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OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

ANNUAL REPORT 2014 - 2015


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CALF LEADERSHIP

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Loren Booth, Chair / Booth Ranches, LLC Jeff Elder, Vice Chair / J.G. Boswell Company Pierre Tada, Secretary - Treasurer / Granite Peak Partners Karm Bains / Karmdeep S. Bains Farms / Bains Ranches Barbara Boswell / J.G. Boswell Company Edwin Camp / D.M. Camp & Sons Robert Cherenson / Lander Veterinary Clinic John Colbert / Greenleaf Farms, Inc. A.G. Kawamura / Orange County Produce, LLC Ejnar Knudsen / Passport Capital Joe MacIlvaine / Paramount Farming Company James R. Maxwell / Agriland Farming Company, Inc. Rod Stark / Valley Small Business Development Corporation Mary-Ann Warmerdam, Secretary / Treasurer / The Clorox Company Dr. Lester Young / California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Rob C. Yraceburu / Wells Fargo Bank

CORE FACULTY MEMBERS

Dr. Michael Thomas / California State University, Fresno Dr. Robert Flores / California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo Dr. Peggy Sears Perry / California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Dr. Annie King / University of California, Davis

UNIVERSITY DEANS

Dr. Charles Boyer, Dr. Sandra Witte / California State University, Fresno Dr. Andrew Thulin / California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo Dr. Mary Holz-Clause / California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Dr. Helene Dillard / University of California, Davis

Annual report designed by TMD Creative www.tmdcreative.com

WHAT’S INSIDE

ALUMNI COUNCIL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Melissa Duflock (40), Chair Holly Dawley (38), Vice Chair Matt Fisher (41), Secretary / Finance Rob Geis (35), Immediate Past Chair Mike Young (35), Foundation Board Liaison

OUR MISSION

REGIONAL DIRECTORS Region 1: Holly Dawley (38), John Weiler (22) Region 2: Steve Knudsen (41), Andrea Card (38) Region 3: Michael Campbell (3), Mica Heilmann (40) Region 4: Chase Hurley (35), Robin Flournoy (29) Region 5: Melissa Duflock (40), Jorge Suarez (41) through Dec. 2014 Region 6: Timothy Vaux (31) Region 7: Lisa Bodrogi (39), Dan Sutton (40) Region 8: Jensen Devaurs (43), Todd Snider (41) Region 9: Yissel Barajas (40), Scott Beylik (40) Region 10: Bryan Foley (39), Liz Silva (41) At-Large: Noelle Cremers (35), Alexander Ott (37), Gerald DiBuduo (31), Mandy Critchley (37), Matt Fisher (41)

We grow leaders who make a difference.

CALF STAFF

Bob Gray, President & CEO Dr. Michael Thomas, Director of Education Dr. Charlie Crabb, Program Advisor Dr. Jim Wolford-Ulrich, Leadership Program Manager Judy Sparacino, Program Coordinator Emily Clark, Enterprise Coordinator Teresa Straub, Finance & Human Resources Meredith Rehrman Ritchie, Writer / Editor Liza Teixeira Robertson, Writer / Editor

ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

JOINT MESSAGE

HIGHLIGHTS

FELLOWS

QUOTES

UNIVERSITIES

FINANCIALS

DONORS

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ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

JOINT MESSAGE

FOUNDATION FOR OUR FUTURE Loren Booth and Bob Gray

Our focus did not change this fiscal year. We will offer an update on the program, a review of recruiting for the program (the people report), and a review of the philanthropy that sustains the program. This latter involves a huge number of alumni and other volunteers who support the many important events that take place every year, and without whom nothing could be done. We are also thankful to the employers in the agricultural industry who support Ag Leadership by giving us their talented employees and allowing them to dedicate 17 months to the program. Thank you. We are truly grateful for your support. The California Agricultural Leadership Program is focused on mid-career and adult education, part of which is experiential. While we can now personalize the curriculum in ways we couldn’t in the past, with the psychometric testing instruments and a 360 degree review as part of the coaching process, we know that what a fellow brings to the program experience, from life and from work, influences the learning of others. While the coaching process is designed to help develop meaningful personal goals, necessary vital behaviors to reach or achieve those goals and the emergence of a personal leadership model for each fellow, the shared learning experiences from life and work are hugely important to program outcomes. The new curriculum was delivered to the third group of fellows in Class 45, who started in the fall of 2014. This class, similar to the ones before it, witnessed another record high number of applicants for the program (over the last 13 years). We thank everyone who helped convince these fine emerging leaders to get involved. The 17-month curriculum caused some calendar changes once again, similar to last year when the program was just 16 months. The international travel seminar to Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa was

again held in November instead of February, which is actually a better month for most of our destinations because of weather considerations. Commencement for Class 44 was held in February for the first time, not in January, and was again held at CSU-Fresno. Any mention of Ag Leadership has to include at the top of the list the 1,200+ distinguished and dedicated alumni who make everything we do possible. They are, after all, why we have a program in the first place. They fill the Alumni Council with their talent and enthusiasm. They comprise about three-quarters of the board of directors. And they are the leading stakeholders in the financial future of the foundation and the program. We are forever in their debt. Finally, we are happy to report some healthy financial progress during the fiscal year. We have grown our total assets by over $720,000. We continue to receive a “clean” audit opinion. Loren Booth’s matching challenge grant, announced in January of 2014 (in the prior fiscal year) for new or increased giving to the foundation, stimulated the donation of some $665,785 additional dollars during the fiscal year. We are blessed to have Loren on our team. The foundation is still in the best place it has been since March 2009, at the depths of the financial crisis that shook the world. But as we said last year, the foundation and the program it supports, cannot survive forever on the generosity of just two legacy donors — the Boswell family and the Booth family — because a two-legged stool cannot stand. It takes a diverse base of support to become that third leg, so that the stool will stand. To everyone who has contributed in any way to the success of this program — whether with time, talent or treasure — we cannot thank you enough for making our mission possible: “We grow leaders who make a difference.”

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HIGHLIGHTS

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

HIGHLIGHTS. JULY 2014 - JUNE 2015

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AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

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2014

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JULY 2014

AUGUST 2014

SEPTEMBER 2014

Screening committees interviewed dozens of Class 45 *   candidates in Pomona, Fresno, Chico, Davis and San Luis

A class of seven was assembled to participate in the *   reinvented California Educational Fellowship Program, which

24 fellows of Class 45 *  The were announced.

Obispo. The regional committees included alumni, board members, industry representatives and CALF staff. PHOTO (1)

The Alumni Council held its summer meeting at the *   Harden Foundation office in Salinas. Among the agenda items were D.C. Exchange, California Exchange, class liaisons and 2014 CALF awards. The group also discussed the idea of conducting an online survey of alumni to determine the financial impact of Ag Leadership alumni in agriculture. In addition, Bob Gray provided reports on the foundation, program and finances. Approximately 15 people attended a reception at the CALF office the evening before the meeting.

was held on California’s Central Coast. The reinvention of California Exchange was required by the Fair Political Practices Commission, which governs access to policy and decision makers in California. As a nonprofit education foundation, CALF applied to produce the program again under the appropriate FPPC guidelines, and was accepted. The format is similar to D.C. Exchange (DCX), but shorter and more formally educational in content, with aspects of leadership development embedded in the experience. Home stays, like DCX, are an essential part of the program experience. The Alumni Council is hoping to produce at least three successive years of these programs around the state, at different times and places, and will then reassess and recalibrate, if needed. PHOTOS (2) (3)

PHOTO (4)

24th annual Region 9 *  The Golf Tournament was held at the Los Posas Country Club in Camarillo. The event raised $35,000 for CALF. PHOTO (5)


ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

HIGHLIGHTS

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EXCHANGE

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OCTOBER 2014 33rd Washington D.C. Educational Fellowship Program was held in regions 9 *  The and 10. The fellows had a busy week of site visits, tours, briefings and discussions, as well as one-on-one time and overnight stays with host families. Ag Leadership alumni organized an outstanding week for the 20 fellows. PHOTOS (6) (7) (8) (9) (10)

crowd of 600 filled the Fresno State Satellite Student Union to hear from *  Aemotional intelligence and leadership expert Dr. Daniel Goleman. This Life-Long Leadership Learning (L4) Seminar drew an audience of alumni, fellows, industry friends, faculty, staff and students. Goleman’s presentation was followed by a reception, book signing and synthesis. PHOTO (11)

45 inauguration and the 2014 Ag Leadership *  Class Awards ceremony were held at Fresno State’s University Courtyard Dining Hall. Alumni hosted a reception which was followed by dinner and ceremonies. PHOTO (12)

The 2014 Profiles in Leadership Award was presented to *   Nat DiBuduo (6) and Mary Kimball (32). PHOTO (13)

The 2014 Honorary Fellow Award was presented to *   Dr. Lester Young, former dean (retired), College of Agriculture, Cal Poly Pomona. PHOTO (14)


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HIGHLIGHTS

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS. 1

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JANUARY $1 MILLION MATCHING GRANT

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NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

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NOVEMBER 2014

DECEMBER 2014

JANUARY 2015

Class 44 traveled to United Arab Emirates, *   Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa for its

reached the 60% mark of its $25 million endowment *  CALF goal. Approximately $800,000 of Loren Booth’s $1 million

application process *  The began for Class 46.

international travel seminar.

matching grant remained at the end of 2014.

PHOTOS (1) (2) (3) (4)

PHOTO (6)

The 25th annual Dean Brown Golf Tournament *   was held at the Santa Maria Country Club. The event raised $35,000 for CALF. PHOTO (5)

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The fourth annual Jim Manassero Memorial Luncheon was held at The Grower’s Pub in Salinas. Manassero was a member of Class 1 and a longtime leader in Salinas Valley agriculture. All proceeds from the luncheon were contributed to the Manassero Fellowship Fund.

Applications were available online in early January. A press release was emailed to agricultural and mainstream news outlets to announce that applications were now being accepted for Class 46. PHOTO (7)


ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

HIGHLIGHTS

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FEBRUARY 2015 13th annual Colusa Farm Show Breakfast was *  The held at the Colusa Fairgrounds. George Soares (4), founding member and partner of Kahn, Soares and Conway, was the event’s keynote speaker. PHOTO (8)

Region 6 recruitment event was held at *  The Sun-Maid Growers of California in Kingsburg. PHOTOS (9) (10)

44 graduation was held at Fresno State. Dr. *  Class Joseph Castro, Fresno State president, gave a pre-commencement address at the event. PHOTOS (11) (12)

Region 3 recruitment event was held in *  The Clarksburg at the home of Mike Campbell (3).

wine and cheese reception - honoring the *  Ainsurance sponsors of the Ag Leadership Alumni World Ag Expo Breakfast - was held at the Chinese Cultural Center in Visalia.

PHOTO (13)

21st annual Ag Leadership Alumni World Ag *  The Expo Breakfast was held in Tulare. The keynote speaker was Dr. Patrick Moore, “the sensible environmentalist,” who was a founding member of Greenpeace and former president of Greenpeace Canada. PHOTO (14)

Region 1 recruitment event was held at Montna *  The Farms in Yuba City.

PHOTO (15)

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HIGHLIGHTS

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

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MARCH 2015

government leaders, *  California agricultural industry leaders, Ag Leadership alumni and current program fellows enjoyed the annual Agricultural & Government Leaders Reception in Sacramento. CDFA Secretary Karen Ross was in attendance and addressed the group about current ag issues. As part of the event, 197 pounds of fresh California produce was donated to the River City Food Bank. PHOTO (1)

APRIL 2015

a two-day seminar at UC *  Following Davis, Class 45 fellows arrived on the East Coast to begin their national travel seminar in Philadelphia, Gettysburg and Washington, DC. PHOTOS (2) (3)

*  The Region 2 recruitment event was held in Glen Ellen. PHOTOS (5) (6)

co-sponsored the Common Threads North Award honoring women *  CALF in agriculture. A luncheon and ceremony were held in Chico. PHOTOS (7) (8)

10 recruitment event was held *  Region in Fallbrook.

*  The Region 5 recruitment event was held in Gonzales.

co-sponsored the Common *  CALF Threads Award honoring women in

*  The Region 8 recruitment event was held in Bakersfield.

agriculture. A luncheon and ceremony were held at Fresno State. PHOTO (4)

PHOTO (9)


ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

HIGHLIGHTS

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Peter Senge, a senior lecturer in leadership and *  Dr. sustainability at the MIT Sloan School of Management, founding chair of the Society for Organizational Learning and author of the widely-acclaimed book “The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of The Learning Organization,” spoke at CALF’s L4 Seminar at Cal Poly, Pomona. PHOTOS (10) (11)

*  The All Class Reunion was held at the Minkler Ranch.

PHOTOS (12) (13) (14)

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MAY 2015

JUNE 2015

board of directors and Alumni Council *  The held their meetings in San Luis Obispo. Both

of Class 2 of the California *  Participants Exchange spent four days in Kern County

groups interacted with Class 46 fellows at their seminar and attended the Talley Vineyards recruitment event.

PHOTO (15)

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The Region 7 recruitment event was held at Talley Vineyards in Arroyo Grande. Among those in attendance was Dr. Jeffrey Armstrong, president of Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, who addressed the group. PHOTO (16)

learning about water, labor, food safety, sustainability and other current ag issues. PHOTO (17)

Alumni Council announced the newly *  The elected directors for regions 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10: Andrea Card (38), Steve Knudsen (41), Robin Flournoy (29), Chase Hurley (35), Bill Lewis (43), Tim Vaux (31), Jensen Devaurs (43), Todd Snider (41), Bryan Foley (39) and Liz Silva (41).

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FELLOWS

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

CLASS PROJECT

Books for Africa

CLASS 44 Inauguration: October 2013 Graduation: February 2015

When Paul Parreira and his 23 classmates stepped off the bus at the outskirts of Johannesburg, South Africa, he had no idea how profoundly affected he would be by Class 44’s international trip. Matthew Altman • Jose Arriaga • John Chandler • Gabe Cooper • Megan Foster • Dustin Fuller Steve Garland • Taylor Genzoli • Layci Gragnani • Eric Heinrich • Patrick Hooker • Greg Krzys Jessica Light • Tom Merwin • Trevor Meyers • Heather Mulholland • Matt Neubert • Paul Parreira Justin Perino • Julie Rentner • Carissa Rivers • Brandon Souza • Eric Thor • Luke Wilson

“We have no idea what poverty is here, we really don’t,” said Parreira. “We see a different type of poverty there than you see here.”

International Travel Seminar

United Arab Emirates, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa “In judging our progress as individuals, we tend to concentrate on external factors such as one’s social position, influence and popularity, wealth and standard of education...but internal factors may be even more crucial in assessing one’s development as a human being: honesty, sincerity, simplicity, humility, purity, generosity, absence of vanity, readiness to serve your fellow men – qualities within the reach of every human soul.” -Nelson Mandela, in a 1975 letter to Winnie Mandela Each day of Class 44’s international travel seminar was highlighted with a poignant Nelson Mandela quote. The quotes were used as themes to frame the fellows’ experiences with and understanding about the people, cultures, histories, changes and leadership of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa. Fellows began their journey in Dubai and Abu Dhabi and then embarked on a captivating exploration of Southern Africa. They witnessed the full spectrum of existences: an affluent metropolis, growing urban areas, small village farms and large vineyards, wildlife conservation areas, townships and slums. “Africa was a near perfect region for an Ag Leadership international experience because the leadership examples – good or bad – were right there in front of us at every stop,” said CALF Director of Education Dr. Michael Thomas. “Along with the leadership lessons, the fellows had strong emotional connections. They really responded to the variety of learning experiences and I think they all changed in some way.” The main lessons studied before and during the seminar were Nelson Mandela’s leadership and legacy; the disparate leadership styles of Mandela and Robert Mugabe; differences between Zambia and Zimbabwe; and South Africa as a completely different example of history, progress and leadership.

Kliptown, which is made up of 10-foot by 10-foot corrugated tin structures that house six to 10 people each, is referred to as an informal settlement. There is no running water and cooking is done outside, over wood and charcoal fires.

“AFRICA WAS A NEAR PERFECT REGION FOR AN AG LEADERSHIP INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE BECAUSE THE LEADERSHIP EXAMPLES – GOOD OR BAD – WERE RIGHT THERE IN FRONT OF US AT EVERY STOP,” SAID CALF DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION DR. MICHAEL THOMAS.

Class 44 fellows spent a half-day experiencing the impoverished area and learning about the needs of the community. While there, they helped serve lunch to 460 schoolchildren at the Kliptown Youth Project. Back on the bus, Parreira thought back to what the leaders of the Kliptown Youth Project had said to him: “One day, we want to build a library.” So Parreira and his classmates agreed to help build a library for Kliptown. As of early March 2015, the class had already collected eight pallets of books, and the donations kept coming. In fact, a local library even provided books from their collection for the cause. “They just called and they have 70 boxes for me to pick up,” said Parreira. Class 44 fellows have wasted no time in deciding how they’ll make an impact in the world. Parreira didn’t have to stop and think when asked why he’s so moved to build a library more than 10,000 miles away from his farm. “Whether I help the person next door, or a person continents away, we’re still helping a human being, and we’re helping somebody better themselves. We’re sending opportunity. The opportunity to learn and to have the knowledge to venture out of Kliptown and to get a meaningful job and to help their family,” said Parreira.


ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

FELLOWS

CLASS PROJECT

Class 45 Partners with Poverello House to Fight Hunger in Rural Communities Together with Fresno’s Poverello House, Class 45 is working to fund a food truck project which will provide hot meals and fresh produce to rural communities. The nonprofit organization works to provide social services, meals, health care and temporary housing to assist those in need. Currently, the Poverello House serves more than 500,000 meals each year. “The truck will be on a schedule and it will partner with cities in Fresno County to provide meals,” said Justin Morehead (45). “There will likely be lunches and weekend events when lots of children are out of school and are in more need.” The class set a fundraising goal of $85,000 to purchase a customized truck which will be furnished with all the kitchen equipment necessary to prepare, cook and serve hot, nutritious meals. “We’ve had a lot of positive feedback for our fundraising goal,” said Morehead. “The project itself has compelled folks to help out. We know that with the help of the local community, we can create a concerted effort and meet our goal.” Once the program is fully implemented, the Poverello House will use the food truck to serve meals and distribute bags of food (free of charge) in some of Fresno County’s rural communities: Mendota, San Joaquin, Huron, Del Rey, Parlier, Orange Cove, Riverdale and Sanger.

CLASS 45 Inauguration: October 2014 Graduation: February 2016

Derek Azevedo • Correen Davis • Matthew Efird • Lucas Espericueta • Rob Goff • Stephanie Gonzales Tou Her • Tyson Heusser • Chris Jensen • Stanley Kjar, Jr. • Brad Lindemann • Cameron Mauritson Jeff Milinovich • Justin Morehead • Brian Neufeld • Lauren Reid • Rick Rhody • Jane Roberti Yvonne Sams • Jason Schwartze • Justin Spellman • Abby Taylor-Silva • Ravi Thiara • Devon Yurosek

National Travel Seminar In March of 2015, the 24 fellows of California Ag Leadership’s Class 45 started their 10-day national seminar. The experience began with a two-day seminar in Davis and Sacramento where the group learned about how to engage with local and state governments while meeting many government and industry leaders. After the seminar, the class headed to the East Coast for an eight-day trip to Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and Gettysburg. On their first morning in Washington, D.C., the group woke to sleet, heavy snow and uncertainty about how they would maintain their scheduled agenda. Although there was a federal government closure, the Supreme Court remained open, and the class was relieved that their meeting with Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was still on schedule. “It was an honor and a privilege to sit in the nation’s highest court with Justice Scalia,” said Class 45 fellow, Cameron Mauritson. “To sit in the same courtroom where so many important decisions have been made on behalf of our country’s future, is an experience we will never forget. I can’t stop thinking about what Justice Scalia meant when he stated: ‘If you don’t get the reasoning right, you have got it all wrong.’ ” The seminar continued with leadership lessons at Gettysburg; the Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. where Reverend William H. Lamar IV delivered a rousing and powerful sermon that resonated with the class; a visit to the

State Department for a meeting with Colonel Stephen Randolph, the State Department’s historian. During the final days of the national travel seminar, the fellows took to the halls of the U.S. House of Representatives. Meetings included a section chief from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE); Kyle Lombardi, legislative director for House majority leader, Kevin McCarthy; Congresswoman Lisa Sanchez’s legislative assistant and staff from the Agriculture, Ways and Means Trade subcommittee, Natural Resources and the Intelligence committees. The last full day of the national seminar took Class 45 fellows to U.S.A. Rice Federation to meet with their CEO and president, Betsy Ward; COO, Bob Cummings and director of international promotion, Sara Moran. “Though there was no way we could completely synthesize the entire experience of this national seminar, we were able to recognize the importance of engaging in our political process in order to represent our industry, our environment, our families, and our future. We were told over and over again that it’s all about building and maintaining relationships. However, one of the things we realized is that leadership comes in to play AFTER we’ve built those relationships. Being an effective leader is about having the maturity not to compromise those relationships as we maneuver through controversial issues and advocate for our cause.” —Excerpted from travel blog by Correen Davis, Rob Goff and Rick Rhody.

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QUOTES

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

REFLECTIONS. 2014-2015.

EXCERPTS TAKEN FROM HORIZONS SUMMER 2014 - SUMMER 2015


ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

David Guy | Class 26 The program truly broadened my perspective on a very diverse state, as well as the opportunity to meet and get to know and learn from many agricultural leaders. Chase Hurley | Class 35 It (Ag Leadership) made me understand that it takes more that just my youthful background in tilling the land, milking cows and irrigating crops to make our agricultural sector strong. I better understand the critical thought process of those who live in Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York and abroad who are buying our goods. Danny Merkley | Class 19 I learned that a strong leader is not necessarily in the spotlight, that strong leadership is often hard work behind the scenes without much recognition. I learned greater understanding for those I did not agree with, those with thinking so different than mine that I used to think they were wrong, rather than just different. Daniel Nelson | Class 14 My Ag Leadership experience began 30 years ago. I feel as if that helped initiate a growth path that I’m still on today. In retrospect, it was an important part of my development, both career-wise and as an individual. The program broadened my perspectives and put California agriculture in a broader context. Jason Peltier | Class 16 It (Ag Leadership) brought into clear focus that regardless of where you farm or what you bring to the agribusiness system, we all have a tremendous commonality of aspirations, values and challenges.

QUOTES

Chris White | Class 43 My recent Ag Leadership experience helped prepare me just in time to face the challenges presented in this 2014 water crisis. Learning my personality strengths and weaknesses, the mentoring of my class fellows by the core faculty, and the study of true leadership in action has provided the foundation for engagement and for lifelong learning and growth. Larry Fleming | Class 6 Ag Leadership was like doing the weight training and when you get out, you’re ready to fight. The contacts I made were extremely valuable. People I met were influential in helping me and introduced me to others who were helpful. You never really know how it’s going to directly influence you until after you graduate. Justin Perino | Class 44 We visited the small village of Nsongwe, where we met with 18 women who set up a small farm to provide food for the village as well as generate income by selling produce to local hotels in the Livingstone area. Women in this part of the world are rarely empowered; this is one bright spot of leadership and determination to make a better future. Julie Rentner | Class 44 The Chinotimba Old People’s Home is a place where elderly ‘refugees’ from neighboring countries who cannot afford to go home are cared for. They accept anyone who needs help. When we asked Rebecca, the head staff, why she chose this job, she said she just felt like she needed to help. I’m more inspired than ever to be a leader in my community, to help those in need.

Gabe Cooper | Class 44 The sun sets in Cape Town on our final night. It has been a phenomenal experience being a part of and traveling with Class 44. Our final synthesis indicated that everyone has found something here in Africa to bring back with them. The main takeaway leadership qualities for me were hope, resilience, selflessness and gratitude. I have a new found appreciation for how blessed we are to have the freedom and opportunities at home. We are all motivated to go home and give back, to serve our community, and in turn, humanity. Joel Kimmelshue | Class 37 First and foremost, our business has made the Ag Leadership Program an external focal point for our staff for many reasons. I know of no other professional development and personal training program that provides what Ag Leadership does. As a result, we have had a few people go through the program and we are grooming candidates for future classes. Meredith Rehrman Ritchie | Class 28 Ag Leadership has been a special part of my life since opening that acceptance letter in 1997. I am extremely proud to have worn a few hats: fellow, alumnus and staff member. It has been a pleasure and honor to promote Ag Leadership and to work with, learn about and write about so many unique and inspirational fellows and alumni who are making a difference. Great people, great stories. Roberta Firoved | Class 30 Ag Leadership taught me to identify various personality types resulting in acceptance of viewpoints other than mine. Collaboration toward a

solution often results in opinions and approaches different from what I would take. Leadership often requires the faith to put a mirror in front of your face and the courage to change what you do not like. To not be stuck in old behaviors, yet adaptive to change. To quote Dr. Patrick Lattore, “The changes we make in ourselves have the greatest possibility of changing others.” Mark Kimmelshue | Class 28 I came from a small town, grew up in a relatively conservative family and attended a (then) relatively conservative college (Cal Poly SLO). Ag Leadership helped me start understanding that to be an effective leader, I needed to understand and be more open and accepting of beliefs and opinions that don’t necessarily align with my own. Charley Mathews | Class 26 Everything was presented and executed as a group (my class) and I learned that individual brains were no match against the brains of the group. The trick is to understand and appreciate the thoughts and views of others while working towards a common goal as a group. Frank Rehermann | Class 8 Taking part in Class 8 was a truly beneficial experience. We were encouraged to consider our role in a world effectively decreasing in size. We learned about the importance of relationships and the consideration of opinions not always concurrent with our own. Shortly after graduation from Ag Leadership, some alumni and I began organizing the California Wheat Commission. After considerable effort, we were successful in 1983. As it relates to the rice industry, when the

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CRC was formed to succeed the Rice Promotion Board, I was comfortable that it was the right thing to do. Nicole Montna Van Vleck | Class 26 Ag Leadership taught me the value of collaborating with others to achieve a common goal. From working with other rice states and other commodities on Farm Bill issues, working with environmental organizations on the benefit of water on rice fields for waterbird habitat, or working with both urban and rural stakeholders in the Sacramento Valley on drought issues, collaborating with a wider group helps reach a larger audience and often proves with much greater success than if one tackles it alone. Carissa Koopmann Rivers | Class 44 This program has been the introduction to the journey I plan to continue the rest of my life, which is to persistently shape myself into this image of a hero or effective leader by using all the new shiny tools I have acquired in my growing toolbox during the last 16 months. Paul Parreira | Class 44 Whether I help the person next door, or a person continents away, we’re still helping a human being, and we’re helping somebody better themselves. We’re sending opportunity. The opportunity to learn and to have the knowledge to venture out of Kliptown and to get a meaningful job and to help their family. Heidi Harris | Class 43 Ag Leadership changed my life, changed my perspective and now it is changing my reality.


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UNIVERSITIES

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

Class 44 | Year Two Seminars

A Solid Alliance for 45 Years Seminars are delivered by four exceptional partner universities – Cal Poly, Pomona; Cal Poly San, Luis Obispo; Fresno State and UC Davis. Fellows learn from first-rate educators, subject authorities and individuals from diverse professions and backgrounds. Core faculty members at each university are responsible for the content and delivery of the seminar curriculum. Through these dynamic and intensive seminars, fellows focus on leadership theory, critical and strategic thinking, effective communication, motivation, change management, complex social and cultural issues, emotional intelligence and other skills that contribute to improved performance as a leader.

Focus: Change management, social issues, culture, history and religion.

Focus: Team building, communication skills and personal assessment.

October 2014 — Fresno State and San Quentin Criminal justice system, criminology, death penalty, polarized viewpoints and emotional responses, critical thinking skills for complex issues. Included tour of San Quentin. November 2014 — International Seminar, United Arab Emirates, Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa Fellows began their journey in Dubai and Abu Dhabi and then embarked on a captivating exploration of Southern Africa. They witnessed the full spectrum of existences: an affluent metropolis, growing urban areas, small village farms and large vineyards, wildlife conservation areas, townships and slums. January 2015 — Cal Poly, Pomona International seminar synthesis, including leadership lessons and broadened perspectives. February 2015 — Commencement, Fresno State The power of harmony in succession planning and all areas of life, life after Ag Leadership, taking personal responsibility for leadership development, reflective interviews, graduation ceremony.

Class 45 | Year One Seminars October 2014 — Inaugural, Fresno State CALP history and traditions, program expectations, synthesis, leadership basics, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, alumni activities.

Focus: Emotional intelligence, criminology and national leadership issues.

Focus: Conflict management, facilitative leadership, economics, local and state government.

November 2014 — Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo The leader as a communicator. Team building exercises, practical application of speaking principles (informational speech), communicating through print media, TV/radio interviewing skills.

December 2014 — UC Davis Group dynamics, diversity in the workplace, organizational structure and motivation in the workplace, conflict resolution, facilitative leadership. Included visit to Loaves & Fishes. January 2015 — Cal Poly, Pomona The concept of culture and its formation, different cultures, the role of culture in complex societal issues and solutions, cross-cultural simulation exercise, prejudicial attitudes. Included visit to Homeboy Industries. February 2015 — Fresno State Emotional maturity in leadership effectiveness, the connection between biological systems and leadership behaviors, the role of emotional intelligence in complex leadership challenges, leadership from various historical perspectives. March 2015 — UC Davis The ecology of organizations, responding to challenges in communities, engaging the legislative process (local and state issues). National travel seminar to Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and Gettysburg. April 2015 — Cal Poly, Pomona The significance of change and its impacts on individuals and organizations, the value of agility in responding to change, personal power. Examine economic, social and political aspects of Southeast Asian culture. May 2015 — Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo Persuasive speech, active listening, microphone manners, executing powerful presentations, leadership model of influence with vital behaviors.


ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

FINANCIALS

OUR FINANCIALS. 2014-2015.

CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS FOR THE YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2015 AND 2014

PAGES 16 - 21

15


16

FINANCIALS

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION JUNE 30, 2015 AND 2014

2014

2015

- 46,134 865,150 640,608 2,500

168,231 1,284 3,102,787 73,234 13,664

1,554,392

3,359,200

7,910 3,287,533 10,433,806

4,316 518,327 12,125,266

15,283,641

16,007,109

CURRENT LIABILITIES: Cash overdraft Accounts payable Funds held for others Other current liabilities

3,011 55,853 35,079 81,759

66,869 56,097 45,553

Total current liabilities

175,702

168,519

1,440,990 1,000,000 1,367,377 11,299,572

1,503,969 1,000,000 1,051,539 12,283,082

Total net assets

15,107,939

15,838,590

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

15,283,641

16,007,109

ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS: Cash and cash equivalents Contributions receivable Pledges receivable Short-term investments Other current asset Total current assets Property and equipment – net Pledges receivable – net Long-term investments TOTAL ASSETS

LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS

VISION: CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURAL LEADERS UNITED AS A CATALYST FOR A VIBRANT INDUSTRY.

NET ASSETS: Unrestricted: Undesignated Board designated Temporarily restricted Permanently restricted

See Notes to Financial Statements.


ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

FINANCIALS

STATEMENTS OF ACTIVITIES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS JUNE 30, 2015 AND 2014 2014 CHANGES IN UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS: REVENUES AND GAINS: Special events gross revenues Less: special events direct costs Net revenues from special events

259,573 (52,756) 206,817

Contributions Net investment income In-kind revenue Other income Net assets released from restrictions

1,544,969 182,385 65,368 18,008 397,888

Total unrestricted revenues and gains

2,415,435

EXPENSES: Program services Fundraising General and administrative Granted fund expense

1,346,047 402,674 152,656 200,000

Total expenses

2,101,377

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN UNRESTRICTED NET ASSETS

314,058

2015

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES: Change in net assets 329,958 Adjustments to reconcile change in net assets to (110,138) net cash provided (used) by operating activities: 219,820 Bad debt Depreciation 1,168,826 Net realized/unrealized (gain)/loss on investments 25,931 Contributions for endowment purposes 41,897 Change in present value of discount on pledges 19,494 (Increase) decrease in: 532,966 Contributions receivable Pledges receivable 2,008,934 Deposits Increase (decrease) in: Accounts payable 1,296,141 Funds held for others 311,243 Other liabilities 138,571 200,000 NET CASH PROVIDED (USED) BY 1,945,955

61,729

CHANGES IN TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED NET ASSETS: Net investment income Net assets released from restrictions

1,103,863 (397,888)

217,128 (532,966)

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED NET ASSETS

705,975

(315,838)

CHANGE IN PERMANENTLY RESTRICTED NET ASSETS – Contributions INCREASE (DECREASE) IN PERMANENTLY RESTRICTED NET ASSETS

569,368

983,510

2014

2015

1,589,401

730,651

- 4,780 (1,221,921) (1,833,340) (84,628)

8,000 3,594 (132,668) (1,666,230) (122,929)

(35,320) 1,354,850 -

44,850 646,498 (11,164)

(51,591) 18,559 (54,160)

11,016 21,018 (36,206)

(313,370)

(503,570)

(4,305,644) 2,879,765

(9,091,704) 8,100,286

(1,425,879)

(991,418)

OPERATING ACTIVITIES CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES: Investment purchases Proceeds from sale of investments NET CASH PROVIDED (USED) BY INVESTING ACTIVITIES: CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES: Permanently restricted contributions Cash overdraft Borrowings on line of credit Repayments on line of credit

1,833,340 3,011 101,140 (201,293)

NET CASH PROVIDED (USED) BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

569,368

983,510

1,589,401

730,651

NET ASSETS, BEGINNING OF YEAR

13,518,538

15,107,939

NET ASSETS, END OF YEAR

15,107,939

15,838,590

CHANGE IN NET ASSETS

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS JUNE 30, 2015 AND 2014

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS BEGINNING OF YEAR END OF YEAR SUPPLEMENTARY DISCLOSURE – Cash paid for interest

1,666,230 (3,011) 6,675 (6,675)

1,736,198

1,663,219

(3,051)

168,231

3,051 -

168,231

543

-

17


18

FINANCIALS

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

NOTE 5.

INVESTMENTS

I nvestments are stated at fair value based on quoted market prices and were composed of the following at June 30: 2014 2015 Money market funds Domestic stocks and stock funds International stocks and stock funds Domestic corporate bonds and bond funds International corporate bonds and bond funds Liquid alternatives

640,608 3,187,416 1,609,177 4,769,093 868,120 -

73,234 4,223,366 2,416,983 2,401,754 1,270,652 1,812,511

Total investments

11,074,414

12,198,500

The following schedule summarizes net investment income for the years ended June 30: 2014 2015 Interest/dividend income Realized/unrealized gains (losses) on investments Investment fees Total investment income (loss) – net

NOTE 6.

111,111

164,986

1,221,921 (46,784)

132,668 (54,595)

1,286,248

243,059

PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT – Net

The foundation’s property and equipment consists of the following at June 30:

MISSION: WE GROW LEADERS WHO MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

2014

2015

Office furniture and equipment Computer and software

18,821 22,949

18,821 22,949

Total

41,770

41,770

(33,860)

(37,454)

7,910

4,316

Accumulated depreciation Property and equipment, net

Depreciation expense for the years ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 was $3,594 and $4,780, respectively.


ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

RESTRICTED FUND GROUP Dean Brown Endowed Founder’s Chair JG Boswell II Endowed Founder’s Chair Special Purpose Accounts [detailed below] Board Designated Endowment Charles Buchinger Memorial Endowment Franklin Otis Booth Legacy Fund Dean Brown Growth and Innovation Fund JG Boswell II Legacy Fund Total Restricted Fund

FINANCIALS

Corpus year end 6.30.2014

Fiscal Year contributions 2015

Corpus year end 6.30.2015

Accrued Value year end 6.30.2015

$1,000,000 - $1,000,000 $1,322,722 $1,000,000 - $1,000,000 $1,322,722 $1,467,687 $191,730 $1,659,417 $1,958,476 $1,000,000 - $1,000,000 $1,322,722 $90,905 $500 $91,405 $1124,494 $2,380,102 $1,425,250 $3,805,352 $4,283,057 $37,250 - $37,250 $46,419 $1,540,900 $50,000 $1,590,900 $1,816,887 $8,516,844

$1,667,480 $10,184,324 $12,197,498

Unrestricted Fund

$1,002

Total Investments $12,198,500 SPECIAL PURPOSE ACCOUNTS Fellowship Funds: Alumni Fellowship $12,145 $750 $12,895 $15,593 Dean Brown Fellowship $8,300 $500 $8,800 $10,722 Women in Leadership Fellowship $25,645 $900 $26,545 $29,773 Lagomarsino Family Fellowship $26,650 $1,000 $27,650 $36,124 Richard Pidduck Fellowship $45,600 $2,100 $47,700 $60,165 Manassero Fellowship $75,350 $8,051 $83,401 $101,012 John and Sheila Lake Fellowship Fund $41,250 $15,000 $56,250 $59,504 Thomas Mulholland Fellowship Fund $75,000 $25,000 $100,000 $104,101 Paul and Yvonne [Natsuhara] Murai Fellowship Fund $10,550 $9,031 $19,581 $19,632 Gene Rapp Fellowship Fund $12,550 $1,450 $14,000 $14,477 Jim and Betsy Hansen Family Fellowship Fund $18,901 $1,000 $19,901 $21,108 John and Betsy Grether Fellowship $110,000 $10,000 $120,000 $126,217 Patricio Family Fellowship (NEW) - $5,000 $5,000 $4,974 Endowment Funds: Borba Family Endowment $212,875 - $212,875 $258,886 Ladera Foundation $211,000 $5,500 $216,500 $283,587 Class 12 Endowment $13,825 $2,000 $15,825 $20,235 Class 17 Endowment $28,135 $5,000 $33,135 $41,664 Class 23 Endowment $8,600 $2,450 $11,050 $10,837 Class 25 Endowment $5,670 $7,750 $13,420 $13,398 Class 30 Endowment $66,122 $5,800 $71,922 $90,363 Class 33 Endowment $31,549 $2,920 $34,469 $43,471 Class 41 Endowment (NEW) - $18,055 $18,055 $18,205 General Endowment $342,555 $56,333 $398,888 $458,163 Memorial Funds: Tim O’Neill / Class 10 Memorial Fund $28,555 $3,390 $31,945 $39,390 Michelle Turner Memorial Endowment $22,360 - $22,360 $29,558 Dr. George Johannessen Memorial Endowment $29,000 $750 $29,750 $38,983 Remo L. Matteucci Memorial Endowment $5,500 $2,000 $7,500 $8,333

$1,467,687

$191,730 $1,659,417 $1,958,476

19


FINANCIALS

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

   Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2015

market value ($)

%

D

%

%

%

%

5.6

6.9

-

-

IN

CE PT

RE TU RN

EA 7Y

%

IO

N

%

RS

S EA R 5Y

S EA R 3Y

R EA 1Y

LE CA

FIS C

AL

YT

ND AR

D

YT

RT FO LIO PO

DA TE

FUND COMPOSITE Restricted Composite Asset Allocation and Annualized Performance - Net of Fees

OF

20

%

Global Equity

6,647,884

54.5

US Equity

4,230,899

34.7

10.4

5.3 10.4 17.6 17.0 9.0 7.8 Apr-2008

2,416,984

19.8

0.5

6.7

Non-US Equity Fixed Income Balanced Strategy Cash

3,663,869 1,812,511

30 14.9

73,234 0.6

6.9

7.0

Dec-2013

-

- 13.1 May-2012

-1.2 -1.2 -1.2 2.2

-

- 3.7 Feb-2011

0.3

-

- 10.8 May-2012

0.7

0.5 12.3

-

0.3

10.1

- - - - - - -

-


ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

FINANCIALS

CASH 0.6%

LIQUID ALTERNATIVES 14.9%

U.S. EQUITY 34.7% FIXED INCOME 30%

NON U.S. EQUITY 19.8 %

ASSET CLASS

MARKET VALUE

ALLOCATION

U.S.EQUITY $4,230,899 34.7% NON-U.S. EQUITY $2,416,984 19.8% FIXED INCOME $3,663,869 30% LIQUID ALTERNATIVES

$1,812,511

14.9%

CASH* $74,236 0.6% TOTAL $12,198,499 100% *Cash includes $1,002 of Unrestricted Cash

21


22

DONORS

Pledge Payments Received During Fiscal Year The Otis Booth Foundation: $1,500,000 Boswell Family Foundation: $50,000 California Cotton Alliance: $50,000 Taylor Farms (Bruce Taylor): $25,000 John and Sheila Lake: $15,000 Growers Express: $10,000 Mission Produce, Inc: $10,000 Vessey and Company, Inc: $10,000 Paul Parreira: $6,000 D’Arrigo Bros. Co. of California: $5,000 Jeff and Mori Elder: $5,000 Westside Produce (Steve Patricio): $5,000 Paul and Yvonne Murai: $2,500 Matthew and Julie Fisher: $2,000 John and Edyth Ledbetter: $2,000 Rick and Evelyn Vorpe: $2,000 John Eisenhut: $1,666.67 Victor Packing, Inc. “Madera Brand Raisins”: $1,666.67 Rick and Kandi Burnes: $1,000 Stephen Kritscher: $1,000 Beth Brookhart Pandol: $1,000 Matt Toste: $1,000 Linda Hildebrand Ballentine: $600 Lauren Grizzle: $500 Soapy Mulholland: $500 Michael Kelley: $300 Brent Grizzle: $250 Jim and Carol Storm: $250 Brian and Kellie Neufeld: $200 Stephanie and Shawn Tillman: $150 $200,000 James G. Boswell Foundation (for the partner universities) $100,000 James G. Boswell Foundation (for operational support) $40,000 Wells Fargo $27,004 Estate of Katherine Brown $25,000 Borba Families

OUR FUTURE. OUR FOCUS.

Driscoll Strawberry Associates, Inc. Thomas Mulholland Reiter Affiliated Companies, LLC Western Growers Association $24,000 Rabobank, N.A. $20,000 Loren Booth $17,500 Bowles Farming Company $15,000 Harden Foundation The Norton Foundation (John and Lil Norton) Wegis & Young Property Management (Greg Wegis, Rick Wegis, Mike Young) $10,000 Farm Credit: American AgCredit, CoBank, Farm Credit West, Fresno Madera Farm Credit (2013 annual report) Farm Credit: American AgCredit, CoBank, Farm Credit West (Agricultural and Government Leaders Reception co-sponsorship) Farm Credit: American AgCredit, CoBank, Farm Credit West, Fresno Madera Farm Credit (2014 annual report) Greenleaf Farms, Inc. (John Colbert, Bob Kolberg, and Nick Hill) John and Betsy Grether Ladera Foundation (George Myers) Rod and Carol Stark Syngenta (Dennis Kelly) Wonderful Orchards (Joe MacIlvaine) $8,500 AGR Partners (Ejnar Knudsen) $7,946.73 Mary-Ann Warmerdam $7,000 C.H. Robinson Company (Jim Lemke and Ray Griffin) $6,350 Charles Buchinger Memorial Endowment Fund $5,500 Hidden Villa Ranch (Mike Sencer)

$5,000 Abundant Harvest Organics (Vernon and Carol Peterson) Karm Bains Bank of America Edwin and Kaye Camp Doug and Jan Circle John and Nan Colbert Peggy Sears Perry Peter Peterson and Jim Peterson Janette Smith Woolf Farming & Processing $4,000 John Weiler $3,600 T.M. Bunn Trust (Chris Bunn) $3,404.60 Class 41 Treasury Account $3,306.70 Margaret Duflock $3,000 Gail and John Gray Kershaw Companies King and Gardiner Farms (Holly King and Keith Gardiner) Limoneira Foundation Fund $2,500 Anonymous Rose Marie Burroughs Gary and Diana Cusumano J. Link and Sally Leavens Benina and Heriberto Montes Rolling Ridge Ranch Jeffrey Stone The McClarty Family Foundation The Philip E. & Jamie N. Bowles Fund $2,000 George and Janice Higashi (The Higashi Revocable Living Trust) Larry and Jeana Hultquist Kimberly Clauss Jorritsma Link Leavens and Leslie Leavens John Muller Craig and Sara Jane Underwood Vina Quest (Dan Rodrigues) $1,616.11 Dean & Katherine Brown Charitable Trust $1,500 Anonymous Tim Vaux

$1,390 Class 10 Alumni (Tim O’Neill Memorial Fund) -Mike Bennett -Lance Brown -Ron Caird -Steve Chrisman -John Crossland -Bill Daniell -Pete Fallini -Gary Foster -Randy Linquist -Mike Phelan $1,200 Ken Zimmerman $1,100 Santa Paula Creek Ranch (Richard Pidduck) $1,058.06 Far West Equipment Dealers Association (Steve Kost) $1,000 Agriland Farming Co, Inc. (Jim Maxwell) Allied Grape Growers Kevin Andrew Anonymous BAPU Farming Company, Inc. (Sohan Samran) James Beecher Berry Pack, Inc. Blazer Wilkinson, LP (John Wilkinson) Carson and Natalie Britz Brokaw Nursery, LLC Mark and Mona Burrell Ron Caird Ben and Denise Carter Bill and Carol Chandler John Chandler Chino Valley Ranchers (Steve and Chris Nichols) Jim Clare Richard Clauss William Coit Conant Orchards (Matthew Conant) Costa Family Farms Richard Cosyns Sandy Creighton Doug and Alison DeGroff Danielle Dupree Russel Efird

Elkhorn Packing Co. (Pete Colburn) James Finch Roberta Firoved Matthew and Julie Fisher Five Crowns Marketing (Joe Colace) Fresno Equipment Company (Marsha Vucovich) John and Sharon Garner John and Jane Gibson Jim Hansen Bernell Harlan Mica Heilmann Kevin and Diane Herman Gary Hester J.D. Heiskell Holdings, LLC (Scot Hillman) Kenneth Kaplan Stanley J. Kjar., Inc. Keithly-Williams Seeds Hilda Klein Bob and Jennifer Kolberg Charles Kosmont Stan Lester Materra Farming Co., LLC, (Brent Grizzle) Meyers Farms Family Trust (Trevor Meyers) Justin and Candice Micheli Mixtec Group Stephen and Wendy Murrill Nelson Irrigation Corporation Oji Bros. Farm, Inc. Ty and Sheri Parkinson Personal Ag Management Services, LLC (Dan Carothers and Todd Snider) Joe Pezzini (Valley Pride) Jonathan Pinkerton John Pucheu Sherman Railsback Creek Rock Ventures, LLC (Ed Kuykendall) Gerry and Elaine Rominger Leland Ruiz Richard and Ronnie Russell Steve and Nadine Sagouspe Paul Sanguinetti Stasi Seay Gary Simleness Richard and Claudia Smith Victor Smith

Steward Ag Services (Kevin Steward) Brian Talley Rosemary Talley The Nunes Company, Inc. (Tom Nunes) The Thornhill Companies (Nicholas Miller) Uni-Kool Partners Val-Mar Farming, LLC (Catarino Martinez) Ivor and Brooks Van Wingerden Paul and Deborah Wenger Western Precooling Systems (Craig Miller) $750 Calamco (Bob Brown) Duda Farm Fresh Foods, Inc. Mark and Megan McKean Joey and Shari Mendonca Ray Gene Veldhuis $624 Moncrief & Hart, PC (Paul Moncrief) $523 Rick and Fritzie Rhody $500 Bill and Chris Adams James and Carol Ahlem Dennis and Beth Albiani Art Barrientos Hugh Bello Tom Chandler Jim Cunningham Stephen Danna Scott and Leslie Deardorff John DeRuiter Efird Ag Enterprises (Matthew Efird) Efird Farming, Inc. (Jack Efird) Ralph and Sylvia Evans Joey and Tawni Fernandes Joseph Ferrara Kay Filice Mike and Jeanette Fitch Robert Flores Michael and Kristy Frantz Mark Gilles John and Carol Gorter Granite Peak Partners, Inc. (Pierre Tada) Jody and Susan Graves


ANNUAL REPORT 2014-2015

Henry Avocado Corporation (Phil Henry) Les and Janet Heringer Frank Hilliker Huntington Farms Dale and Mary Jane Huss Fidela Irigoyen Mark Jacobs A.G. Kawamura Patrick Lattore Chris and Christy McKenzie Kathryn and Kent McKenzie Ed McLaughlin Mike Mendes Laura and Ted Mills Jonathan Munger Paul Newton Bre Owens Parsons HomeGrown (Tom and Kelley Parsons) Garrett Patricio Jean Phillimore R. Gorrill Ranch Enterprises Reynolds Farms (Sarah Reynolds) Kim Rogina Barry and Karen Ross Yvonne Sams Todd Snider Storm Land & Cattle (Terrell Storm) T & P Farms (Sarah Reynolds) The Growers Company, Inc. Triple C Farms (Darrell and Norma Cordova) Raymond and Katherine Van Beek Scott and Susan Van Der Kar Deanna and Roger van Klaveren Van Ruiten Bros. (Anthony Van Ruiten) Bob and Carolyn Wilbur Herman and Bobbie Wilson Norm Yenni $400 Bob and Anne Atkins Gregg Avilla Meredith Rehrman Ritchie $350 Noelle Cremers $300 Doug Dickson Robert Goodwin Cathie Joughin Bob Lilley

DONORS

John and Christine Schaap David Shabazian Jeff Stephens Lance and Audrey Tennis Ann Thrupp David Warter E. & J. Gallo Winery $275 Doug and Laura Rudd $250 Arnold Barcellos William Bennett Karen Caplan Robert and Lisa Cherenson Circle “G” Farms (Chris Hurd) Edwin and Valerie Coe Christopher Coyle Vernon Crowder Peter DeGroot Steven Dennis Dutchman Farms (Clay Groefsema) Ferguson Farms, Inc. (Bob Ferguson) Bonnie Fernandez-Fenaroli Robin Flournoy Four Little Devils Farms, Inc. (Troy Edwards) Freeman Farms (Loren Freeman) John and Mary Ann Frye Chris and Elizabeth Giannini John Giovannetti Bill Gisvold George Gough Grimmway Farms (Jeff Meger) Ed Grossi Hal Robertson Farms, LLC (Hal Robertson) Henry Hibino Farms, LLC Stephen and Donna Heringer Debbie Hurley Tracy Kahn and Norman Ellstrand Nomie Kautz Christine Long Mark Sorensen Farms Stuart and Delores Mast Craig and Julie McNamara Kenneth Monroe Dina and Mark Moore Cindy Myers James Neeley New Hope Dairy, LLC (Arlan Van Leeuwen) Peter Orr

Lane and Joyce Parker Steven and Mary Pastor Justin Perino Joseph and Jeanette Petersen Doug and Ann Phillips Todd and Andrea Rehrman Mike Richardson Rickert Agricultural Services, Inc. (James Rickert) Don Roberts Gerald Schwartz Charles Sherrill Herb and Dale Simmons John Slinkard Julie Spezia The Gualco Group, Inc. (Jack Gualco) Joe Turkovich Washington Agriculture and Forestry Education Foundation Roger Wood John and Teri Zonneveld $210 Darlene Din Vic Lanini $200 Jose Luis Aguiar Jose Baer Lewis Bair John Boyes Robert Cadenazzi Ali Elhassan Fred and Susan Ferro Lori Frommer Lauren Grizzle Bruce Hall Neil Johannessen Arnold and Jan Johansen Jeff Koligan L & M Fertilizer (Leo McGuire) Larry and Kathleen Lemke Mitch Millwee Oro Del Norte, LLC Lynnel and Herb Pollock Victor Sahatdjian Rick Schellenberg Jerry and Anne Spencer Stuart Yamamoto Victor Yamamoto $180 Sue DiTomaso $150 Rachelle Antinetti Pierre and Kathie Camsuzou

Pete and Sandra Dinkler Benny and Donna Jefferson Gary and Kris Kaprielian Ed and Tisha Kurtz Dan and Nancy Nelson Bob and Pat Rathbone Cliff Sadoian Karen Schott Paul and Michele Violett $120 Anthony Laney $100 Nina and David Ames David Arakelian Woody and Jane Barnes Lisa Bodrogi Bill and Jen Carriere Norman Clark Ria de Grassi Sarah DeForest Ralph DeLeon Mark and Lorraine Edsall John Eisenhut Paul Hain Joe Produce, LLC JoeProduce.com (Rex Lawrence) Mary Kimball Allison and Douglas Larsen Dennis and Kathleen Leonardi Kandi Manhart Dexter McDonald Roz McGrath Steve McShane Anthony Mendes Nicholas Miller Julie and Joe Morris Teri Murrison Stephen Olson Libby Ouellette Rabo Agrifinance, Inc. Robert Kasavan Marketing Jane Roberti David and Jan Roseleip Joseph and Karen Russ Abby and Paul Silva David Silva Bob Steinhauer Etaferahu Takele John and Cristel Tufenkjian Mark Turula Doris Uyeda Melissa Varcak $88 Sam Nevis

$50 Rob Harris Bart Hill Lynn Kuo Jonathan Merriam William Scott $25 Cathy Haas Don Nelson $20 Andrea Card Dan Marcum Megan McGrath Donations to Class 44’s Project Bob Brandi Honey & Farming: $500 Lura Meyer: $500 Matthew and Jacqueline Ruiz: $500 R. Wallace Wertsch: $500 Leonard Van Elderen: $250 Gabe and Shannan Cooper: $200 Robert Flores: $200 Heinrich Agriculture: $200 Twin Peaks Agriculture, Inc. (Anthony Laney): $200 Paul Parreira: $200 Larry and Jeana Hultquist: $100 Jeffrey Parks: $100 M.T. Sheppard and L.J. Timbers: $100 Robert Wertsch: $100 Fatima Yriarte: $100 Marianne Peluso: $10 Donations to Class 45’s Project Sierra Valley Legacy of Ag Foundation: $1,500 Bayer CropScience: $1,000 Crop Production Services: $1,000 Stanley Kjar, Inc.: $1,000 Roberti Ranch, Inc.: $1,000 Mark Testerman: $1,000 VAMCO LTD, Inc: $1,000 Actagro: $500 Anonymous: $500 Porterville Citrus, Inc.: $500 Verdegaal Brothers, Inc.: $500 Nichino America: $250 Erik Jertberg: $100 In Honor of Al and Helen Britz Martin and Debbie Britz: $10,000 In Memory of Jim Coelho (1) Woody and Jane Barnes: $100

In Memory of Paul Couture Bob and Patricia Gray: $1,000 Bob and Teresa Keenan: $250 Tom Perez: $200 Eisenhut Properties: $100 Carol Neel: $100 Patsy Stoebner: $100 Turlock Fruit Company (Don and Steve Smith): $100 Beverly Winger: $25 In Memory of Susan Diefenderfer (10) Jerry Diefenderfer: $1,000 In Memory of Sonny Kalkat (33) Reason Farms: $500 North Valley Ag Services: $300 In Honor of the Marriage of Holly King (24) and Steve Runyon Denise and Ben Carter: $100 In Memory of Tom McGrath (4) Richard and Frances Bozzano: $1,000 Dempel Farming Company: $200 In Recognition of Steve (21) and Kim McIntyre Tim and Maureen Treichelt: $250 In Honor of Abby Taylor-Silva (45) Joanne Nissen: $100 In Memory of Hank Stone (1) Woody and Jane Barnes: $350 In Memory of Bill Taylor Rincon Farms, Inc: $100 Alumni Fundraising Events World Ag Expo Leadership Alumni Breakfast: $93,000 Dean Brown Leadership Foundation: $35,000 Region 9 Golf Tournament: $35,000 Colusa Farm Show Breakfast: $20,726.43 In-Kind Darlene Din: $29,850 TMD Creative: $15,250 Fisher Farms: $894.18 Belmont Nursery: $589.61 Parsons HomeGrown (Tom and Kelley Parsons): $372 Jensen Devaurs: $360 Allied Grape Growers: $328.32 Art Bliss: $250

23


100 YEARS STRONG

100 years ago we planted roots that still thrive today, stronger than ever. We look forward to the next century of offering the financial services you need for your farm or ranch.

American AgCredit

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Fresno Madera Farm Credit

Find the Farm Credit lender location near you. FarmCreditAlliance.com

(855) 611-4110 toll-free

2014 - 2015 Annual Report  

California Agricultural Leadership Foundation 2014 - 2015 Annual Report

2014 - 2015 Annual Report  

California Agricultural Leadership Foundation 2014 - 2015 Annual Report