. I liked my football friends, my theater friends. But the one thing I had always noticed was the jocks, they’re a lot more competitive. Everybody at the theater is rooting for each other. Everybody wants the other one to succeed. And I think that also helps with making the theater a safe place for just about anybody.”

Moving Forward

“I see a very successful future for Tré,” says Jason Crespin. “He’s a hard worker, someone who isn’t looking for the easy way out. When he is passionate about something and committed fully to an idea, he will work hard towards that goal, ask all the right questions on how to improve, and not let anything distract him along the way.” Tré is looking forward to college at whichever institution he chooses, where he will major in musical theater. For his part, Tré’s father isn’t worried about his son’s future. “He is already heavily involved in searching for his next place in life, and musical theater is his passion. My biggest hope for him is that he continues to live his life with optimism and puts a best face on each day. I would love to see him stay close to home, but sometimes we have to let someone go out and find their future.” Wherever this life leads him, everyone is in agreement that the theater has armed Tré Butcher with some very special qualities – traits that will serve him well. “Tré easily could use his misfortunes in life as a crutch,” says Crespin. “Instead, he propels himself from those travesties to motivate himself to achieve more out of life. Tré knows that time is too precious to just sit back and wait for things to happen. He wants to make things happen.” Crespin says he could easily see Tré graduating from a university, making it to Broadway, or starring in a feature film. But what Crespin really hopes for Tré is three things. First, “a role in this show called life, in which he is proud each and every day of the things he is accomplishing.” Second, “Someone who looks at him with love in their eyes, like his mother would look at his father.” And third, “That he continues to create positivity in his community and one day is able to pass that positive outlook on to the next generation of artists.” As an artist and a man who is, by all accounts, a famously goodhearted human being, Jason Crespin continues to be inspired by Tré. “Tré’s work ethic inspires me daily and reminds me, no matter what I am faced with, to choose to find the positive and continue to pursue the good in life. I’m sure his story has inspired others in our ALT community in the same way.” Perhaps Tré’s father, John Butcher, puts his son’s special qualities most succinctly. “Tré is the kind of young man who will be successful in whatever he chooses to do.”


PHOTO BY SHANNON RICHARDSON

What’s Cooking?

HEALTHY HONEY

“H

oney’s just healthier for you all around, especially raw honey,” says Paige Nester of Creek House Honey Farm east of Canyon. “Instead of using sugar, I substitute honey in almost everything that we bake or make. I have that luxury because I’m a beekeeper.” Nester and her husband, George, manage more than 100 beehives. She shares a few of her favorite recipes that use honey as an ingredient. The honey hot cocoa was one of the winners of a recent contest submitted by Creek House customers, and relies on the company’s chocolate honey. “It’s one of the best hot cocoas I’ve ever tasted,” Nester says. Her honey-roasted pecans are sold in Creek House’s retail shop and remain one of its most popular products. The honey-balsamic salmon calls for a raspberry balsamic vinegar sold by Amarillo Grape & Olive. “It’s gets caramelized and is just really good,” she says. One thing Paige loves about cooking with honey is that the taste of honey changes based off its nectar source – honey made from bees relying upon cotton nectar will taste different from honey that comes from orange blossoms or cranberry. “That’s fun, to see that surprise finish at the end. There’s not going to be one honey that tastes alike. It makes such a healthy, alternative option. I’m a big advocate for honey.” Spoken like a true beekeeper. RECIPES AND PHOTOS COURTESY OF PAIGE NESTER, CREEK HOUSE HONEY FARM

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HONEY ROASTED PECANS

HONEY HOT COCOA 24

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PROVIDED PHOTOS

HONEY BALSAMIC SALMON


The Recipes Honey Roasted Pecans 1 pound pecan halves 2 egg whites ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon vanilla ¾ tablespoon cinnamon ½ cup brown sugar ½ cup honey Add egg whites to small pot. Whip egg whites until foamy. Add salt, vanilla, cinnamon, brown sugar and honey. Mix again thoroughly; add pecans. Lay out on greased baking sheet. Bake for 1 hour at 250 degrees, stirring every 15 minutes. When stirring, make sure to stir the perimeter of the baking sheet. After pecans have been baked for 1 hour, separate onto multiple sheets and break up as much as possible; this will help keep them from sticking together and sticking to the pan. Use nonstick cooking spray on food safe gloves to help prevent pecans from sticking to your hands. Makes 1 pound pecans

Honey Hot Cocoa

Recipe by Tracy Damron, winner of Creek House Honey Farm’s Recipe Contest 8 cups milk ½ cup honey (or Creek House Honey Farm’s chocolate honey) 1 teaspoon cocoa powder (do not include if you are using CHHF chocolate honey) 1 teaspoon Mexican vanilla Whipped topping Sprinkle of cinnamon Bring milk to low boil in medium saucepan. In separate bowl, mix honey and cocoa powder until smooth. Add honey/cocoa mixture and vanilla to milk and stir. Pour into mugs; add whipped topping and a sprinkle of cinnamon to each mug before before serving. Makes 8 cups cocoa

Honey Balsamic Salmon 1 ½ pounds salmon ¼ cup honey ¼ cup melted butter 1 tablespoon minced garlic ½ cup balsamic vinegar of choice (We prefer raspberry balsamic from Amarillo Grape & Olive.) Heat oven to 350 degrees. Place salmon on pan lined with foil. In small microwave safe bowl, melt butter. Stir in honey, balsamic and garlic. Spread honey sauce over salmon and bake for 50 minutes. Makes 3 servings

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Meet the Cook:

Paige Nester of Creek House Honey Farm

B

ack in 2010, George and Paige Nester decided to order a couple of bee hives, hoping they would help pollinate their garden and their daughters’ pumpkin patch. Both have a background in science – he has a doctorate in pharmacy and she was an educator with a teaching certificate in biology – and were fascinated by the hard-working insects. The pollination worked and the couple began giving away the resulting honey to friends and family. But strong honeybee colonies can grow. When the hives are strong and healthy, the bee population begins to outgrow its hive. That sometimes requires splitting the hive. So those original two hives turned into four. By the third year of their hobby, the Nesters had eight hives, a plentiful garden, and family acreage that was producing more honey than they could consume. That’s when they started to think about making honey more than a hobby. Today, Creek House Honey Farm is a full-fledged local business and the couple manages more than 100 hives. From their retail establishment at 5005 Fourth Ave. in Canyon, they sell raw, unfiltered honey, beeswax candles, and a variety of honey-based skincare products. “We were super-lucky that COVID didn’t slow us down,” Paige says. Like many local businesses with an online presence, Creek House began seeing an uptick of orders during the shutdown. On average, the Nesters ship out five packages a day to destinations as far as New York City or Los Angeles. But one day, 120 orders came through in a

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24-hour period. “It’s crazy to think we’re reaching that many people,” she says. They’re about to reach even more, as Creek House has spent the summer working on an expansion. “It should be completed by November. The new store will be three times as big,” she says. It will include a classroom and event center, which allows Nester and her team to conduct more bee tours. Prior to the pandemic, Creek House had become a popular field trip destination for local students. “We were having big busloads of kids but just weren’t able to fit everybody,” says Paige. New merchandise is on the horizon as well, with a line of Creek House CBD skincare products on schedule to roll out this month. “Honey is a true healant for the body already,” she says. “The healing properties [of the new products] are going to be outrageous.” Creek House products are currently being sold in dozens of retail stores, including Amarillo and Lubbock retailers as well as businesses in Dallas and even Illinois. And over the past couple years, they’ve also launched Honey Buzz Winery, where George brews and sells a variety of meads. Honeybees are vital to the food and agriculture industry, and raw honey has a number of research-based healing properties. “We’re just big advocates of honey,” Paige says. For its taste, for its health benefits, and maybe for its impact on the Nesters’ lives and careers.


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

This year’s pandemic and resulting business closures have challenged local business’ ability to not only keep doors open, but also their ability to change how they deal with their clients. Amarillo’s stalwart citizens have met that challenge head on. No one understands the local market better than the professionals that do business in Amarillo every day. Whether you’re new to town, or you simply find yourself in need of a new product or service, who should you call? Flip through our Faces of Amarillo profiles, and meet the individuals behind the companies that make Amarillo a great place to live. From construction and education to insurance and mortgage advice, these are the folks you can turn to when you need help. And now, more than ever, these longstanding businesses need our support and patronage.


FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

BANKING

Amarillo National Bank

410 S. Taylor St. | 378.8000 | anb.com

Amarillo National Bank has been meeting the financial needs of Amarillo residents since 1892. Other banks have closed, moved away or sold, but ANB has proven that it is here to stay. A vital part of Amarillo’s banking landscape, ANB employs more than 600 locals in its Commercial and Personal Banking, Loan and Wealth Management Departments, and offers locally serviced credit/debit cards and a variety of banking services. ANB employees are the lifeblood of the organization, talented locals dedicated to unparalleled customer service and a commitment to the community. You’ll find ANB employees volunteering across the city. ANB gives back more than $2 million a year to local nonprofits and organizations. Amarillo always comes before bank. The family-owned bank doesn’t answer to outside shareholders, which frees it to make decisions that put its customers and community first. As Amarillo continues to grow, ANB will continue to invest in its employees, customers and city. 28

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THE FACE OF

MORTGAGE LOANS Amarillo National Bank

2401 Coulter St. | 378.8000 | anb.com

As the largest mortgage provider and servicer in the Texas Panhandle, Amarillo National Bank offers competitive interest rates, a wide array of homebuyer programs, and fast closing options. The family-owned bank has been originating home loans for more than 40 years. With 65 local employees, ANB services its conventional loans locally, and has been voted Amarillo’s Best Mortgage Company every year since 2005. Online lenders simply cannot compete with ANB’s knowledge of the local market and top-notch customer service. Quick, no-hassle loan approvals ensures a no-headaches experience, unlike other mortgage lenders. A trusted name in the banking industry, ANB offers an easy-to-use online application for loan approvals. Plans for the future include expanding this process to include electronic closings, which means borrowers will not have to physically go to a title company. They will be able to electronically sign their loan documents in the convenience of their own home. ANB is committed to the community, giving more than $2 million a year to local nonprofits and organizations. ANB employees volunteer across the city.

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

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THE FACE OF

NEW HOMES

Betenbough Homes

8780 Heritage Hills Parkway | 806.513.6338 betenbough.com

Twenty-eight years ago, Ron and Rick Betenbough realized there was a growing need to deliver quality homes at the most competitive price. Betenbough Homes expanded into the Amarillo area five years ago, and has been building quality, affordable homes for families across West Texas ever since. Betenbough Homes builds high-quality, affordable new homes for first-time and move-up home buyers. Its homes include luxury brands such as Moen and Samsung. Buying a new home is one of the most important investments a family will ever make, but the value of that investment is dependent on the home you choose. Betenbough Homes has developed efficient and engineered building processes to offer home buyers the highest-quality home at the most affordable price, creating a path to homeownership with less of the stress and more of the memories. Betenbough Homes’ people-first culture is what makes it unique. The company believes that when you put your people first, they will go above and beyond to serve others, ultimately allowing them to positively impact home buyers, business partners and the community. In the past year, the company has given a total of $24,750 to local Amarillo organizations. Betenbough Homes stays committed to the Amarillo community and will continue to offer the opportunity to invest in more home for less money.

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

ENERGY

Grammer Land & Exploration Corp. Grammer Law Group, P.C. 881.5404 grammerland.com Established 17 years ago, Grammer Land and Grammer Law Group are composed of five landmen, with a legal staff of four attorneys. Originally incorporated to serve primarily the oil industry, Grammer now finds itself serving a wide range of energy companies from public utilities, solar and wind farm developers, financial lenders and agricultural producers. Grammer Land & Exploration Corp. handles land-related issues, such as examination of mineral ownership, oil and gas lease negotiations, pipeline and transmission right-ofway, and wind and solar lease acquisitions, with around 48,000 acres under lease, 200 miles of transmission and just over 1,000 megawatts of solar under development in three states. Grammer Law Group, P.C., handles the legal representation of companies involved in mergers and acquisitions, energy transactions and energy finance law in Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Colorado. The corporations’ hard-won success is due, says landman and owner Jonathan Grammer, to his mother. His faith-based upbringing, the perseverance she modeled, and an emphasis on the importance of understanding the land and the way people live upon it has been essential to achieving his goals. Clients rely on Grammer Land and Grammer Law Group for its reliability and excellent service, day or night. Grammer Land and Grammer Law Group are dedicated to the community and give back through getting involved to implement positive change in the local economy and community. With respect to the energy industry’s impact on the community, the group stays focused on remaining integral, primarily in legislative initiatives. Energy in Texas and throughout the Southwestern United States will remain essential and Grammer intends to avail itself of the benefits stemming from every section of the energy market, in order to harness as much energy as possible.

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

COLLEGE PREP EDUCATION Ascension Academy

9301 Ascension Parkway | 342.0515 | ascensionacademy.org

Ascension Academy welcomed its 21st group of scholars, artists, athletes and leaders for the 2020-2021 school year in August. The students were eager to return to campus to continue their college preparatory education, dive back into their extracurricular activities, and return to athletics. Katy Engler, director of admission and financial aid added, “The value of our students and teachers in the classroom together is significant for personal and academic growth. As such, this was a priority for our re-open plan to welcome our new and returning students. Under the leadership of our new Head of School, Tim Oditt, we opened our doors for in-person instruction on Aug. 17. Our school community has adjusted well to the health and safety protocols, and we are looking forward to another fantastic year for our students.” Earlier this year, Ascension Academy became 1 of only 14 schools in the state of Texas to be accepted as a Cum Laude Society school. The Cum Laude Society, which numbers 383 chapters worldwide, honors the scholastic achievement of secondary school students. To be welcomed into this exceptional company of schools, Ascension had to pass through an application process in which the academic strength of curriculum, the scholarly qualifications of the faculty, and the academic performances of recent graduates were examined and 34

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judged to meet the Cum Laude Society’s rigorous standards. The Cum Laude Society represents college preparatory academies in 41 states, Canada, England, France, Spain, the Philippines, and Puerto Rico. “Being accepted to the Cum Laude Society is a distinct honor for Ascension Academy. It is a testament to the high quality of our college preparatory education and the dedication of our faculty. We are pleased to recognize the first group of graduates who were inducted into the society,” said Tim Oditt, head of school at Ascension. Cum Laude students represent the top 20% of their graduating class in addition to Cum Laude scholastic qualifications. The 2020 graduating class of 13 saw the first three students earn the prestigious honor of induction into Ascension Academy’s Cum Laude chapter. The valedictorian and two salutatorians are attending Stanford, Princeton, and Texas A&M University. All three students attended Ascension Academy for their middle school and high school careers. Serving grades six through 12, Ascension Academy provides an exemplary college preparatory education in a challenging, faithaffirming environment to maximize the potential of every student.


FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

CARPET CLEANING AND RESTORATION Amarillo Steamway

2700 Amarillo Blvd. West | 373.4592 | amarillosteamway.com

Years in Business: Founded in 1968 by Howard and Carol Richey, now operated by their daughter and husband, Melody and Eddie Willis, 52 years and still growing. What is your background? As a family-owned business, we have more than 100 years of combined experience with master certification and accountability to back it up. What services or products do you offer? Today more than ever before, a clean environment is crucial to provide a sanitized home and workspace. Our slogan says it all: “The cleanest clean you have ever seen.” We have always been a leader in our industry offering a Premiere Cleaning and Restoration service. Carpet, upholstery, tile and grout, and area cleaning (oriental, specialty and skins). We also

offer water damage service. To what do you attribute your success? Our customers are our priority. They are the most important part. We have some families that are beginning their fourth generation. We have always treated customers the way we want to be treated and cleaned every job the way we would want ours cleaned. Why do your customers select you over your competitors? Our service is Second to None. Customers are not just a job. Our goal is to provide the best possible experience and build a lasting relationship. What are your plans for the future? 2020 will include combined growth and thankfulness; we will be setting goals for the next 50 years. SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • FACES OF AMARILLO

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

FINE JEWELRY Barnes Jewelry

100 Westgate Parkway West | 355.9874 | barnesjewelry.com

Barnes Jewelry opened its doors 64 years ago, and continues its tradition of excellence in Amarillo under the leadership of owner Don Adams. Barnes offers the expertise of on-site jewelers, a stunning inventory, and custom jewelry and repair, which include CAD, casting, setting and polishing. Step inside Barnes Jewelry’s inviting location near Westgate Mall and you’ll receive an enthusiastic greeting from one of its 10 employees (and maybe even the resident canine greeter). Barnes’ wide selection of jewelry includes well-known brands, such as Forevermark, TAG Heuer, John Hardy, Konstantino, Jude Francis, Charles Krypell and many more. As part of the Amarillo community, Barnes is committed to giving back. From donations and sponsorships of local fundraisers to pet adoption events, Barnes is a familiar presence at events throughout the city. Recently, the jeweler has partnered with the displaced artists from Sunset Center’s beloved First Friday Art Walk. Twenty-one artists now show their work at Barnes. Experience local art, live music and more at the new First Friday Art Walk at Barnes Jewelry. “Celebrate Your Moments” at Barnes, as you choose a timeless piece of jewelry to commemorate life’s most precious memories. The staff at Barnes aims to maintain lasting relationships with each client, getting to know them and their unique stories. 36

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

GLASS

Glass Doctor of Amarillo

2515 Britain Drive | 576.3287 | glassdoctor.com/amarillo

Family-owned businesses are one of the city’s claims to fame. Family-owned Wayne’s Quality Auto Glass opened in 1986, and that same family transitioned to the Glass Doctor franchise in 2006. Customers can count on the same reliable care and friendly service – the same care they’ve received for the past 34 years. Glass Doctor of Amarillo employs 15 people in two locations in order to offer complete glass service for home and auto. From window film, headlight restoration, and rock chip repair to tabletops, scratch removal, windshield recalibration, and shower doors, the professionals at Glass Doctor can handle the full spectrum. Glass Doctor is still going strong thanks to its commitment to exceeding customers’ expectations in every job.

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

INSURANCE Leslie Massey

2700 S. Western St., Suite 700 | 352.7388 | agents.farmers.com/mmassey

After 11 years in the insurance industry, Agent Leslie Massey continues to go above and beyond when it comes to touching the heart of the city. As the first Farmers Agency to be selected from the district to become a member of the Presidents Council, Leslie and her staff have shown a commitment to excellence in caring for each and every client. Each team member at the Leslie Massey Agency dedicates time and energy to a variety of local nonprofits, including United Way of Amarillo and Canyon where Leslie is the Campaign-Co Chair for 2020. The agency strives to make a positive impact throughout the city, beginning with its clients and continuing through each relationship built on trust and the highest level of service. 38

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

DOG GROOMING Need Us Bark Us

3269 Commerce St. | 356.0579 | needusbarkus.net

Need Us Bark Us owner Charlotte Braddock has spent the past 35 years in the grooming industry, dedicating her career to excellent care, honesty and compassion. NUBU employs six groomers, five bathers, two receptionists, and a housekeeper to ensure that every dog receives the ultimate grooming experience. In a competitive industry, which factors attribute to Need Us Bark Us’ success? Charlotte is quick to give credit to her employees, her husband, and a commitment to continuing education and a higher standard of care. The salon is devoted to the community and gives back through donations of merchandise, services and gift bags to various organizations for fundraising events. One day, Charlotte hopes to add a dog photography studio to her long list of services. Need Us Bark Us’ loyal clients go back as far as 30 years due to NUBU’s outstanding offerings, which include full-service grooming, spa treatments, a pet boutique, and a line of CBD oils and treats for anxious pets. It’s clear that the staff doesn’t look at grooming as just a job; it’s their passion to provide tender loving care to the area’s pets.

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

HEARING HEALTH Ormson Hearing Clinic

5501 SW Ninth Ave. | 468.4343 ormsonhearing.com

After 43 years in Amarillo, Dr. Maegan Laughlin has taken over the ownership of Ormson, continuing a legacy built upon honesty, integrity, and reliable advice when it comes to solutions for hearing loss or tinnitus. Originally from Sunray, Texas, Dr. Laughlin has spent seven years serving the Amarillo community in both pediatric and adult hearing and balance disorders after graduating from Texas Tech University with a Doctorate in Audiology, and her clinical residency serving the nation’s veterans at the Mountain Home VA Medical Center in Johnson City, Tennessee. The specialized clinic provides diagnostic testing and treatment of the adult and pediatric hearing population in the Amarillo area with four doctors of audiology. Hearing aids are a big part of the practice, and Ormson also serves the city’s industrial communities, veterans and schools. Patients know they aren’t simply a “sales opportunity.” Ormson is committed to delivering the best care for every patient. It’s no surprise, then, that the clinic thrives from its large “word-of-mouth” referral system at both the physician and patient level. As the primary health care provider for pediatric hearing loss, the staff makes it a priority to give back to local pediatric organizations like Children’s Miracle Network, The Buddy Walk, and AISD, providing hearing health care in the classroom as well as in the clinic. Ormson also works closely with organizations in the community that help provide services for senior citizens, like Panhandle Independent Living. Dr. Laughlin is committed to continuing the homegrown principles and methods created by Dr. Ormson for the members of the community, building on that foundation while adding today’s newest diagnostic and treatment methods.

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

LAW

Underwood Law Firm

500 S. Taylor St. | 376.5613 | uwlaw.com

Years in business: 108 years. We were founded in 1912 and still going strong! Company size: 41 lawyers and 80 total employees What is your background? Underwood has been providing legal services for Texas clients since 1912. Underwood is considered Amarillo’s “go-to” law firm, and its attorneys have long been leaders in all facets of community life in Amarillo and its other Texas locations. With offices in Amarillo, Austin, Fort Worth, Lubbock, and Pampa, Underwood’s locations cover a unique North, West, and Central Texas footprint. What services or products do you offer? Underwood is a fullservice law firm representing individuals and companies in multiple practice areas, such as Agriculture, Banking, Bankruptcy & Creditors’ Rights, Business & Corporate, Construction, Employment, Estate Planning & Probate, Family Matters, Health Care, Immigration, Intellectual Property, Litigation, Municipal, Public Education, Public Finance, Real Estate, Renewable Energy and Tax. To what do you attribute your success? Underwood’s success can be directly attributed to the relentless determination of its lawyers

and staff to advocate for its clients’ best legal interests. Underwood considers the representation of its clients to be a privilege and strives to perform its services in a manner that fosters long-lasting relationships with them. How does your company give back to the community? Underwood has always promoted a culture of “giving back.” Our attorneys have historically served on local and national boards of various nonprofit agencies, and we donate thousands of dollars each year to local organizations. “Time, talent, and treasure” is more than just a saying at Underwood – it’s how we roll! Why do your customers select you over your competitors? In addition to our experience, we know that legal services are about relationships. We take the time to build and foster those relationships, while at the same time taking the time and energy to stay current on all areas of law in which we practice. What are your plans for the future? To continue to adapt in this ever-changing world so we can serve our clients across the State of Texas for generations to come. SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • FACES OF AMARILLO

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

HOME DECOR The Urban Giraffe

4000 SW 51st Ave. | 418.8962 | theurbangiraffe.com

For the past seven years, The Urban Giraffe has built a reputation of top-notch customer service, while offering a dazzling array of the latest in home decor to fit any budget. The store’s welcoming environment offers inspiration at every turn. Lose yourself in Urban Giraffe’s 9,000-square-foot showroom, which includes everything needed to create your own personal masterpiece. As locals have made the important shift to spending more time at home over the past few months, there’s no better time to update your space. Urban Giraffe’s talented staff can help you choose just the right furniture, mirrors and accessories to create a space you can treasure.

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FACES of

AMARILLO 2020

THE FACE OF

PERSONAL INJURY LAW Wood Law Firm

610 SW 11th Ave. | 372.9663 | woodlawfirm-tx.com

Years in business: 31 years combined experience Company size: Two lawyers and four staff members What is your background? Channy: BS, Ag.Eco, ’89, JD, ’94 from Texas Tech; Leslie: BA, ’06 from Sam Houston State, JD, ’13 from Baylor What services or products do you offer? We fight for the good guys. Our practice is devoted to representing people who are victims of wrongful actions of others. We won’t represent or defend wrongdoers. To what do you attribute your success? The support of my family, humility, and extending grace, dignity and respect to my clients as well as my adversaries. How does your company give back to the community? We are a long-time supporter of the High Plains Children’s Home. We also sponsor charitable organizations such as Will Rogers Range Riders, Amarillo Junior League, Amarillo College educational summer

programs, and youth sporting activities. What is unique about your business? We work for people who can’t afford to hire a lawyer. We only get paid if we can attain a successful resolution of our client’s legal issue. That is our guarantee to our clients. Why do your customers select you over your competitors? We are local, hometown lawyers helping local people. We care about our clients; they become a part of our family. What are your plans for the future? We hope to continue to build upon the foundation of our past successes and relationships by adhering to the principles of honesty, integrity and perseverance. What made you choose Amarillo? We enjoy the rich Western heritage of Texas and the people who chose to make this their home. Here in the Panhandle, principals of honesty, fairness, responsibility, compassion and hard work are still a way of life. SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION • FACES OF AMARILLO

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Start at amarillomagonline.com. Find us on Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram!


Let’s Eat!

Restaurants • Food • Spirits

Walk-On’s Sports Bistreaux

T

he city’s newest sports bar/restaurant opened this July, offering dine-in and to-go with curbside service of its Cajunstyle cuisine. Choose from an array of mouthwatering sharable appetizers, seafood dishes, traditional Cajun favorites, enormous burgers and poboys, salads and more. Voted the No. 1 Sports Bar in America by ESPN, enjoy the big game with a taste of Louisiana.

3506 S. Soncy Road 398.2003 walk-ons.com Open Sunday through Thursday, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.-midnight

PROVIDED PHOTOS

PRICING GUIDE $ most entrees less than $10 $$ most entrees $11 to $20 $$$ most entrees more than $21 NEW New to Let’s Eat! UPDATE

Updated entry

THE LET’S EAT! GUIDE IS A READER SERVICE COMPILED BY THE AMARILLO MAGAZINE EDITORIAL STAFF. THE MAGAZINE DOES NOT ACCEPT ADVERTISING OR OTHER COMPENSATION IN EXCHANGE FOR A LISTING. THE GUIDE IS UPDATED REGULARLY. TO CORRECT A LISTING OR RECOMMEND A RESTAURANT FOR CONSIDERATION, CONTACT MICHELE MCAFFREY AT MMCAFFREY@AMARILLO.COM.

SEPTEMBER 2020 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

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Amarillo 575 PIZZERIA

Toppings runneth over at 575 Pizzeria, not to mention the specials that rotate every month. (Check the board when you walk in.) 575 is family-owned and family-friendly, so it’s a great Friday night dinner choice. 2803 Civic Circle/7710 Hillside Road, Suite 700322.5575, 575pizzeria.com $$

THE 806 COFFEE + LOUNGE

In addition to its vast organic, fair trade coffee and tea offerings, The 806 caters to local vegetarians and vegans with its “foodie” menu. The limited (but tasty) menu includes omelets, bagels, sandwiches, and nachos along with made-from-scratch desserts, a few which are also gluten-free. Don’t miss brunch served on Saturdays and Sundays. Regulars go for coffee that packs a punch and the healthy eats. 2812 SW Sixth Ave., 322.1806, the806.com $

THE AÇAÍ BAR

For those pursuing the clean-eating trend, The Açaí Bar can keep you on track. Choose from filling bowls or smoothies as an alternative to a fast food breakfast or lunch. Each menu item is made fresh with mostly organic ingredients. The customer favorite Monkey Bowl – an açaí blend topped with granola, pineapple, bananas, strawberries, mini chocolate chips, coconut shreds and honey – will keep you satisfied past the daily 3 p.m. slump. 7306 SW 34th Ave., Suite 9, 367.9724, theacaibaramarillo.com $

AMERICAN MADE COFFEE HOUSE

American Made’s menu includes fresh sandwiches, gourmet coffee, and freshmade sweets. Stop by for speedy and friendly service before you begin the workday. 6402 River Road, 236.0005 $

BAGEL PLACE

Whether for breakfast or lunch, the Bagel Place offers a wide variety of cream cheese and bagel flavors. Zip through the convenient drive-thru for a great, lazy morning take-home breakfast. For lunch, try the bagel sandwiches made with Boars Head cheese and meat, a generous salad, or a tasty bowl of soup. 3301 Bell St., 353.5985, bagelplace.net $

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BENJAMIN’S DONUTS & BAKERY

DAVID’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

BUTTERLOVE BISCUITS

DELVIN’S RESTAURANT & CATERING

Family-owned and -operated, Benjamin’s serves doughnuts, pastries, kolaches, breakfast sandwiches and burritos. Go early for the best assortment of filled, cake and glazed doughnuts – we love the green tea glazed and red velvet cake flavors. 7003 Bell St., 353.1100/1800 Western St., 803.1133 $ Eye-popping big biscuits are the draw at Butterlove Biscuits. And we’re not exaggerating – these things are gigantic. Comfort all of your cravings with savory and sweet biscuits, grab-and-go biscuits, waffles, and perfect brunch-inspired cocktails. 3440 S. Bell, Suite 130, 418.8966, butterlove.com $$

CADA VEZ COMIDA MEXICANA

Located in Town Square, Cada Vez serves Tex-Mex cuisine in a family-friendly atmosphere. Popular items include Mexican street corn, enchiladas, and a classic margarita. Choose from 22 beers on tap from the bar, enjoy the patio and live music, or host a large group inside the restaurant’s party room, which can accommodate up to 50 guests. 9200 Town Square Blvd., Suite 1000, 418.6976, cadavezamarillo.com $$

CAFE MARIZON

Cafe Marizon serves up great, homecooked taste with consistently delicious specials of the day. Go early so you can have a piece of the homemade pie or cake. 6151 Hillside Road, 352.2046, cafemarizon.com $$

CASK & CORK

You’re in for a treat when you visit Cask & Cork. Ingeniously crafted menu items, which range from flatbread pizza and pasta to rib-eyes, quail and seafood to sandwiches and salads, will make choosing only one item a challenge. 5461 McKenna Square, Suite 101, 410.1113, caskncorkamarillo.com $$

COYOTE BLUFF CAFE

Don’t let the outside fool you. This is seriously good food. The full pound, green chile cheeseburger is Southwest divine (add jalapeños for extra zip). Cool off with an ice cold beer. 2417 S. Grand St., 373.4640, cbctogo.com $

Locals rave about David’s fresh, flavorful Mexican food. Feast on traditional favorites like street tacos, tamales, burritos, and fajitas. Keep up with the tantalizing specials of the day on the restaurant’s Facebook and Instagram profiles. 400 E. Hastings Ave., 418.6333 $

Head to Delvin’s and fill up on some of the city’s finest comfort food. Long-time chef Delvin Wilson opened his small eatery in 2015, and it’s quickly become a favorite lunch and brunch stop. Sample a three-meat combination barbecue plate, or traditional American favorites like fried chicken, soul food, and fresh fried catfish. Finish with the homemade buttermilk pie. 1300 N. Hughes St., 803.9111/ 701 S. Taylor St., 350.7441, delvinsrestaurant.com $

DOÑA JUANITA RESTAURANT

If you’re in the mood for traditional Mexican dishes, give Dona Juanita’s a try. The guacamole is made fresh daily and the ceviche is some of the best in Amarillo. 2208 Amarillo Blvd. East, 220.2610 $

THE DRUNKEN OYSTER

Open Monday through Saturday 11 a.m.2 a.m. and Sunday 11 a.m.-9 p.m., The Drunken Oyster features Louisiana-style cuisine in a unique and sophisticated setting. Fill up on fresh oysters, crawfish etouffee, gumbo, jambalaya, po’boys, and plenty of shrimp entrees. Craft cocktails and an excellent wine list ensure you’ll stay awhile. 7606 SW 45th Ave., Suite 100, 418.6668, drunkenoysteramarillo.com $$

THE EATERY ON ROUTE 66

A glance at the baked goods and lunch items on The Eatery’s Facebook page will get your mouth watering. Choose from a rotating menu of soups, salads and sandwiches Monday through Saturday, with weekly specials and half-price desserts on Tuesdays. 3208 SW Sixth Ave., 322.0828, eateryonroute66.com $

EL CARBONERO RESTAURANTE Y PUPUSERIA

This hidden gem specializes in authentic Salvadoran cuisine. Discover pupusas, a fresh-made masa cake (much like


a pancake) filled with your choice of ingredients like queso and loroco (an earthy, green vegetable), pork and cheese, or zucchini and cheese. Traditional options like fajitas, fried fish and asada abound. 1702 Amarillo Blvd. East, 373.1973, elcarbonerorestaurantamarillo.com $

EL TEJAVAN

We love El Tejavan’s homemade guacamole, served up thick with onions and cilantro. The ceviche makes for a great starter or a light meal. For authentic taste, try the soft corn tortilla chicken tacos. The recipes at El Tejavan have been passed down for generations, so everything’s good. 3801 I-40 East, 372.5250/3420 I-40 West, 354.2444 $$

FAVS

Conveniently located close to downtown, FAVs (which stands for Fruits And Veggies) offers salads, smoothies, soups and snacks chockfull of fresh vegetables, fruits, seeds and nuts – perfect for grab-and-go early morning fuel or a midday lunch. The healthconscious diner will also appreciate protein shakes, fresh muffins, juice and more. 706 SW 16th Ave., 803.9171, favstx.com $

FURRBIE’S

GLORIA’S OYSTER BAR

Gloria’s menu consists of seafood, Mexican, Tex-Mex dishes and Salvadoran food. The lightly spiced tamales are handmade, steamed in banana leaves and filled with chicken, potatoes, sweet peppers and tomatoes. The sopa siete mares, a brothbased soup made with shrimp, scallops, halibut, perch and vegetables, is full of flavor. 1300 S. Grand St., 373.2722 $

THE GOLDEN LIGHT CAFE

As the oldest operating restaurant in Amarillo, The Golden Light has been in business since 1946, all in the same location. For a great burger and fries, this is the place to go. 2908 SW Sixth Ave., 374.9237, goldenlightcafe.com $ NEW

GOLDEN WAFFLE COMPANY

There are so many crave-worthy options at the Golden Waffle; it’s hard to know where to begin! Serving sweet and savory breakfast options focused on waffles (and brunch on weekends), choose from waffle bennys, chicken and waffles, huge waffle wraps, waffle sandwiches and more. A variety of mimosas and micheladas will

hit the spot during a leisurely brunch. 6017 Hillside Road, Suite 250, 367.8141 $

THE HANDLE BAR AND GRILL

Open at 7 a.m. on Friday, Saturday and Sunday for the breakfast crowd, The Handle Bar serves Texas-style comfort food – the handmade burgers are a customer favorite. Dine outside on historic Route 66 or cool off inside while savoring an icecold beer. 3514 SW Sixth Ave., 803.9538, thehandlebarandgrill.webs.com $

HOFFBRAU STEAK & GRILL HOUSE

Family-owned Hoffbrau has been serving Texas-style steaks and beer for three decades. We recommend one of the Gr8 Steaks or something from the Hill Country Favorites list upon your first visit. Guaranteed, you’ll go back again. 7203 I-40 West, 358.6595, hoffbrausteakandgrill.com $$

HUMMERS SPORTS CAFE

Hang out with friends and eat your fill of Hummer’s great appetizers. Start off with a platter of raw oysters and a bucket of

You’ll find old-fashioned grilled onion burgers and an array of sandwiches, salads, seafood and ice cream treats at Furrbie’s. Hot dog enthusiasts will love the famous Nathan’s Hot Dogs, the originals from Coney Island, New York, made with 100-percent kosher American beef. Looking to cool off ? Choose from fruity-flavored ice treats or ice cream. 210 SW Sixth Ave., 220.0841 $

FUZZY’S TACO SHOP

Options are endless at Fuzzy’s with everything from a variety of Baja-style tacos to enchilada plates, over-sized salads, tamales, and breakfast all day, every day. Party on the patio in this casual eatery that originated in the Fort Worth area. 7408 SW 34th Ave., 352.8226, fuzzystacoshop.com $

GEORGIA STREET TAPHOUSE

Whether in the dining room or inside the spacious bar area, there are plenty of big screens to keep you entertained at Taphouse. Sample typical pub fare and enjoy daily drink specials inside or on the covered patio. 2001 S. Georgia St., 803.7000, georgiastreettaphouse.com $$

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beer. We highly recommend the steak. 2600 Paramount Blvd., Suite B2, 353.0723, hummerssportscafe.com $$

ICHIBAN NOODLE BAR & ASIAN CUISINE

With the inner workings of its kitchen on display, Ichiban makes you feel like you’re right in the middle of a bustling noodle bar on a street in Asia. Endless choices of cold noodles and hot dishes make your dinner decision a tough one. 3309 Wimberly Road, 355.5031 $

IT’S A PUNJABI AFFAIR

If you were among the many Indian food fans that despaired when Amarillo Hut closed its doors, brood no more. Punjabi Affair serves Indian-style street food, available for dining in or to take out. Savor classics like flat bread, butter chicken and samosa, and a few you might not be accustomed to like lamb curry, or marinated and fried tilapia. You’ll also find options for vegans and vegetarians. The menu will change with the seasons in order to offer fresh local ingredients. 4201 Bushland Blvd., 414.2114, punjabiamarillo.com $

JACOBO’S CAFE

The shrimp tostadas with pico de gallo, cucumber, avocado and rice, and Don Jacobo Burger, two half-pound patties with ham and asadero cheese, caught our eye at Jacobo’s Cafe. But if you’re in the mood for breakfast, the Belgian waffle or breakfast burrito will surely satisfy. 3701 Olsen Blvd., Suite L, 418.8850, jacoboscafe.com $

JERRY’S CAFE

Craving breakfast food? Jerry’s Cafe has the solution. You can’t miss with anything off Jerry’s lengthy breakfast menu, served all day every day. Tex-Mex options fill up the rest of the menu with favorites like chile relleno, fajitas and barbacoa. 1601 S. Grand St., 374.4335 $

JERSEY MIKE’S SUBS

Jersey Mike’s brings a taste of the Jersey Shore to the Panhandle. The franchise stands behind its high-quality, premium meats, cheeses and fresh-baked bread. Try a cold sub like the Famous Roast Beef and Provolone, a hot sandwich like Jersey Mike’s Famous Philly, or make any sub into a wrap or salad for a low-carb option. Order in-store or online and pick it up for a quick and tasty meal. 2311 Georgia St., 731.0731, jerseymikes.com $

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JIMMY’S EGG

Fast, friendly service, a bright and cheerful dining area, and plenty of breakfast and lunch items from which to choose will keep you going back to Jimmy’s Egg. Order any menu item beginning at 6 a.m. and customize your entree to your liking. Catering, dine-in, and easy online to-go ordering make your visit an easy one. 2225 S. Georgia St., 418.6752, jimmysegg.com $

KABUKI ROMANZA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR

and beignets. 2401 I-40 West, 576.0019, thelostcajun.com $$

LY’S CAFE

If you’ve never tried Laotian food, head over Ly’s Cafe and fill up on authentic, fresh and delicious food. Handmade sausage, beef jerky, duck – add the essential sticky rice and a hot tea for a classic meal. The friendly staff will help you choose from the ample menu if you’re stumped. 5615 Amarillo Blvd. East, 383.1569 $

MALCOLM’S ICE CREAM & FOOD TEMPTATIONS

Who says you can’t enjoy fresh sushi aboard a boat in the heart of the Panhandle? Kabuki Romanza serves teppan-style cooking and fresh-sliced sushi in a dining area that resembles a boat, surrounded by special effects that add to the tropical feel. 8130 I-40 West, 358.7799, kabukiromanza.com $$

Malcolm’s offers the ultimate in classic soda-fountain food: burgers, sandwiches and salads – everything’s good. Be sure you save room for dessert. Better yet, start with a treat. After all, it’s the most important part of the meal at Malcolm’s. 2100 Paramount Blvd., 355.3892 $

LA BELLA PIZZA

Settled inside Evole by Moonwater on Sixth Street, The Mason Jar offers layered salads, sandwiches, soups, wraps, and charcuterie and dessert boards. 3313 SW Sixth Ave., 236.1799 $

With an expanded dining area and bar, the Olsen Boulevard location of La Bella Pizza gives diners more options than takeout. Fill up on Sicilian-style pizza, subs, burgers, calzones, pasta, gyros – the list goes on and on – the hefty menu even includes seafood. 3801 Olsen Blvd., Suite 9, 352.5050, ilovelabellapizza.com $

LAS PARRILLADAS NORTEÑAS

With cuisine typical of northern Mexico, Las Parrilladas Norteñas features parrilladas, mixed grill items designed to feed more than one person. Grill plates come with chicken, beef and pork. Or feast on the parillada de mariscos, a plate brimming with shrimp, crab legs, oysters, lobster, tilapia, and ceviche, which feeds four people. Customers love the buffet with traditional Mexican entrees and sides. 1706 Amarillo Blvd. East, 418.8321 $$

LONE STAR BAR & GRILL

Visit Lone Star Bar & Grill for classic, American grill-style food including savory steaks, burgers, chicken sandwiches and more, all at an affordable price. You’ll also enjoy down-home, friendly service. Lone Star’s guarantee: no hot beer and no small steaks. 935 E. FM 1151, 622.9827 $$

THE LOST CAJUN

You’ll find southern-style comfort food at The Lost Cajun. Enjoy the open kitchen as you dine on New Orleans favorites like fried catfish, oysters, gumbo, po-boys

THE MASON JAR

MEXICO LINDO RESTAURANT

Mexico Lindo has a friendly staff that delivers excellent service with a smile. The appetizing food comes at reasonable prices and the restaurant offers several popular items such as the gordita plate, crispy rellenos and enchiladas. 4515 S. Georgia St., 355.1851 $

MY THAI

It’s hard to find authentic Thai cuisine that compares to My Thai. We recommend the angel noodle with sauteed tomatoes and mushrooms for a tasty alternative to fried rice. 2029 Coulter St., 355.9541, mythaiamarillo.com $

NAPOLI’S FINE ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Napoli’s has created an oasis in downtown Amarillo. Indulge yourself with the housebaked bread while you browse the ample menu. Try the hearty lasagna or one of the over-sized calzones while enjoying live music on the spacious patio. 700 S. Taylor St., 220.2588, napolisofamarillo.com $$


NORTH HEIGHTS DISCOUNT & CAFE

Part convenience store and part neighborhood eatery, North Heights Discount & Cafe serves made-to-order soul food every day but Sunday. Portions are huge at Discount, but can you ever have too much smoky ribs, fried catfish, french fries, or mac-and-cheese? We don’t think so. 1621 NW 18th Ave., 418.6751 $

OHMS CAFE & BAR

Set in downtown Amarillo, OHMS serves a buffet-style lunch then switches to wait service in the evenings. The chef features specials each week that range from seafood and smoked duck to beef tenderloin. Start with daily Happy Hour and give the Bar Burger a try. (It’s not on the menu, but it might be the best burger in town.) Excellent cuisine and service make this a delightful place to linger. 619 S. Tyler St., 373.3233, ohmscafe.com $$-$$$

PACIFIC RIM

Pacific Rim offers a variety of Asian-Fusion cuisine in a unique setting. One of the best things about this place is the greeting you’ll get from Andy, the owner. But let’s talk food. The lettuce wraps are outstanding. In fact, everything is good. Pacific Rim even offers speedy delivery. 2061 Paramount Blvd., 353.9179, pacificrimam.com $

PAN-HANDLERS CAFE

Kick your lunch experience up a notch at Pan-Handlers. Settled in the basement of Amarillo National Bank Plaza One, this family-run restaurant supports the community by using farm-fresh produce. With a list of daily specials ranging from Mexican to seafood and cleverly concocted sandwiches (try the ANBLT on ciabatta bread), your dining experience will be anything but bland and boring. 410 S. Taylor St., 352.2590, thepan-handlers.com $

PIZZA PLANET

For dine-in or takeout, Pizza Planet offers some of the best pizza in town. If you like a good chef salad, this is your place. Be prepared to share – it’s huge. 2400 Paramount Blvd., 353.6666/ 6801 Bell St., Suite 100, 352.6666, pizzaplanet.com/335 E. Hastings Ave., 381.2333, amarillopizzaplanet.com $$

THE PLAZA RESTAURANT & BAR

A long-time Amarillo favorite, the many loyal customers of the Plaza attest to the

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great food and affordable prices. Eat your fill of fresh chips and hot sauce and enjoy the laid-back atmosphere. Perfect for a family night out, the menu offers enough variety to suit the pickiest eaters. 2101 S. Soncy Road., 358.4897, theplazaarestaurant.com $

PUBLIC HOUSE

You’ll want to take your time to enjoy the ambience and upscale Southern comfort food at Public House. Savor the house favorite, a generous portion of meatloaf comprised of ground duck, pork and beef with mashed potatoes, a house-made pimiento grilled cheese sandwich, or enticing nightly specials. 3333 S. Coulter St., 398.7777, publichouseamarillo.com $$

RAIN PREMIER SUSHI BAR & LOUNGE

Rain lights up Polk Street with its sleek, energetic ambience and exceptional menu of contemporary Asian cuisine. Grab the gang for an evening of flavor and fun. 817 S. Polk St., 331.1155, rainamarillo.com $$

RIBCRIB BBQ & GRILL

RibCrib has your hankering for smoky barbecue covered. Choose from chicken, pork and beef on the Crib’s extensive menu, with a variety of sauces as well. Visit early for Happy Hour and stay to enjoy the Pigman, a half-pound sandwich heaped with slow-smoked brisket, pulled pork and sausage, then covered in sauce, pickles and onions. Quench your thirst with a glass of refreshing lemonade. 5050 S. Coulter St., 803.9360, ribcrib.com $$

ROOSTERS RESTAURANT AND CATERING

Roosters offers more than just a good cup of Joe. Stop in and plan on staying for a hot breakfast pastry or one of the delicious lunch specialties. It’s the perfect place to relax with friends for lunch. 3440 S. Bell St., Unit 110, 353.7309, silver-fork.com $

THE RUFFLED CUP KITCHEN

This beloved bakery has moved and expanded, with a lunch menu that is served daily from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Feast on a variety of hot and cold sandwiches – all on freshbaked bread – soups and salads. To-go orders are also available. 3440 S. Bell St., Suite 100, 318.3961, theruffledcup.com $$

SAIGON RESTAURANT

If you’re in the mood for authentic Vietnamese cuisine, this is the place to dine. Even the pickiest eater can find something 50

AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • SEPTEMBER 2020

they like at Saigon. The extensive menu, which consists of traditional Vietnamese favorites such as pho, spring rolls and Korean barbecue ribs, is vegan-friendly, too. 2909 I-40 West, 373.3456 $

SAKURA JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE & SUSHI BAR Choose from an extensive sushi menu that includes nigiri style, cut rolls, special rolls, spicy rolls, sushi salads, and for the beef lover, Texas sushi. At Sakura, get ready to be entertained by chefs who prepare your meal at the table. We wholeheartedly recommend the swordfish. 4000 S. Soncy Road, 358.8148, amarillosushi.com $$

SCRATCH MADE BAKERY & CAFE

Conveniently located in downtown Amarillo, Scratch Made has the solution for your sugar cravings. This small bakery features cupcakes, along with a variety of from-scratch cookies, pastries, pies and cakes. Feast on some of the best biscuits and gravy in town during the weekday and Saturday brunch, from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. 118 SW Sixth Ave., 731.4477, scratchmadebakery.com $

SHI LEE’S BARBECUE & SOUL FOOD CAFE

You’ll find classic barbecue along with fried chicken wings, catfish, pork chops and a featured soul food meal of the day at Shi Lee’s. Meat lovers can feast on platters piled high with ribs, sausage and brisket, with plenty of sides to fill up even the hungriest diner. 1213 SW Third Ave., 220.0032 $

SINALOA HOT DOGS AND MEXICAN FOOD

The hot dogs Mexicanos are the star of the menu at Sinaloa (although the roasted chicken is pretty tantalizing, as well). The extra messy hot dog, topped with bacon, avocado, onions, mayonnaise, mustard and ketchup comes on a toasted bun. We recommend extra napkins. 2618 Amarillo Blvd. East, 367.8935 $

SMOKEY JOE’S ON ROUTE 66

A welcoming bar and grill located in the historic antique district on Route 66, Smokey Joe’s is one of Amarillo’s best-kept secrets. With an outdoor patio and live music on the weekends, this is the place to be. 2903 SW Sixth Ave., 331.6698 $$

STIX FOOD ON A STICK

Serving lunch and dinner, Stix serves steak, chicken, pork, sausage, and ground beef kabobs – even roasted corn on a stick. Stix also runs a food truck and now shares a dining area with J’s Bar & Grill. 3130 Soncy Road, 341.2451 $

TACOS DON MIGUEL

Serving Jalisco-style tacos, menudo, elote, and huge baked potatoes with all the fixings, Tacos Don Miguel is a favorite with local diners. 2509 Amarillo Blvd. East, 471.9325 $

TAQUERIA RIVERA

This unassuming little place is easy to miss. But don’t let the exterior fool you. The chorizo is well worth going a bit off the beaten path. 2602 SE Third Ave., 803.9485 $

TEDDY JACK’S ARMADILLO GRILL

Teddy Jack’s is known for its Texas-style comfort food featuring gourmet burgers, brick-oven pizza, and Tex-Mex. But the ample menu doesn’t stop there – fill up on Italian entrees, seafood and wraps and sandwiches. There’s plenty of items to make you go back for more. 5080 S. Coulter St., 322.0113, amarillo.teddyjacks.com $$

THAI HOUSE

A look past the classic dive appearance will gain you an excellent dining experience at Thai House. The diverse menu includes Thai, Lao and Chinese styles with can’tmiss choices like dancing shrimp, fresh Lao oysters, catfish and pad kee mao. 5601 Amarillo Blvd. East, 383.0003 $

TORCHY’S TACOS

Feast on Torchy’s breakfast and savory tacos, many with the eatery’s signature use of pickled ingredients, making for a spicy, zesty twang of flavor in every bite. Start with the queso and a Happy Hour special and linger in Torchy’s hip atmosphere as the perfect end to a workday or for daytime weekend relaxation with friends. 3562 Soncy Road, Suite 101, 398.1111, torchystacos.com $

TWO KNIVES CATERING

Operating out of a small storefront on I-27, Two Knives offers from-scratch to-go meals, from salads and soups to lasagna and enchiladas. There’s even desserts and homemade ice cream. The menu changes weekly and is available on Facebook and Instagram. 5500 Bluebird Drive, Suite 500, 674.5245, twoknivescatering.com $$


URBANA COFFEE WORKS

Southwest Amarillo can get its caffeine fix a little closer to home with the opening of Urbana Coffee Works. Hang out with a fresh brew and breakfast pastry, or enjoy lunch from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. daily with hearty, hot sandwiches, tapas, soups and salads, and desserts like gelato or cupcakes. 5215 S. Coulter St., Suite 100, 803.9022 $

WESLEY’S BEAN POT & BBQ

Loyal customers return again and again to Wesley’s. The atmosphere is friendly and the barbecue is genuine Texas style. The baby back ribs and brisket The baby back ribs and brisket are customer favorites. 6406 River Road, 381.2893 $

WINGSTOP

Wingstop cooks up some of the best chicken wings around. There’s a flavor for every palate. And if you haven’t had sugared and salted french fries, you just haven’t lived. 5807 SW 45th Ave., Suite 260, 356.9464/3300 I-40 East, Suite 900, 331.9464/ 5512 Gem Lake Road, Suite 700, 391.3786, wingstop.com $$

YCSF CRAFT

YCSF Craft serves its popular gourmet eats for lunch and dinner. The diverse but limited menu boasts burgers, tacos, and daily specials, and features craft beer and a well-rounded wine list. 2916 Wolflin Ave., 353.9273, yellowcitystreetfood.com $

YOUNG SUSHI “ROCKS!”

The friendly greeting you receive when you walk into Young’s is your first clue your experience will be a good one. The helpful staff is always willing to offer suggestions regarding the sushi. If sushi’s not your thing, try the authentic Thai cuisine. 202 SW 10th Ave., 371.7200 $$

ZOMBIEZ BAR & GRILL

Locals rave about the homestyle offerings at Zombiez Bar & Grill. Fill up on daily specials, burgers, chicken-fried steak or chickenfried chicken. Dine-in, takeout and delivery are available. 711 SW 10th Ave., 331.7305 $

Canyon BACK 40 GRILL

With daily specials and live music, Back 40 Grill is set on livening up the square in Canyon. American food favorites like burgers and fries, nachos, and chicken fry fill the menu. No matter your choice, you’re in for a rocking good time at Back 40. 1512 Fifth Ave, Suite 101, 557.3700, theback40grill.com $$

BEAR’S BURGERS & DAWGS

Choosing from the simple offerings is an easy task at Bear’s. Other than handmade burgers, hot dogs and fries, a few comfort food items like Frito pie and loaded baked potatoes round out the menu. Ice cold beer will help you wash it all down. 2001-A N. Second Ave., 452.8033 $

BEST THAI

Open seven days a week, there’s always something on the menu at Best Thai to satisfy your cravings for good Thai food, such as the vegetarian Curry Joe with yellow curry and steamed rice. Check out the Canyon’s Favorites menu; the pineapple fried rice and Charlie Special are full of flavor. 210 23rd St., 655.7299 $

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BURROWING OWL FAVORITES Reading Recommendation

BUFF’S

Buff ’s specializes in home-style comfort food and more-thangenerous portions. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, you’ll find plenty of crave-appeasing items all day long. 2201 Fourth Ave., 655.2833 $

FAMILY SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT

You’ll find plenty of mouth-watering options at The Family Soul Food Restaurant. Feast on traditional family recipes like chickenfried chicken, fried ribs, catfish, or cheesy meatloaf with all the sides, topped off by a slice of sweet cornbread. Save room for the rotating dessert menu. 1205 23rd St., 463.4686 $

FELDMAN’S WRONG WAY DINER

Feldman’s fun, casual atmosphere and model trains that run a course along the ceiling make it a great place for the whole family. Try the made-fresh burgers or the Tortugas chicken, satisfaction guaranteed. 2100 N. Second Ave., 655.2700, feldmansdiner.com $

HIL’S BURGERS

This burger joint’s menu is pretty snazzy. The Philly cheese steak sandwich pairs perfectly with a side of sizzling, thinly sliced onion rings, but you can’t go wrong with the chicken-fried steak sandwich topped with chili, either. 1302 23rd St., 656.0810 $

JOE TACO

One of Amarillo’s most beloved Tex-Mex restaurants has made its way to Canyon. Located on the bustling square, the new location offers the same Tex-Mex favorites and energetic vibe as its Medical Center location. Enjoy lunch and dinner seven days a week. 502 15th St., 452.8226, joetaco.net $$

THE KING AND I

Craving fresh sushi? The King and I will surely satisfy. Try the customer favorite, the Canyon Roll, and savor every scrumptious slice of crab, tempura shrimp, avocado, cucumber and cream cheese topped with red tuna, white tuna, shrimp and eel. If you still have an appetite, order the fried bananas covered with powdered sugar and strawberries. 104 15th St., 655.2491 $$ Monarchs of the Northeast Kingdom

ROCKIN’ ZEBRA SODA SHOPPE

A gripping journey into a deceptively quiet life, “Monarchs of the Northeast Kingdom” illustrates one woman’s path toward resilience and self-discovery amid a harsh and beautiful landscape where neighbors trespass, coyotes roam, bears threaten the livestock, winter starves the wild animals, and debilitating sickness is barely kept at bay.

SAYAKOMARN’S RESTAURANT

by Chera Hammons

SPONSORED BY:

Located on the square, the Rockin’ Zebra Soda Shoppe offers classic soda shop fare like French dips, pulled pork sandwiches, or a grilled cheese sandwich. Cool off with a specialty drink or ice cream sundae. 404 15th St., 655.3381 $ Sayakomarn’s offers a variety of traditional Thai dishes with daily lunch specials that won’t empty your wallet. Be sure to try their boba tea made with tapioca balls and shaken into fruit-flavored or milk tea. It’s yummy. 421 16th St., 655.2698, sayakomarns.com $$

TAQUERIA EL TAPATIO MEXICAN RESTAURANT FIND YOUR NEXT FAVORITE READ AT:

BURROWING OWL BOOKS 419 16TH ST., CANYON

52

BURROWING OWL BOOKS 34TH AND COULTER, SUMMIT SHOPPING CENTER, AMARILLO

AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • SEPTEMBER 2020

El Tapatio’s second location in Canyon serves up the same authentic Mexican food at affordable prices. The carne el pastor is a customer favorite. 2301 12th Ave., 510.7703 $


As of press time, our September calendar was up to date. It is subject to change due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Arts & Entertainment

SEPT. 4

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK

5 p.m. Barnes Jewelry, 100 Westgate Parkway West, 355.9874

SEPT. 12

THE THREE REDNECK TENORS

6:30-8:30 p.m. Annual concert will be held outdoors. Amarillo Country Club, 4800 Bushland Blvd., 372.7464

Benefits & Fundraisers

SEPT. 5

SECOND ANNUAL SPORTING CLAYS SHOOTOUT

7 a.m. Funds will benefit Brothers-Sister of our Military Adventures. Cactus Gun Club, 9999 Brickplant Road, 231.1707

JIM LEA MEMORIAL GOLF SCRAMBLE

8 a.m. Comanche Trail Golf Course, 4200 S. Grand St., 355.3016

FAMFEST

11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fundraiser for Mission Amarillo. Sam Houston Park, 4101 Line Ave., 553.0408

SEPT. 11

KIDS CAFE CLASSIC GOLF TOURNAMENT

11:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Lunch at 11:30 a.m. with a shotgun start at 1 p.m. Hosted by High Plains Food Bank. Ross Rogers Golf Course, 722 NW 24th Ave., 374.8562

SEPT. 12

JUNIOR LEAGUE SPORTING CLAY SHOOT

8 a.m.-4 p.m. Event will include breakfast and lunch. Cactus Gun Club, 9999 Brickplant Road, 374.0802

WINGS OF HOPE

Events | September 2020

SEPT. 26

CRAFTERSHIP MARKET

10 a.m. Downtown Amarillo, 670.1568

SEPT. 4

PDSG’S 19TH ANNUAL BUDDY WALK/CAR CRUISE

WADE BLACK SPORTING CLAYS SHOOT

PARENT’S NIGHT OUT

SEPT. 27

SEPT. 12

4-7 p.m. Amarillo Civic Center Complex Heritage Room, 401 S. Buchanan St., 414.1059

11 a.m.-2 p.m. 4111 S. Georgia St., 350.8387

2-5 p.m. Benefiting Texas Panhandle Charities. River Breaks Ranch, 7802 Durrett Drive, 374.0357

RESPECT LIFE BANQUET

Music

SEPT. 3

TRENT BRITTEN

7 p.m. The Handle Bar and Grill, 3514 SW Sixth Ave., 803.9538

SEPT. 4

BROKEN ECHO

9 p.m. Marshall’s Tavern, 3121 SW Sixth Ave., 367.5333

SEPT. 6

MUSIC IN THE CHURCH YARD

6:30-8 p.m. Polk Street United Methodist Church, 1401 S. Polk St., 374.2891

LENIN RAMIREZ

9 p.m. Azteca Music Hall, 500 N. FM 1912, 335.9990

SEPT. 10

TRENT BRITTEN

7 p.m. The Handle Bar and Grill, 3514 SW Sixth Ave., 803.9538

SEPT. 12

JEN WILLIAMS AND THE POTTY MOUTHS

10 a.m.-12 p.m. Hosted by the Hope & Healing Place. 8-11 p.m. Crush Wine Bar & Restaurant, 627 S. Polk Butterfly release will honor the like of a loved one. St., 418.2011 Memorial Park, 3501 S. Washington St., 371.8998

THIRD ANNUAL 0.5K SLACK-A-THON

5-8 p.m. Hosted by Wolflin Square and Martha’s Home. Adjustments will be made to the event for COVID safety. The Shops at Wolflin Square, 1932 Civic Circle, 372.4035

SEPT. 17

TRENT BRITTEN

6 p.m. La Bella Pizza, 3801 Olsen Blvd., 352.5050

SEPT. 24

SEPT. 19

TRENT BRITTEN

8:30-11:30 a.m. Event raises funds for local cancer patients. Amarillo College, 2201 S. Washington St., 331.6936

SEPT. 29

SEPT. 25

7 p.m. Hoot’s Pub, 2424 Hobbs Road, 358.9560

OUR COLORS RUN TOGETHER 5K & WALK

PULL FOR PAWS

2-11 p.m. Benefiting Gracie’s Project. River Breaks Ranch, 7802 Durrett Drive, 341.7493

2 p.m. SALT Spices & Specialties, 2625 Wolflin Village, 350.7440

6-9 p.m. Amarillo’s Stockyard Grill, 101 S. Manhattan St., 220.0484

HINDER

Special Events

5 p.m. Warford Activity Center, 1330 NW 18th Ave., 803.9785

TEXAS PANHANDLE WAR MEMORIAL CENTER GRAND OPENING

SEPT. 17

WOMEN OF LEADERSHIP AWARDS 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. ANB Skyline Room, 410 S. Taylor St., 378.8000

SEPT. 19

NATIONAL CLEAN-UP DAY 2020

9a.m.-12 p.m. Groups will work throughout the city to clean up open spaces and trash hot-spots at area elementary schools. Coordinators needed. 678.4615 or 670.8064

FALL DAYS & GIANT MAZE

10 a.m.-9 p.m. Maxwell’s Pumpkin Farm, 12908 Bell St., 373.9600

PARENT’S NIGHT OUT

5 p.m. Warford Activity Center, 1330 NW 18th Ave., 803.9785

SEPT. 20

FALL DAYS & GIANT MAZE

1-9 p.m. Maxwell’s Pumpkin Farm, 12908 Bell St., 373.9600

MISS AMARILLO LATINA

7-10 p.m. Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts, 500 S. Buchanan St., 378.3096

SEPT. 26

FALL DAYS & GIANT MAZE

10 a.m.-9 p.m. Maxwell’s Pumpkin Farm, 12908 Bell St., 373.9600

SEPT. 27

FALL DAYS & GIANT MAZE

1-9 p.m. Maxwell’s Pumpkin Farm, 12908 Bell St., 373.9600

Sports & Recreation

SEPT. 24-26

PRCA RODEO

7:30 p.m. Tri-State Fairgrounds Amarillo National Center, 3301 SE 10th Ave., 376.7767

SATURDAYS IN SEPTEMBER AMARILLO COMMUNITY MARKET 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Santa Fe Passenger Depot, 401 S. Grant St., 335.6360

SEPTEMBER 2020 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

53


Panhandle Perspective

“Amarillo Panhandle Rest Stop”

F

DAVID CORBIN

or 65 years, I have been absorbing input from my experiences of what my life had become. I became a nomad at an early age, and moved across the great USA to take in the good and bad that would accumulate into an outburst of visual images. My arrival in the Texas Panhandle in 1979 was full of surprises and a culture shock. I had to find a little humor in that fact. The endless possibilities to express my photo expressions had been answered. I started projects that will satisfy my creative outbursts, plus satisfy the viewer’s appetite for a visual confrontation. “Amarillo Panhandle Rest Stop” was a delight to photograph. From mild to wild, the opportunities to show the lighter side of living on the plains fed my artistic outbursts. My black-and-white images project a timeless quality for the viewer that will continue to influence generations to come. Thank you for understanding my quest for visual communication with the world. Art is a communicator that breaks down all language barriers. 54

AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • SEPTEMBER 2020


Amarillo Globe-News

amarillo.com

Amarillo Magazine

one company. countless solutions.

Digital Solutions

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Sunday Homes

Amarillo Jobs 600 S. TYLER ST., SUITE 2300 • AMARILLO.COM • 376.4488

.

SEPTEMBER 2020 • AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM

55


20 Questions

STEPHANIE PRICE What is the best advice you received when you were beginning your career? Always show gratitude to someone for the smallest token or help. Gratefulness is contagious. How do you use social media to grow your network? LinkedIn is the best way professionally for me to develop new contacts. After any conference or convention, I add all those I met. I try to create a broad network on there. I also manage the museum’s social media content. It’s about connecting with our audience and providing them thoughtful content or ideas to enrich their time. How do you maintain balance? You have to choose how you spend your time and make time for what matters most. That’s a hard one for me, if I am honest. I have to schedule downtime. COVID has changed that a bit but I think making myself relax, read or pursuing a hobby allows me balance. What has been your wisest investment? My master’s degree. It pushed me to dive into my field, manage my time well with a full-time job and achieve a long-awaited goal. How has your past work experience shaped you into a leader? I’ve been given the opportunity to spearhead projects and lead my own department. I have learned from my husband to never ask someone to do something you aren’t willing to do, and that’s an incredibly important attribute in a leader. What is the best part about your job? I always tell people I get paid to go to a museum every day! How lucky is that? My favorite part is the creativity my job allows. I work on promoting anything from exhibits about fine French artifacts to craft beer events. There is always something new and exciting. I help bring program and exhibit ideas to our staff and get to see months or years of work come to fruition. How has mentorship made a difference in your professional and private life? I’ve been blessed to have several mentors in my life. My college professor, the late Leigh Browning, was instrumental in helping both my husband and I find something we could call our passion and letting us know we could leave a job that wasn’t the right fit! I miss her every day but often think about the advice she would have given. I have two friends who encourage my running and run alongside me, even though I am the slowest one by far! Each of them helped me in honoring my daughter, Charlotte, who passed away in 2016. Which living person do you most admire and why? My sister, Jordan Chavez, who is a lawyer in Dallas-Fort Worth. I have learned so much from her, even though she is my younger sister. The other is someone I had the chance to meet – Condoleezza Rice. She is the epitome of sophistication. She has remained classy in the face of so much adversity. Which over-used word or phrase makes you cringe? During COVID, “These unprecedented times.” Please stop ... I also get incredibly frustrated when everything is blamed on Millennials. My friends and peers my age are some of the most hardworking, thoughtful and driven individuals. Millennials are now in their 30s with families and real responsibility. Each of us is unique in our drive and goals. What is your business philosophy? Be the person everyone wants on their team. Be the person that hustles, that is understanding while thoughtful and knows how to lead but also to follow. Which quality do you most value in an employee? Teamwork and communication. If someone can work with anyone and produce a stellar product, that’s who I want on my team! What personality trait has most helped you succeed? Organization and tenacity. I don’t give up easily and I find the steps to get the goal accomplished. It may be well outside my comfort zone, but if I say I am going to do something, I work until it is done. Who is your favorite author? I read books rather than authors. I’m a veracious reader. I love a good dystopian novel, historical fiction, mystery, meet cutes, zombies, magic, royals, epic journeys or a poignant novel. The ones that have stayed with me are “The Hunger Games,” “The One Chronicles,” “All the Light We Cannot See,” “Thousandth Floor” series, “The Tattooist of Auschwitz: A Novel by Heather Morris,” “Firefly Lane,” “The Chemist,” and my all-time favorite, “The Giver” series. And who can forget Harry Potter... That is a must-read and watch in our house.

56

AMARILLOMAGONLINE.COM • SEPTEMBER 2020

PROVIDED PHOTO

COMMUNICATIONS AND MARKETING DIRECTOR, PANHANDLE-PLAINS HISTORICAL MUSEUM

What did you learn from your best boss? Your worst? From each boss I have had, I picked up something new. I have learned how to lead and prep meetings, speak with confidence in a project, organize emails properly (which seems small but has been a lifesaver) and how to fine tune the details. Communication is key and I have had incredibly communicative bosses and others that were not. I want all the information I need to do my job, so I try to make sure I am a great communicator. How can Amarillo improve its business environment? As we continue to grow as a city and Panhandle area, we must make sure we listen to all voices and ensure everyone has a chance to thrive in our community. Growing and changing is hard but ensuring that we remove obstacles to those who have been historically marginalized or silenced is incredibly important. We all have to examine the ways we can each do something to make life and business better for others. Most important tech tool: I love my Apple watch! I use it to exercise, answer texts and keep track of all sorts of things. Best time management tool: I use my Outlook calendar for everything; it’s attached to my phone and work email so it keeps me on track. I also love a good old-fashioned list on paper or in the notes of my phone that I can check off. I can’t live without my: I should say husband here, right? He is my best friend and is so good to me. But I will say that I can’t live without my friends, as well. If there’s anything COVID has taught me, it’s that life is built around people. I am so fortunate to have friends around the world and I am grateful for technology so I can text or message people! There is nothing like spending time with friends and the memories, energy, and happiness that come from those times. My favorite thing about Amarillo is: The feeling of being in a small town where people are friendly and helpful, but having all the necessities and entertainment available. There is so much to do and the arts/entertainment sectors of our cities work so hard! I love living in Canyon and having all that Amarillo has to offer just 15 minutes away. Most unusual job or task: I was once a co-curator of the Pop Culture Theatre, which was a video and theater exhibit. I was able to pick the artifacts and movies we showcased during this year. Pop Culture with our team was so much fun – it brought in new audiences and excitement to PPHM.


presents

RY I FA E TH

RA E P O OF E L TA

PAPERMOON OPERA PRODUCTIONS

PHOTOGRAPH BY CORY WEAVER

HEADLINING OUR INSPIRATIONAL & INNOVATIVE SEASON

RSBE

MESSIAH

MOPEI TRIPLETS

HANSEL AND GRETEL

REMOVE SHOES BEFORE ENTERING NOVEMBER 13 & 14 AT 7:30 PM AMARILLO COLLEGE CONCERT HALL

FEBRUARY 13 AT 6:30 PM RUSSIAN ROOM

AMARILLO SYMPHONY COLLABORATION DECEMBER 11 AT 7:30 PM GLOBE-NEWS CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

APRIL 10 AT 7:30 PM GLOBE-NEWS CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

MARY JANE JOHNSON, EXECUTIVE & ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

AMARILLOOPERA.ORG

372-7464


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Amarillo Magazine | September 2020  

Amarillo Magazine | September 2020  

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