Page 1

SEARCH EXPLORE ENGAGE ISSUE 01

c

a publication of afro tourism

EXPLOR

E Africa’s Mul���il lion dollar to urism industry

UNTAPPED AFRICA: Unveiling the Secret Jewels of Africa

Come wander through wonders

ZIMBABWE


42

COVER STORY

Contents Mana Pools

A Foodie Guide to Fez

UNTAPPED AFRICA

FUNFARE IN

Why Bulawayo should be your next destination

58

ZIMBABWE:

36 04

S.E.E AFRICA

62 86 Capetown 94 Essential Essaouira 100 Cultural Diverity Drum 104 Nigerian Festival 106 Untapped Ogun 12 Hidden Museums in Nigeria you need to see

78

54

Features

COME WANDER THROUGH WONDERS Scratch everything you’ve heard about Zimbabwe, what you’ll find in this piece is the 'Holy Grail' about the country. This is Zimbabwe beyond the streets' grits and Victoria Fall's glamour, it’s Zimbabwe presented like never before.

www.afrotourism.com

UNTAPPED AFRICA

66

Meandering through Africa’s amazing landscape are countless sights that leave mouths agape. Interestingly, many people do not even know they exist. Find out some of these amazing places as we unveil some of Africa’s untapped jewels.


WELCOME NOTE

W h y To u r i s m ? ourism has long been considered as a potential driver of economic empowerment for African economies. The World Travel and Tourism Council estimates that 3.8million jobs could be created by the tourism industry in Sub-Saharan Africa over the next 10 years. Afro Tourism is dedicated to providing useful travel information to visitors travelling to and around the continent. As an African based company offering comprehensive and integrated tourism services, helping grow the African travel and hospitality economies, we pride ourselves on our ability to offer timely news on tourism in Africa.

Today we’ve built on our content hub with the addition of the SEE Africa Magazine – a publication dedicated to promoting the trade of travel and tourism in Africa. The magazine aims to become the number 1 voice of authority in the African travel and tourism industry and help distribute press releases and news updates from our partners.

Truly this is a continent blessed with abundant assets, amazing wildlife, expansive beaches, extensive natural and cultural attractions, and adventure opportunities. Over the last 3 years we have used the medium of our website to draw attention to destination cities that have not yet benefited from tourism. We’ve covered over 150 African cities including previously undiscovered, off-the-beaten-path travel destinations.

Here at Afro Tourism, we strongly believe in the potential of tourism to developing national economies in Africa. This is why we do what we do. Thank you for reading.

T

This maiden edition of the magazine represents the dedicated efforts of our small team of editors, travel writers, marketers, researchers and graphic designers. Its been born out of a love for the continent and the desire to bring the vibrancy and color of Africa alive in the pages of this issue and subsequent ones to follow.

Our partnership with national tourism boards and tourism ministries has encouraged the increase in government’s role of formulating strategies for promoting tourism in Africa. Within the last year we’ve participated in panels organized by the African Travel Association (ATA), the United Nations (UN) and the Corporate Council on Africa (CCA). Our vision as a company is clear: To offer a comprehensive and integrated tourism information service that will help grow African travel and hospitality economies. The value of the services we offer to the continent can all the more be appreciated when one considers the fact that 50-70% of UK and US tourist require information from specialists when visiting Africa. As compared to 10-15% required for other destinations they visit in Europe or Asia. This tells me that there is still the need to put quality information on this beautiful continent out there.

Chief Operations Officer

NOVE MBER 2016//

05


Search Explore Engage

c PUBLISHER Afro Tourism

CREATIVE AND EDITORIAL TEAM Content Editor Subeditor Creative Writers

c

Creative Designer

Miriam Chiazor Chinenye Egwuonwu Omoniyi David Samuel Adeleke Michael Usifo Michael Akintola

BUSINESS TEAM

... a traveler’s guide to Africa AVA ILA B LE ON:

Lead Marketing Representative Kelechi Abiri Marketing Representative Nkiru Osuji Database Analyst Ayobami Olopade

OPERATIONS Chief Operating Officer Research Assistant

Funsho Peters Udochi Anyogu

DIRECTORS Chairman Vice Chairman Member Member

Chief Olufemi Adeniyi - Williams Olaleye Adebiyi Omowande Adeniyi- Williams Maxwell Ukpebor

S.E.E. Africa magazine is published by Afro Tourism West Africa Limited. Head Office: 16 Wema Terrace, Udi Street, Osborne Estate, Ikoyi, Lagos. Tel: +234(0)700 TOURISM

Office: 5108 Bellemeade Lane, Alexandria, VA 22311, U.S.A Tel: +1 (228) 596-7004

www.afrotourism.com E- info@afrotourism.com twitter: @frotourism Instagram: @afrotourism

Afro Tourism is an Africa-based full-service tourism management company that specializes in providing dynamic travel and industry resources for Africa and its surrounding islands. Afro Tourism aims to unveil the untapped potential of the world’s most culturally rich and diverse continent as a destination of choice for travel and tourism. Afro Tourism is equipped to work with governments, destinations and the private sector to improve and enhance any tourism destination.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, photocopying or otherwise without the prior written permission of the copyright owners, Afro Tourism. While reasonable precautions have been taken to ensure the accuracy of advice and information given to readers, the editor, and publisher cannot accept responsibility for any damages or inconvenience that may arise from incorrect information.

06

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


CONTENTS

86 100 CULTURAL DIVERSITY:

The shocks and thrills of the cultural diversity across the planet provide the intriguing element to a travel experience. Sometimes, a strange cultural practice may offend our sensibilities, especially when such is deemed as negative...

18

TRAVEL TRENDS

Keep up with the latest movie releases that engage our minds whilst entertaining us and check out our review on the acclaimed movie ‘Beasts of No Nation’ starring Idris Elba. On our bookshelf review, read about the Man Booker shortlist ‘The Fishermen’ a tragic yet fantastic story about a family’s gradual descent to the words of a mad man; also check out

AT NIGHT

82

117

other books that tells Africa’s stories as it matters to her people. Our shopping segment takes us on a journey on how shopping is done across the continent and where to buy what. Gadgets and Tech will arm you with the latest and most practical travel gadgets and accessories that will make your travel hassle free. And finally, for our African Music Icon, relax with the soothing jazz sound of the maestro himself - Hugh Masekela, read all about him and how he began his journey to legendary.

Where do you go when the sun goes down? Lock yourself indoors and just call it a day? Don't even think about it - especially when you're holidaying in The Gambia. Explore the famous Senegambia Strip at night and discover why Kololi is such a magnetic hub for everyone.

100

50

JUST BEFORE YOU LEAVE:

61

84 Dressing up for the trip

34

FASHION

96

52 BUSINESS Looking to invest for the long haul? Africa’s tourism market beckons. The numbers are staggering; the opportunities are endless. Come, let us show you how.

Forgetting important stuff is a nightmare no traveller wants to experience. You're better safe than sorry. Mark this page for reference, and don’t forget to thank us with a selfie taken on your trip…*wink*

HEROES OF AFRICA

110 NOVE MBER 2016//

07


@paparaZZiMimi

Miriam Chiazor

paparazzimimi

paparazzimimi

EDITOR’S NOTE

That bucket list isn’t going to check itself off!! W

hen I finally went on my first vacation around Africa in 2011, I couldn’t help popping my head out of the window in a mix of anxiety and absolute excitement; I couldn’t believe this was happening. So this is all I have been missing!! Really!!!

This was finally happening after 4 years of dilly-dallying and procrastinating. From blackberry messenger group chats to Whatsapp group chats, we even had a juicy group name “AJALA THE TRAVELLER “ LOL! From friends dropping out last minute to no funds available. Summer 2011 in the company of two of my hearted friends we departed for The Great Mara, Narok County, Kenya. We first visited the plains between Esoit Siria Escarpment and Mara River, which act as the best viewing site for Cheetah and Lions. During the

day, we would hail our hot air balloon to the “Serengeti Ecosystem” to explore the “World Cup of Wildlife.” The Thomson’s gazelle, Zebra, and Eland were gracefully migrating to The Serengeti National Park; this being October-as the crocodiles and other predators maintained their calmness with the notion of expecting abundant food. This felt really, really good! The tour was a life-changer. I had a lot to talk about: the wild beast migration, the fierce “Big five”, and the people covered in alluring unique traditional attire known as “Shuka” as they headed herds of cattle. I also noticed that I had saved much more than I had expected. Since then, my teammates and I have been visiting various places across the globe, making new discoveries while increasing our already long list of friends. We harnessed the experience into making S.E.E Nigeria last year. The success of that publication gave birth to the more elaborate, rich and continent-wide S.E.E Africa Magazine that you now hold in your hands. In this maiden edition, we unveil new horizons in African travels. In line with its name, S.E.E Africa Magazine shows you what is where, and how to have the best of fun as you explore this little world. The magazine helps you to search, engage, and explore new experiences, places, people; and motivates you to cross out your bucket list. Also included inside are great and exhilarating stories relating to Culture connection-both ancient and modern, Inspiration, People, Celebrities, Fashion, Health, Taste, Scenery, Literature, Business, Leisure, Entertainment, and Trade News among others-all associated with touching adventures and discoveries. Be sure to read our feature story “Come wander through wonders” through the eyes of our award winning in-house writers Niyi David and Michael Usifo who spent three weeks in Zimbabwe just to bring the best of Zimbabwe to you. Also join Sam Adeleke in our business feature to take a peek “Inside Africa’s Multi-billion Dollar Tourism Industry.” If our tales inspire you to head off on your own journeys to check off your bucket list, then we have achieved our goal.

iriam Chiazor

Content Editor

08

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

W


@Imonide

1

Niyi David explores the beautiful and enthralling continent of Africa with Afro TourismÂŽ capturing colourful memories of places, cultures and events in words and images.

2

samadeleke

WRITERS

sam.adeleke

@sam.adeleke

In addition to her role as the Sub-Editor at Afro Tourism, Chinenye is a freelance editor and author with many published short stories under her wing. Besides writing, her favourite things to do include binge reading, handcrafting and some form of luxury travel. Follow her on twitter @Chini6.

@samadeleke

4

Michael Usifo-Alvin, an imaginative get-it-done wordsmith, blends uncanny taste for facts gleaned from his training in law, and journalism by UNESCO, in his travels and reports about Africa for Afro Tourism.

Sam Adeleke is a travel junkie, jollof lover and tourism business enthusiast. He is a passionate Nigerian committed to reminding Africa and the world of its unique beauty.

WRITERS 3

1

NIYI DAVID

2

CHINENYE EGWUONWU

3

SAM ADELEKE

4

MICHEAL USIFO-ALVIN

NOVE MBER 20 16//

09


CONTRIBUTORS PG 90

AMANDA MOUTTAKI PG 58

PG 62

My name is Sean Streak and I'm a freelancer and travel enthusiast. I enjoy exploring culture, history, and reviewing both trendy and underground locations across this fantastic planet we call home. When I'm not abroad, I can be found outside typing away on a vintage Olivetti with coffee in hand.

Millie wants to live a life full of travel adventures that comes with great memories and awesome moments spent with people she would have never met had she lived in one place. As a budding travel blogger with a lot of passion about travel, she has visited most places in Kenya and neighboring Tanzania. She is the engine behind the blog www.someplacesomeday.wordpress.com and Facebook page www.face-

Amanda Mouttaki is a freelance food and travel writer based in Marrakech, Morocco. She writes on her website MarocMama.com where she shares culinary adventures and cultural experiences from around the world – especially Morocco. Along with her husband she owns and operates Marrakech Food Tours, showing visitors to her adopted city, the best eats.

Pelu Awofeso is a travel writer & blogger, a culture reporter and winner of the CNN/ Multichoice African Journalists Awards. He is the Founder/ CEO of @TravelNextDoor, a travel company specialising exclusively in tours and vacations in Nigeria.

book.com/someplacesomeday

MOJEREOLA MUSTAPHA

LYNN SHEPPARD

OGBEMUDIA ISIBOR

PG 114

PG 94

PG 34

MJ as fondly called is a management expert in the field of aviation. Having started her career in the industry as a cabin crew, she seeks to share funny yet inspirational stories with her audience in the hope that they can become more comfortable with crossing continents and people.

Lynn Sheppard is an expert on all things Swiri (Essaouiran) who has written her own e-guide, The Best of Essaouira as well as writing about Morocco for several travel publishers and blogging at maroc-o-phile.com. A keen foodie, Lynn hopes to write a Moroccan cookbook. She lives in Essaouira and Edinburgh.

With over 15 years experience in men's fashion and style, Ogbemudia Isibor is the creative director of Bosi&Charles, a menswear Brand based in London, England and Lagos, Nigeria. He studied fashion in West London College, London and has worked as a Style editor with Hello! Nigeria and Complete Fashion Magazine.

10

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

PELU AWOFESO

CONTRIBUTORS

PG 84

MILLICENT KAIMENYI

SEAN STREAK


S Landscape scenics of vineyards and mountains, near sunset Stellenbosch Winelands, Western Cape, South Africa.

big hole in Kimberley, South Africa,

NOVE MBER 2016//

11


Afro Tourism providing all kinds of information on the Continent since 2013

DEAR AFRO TOURISM

Searching for an Ancestor

Seeking to Perform

Hello Andre, Thank you for

Dear Afro tourism

Good day!

I have an ancestor who was with

Wits Trio is visiting Windhoek on

the Royal Navy when Ascension

Friday 24 June for a performance. I

tourist office’s contact details

Island was a stone frigate. His name

would like to explore the possibility

below,

was Charles Sayers and he was a

of a performance in Swakopmund.

Afro Tourism says

contacting Afro Tourism. As requested, please see

WWW.AF RO

Address: 39 Sam Nujoma Ave,

diver and captain of the forecastle. He is mentioned in the court martial

Could you please forward me their

Swakopmund

of Captain Wilmshurst of HMS

tourist office’s contact details? Or

Email: swakopmund@henckert.com

Flora in the London Daily News on

put me in contact with a music

Telephone +264 81 255 4115

8 Jan 1869. I wonder if you have

society.

+264 64 40 0140

history at this time.

Much appreciated,

Or

Andre S tolz

Windhoek

Kind regards

any information about him or the

Maureen

Tel: +264 61 2906000

Dear Maureen, It is great hearing from you, we would love to help you with the information you need. Please find below contacts of authorities in Ascension Island that can help. Corporate Services Ascension Island Government Georgetown Ascension Island ASCN 1ZZ aigenquiries@ascension.gov.ac Tel: (+247) 67000 ext 100 Fax: (+247) 66152

We, Beijing GongMao travel Inc, a

our website.

travel agency from Beijing of china.

We look forward to your response.

happy to promote your event on

In china right now there are many Chinese who want to travel to Djibouti. We want to travel for 5 days, flights, feeding and intra

HELP WITH RECIPE

transportation will be needed. Please can you send a quote with the best low price, how to make payment and payment terms. We information if you have any questions. Thanks Cyrus President

Beijing GongMao Inc. www.afrotourism.com

info@namibiatourism.com.na Also, please know that we will be

Kind regards

S.E.E AFRICA

Fax: +264 61 254848

Dear Afro tourism

are open to provide more

Email:

12

Private Bag 13244 Windhoek,Namibia

Travellers from Beijing

Afro Tourism says

C/O Haddy & Sam Nujoma Drive

Dear Afro tourism Please help me with some videos, I want to learn more how to Cook urojo. Regards

Amina Majid

... a traveler’s


OUTO R ISUR M.COM ISM.COM

Permission to use image

The Postcard Collector

Dear Afro tourism

Dear Afro tourism

I’m working on the new series of QI

My name is Isabelle Tremblay. I am a

for the BBC and I was hoping you

Canadian girl collecting postcards. My

might be able to help me with

dream is to have one postcard from each

something…

country, written and stamped (NO

Dear Isabelle, Thank you for your Afro Tourism says

email. Please do send us your full address Afro Tourism

envelop). I like this simple cultural

will be glad to send you as many

On this webpage - http://afrotour-

exchange. The image on the card, the

postcards as we can get.

ism.com/trip-idea-blog/6-rea-

words chosen by the writer, the stamps

sons-to-visit-dakar-this-summer-2/

in the corner of the card... It is like travelling! I am in love with learning

Q?

You have an image of the African

about daily life, religions, cultures, and

Renaissance Memorial in Senegal

traditions from all around the world! And

which we would love to use on the

as I won't be able to travel much, being a

new series of QI, would this be

single modest housekeeper, I travel by

possible?

the mean of postcards!

I was wondering what are the

It is difficult to find people to send cards

dates for the wedding Expo

from so many countries. And I am not

Rustenburg and how does one

surrounded by a lot of travelling friends

get a chance to showcase their

here! That is why I address myself to you

services?

Look forward to hearing from you.

Good Morning

Kind Regards,

now, maybe you can help. Nigeria is still

Miranda

missing in my "Family Earth Album"! I

Regards

just knock on more or less touristic and

I thabeleng Mathibe

cultural related doors, and sometimes it is possible, sometimes not. In any case, thanks :-)

Dear Miranda,

uide s guide to Africa to Africa Afro Tourism says

If you want to send me a card, please let It is great hearing

me also know a full address so I can send

from you. Yes you

you one, too. I love sending as well as

have permission to

receiving! So far I have collected written

use the image.

and stamped cards from around 180 countries and autonomous territories.

All we ask in return is reference to

African continent is the one less

www.afrotourism.com

represented so far in my collection and the one I have bigger attraction for.

Good luck on your project and keep

Someday I will make it over there!

in touch.

Isabelle Tremblay

Hope this email Afro Tourism says

meets you well, thank you for contacting us.

Regarding your question about being part of the expo, there is no fixed date yet for this event. We will send you contacts to speak with once they are available.

Hello Amina,

Afro Tourism says

Hello Mathibe,

In the meantime, you might Hope this email

Also see link http://bit.ly/1UDi8v9

meets you well,

to read more about Urojo recipe

thank you for

on our website.

contacting Afro Tourism

Hope we have been able to help, please feel free to contact us

Please see video content for Urojo http://bit.ly/1PD2Fg3

should you need any more help.

want to see more information about Rustenburg before you plan you trip. Click on the link http://afrotourism.com/city/rustenburg/ to know more. Please feel free to contact us should you have any questions. Enjoy the rest of your week. Warm regards,

NOVE MBER 2016//

13


TRADE NEWS AI R L I N E S

Sao Paulo to JohannesburgLATAM launches new international service

R E S ORTS

LATAM Airlines Group has launched its operations to Africa with its first flight landing at the O.R. Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg, South Africa in October, 2016.

Nairobi is set to accommodate the tallest building in Africa as Hilton Hotels and Resorts is scheduled to open its 50th outlet, which will stand at 1,083 feet, in 2020.

With the launch,

over 50,000

The 255-room Hilton Nairobi Upper

LATAM becomes the

passengers yearly on

Hill will possess a residential, retail

only Latin American

the Sao

and entertainment complex as well as

Carrier with direct

Paulo-Johannesburg

an executive lounge, a poolside bar,

flights to Africa. The

route.

smokehouse, grill restaurant, among others.

group expects to fly

The new outlet, which is situated 16 kilometres away from the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport,

Hilton plans Africa’s tallest building in Nairobi

Nairobi, is part of efforts by the brand to expand its operations across the African continent and is reportedly estimated at $110 million.

G RO OV E

Best Western to open The Alba, Nairobi Beginning from the third quarter of 2017, travellers to Kenya will have the option of lodging at the Best Western Premier Collection The Alba in Nairobi. The new hotel by Best

fascinating amenities.

Western Hotels &

It will also possess a

Resorts, boasts of 83

100-capacity

rooms with a secure

state-of-the-art

underground parking

conference facility

garage, three dining

and a pre-function

options on site, a

space.

health club and other

14

S.E.E AFR IC A

www.afrotourism.com


RE S ORTS

Alexandria welcomes new Hilton Hotel

Nairobi to Cape Town Kenya Airways opens new Route

Hilton Hotel has opened its doors to travellers at Alexandria, making it the 18th hotel under the chain in Egypt. Known as King’s Ranch, this hotel boasts of 199 rooms, the first spa and prevention centre in the Middle East and complimentary snacks and drinks all day for members of the Executive Lounge. Source - Business Traveller.

Kenya airways in July, began its new route into Cape Town. This is the second destination after Johannesburg in South Africa the airline will fly to. It will fly Nairobi Livingstone - Cape Town, operating three days a week (Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays) Source - Business Traveller.

T

he Travel Ethiopia Team invites you and your loved ones to a land that makes you seven years younger.

Northern Ethiopia possesses the county’s ancient architectural designs, while southern Ethiopia holds the rit valley lakes and the remains of the world’s oldest human beings, along with a chance to see the unique tribes of Ethiopia. Eastern Ethiopia holds the ancient cities of Harrar and Dire Dawa. Venture to western Ethiopia to experience the birthplace of cofee.

AI R L I N E S

Air Mauritius expands its Chinese Routes Air Mauritius has begun flight operations to its fifth destination in China, Guangzhou, in the Guangdong province. This is in addition to its services to Shanghai, Beijing and Chengdu. This new route will serve business travellers who would prefer a direct flight from the Indian Ocean to the business district of Guangzhou. This is because over the last five years,

Mauritius has seen number of arrivals into the country double. Air Mauritius now operates eight services weekly to Chinese destinations. (Source, Business Traveller)

http : //w ww. b u s i n es s travelleraf ric a. co. z a/news/ai r-mau ri tius-co nti n u es -to -d evel op -c hinese-networ k

Tours and Safaris (Established routes or tailor-made to your requirements) • Itinerary Planning • Hotel and Lodge Booking • Camping Equipment and Car Rental • Flight Booking • Meet and Greet Services and Airport Transfers • Visa Processing • Organizing Conference

Address

Minilik’s the second avenue National Hotel First loor Addis Ababa, Ethiopia P.O.Box 9438 Addis Ababa Ethiopia www.travelethiopia.com info@travelethiopia.com travelethiopia@ethionet.et travelethiopia@yahoo.com Tel: +251 115 51 31 65/115 50 88 70/115 510168/115 52 54 78 Fax: +251 115 51 02 00


AWA R D

Cape Town Scoops it again! For the fourth consecutive year, Cape Town scoops the award for the best city in the world, according to a vote by readers of The Telegraph (June 2016) and travel enthusiasts. What’s not to love about the city - rich in amazing beaches, captivating nightlife and its rich culture.

If you are looking for that holiday getaway, why not visit the very best and find out more of what the mother city has to offer.

http : //w ww. s ou t h af r i c a. net/t rade/en/news/entr y/n ews -s o u th -afr i c a -come s-out-tops-agai n

I SL AN D

Good News Reunion Island, LUX* is here! … well, almost. In 2017, Reunion Island will attract more luxury travellers to come experience the best of the island as one of the best boutique hotels, LUX* Resorts and Hotels, will be launching their LUX* Sud Savage on the beautiful Cote Savage island, a short distance away from La Fournaise Volcano. This we hope, will increase tourist attractions to this untapped destination as well as continue to promote ecotourism in Africa. http : //w ww. l u xres o r t s .com/en/hote l-reu ni on/ lux s u d s a u va ge

AIR L IN E S

Precision Airlines resumes Flights to Comoros Tanzania’s Precision Air, the only publicly quoted airline of the country will resume flights to Hahaya in Comoros from its port at Dar es Salaam, which commenced on August 16, 2016. The decision to halt routes to the area in 2014 was due to the company undergoing restrategising and justification of the route. The company’s

airline, Mr. Robert Owusu, said resuming the network will strengthen trade relations between both countries as well as encourage tourism into Comoros islands.

htt p : // w w w.etu r b onews.com / 72477/re su m e d -co m oros-fl i g hts-b oost-tou r i st-v i si t s

PA S S P ORT

Vision 2018: AU Single Passport African leaders are set to propose a plan for free movement within Africa by the creation of a single passport. This is following the style of the EU schengen free movement deal, which allows for free movement amongst EU countries on a single passport.

16

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

htt p : // w w w.i nd e p e nd e nt. co . u k /n e ws/ wor ld /afr i c a /afr i c a n- u n i o n - af ri ca -si ng le -p a ssp or t-trave l - e a s i e r- e u -sc he nge n-a re a -sty le -co nti n e nt - b ord e r-f re e -a 7091551.ht m l

The plan is scheduled to be in effect from 2018 and the hope is to abolish the need for visas between the 54 states the AU represents. They also intend by 2017 to inaugurate a free trade deal across the continent.


CO N FE REN C E

Rwanda to Host 2016 ATA Conference The Africa Travel Association (ATA) conference will be held in Kigali, Rwanda this November. This is the first time the country will host the congress and gives a chance for the country to showcase to the delegates the true hospitality and beauty of Rwanda. The theme of the conference this year is “Destination Africa: The Future of African Tourism”. It will be held from the 14th to the 17th of November, 2016.

Delegates will get the chance to visit select hotspot destinations within Rwanda, known for its gorilla trekking adventures as well as its breathtaking landscape.

http : //w ww. travel a ndtourworld. com/news/artic le /ata-4 1 st-con gres s -c h o o s e s -ea s t-af r ic as-rwanda-as-the-host/ RES O RT S

Tune Hotels Launches In Kenya Nairobi, Kenya, became the first city in Africa to welcome Tune Hotels, an Asian based hotel chain. With a massive 280 rooms across 11 floors, a coffee shop, restaurant and a rooftop bar, this hotel gives travellers exactly what

T R AV E L T I P S

they need to ensure they have a wonderful stay at an affordable rate. Tune hotels is an affiliate of the Air Asia

http ://ww w.e tu rb o ne w s . c om/7265 9 /tu n e - ho t e l s -a b out-op e n -ke n ya-ho t e l

group and are looking to open up more hotels within East Africa in the near future (Source e-turbo news).

C O O R D I N AT E S + T O TA L D I S TA N C E

Approximate travel time from Nairobi to Pretoria, is 3 hrs, 40 mins

MILES

1815.58

NAIROBI, KE

2921.81

JOHANNESBURG, SF

BEARING

NE

NAIROBI, KE

28.0833

-26.2000 -1.2833

NOVE MBER 2016//

17


18-24 & 30-33 com piled by:

C HINENYE E ME ZIE -EGWUONWU

MOVIES // BOOK S // S HOPPING // MUS IC // T ECH N OLOGY

BEASTS OF NO NATION

rev i ew : C H I N EN Y E E M EZ I E- EGW U O N W U 137 MINUTES

B

ased on the book of same title written by Nigerian author Uzodinma Iweala. The movie stars British actor Idris Elba and a host of other fantastic cast including the youngster Agu played by Abraham Attah who gave a really impressive performance. The story is largely centred around a war going on in an unnamed nation. Elba is the commandant of the rebel group who are agitating the government soldiers who they term as the enemy. The rebel leader (Elba) devised dubious means in recruiting and keeping his force loyal to him and to their cause many of

whom are young children including Agu who fled his home in the wake of the invasion of his town by the army in the heat of the war. Besides the normal combatant military training, unconventional methods were also initiated by the commandant and his allies in the process of their war preparation this includes among others diabolical measures characterised by human sacrifices and excessive drug use. As the film progresses so does the atrocities of the rebel group and it’s obvious that the story revolves around these atrocities than any major cause any of the parties were fighting for. Save for a few occasional musings by the young Agu, there’s wasn’t much of a ‘stand-out’ moment content wise in the movie nor was it crystal clear what the war was about. But then again, I suppose all sense is lost in war. Recommendation: Watch if you enjoy War stories. Skip if you’re allergic to blood, gruesome images and strong language. There’s enough of those in this movie.

Idris Elba

18

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

Abraham Attah

Kurt Egyiawan

Jude Akuwudike

Emmanuel "King King" Nii Adom Quaye


THE JUNGLE BOOK

105 MINUTES

Neel Sethi

Bill Murray

Ben Kingsley

Idris Elba

After a threat from the tiger Shere Khan forces him to flee the jungle, a man-cub named Mowgli embarks on a journey of self-discovery with the help of panther, Bagheera, and free spirited bear, Baloo.

THE LEGEND OF TARZAN 110 MINUTES

TIMBUKTU 96 MINUTES

Abel Jafri

Tarzan, having acclimated to life in London, is called back to his former home in the jungle to investigate the activities at a mining encampment.

Hichem Yacoubi

A cattle herder and his family who reside in the dunes of Timbuktu find their quiet lives -- which are typically free of the Jihadists determined to control their faith -- abruptly disturbed.

CONCUSSION 122 MINUTES

In Pittsburgh, accomplished pathologist Dr Bennet Omalu uncovers the truth about brain damage in football players who suffer repeated concussions in the course of normal play. Hollywood star actor Will Smith stars in this dramatic thriller based on an incredible true story. Based on Game Brain by Jeanne Marie Laskas

Based on Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs

C O U R T E S Y:

NOVE MBER 2016//

19


FICTION R EVI EW: C HIN EN YE EM EZIE-EGWUONWU

T

he Fishermen starts off really good, Obioma’s style is that of a master of literary fiction and employs allegory to a large extent. One gets the feeling that the story transcends what is being read and this is evident in Obioma’s exploration of certain concepts, berthing major political and social commentaries. It’s no wonder it was a shortlist for the Man Booker Prize what I choose to call the Grammy of Literary awards. This review won’t include any spoilers, you’ll have to go find the book and read it yourself. But I promise you, you’ll be holding on to the edges of your seats or beds as the case may be till you have read the last page. I’ll start off with this poem by Mazi Kunene on the opening page of the book as it serves as a reference point to what is about to come within the pages.

The madman has entered our house with violence Defiling our sacred grounds Claiming the single truth of the universe Bending down our high priests with iron Ah! yes the children, Who walked on our Forefathers’ graves Shall be stricken with madness. They shall grow the fangs of the lizard They shall devour each other before our eyes And by ancient command It is forbidden to stop them!

The Fishermen is the story of four brothers and their childhood shenanigans in the small town of Akure in southwest Nigeria. When their strict father was transferred to work in a town far away from home, the brothers take their father’s

THE FISHERMEN

absence as an opportunity to commence mischief by going fishing, neglecting their school work or even skipping school entirely. The story is told from the point of view of Benjamin or Ben, a nine year old and the youngest of the four brothers. The Omi-Ala the river where the boys fish is a forbidden river located near their home where the brothers usually sneak out without their mother’s knowledge. The Omi-Ala River is notorious for being a harbinger of filth and tragedies. The boys however decide to ignore their parents caution about going within the vicinity of the river’s location. Then one day on one of their subsequent visits to the river they meet a dangerous local madman, Abulu. Abulu the madman is a sort of prophet of doom. Everything he prophesies comes to

Chigozie Obioma (was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2015)

20

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

pass. Ikenna the oldest of the brothers is told by Abulu that he is destined to be killed by a fisherman which essentially could be one of his siblings. And that is the catalyst of the book. The events that unfold after this prophesy are mythic and tragic. There’s a lot to unpack and take in as Ben’s mind is thrown into a state and the reader is forced to go through this visceral journey with him to the point of blowing little bits of the mind away. The Fisherman is basically a family tale – albeit a tragic one, thus with a universal appeal to any reader. The family dynamics of the Agwu family is one all too familiar in many African homeswhere the father is absent and the mother is almost entirely left alone to fend for the children. Obioma utilises allegory as a literary tool to compare the Agwu family to Nigeria as a country destined to fail. Just like a mother is left to cater to six children among them four energetic young boys, likewise Nigeria was set up to fail from the onset of its independence by the British through the amalgamation of various unrelated tribes thrown into a space and told to survive. For a debut novelist, Chigozie Obioma’s voice is original yet masters the art of storytelling of the likes of Chinua Achebe, Ayi Kwei Armah and the rest of the canons of African Literature.

Do yourself a favour read this book!


UNDER THE UDALA TREES

she will have to hide this part of herself. But there is a cost to living inside a lie.

Chinelo Okparanta

I

nspired by Nigeria’s folktales and its war, Under the Udala Trees is a deeply searching, powerful debut about the dangers of living and loving openly. Ijeoma comes of age as her nation does; born before independence, she is eleven when civil war breaks out in the young republic of Nigeria. Sent away to safety, she meets another displaced child and they, star-crossed, fall in love. They are from different ethnic communities. They are also both girls. When their love is discovered, Ijeoma learns that

As Edwidge Danticat has made personal the legacy of Haiti’s political coming of age, Okparanta’s Under the Udala Trees uses one woman’s lifetime to examine the ways in which Nigerians continue to struggle toward selfhood. Even as their nation contends with and recovers from the effects of war and division, Nigerian lives are also wrecked and lost from taboo and prejudice. This story offers a glimmer of hope — a future where a woman might just be able to shape her life around truth and love. Acclaimed by Vogue, the Financial Times, and many others, Chinelo Okparanta continues to distill “experience into something crystalline, stark but lustrous” (New York Times Book Review). Under the Udala Trees marks the further rise of a star whose “tales will break your heart open” (New York Daily News).

rom two-time Caine Prize finalist Elnathan John, a dynamic young voice from Nigeria, Born on a Tuesday is a stirring, starkly rendered first novel about a young boy struggling to find his place in a society that is fracturing along religious and political lines.

F

In far northwestern Nigeria, Dantala lives

among a gang of street boys who sleep under a kuka tree. During the election, the boys are paid by the Small Party to cause trouble. When their attempt to burn down the opposition’s local headquarters ends in disaster, Dantala must run for his life, leaving his best friend behind. He makes his way to a mosque that provides him with food, shelter, and guidance. With his quick aptitude and modest nature, Dantala becomes a favored apprentice to the mosque’s sheikh. Before long, he is faced with a terrible conflict of loyalties, as one of the sheikh’s closest advisors begins to raise his own radical movement. When bloodshed erupts in the city around him, Dantala must decide what kind of Muslim—and what kind of man—he wants to be. Told in Dantala’s naïve, searching voice, this astonishing debut explores the ways in which young men are seduced by religious fundamentalism and violence.

BORN ON A TUESDAY Elnathan John

Petina Gappah

THE BOOK OF MEMORY emory is an albino woman languishing in Chikurubi Maximum Security Prison in Harare, Zimbabwe, where she has been convicted of murder. As part of her appeal, her lawyer insists that she write down what happened as she remembers it. As her story unfolds, Memory reveals that she has been tried and convicted for the murder of Lloyd Hendricks, her adopted father. But who was Lloyd Hendricks? Why does Memory feel no remorse for his death? And did everything happen exactly as she remembers?

M

In The Book of Memory, Petina Gappah has created a uniquely slippery narrator: forthright, acerbically funny, and with a complicated relationship to the truth. Moving between the townships of the poor and the suburbs of the rich, and between the past and the present, Gappah weaves a compelling tale of love, obsession, the relentlessness of fate, and the treachery of memory.

KIDS COR ER N

NOVE MBER 2016//

21


Balogun Market, Lagos for Wholesale/Bulk Purchase

SHOPPING AFRICA IN

Travel and shopping could be said to be two interwoven species. What is travel without a bit of shopping or a lot as the case may be. Travellers love to shop and in Africa there is a plethora of shopping options for the discerning traveller. Having said that, however, it’s worth noting that countries in Africa offers shopping experience differently and it will do you well as a traveller to familiarise yourself with this info before embarking on your shopping spree. From open markets to souks to craft markets, farmers market to shopping centres and malls, these are some of the many options to explore. In many West African countries the open market is the largest form of shopping available where everything from wholesale foods, butchery, grocery items and clothing are offered. In recent years however, malls are coming up and these offer safe and convenience shopping for the shopper. As a tourist or traveller in a foreign place your safety is paramount and after this - where to and what to shop for – not forgetting bargain shopping. Here are some of the options you’re likely to encounter on your trips around Africa.

A Craft store in South Africa

A Craft store in Sudan

22

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


Open market store in Algeria

Mall in Durban, South Africa Open Market store in Malawi

SHOPPING MALLS // CRAFT MARKETS // OPEN MARKETS // SHOPPING CENTRE //

Souk in Morocco

A high-end clothing store in a Shopping Centre in Cape Town, South Africa

humnews.com/humnewscom/tag/population hillaids.org.za/projects/woza-moya-craft-store-shop-hillcrest-durban ickr.com/photos/south-african-tourism/8558877299 traveldesignmorocco.com/incentive-marrakech.html saga.ua/667_turns_showturn_4378.html blog.frontierstrategygroup.com/2015/03/algeria-low-oil-prices-risk-opportunity generalpettygree.blogspot.com.ng/2016/07/back-to-sudan-in-amazing-54mm.html

NOVE MBER 2016//

23


H U GH

MAS E K E LA

AFR I CAN

HONOURS

Rhodes University: Doctor of Music (honoris causa), 2015 University of York Honorary Doctorate in Music 2014 Order of Ikhamanga: 2010 South African National Orders Ceremony, 27 April 2010. Ghana Music Awards: 2007 African Music Legend award 2005 Channel O Music Video Awards: Lifetime Achievement Award 2002 BBC Radio Jazz Awards: International Award of the Year Nominated for Broadway's 1988 Tony Award as Best Score (Musical), with music and lyrics collaborator Mbongeni Ngema, for Sarafina

AWA R D S H I S T O RY

GRAMMY

24

Career Wins

Career Nominations

2

7

S.E.E AFR IC A

MUS I C

I CON

Hugh Masekela was born in the year 1939 in kwa-Guga township, Witbank, South Africa. Popularly known as Bra Hugh in his beloved homeland, Hugh is a multi-talented Jazz artist that plays various musical instruments including the trumpet and flugel horn. He is also a composer and singer. His musical career began as a child when he started singing and playing piano at the age of 14. After seeing a film based on the life of the American jazz cornetist Bix Beiderbecke; he took up playing the trumpet. He soon learned the rudiments of playing the trumpet and quickly mastered the instrument. Together with a few of his schoolmates the Huddleston Jazz Band, South Africa's first youth orchestra was formed. By 1956, after leading other ensembles, Masekela joined Alfred Herbert's African Jazz Revue. The agony, conflict, and exploitation South Africa faced during the 1950s and 1960s inspired and influenced him to make the type of music that would help spread political change and many of his music closely reflects this aspect of his life experience. His music portrays the struggles and sorrows, as well as the joys and passions of his country South Africa and through this means he was able to reach a large population that also felt oppressed due to the country's situation. In 1958 Hugh was part of the orchestra of the musical King Kong, written by Todd Matshikiza. The musical went on to become South Africa's first blockbuster theatrical success. He toured the country with the musical group alongside the late Miriam Makeba led by Nathan Mdledle of the Manhattan Brothers'. The musical later went to London's West End for two years. In 2003, he was featured in the documentary film Amandla! And in the following year he released his autobiography titled Still Grazing: The Musical Journey of Hugh Masekela, co-authored with journalist D. Michael Cheers, the book documented Hugh's struggles against apartheid plus his personal struggles with alcoholism from the late 1970s through to the 1990s. In 2010, Hugh Masekela was featured, with his US based and ESPN anchor son Selema Masekela, in a series of videos on ESPN. The series, called Umlando – Through My Father's Eyes, was aired in 10 parts during ESPN's coverage of the FIFA World Cup in South Africa. Afro Tourism salutes this phenomenal musician and African hero, Hugh.

www.afrotourism.com


ASTA Destination Expo Gives Africans Access to US Travelers

O

n February 24-26, 2017, African tourism businesses, including national and local tourism offices, tour operators, and other suppliers, will have their biggest opportunity to sell to Americans through the travel agency distribution system by attending the American Society of Travel Agents Destination Expo in Nairobi, Kenya. Hundreds of agents who sell high-end travel packages to eager American tourists will personally be on the African Continent to develop personal relationships to grow the 3% global market share currently held by Africa. The growth potential is even more significant for Sub-Saharan Africa, as it only accounts for 1% of global tourism. Afro Tourism recently met with Zane Kerby, ASTA President, at its world headquarters in metro Washington, DC, in the United States to discuss what this trade show can mean for African tourism businesses. “This once yearly foray out of the United States brings together our American members with members from over 120 countries,” said Kerby. “The ASTA Destination Expo (ADE) is an opportunity for US based agents to experience an upcoming, hot destination then to take their experiences from the Expo home to share with the traveling public in the US. This is a great opportunity to establish face-to-face business relationships. Despite modern communications, nothing beats a face to face conversation followed by a handshake to build trust and start a long term business relationship.” With several hundred agents coming to learn about Africa, 70% or more will extend their stays to participate in familiarization tours. This is great for Africa, as there currently are no “top ten” destinations on the Continent, according to Kerby. “Unfortunately, very few people know Africa well. There is little television or Internet advertising for Africa in America. Several other destinations closer in proximity to the US, such as Mexico and Western Europe are more present in the collective conscience,” Kerby observed. The potential, however, is great. In 1990, 7.8 million Americans held passports. In 2015, the

number had grown to 127 million, a fifteen-fold increase. These Americans are looking for new experiences, giving committed African nations, local destinations, tour operators, and travel businesses tremendous potential for business growth. We asked Kerby who should attend ADE and participate in its trade show. “The expo offers a big opportunity for safari operators. Many Americans see that as a once in a lifetime trip, but want to know if it is affordable. Other service providers, including tour operators, hotel companies, and local airlines should attend. In fact, any travel service providers that want to reach the American consumer should use this opportunity to meet and establish a relationship with US based travel agents who advise the traveling public every day.” Kerby stressed that “national tourism offices should come to help agents learn about what countries have to offer”. The education process is critical. ASTA has an excellent track record for results from prior ADEs. In the past, the show has been held in Dubai in 2013, Merida, Mexico, in 2014, Marrakesh, Morocco, in 2015, and Seville, Spain, this year. “All of these destinations saw immediate results,” reports Kerby. “Sixty percent of the agents, for example, sold Marrakesh after attending ADE and the average travel expenditure per person was $6300.” Exhibitors will need to both purchase booth space and join ASTA to be at the show. To facilitate more African attendance, ASTA will be

working with Afro Tourism giving African destinations and businesses the opportunity to work with contacts in Africa. There is reduced pricing for exhibitors who sign up in October. Kerby recommends a comprehensive approach to selling through the travel agent community. “Bring information and representation, if possible, from your tourism office, tour operators, hotels, and airlines so that ASTA agents have a comprehensive understanding of your destination’s unique features and attractions. We encourage you to bring information on visa policies, medical services, safety, health issues, and anything else, which might have become an issue, due to media reports which exhibitors should be monitoring. “Building a long term relationship requires an on-going commitment. Join ASTA and plan to attend our Global Convention next August in San Diego, California, USA, to keep your contacts fresh or see us any year at World Travel Market in London.” Kerby closed on a personal note. “While I have not yet been to other places beyond Kenya, based on my first taste of Africa, I know that the beauty, natural wonders, and experiences with wild game on the Continent will draw interest from and numerous new customers from the United States.” “The ASTA Destination Expo is a unique opportunity for relationship building between African travel suppliers and US based travel agents. We hope that as many as can attend, will attend.”

NOVE MBER 2016//

25


BUSINESS 26 - 28 By: Sam Ad el eke

The global tourism sector contributes significantly to the 227 million people in employment – that is 1 in 11 jobs on the planet. Its growth of 3.6% was faster than the wider economy and outperformed growth in the majority of leading sectors in recent years. African tourism has contributed significantly to these figures and still continues to. Sam Adeleke explores this theme and other investment indicators that point to the vast opportunities that exist in Africa's tourism industry.

INSIDE

A F R I C A ’ S M U LT I - B I L L I O N DOLLAR TOURISM INDUSTRY

t

he world’s tourism industry is evolving at an astronomical pace. Data emanating from industry regulators and key players suggest that the game has changed. The United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) projects that international tourist arrivals in Africa are to grow by 4% in 2016 alone. IATA (International Air Transport Association) predicts that the African market will grow by 4.7% to 294 million passengers a year by 2034; and African

26

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

aviation currently supports 6.9 million jobs, generates more than $80 billion in GDP and is seen as crucial to the development of Africa’s economy. IATA also submitted that if a quarter of African countries were to implement the ‘Open Skies for Africa’ decision, greater air access will be facilitated between African countries, an additional 155 000 jobs and USD 1.3 billion in GDP could be generated, with obvious benefits for tourism. From the foregoing, it is as clear as the midday sun that tourism is

no longer business as usual, and investors from every corner of the globe should start beaming their searchlight on this promising jewel of the savannah. This was further confirmed in a recent report by the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC), a global business community of travel industry executives which works with governments to promote travel and tourism worldwide. The WTTC report revealed that travel and tourism’s contribution to the world’s GDP grew for the fifth consecutive year in 2014,

rising to a total of 9.8% of the world’s GDP (US$7.6 trillion). Today, the global tourism sector supports over 227 million people in employment – that is 1 in 11 jobs on the planet. Its growth of 3.6% was faster than the wider economy and outperformed growth in the majority of leading sectors in recent years. Indeed, African tourism has contributed significantly to these quoted figures, and countries such as Angola, Cape Verde, Madagascar, South Africa and Egypt all reported double-digit


/HLVXUH7RXULVP6SHQGLQJ

growth in arrivals. Tanzania, Cameroon, Seychelles and Mauritius also showed strong growth rates in the same period under review. But despite these figures, tourism asset owners, service providers and destination marketers in Africa seem not to be operating at their full potential in attracting new visitors. Let’s take a look at what other nations are doing right in this regard. In a recent study, the US Department of Commerce reported that 78 percent of Americans use the web to make travel decisions while 68 percent trust the web for travel related

86EQ

ϭ ^ŽƵƚŚĨƌŝĐĂ

ϮϬ͘ϲϵϲ

Ϯ ŐLJƉƚ

ϮϬ͘ϰϱϱ

ϯ DŽƌŽĐĐŽ

ϭϮ͘ϮϬϰ

ϰ ůŐĞƌŝĂ

ϵ͘ϰϬϬ

ϱ EŝŐĞƌŝĂ



ϲ dƵŶŝƐŝĂ



ϳ ƚŚŝŽƉŝĂ



ϱ͘ϯϰϲ ϰ͘Ϭϵϱ ϯ͘ϭϲϯ

ϴ ŶŐŽůĂ



ϵ <ĞŶLJĂ



Ϯ͘ϱϵϴ



Ϯ͘ϯϲϴ



ϭϬ dĂŶnjĂŶŝĂ



ϭϭ DĂƵƌŝŝƵƐ

 

ϭϮ EĂŵŝďŝĂ



ϭϯ 'ŚĂŶĂ

Ϯ͘ϵϬϴ

ϭ͘ϲϵϲ ϭ͘ϱϰϴ



ϭ͘ϱϮϱ

ϭϰ ŽƚƐǁĂŶĂ



ϭ͘ϯϭϰ

ϭϱ hŐĂŶĚĂ





ϭϲ DĂĚĂŐĂƐĐĂ ϭϳ >ŝďLJĂ

Ϭ͘ϵϳϱ



Ϭ͘ϵϱϵ



ϭϴ ^ƵĚĂŶ

ϭ͘ϭϬϱ





Ϭ͘ϴϰϴ

ϭϵ ZĞƵŶŝŽŶ



ϮϬ ŝŵďĂďǁĞ



Ϭ͘ϲϵϮ

Ϯϭ ^ĞŶĞŐĂů



Ϭ͘ϲϴϴ

ϮϮ ĂŵĞƌŽŽŶ







Ϯϯ ŽƚĞĚΖŝǀŽƌŝĞ Ϯϰ DŽnjĂŵďŝƋƵĞ Ϯϲ ĂŵďŝĂ

Ϭ͘ϱϭϮ



Ϭ͘ϰϴϮ



Ϭ͘ϰϴϬ



Ϭ͘ϰϱϳ



Ϯϳ ^ĞLJĐŚĞůůĞƐ

Ϭ͘ϲϲϴ

 

Ϯϱ ĂƉĞsĞƌĚĞ

Ϭ͘ϳϳϬ

Ϭ͘ϰϭϵ

Ϯϴ 'ĂďŽŶ

Ϭ͘ϮϱϮ

Ϯϵ ZǁĂŶĚĂ

Ϭ͘Ϯϯϵ

ϯϬ ĞŶŝŶ

Ϭ͘ϮϮϭ

ϯϭ ŚĂĚ

Ϭ͘Ϯϭϯ

advice. Only a meagre 5 percent submitted that travel agencies are their most trusted source of travel-related information. On Google, “vacation destinations” are searched 74,000 times every other month, yet no African destination pops up among the first 20 results. This speaks volumes about the future of tourism and the role of new media in the strategies employed by destination marketing professionals, tourism boards and service providers to increase inbound visits, which in turn increases their bottom-line.















This is a wake-up call to stakeholders in Africa’s tourism industry. There is more money to be made; and from the foregoing, it is obvious that the decisions on where to go and how to spend are largely being made online. Investors, owners and stakeholders of tourism assets need to understand that sponsoring print and billboards ads and putting up a website or social media page aren’t ‘just enough’. The competition for tourists is fierce and African destinations do not only compete against each other but against





other better known destinations all over the world. Industry practitioners therefore need to wake up to the fact that strategic branding efforts are required in consciously positioning their destinations when and where the tourist will be making his or her buying decisions. Having said these, the next statement on the lips of investors is, show me the money. In other words, how can you measure the economic value of tourism and its potentials in Africa? First, let’s start with the basics. Tourism, being both a product and service that can be bought and experienced in exchange for monetary compensation, is as tangible as it could get and can be measured using various parameters. For the purpose of this article, we will adopt the phrase ‘tourism products’ as our operational term. According to Tourism in Africa, a publication by the Africa Region Working Paper Series, Tourism Products consists of the principal assets that a country

has to offer tourists, combined with every aspect of the tourism experience. It is a complete package that encompasses the time the tourist decides to travel until his return home. The most frequent types of assets include the sun, sea and sand - for resort tourism; wildlife and desserts for safari tourism; mountains, forests and valleys - for nature, scenic and adventure tourism. Others include cultural assets which are significant in the form of the built environment (monuments, old cities), a living heritage expressed in distinctive local customs and song, dance, art and handicrafts, among others. Museums that reflect the local cultural heritage or a wider global heritage are also significant tourism assets that should not be underestimated. These aforementioned tourism assets make destinations a delightful experience for tourists as well as investors. Essentially, tourism products are broader than tourism assets, and they include transport to and fro

NOVE MBER 2016//

27


BUSINESS

the country of final destination; hotels and other accommodation; access to security and health services. Others are restaurants and other types of food services as well as tour services that link the various components of a trip, including national parks and city tours. A survey of 128 tour operators across 14 countries in Africa was recently carried out by the UNWTO to determine which of the aforementioned tourism products was most lucrative among the pack. Interestingly, Wildlife Watching carried the day, representing 80% of the total annual sales of trips to Africa. From the survey, Kenya and South Africa emerged as major players in Africa’s tourism industry playing hosts to between 2 and 5 million visitors per year. These two countries earn an estimated sum of US$ 90 millionannually.. Countries such as Ethiopia, Lesotho, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda and Zimbabwe play host to over 500,000 visitors per year with an income of between US$ 2 and 15 million annually. Countries with limited number of visitors welcome between 1,000 and 90,000 visitors per year; and are estimated to earn between US$ 20,000 and 700,000 per year. These include countries such as Burkina Faso, Chad, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana and Niger. Receipts from these 14 afore-mentioned countries amount to an estimated US$168

28

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

million per year. A further breakdown of these data reveal that the average daily price of a standard wildlife watching tour is US$ 433 and ranges from US$ 86 to 500 per day. In the “luxury” market, the average daily price is US$ 753 and ranges from US$ 179 to 2,500 per day. What’s more, tourists are want to engage in out-of-pocket spending in the course of their trip. So whether it’s a cute carving they see along the way or a nice souvenir they’d love to get for a loved one back home, out-of-pocket (additional) spending by tourists range from US$7 to 250. That is not all. Further data from the UNWTO survey reveal that the average length of stay by a tourist for a typical wildlife watching tour is 10 days. In the “standard” market segment, the average length of stay is 11 days; the range starts at half a day and reaches up to 42 days while in the “luxury” market segment, the

average length ranges from a day and half to 18 days. If you multiply this number of days with the average amount spent per day on these tours, you’ll appreciate the depth of the goldmine currently existing in the African tourism industry. These figures clearly show that majority of visitors to Africa are ‘loaded’ with significant quantities of cash and will be willing to do business with whosoever is set to offer them value for money. In the same vein, while there’s so much money to be made, there are challenges which investors and stakeholders need to be wary of. Stiff competition is one of them. Unlike other service industries, competition is quite stiff in Africa’s tourism industry, but thankfully there is enough room for everyone to excel, especially service providers that offer value for money. This is why delivery of quality services is non-negotiable for those who are in this for the long haul. Inbound travelers are not ignorant of the various infrastructural challenges facing the continent; they know that provision and maintenance of basic infrastructure is largely out of the control of service providers, yet they still come. But they also know that customer satisfaction is within everyone’s control. It know that this is an attitudinal thing, so it is non-negotiable and cannot be underestimated. That is the least anyone can ask for. Excellent customer satisfaction is central to business growth in the tourism sector. This is what propels

customer retention, repeat business and word-of-mouth marketing by satisfied customers. To be sure, no one investor or service provider in any destination can control all the components of the tourism product. This is why the tourist may have a range of good and bad experiences in the same destination. It could start from the embassy of the destination country (before departure) all the way to the customs or immigration officials on arrival, and even to the local population that might be seeking to exploit vulnerable tourists. This is why stakeholders seeking to invest in countries with poor tourism awareness (but immense potentials) must be proactive in undertaking awareness campaigns about the value of tourism to the economy. Doing this will help counter such attitudes and ensure that all and sundry understand the considerable economic benefits that tourism brings to a nation, especially through job creation which ultimately brings prosperity to the local population. Finally, it is important to reiterate the fact that tourism in Africa is booming; and being the world’s largest employer of labour, it is indeed a great industry to invest in, reap great returns and add value to the local economy. All in one fell swoop. The opportunities for innovation are endless. You should give it a thought. The conversation continues on Twitter @frotourism. Let’s share and engage.


c

Magazine Today!

SEE Africa Magazine – a monthly publication dedicated to promoting the trade of travel and tourism in Africa. The magazine aims to become the number one voice of authority in the African travel and tourism industry and a trusted source for the latest travel news in the industry.

Print versions also available at a special bulk rate with free delivery.

c Get your FREE ACCESS to the digital version of our magazine on your tablet or mobile device! AVA IL A B L E ON :

ϱ͗ϯϭWD ϱ͗ϯϭWD ϱ͗ϯϭWD

ϮϮй

ϮϮй

ϮϮй

B

B

B

T h e M agazi n e i s av ai l ab le in Pr int an d D i g i t a l .

to

8VHUQDPH

(PDLODGGUHVV

3DVVZRUG

(PDLODGGUHVV

/RJLQWRP\DFFRXQW

Subscribe /RJLQ

)RUJRWSDVVZRUG"

6LJQLQZLWKIDFHERRN

/RJLQ %CPPQVCEEGUU[QWTCEEQWPV!

)RUJRWSDVVZRUG"

6LJQLQZLWKIDFHERRN 0GYJGTG!%TGCVGCPCEEQWPV

1HZKHUH"&UHDWHDQDFFRXQW 1HZKHUH"&UHDWHDQDFFRXQW

Subscribe for your FREE digital copy Fully interactive on iPad & iPhone NOVE MBER 2016//

29


CAMERAS, CELL PHONE APPS, HYDRATION UNITS AND OTHER NIFTY TRICKS

30

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


A Nikon D3200 DSLR- a great casual photographers tool and fantastic for trips abroad.

D3200 DSLR

A

s a traveller, sometimes technology can get us out of sticky situations or simply make our excursions much more pleasant. Below are a few gadgets and applications that can be of great help to anyone heading to another country or going on an exciting holiday. The first item mentioned is the camera, a piece of equipment that nobody should travel without. Be it a Canon or Nikon DSLR or even a recently released Smartphone such as a Samsung S7 or I phone 6, the camera is an intricate piece of travel technology that can help you show your loved ones your trip and get them to experience some of it. In addition to the more cumbersome DSLR's mentioned above, if you're up for an adventurous holiday then a GoPro hero 4 might be more your style. The compact design and extremely good image and video quality can truly solidify the fact that dynamite comes in small packages. If you're planning on using a high quality camera, consider purchasing a fast SD card, as the card can be the difference between great video

NOVE MBER 2016//

31


A hiker and his pack, the modern pack houses many compartments to carry items and is brilliant for the outdoors or travelling in an urban environment.

quality and a sloppy laggy video or stoppage during your recording time. If you're a technology fan and like carrying around all your technological possessions and using them frequently then a power bank is a must.. These small battery packs house enough energy to recharge a cell phone, and with the right adapters even a small camera battery. Most come with standard USB connection, although a few come with other adapters. Keeping a power bank on standby if you're travelling outdoors or in a city is a great way for your travel gear to stay charged and ready for that snapshot or phone call. It's always good to know if your battery dies that you still have a backup power bank so you can make that call for a taxi or find out why your tour guide is running late. While still being a form of technology but more for the outdoor explorer, hydration packs and backpacks of high quality can mean the difference between an uncomfortable holiday and a relaxed one. Having a good quality pack with a hydration unit

32

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

can keep you going on hikes, adventuring through the city or just keep all your belongings safe and sound from prying eyes. Safety is always important when travelling and a good bag makes sure your items are kept on your person. If you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a travel backpack, make sure you have a good quality briefcase, messenger satchel or laptop bag to keep your items in check and still look the part. Along with physical gadgets, mobile apps such as Airbnb, Snapchat and Instagram are popular with travelers. Cell phones are a must and having a variety of apps that can enhance your stay or make the trip less stressful is a great bonus. Airbnb helps the user find accommodation easier, instead of hotels or backpackers you can stay with locals in their homes or wherever they offer a location to stay. It has great reviews and works extremely well for both the host and the traveller staying over. It's also a great way to engage in the local domain as you can get acquainted with your host and share


The logo for Airbnb, the app which helps ease travels.

stories, and they can advise you on where to go next. Snapchat is another application that has taken off in recent years, and is a big hit among the youth. Now it seems travellers take it upon themselves to snap away and send videos and photos on a whim to their friends and family, Snapchat also offers the ability to save all videos under one file, this helps as if you're recording some exciting happenings on your travels you can almost instantly create basic movies. Other applications that are beneficial when heading abroad are weather apps, planning applications, price checks, and currency exchange apps connected to certain cities you are travelling around, and there are many more helpful products found on the "Play store" if you have an Android device or "I store" if you're an Apple/Mac user. The Nokia Treasure Tag guarantees you never forget your

phone or laptop before leaving your room. The Treasure Tag connects via Bluetooth to your device and can be used to track and even make a beep if you're leaving without it. Forgetting your phone or laptop is a big blunder especially when you have business to attend throughout the day or a great activity planned. These little innovations in technology were made for the everyday user, but have an enhanced effect when used during holidays and business trips. Finding the right place to stay, making sure your phone or laptop doesn't die or taking the right photographs can mean the difference between an upsetting or boring trip and a fun filled, productive experience. If you're planning on heading somewhere sometime soon, try and get your hands on some of these devices or applications and watch your trips take off in a completely new light.

A power bank that can be used to charge either a cell phone, laptop and even certain cameras.

NOVE MBER 2016//

33


#Style Man

FASHION 34 - 35

Cu ra ted by Og b e Isib o r

Dressing up for the trip Be it a long business trip or a weekend getaway, traveling is almost inevitable. It’’s actually one of the things some of us look forward to year in year out. You’ve gotten your flight booked, accommodation sorted, bags packed and its time to go. All the things that seem difficult on your to-do-list have been checked, or have they? What to wear. As easy as it sounds, this could prove to be a very challenging huddle. Comfort should be a major consideration when putting it together. Don’t be that guy who spends almost half the check-in time trying to put his shoes back on or that one who repeatedly sets the metal detectors off and slowing the line down. Remember also, if you’re taking a long trip, that you want to be very relaxed in what you wear. That said, you still want to stay stylish when you travel. Whether you opt for a business casual look, smart casual or a winter get away, we’ve put together different ensembles for men to help them travel comfortably in style.

Look 1 SMART CASUAL 34

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

Penny driving loafers from www.hugsandco.com Blue Jeans from www.zara.com Slim fit suede bumper jacket from www.mrporter.com 883 Police Aurora Long Sleeve Polo Shirt from www.usc.co.uk Navy Boss leather Gascon holdall bag from http://www.lyst.co.uk/


Look 2 BUSINESS CASUAL Men’s dress shirt from Brooks Brothers Champagne wool tailored suit from www.reiss.com Oxblood Stewart Penny Loafter from www.paulevansny.com Garrison No. 147 brown business bag from www.ghurka.com

Look 1 SMART CASUAL Brother Charles cargo shorts Paul Smith brown boat shoes Denim Jacket from www.levi.com Hurley black men’s short sleeve shirt from www.lyst.com Mulberry Clipper Leather Holdall Bag from www.mrporter.com

NOVE MBER 2016//

35


COVER STORY

By Michael-Alvin Usifo & Niyi David

ZiZimmbabw bab Z

il

36

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


©ANDY BIGGS

bwewe THE WILD MIGRATE

w e com th

r e d an

h g rou

s r e d n o W

The Serengeti (Tanzania) hosts the world’s largest wildlife migration on Earth with over 750,000 zebra marching ahead of 1.2 million wildebeest as they cross this amazing landscape.

NOVE MBER 2016//

37


ZIMBABWE: COME WANDER THROUGH WONDERS

e

... a travelerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guide to Africa

WWW. AFROTOURISM .COM

38

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


VICTORIA FALLS

COVER STORY

WHERE TO GO

//

ZIMBABWE

V

ictoria Falls is the icing on any visit to

Zimbabwe. The waterfalls, Africa’s only representative on the list of 7 Natural Wonders of the world, always awe its guests thanks to its magnificence. In fact,

David Livingstone, the first European to discover it, was so fascinated by its beauty

that in 1857 he wrote that no one in England could even imagine the beauty of this scene. He added that most probably, angels were admiring the scenery while flying nearby. Even among the locals, the waterfalls is highly revered. Mosi-oa-Tunya (the smoke that thunders) is what the locals call it because of

the thunderous roar it produces as large body of water plunges into the 1,700 metre-wide cliff edge leading into the deep gorge where the water goes. As the water plunges down, the gorge reacts with the release of a cloud of spray that sprout forth towards the sky and return like rainfall. At its peak, the shower can spread as far as 60km

radius. Of course the view of the magnificent waterfalls, cascading down 108 meter is something of a wonder from whichever of the 16 viewing points one sees it, but nothing beats seeing it from the sky on the a helicopter ride. While seeing the sheer magnificence of the falls is enough reason for

anyone to dust his passport and fly to Victoria Fall City, the cascading water has pulled other interesting activities that further justify adding it on one’s bucket list. Adrenalin junkies can bungee jump off the Victoria Falls Bridge. There is also a chance for gorge swinging, zip lining, just as one can explore the falls on a canopy tour.

NOVE MBER 2016//

39


ZIMBABWE: COME WANDER THROUGH WONDERS

The Dam changed everything! In a sense, the lake defines Kariba because everything seems to revolve around it. Before its construction, Kariba was merely a riverine area, with the Zambezi River flowing normally and exhibiting regular seasonal fluctuation in water levels. Its significant impact was the transformation of the area into a lacustrine environment, with an additional benefit of increased resident fishes. Also drawn to the area by the lake are: wildlife, aquatic birds and a variety of plants.

40

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


COVER STORY

TRAVEL TIPS

keep these at heart while visiting this wonderland Harare Republic United States Dollar (de facto) 390,757 km2 3910km2 386, 847km2 12, 521, 000 (2009 est.) +263 UTC +2 English, Shona, isiNdebele, and a variety of Bantu Languages Must be valid for at least 6 months from the date of arrival Required at the point of entry, for citizens of a number of countries visit www.evisa.gov.zw to know if you need one keep up-to-date with routine vaccination, required vaccines change depending of prevailing circumstances Temperate climate featuring sunshine (at least 10 hours daily) all year round; winter and summer alternates between May to August and November to March respectively Light jack for summer (raining season)

NOVE MBER 2016//

41


ZIMBABWE: COME WANDER THROUGH WONDERS

KARIBA K

apenta, a small sardine-like fish, announces Kariba anywhere it’s served as it is widely associated with Kariba, though Kariba itself is synonymous with bliss! Kariba is a place to be for an out-of-this-world experience whenever you visit Zimbabwe. The area is a wilderness of water, an Island of beautiful and jaw-dropping baobab and an oasis for various wildlife including the big games and birds. Kariba’s centrepiece is

42

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

its magnificent lake. The lake is succour to landlocked Zimbabwe. It is the second largest manmade structure in Africa after the Egyptian pyramids, and the largest man-made lake in the world in terms of area (282km when full). In terms of volume, it ranks 3rd with 185billion tonnes of water when full, while the Zambezi River, from where the Lake was made, is the 4th largest river on the continent, flowing through 8 countries—Zambia, Angola, Namibia,


COVER STORY

//

ZIMBABWE

Botswana, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Tanzania and Mozambique, before spilling into the Indian Ocean. Today, Kariba is a perfect base for experiencing the best of different worlds—safari and water activities! Thanks to its wide safari space, pristine water and wonderful scenery, visitors can indulge themselves in Kariba’s spoiling luxury. In fact, the lucky visitors get to marvel at the incredible sight of water rushing at 2000 to 3000 cubic meters per second whenever any of the six floodgates of the Kariba dam is opened. There is equally a nice bird view site on the other side at Zambia, while the Kariba museum is the home of history; visit the place to learn about the dam, the history of the Tonga people, their relationship with Nyami Nyami—the water god, and learn the local techniques

of hunting hippos. An evening game drive at Kariba brings everything to you at close range, from herds of elephants, zebras, hippos, to crocodiles, kingfishers and fish eagle all hobnobbing with their kinds in an area of enchanting serenity. The view gets spicier while on a boat cruise or right from a houseboat with wildlife just meters from your bedroom window. But you can’t appreciate Kariba better until you’ve viewed it from the sky, the landscape is a maze of channels, inlets and submerged forests which are homes to various incredible creatures. A trip to Kariba is however incomplete without visiting Mana Pools and Matusadona. While Matusadona is right by the shore of Lake Kariba and is a Protected Zone that is now home to Rhinos, elephants, waterbuck, buffalo,

cheetah etc., Mana Pool, a UNESCO World Heritage site, is like nowhere on earth. In addition to its herds of large mammals and other creatures, Mana Pool seemingly freezes time as visitors are treated to ceaseless streams of sizzling wonders. The picturesque National Park located downstream from Kariba on the south bank of Zambezi “is an invitation to dream, while watching herds of elephants, impalas and zebras elegantly dance together in this idyllic environment” says Elsa Bussière and Matthew Wijers of African Geographic. Mana Pool is where visitors experience nature in its loudest and most audacious style under the canopy created by large baobab and other tall trees. What Kariba lost to Kapenta, Mana Pool earned as it has rightly been named as Africa’s best-kept secret.

NOVE MBER 2016//

43


ZIMBABWE: COME WANDER THROUGH WONDERS

B

ulawayo, Zimbabwe’s second largest city is a laidback place where ancient and modern meets. The city’s signature is its wide roads flanked by beautiful trees-lined streets, and parks. It has many early Victorian and Art Deco style buildings and other Cecil Rhode’s

//

legacies that easily warm it into every visitor’s mind. Bulawayo is also renowned as the city of kings and is frequently tipped as the cultural headquarters of Zimbabwe. Often sheen as an alternative to bustling Harare, Bulawayo is home

to many unique charms which in fact make it standout. This city is a perfect base for visiting two of Zimbabwe’s UNESCO World Heritage Sites –kharmi Ruins and Matobo National Park, and an ideal place to unwind in quaint cottages and beautiful lodges.

BULAWAYO ZIMBABWE

44

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


COVER STORY

HWANGE NATIONAL PARK //

H

ZIMBABWE

wange, a former royal hunting area of the 19th century Ndebele King—Mzilikazi, occupies a classic page in Africa safari. With an area of roughly 14,650sq km, the park is the biggest game reserve that safari goers will find in Zimbabwe and occupies a prestigious position as a prime game viewing site available on the continent. However, Hwange NP is not just all about its size; it is Africa's finest havens for wildlife and a protected zone for all of Zimbabwe’s specially protected animals! This premier game reserve shares a part of the Kalahari Desert, which adds to its interesting variety of animals and fascinating landscape that include woodland savannah, interspersed with saltpans, granite outcrops, grassland and vast open palm-friended plains that encourages unmatchable wildlife diversity. Hwange National park is home to just about every creature you can link to Africa—well, almost all. Here, nobody talks about Africa Big Five but Big Seven—that is elephant, leopard, lion, buffalo, rhino, hippo and crocodile. There are equally the small five, the ugly five among others. However, the elephants are the ‘lords of the manor’ at the park, as they represent more than 85% of the total biomass of large herbivores that call it home.

In addition to its 100 mammal species, Hwange’s National Park also boasts of incredible diversity of birds. Most twitchers consider the park a paradise, what with its 400 species of resident birds, in addition to migrating bird species that flock the park for food during raining season. If the elephants have a crowding presence over other mammal in Hwange, the raptors are the signature birds of this national park with Bateleur, martial eagle, tawny eagle, African hawk eagle, brown snake-eagle, black-chested snake-eagle and pearl-spotted owlet stamping impressive presence there. Between April and October, Hwange NP usually experience dry season that would have made life unbearable for the animals at the park due to the lack of water, but man-made waterholes have been introduced to sustain them. These waterholes have gradually transformed into nice game-viewing spots. This means that visitors can visit Hwange NP during the dry season prepared to see the big mammals come to drink and bath at the different waterholes as shortage of naturally sourced water forces the big games out of their hiding places. Visitors are equally likely to sight raptors sharing a meal with mongooses and baboons; these are just snippets of why a visit to Hwange National park is a step into nature’s wonder.

NOVE MBER 2016//

45


ZIMBABWE: COME WANDER THROUGH WONDERS

T

his architectural opulence gives evidence of Zimbabwe’s historic feats. The Great Zimbabwe is the largest and most significant ancient monument south of the Sahara. It occupies about 720 hectares of land with an imposing edifice offering an impressive panoramic view of a wide area as far as some parts of Masvingo town. This monument is a defining height of ancient Shona rulers’ power. Talk about an impressive and imposing house on a rock and the great Zimbabwe bring the picture to reality. Viewed from below, one will marvel at the hands and mind that set each piece of stone making up this massive monument together to make a home. Did they attempt to mirror the tower of babel or to leave an edifice that would rattle the minds of their successors? Well, no one knows.

As one surmounts this magnificent remains of a once great kingdom, everything seem to fall in place, the freestanding edifice becomes a fortress that bring everything before your view. Speak from the top of the structure and your voice will travel far, probably as far as every nooks and crannies of the old kingdom. Any wonder why the rulers who lived there must have felt like gods. The Great Zimbabwe is a living monument that one must visit at least once in a lifetime. It is divided into three parts, The Hill Complex, The Valley Enclosures and the Great Enclosure. Each division is not just a spectacle, but a standing challenge and inspiration to our generation and those coming next—it's good news that Zimbabwe has donated it to the world as a Heritage Site.

GREAT ZIMBABWE //

46

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

ZIMBABWE


COVER STORY

HARARE //

M

ost trips to Zimbabwe begin at Harare only as a connecting point, but those who spare the time to explore the city usually find it interesting. Harare’s weather is its first bloom, the famous jacaranda trees in the city usually testify to this between September and October when they swing into full bloom, turning Africa’s Sunshine City into a sea of attractive purple.

ZIMBABWE

Harare is equally home to a number of Zimbabwe’s landmarks, with the National Heroes Acre as a distinctive ice on the park. The 57-acre monument, built to commemorate patriots who dedicated their lives to national service, is modelled after an AK-47 rifle and stands as a symbol of Zimbabwe’s independence. Equally distinctive is the Balancing Rock at Epworth. Here, visitors

usually marvel at the arrangement of rocks upon one another in quite amazing manner. The wonderful nature’s ingenuity displayed here is a fascinating geological formation that has in fact featured on the old Zimbabwean Dollar Harare’s many parks and gardens, including the National Botanical Garden, Harare Gardens, Greenwood Park, Mukuvisi Woodland, Kuimba

Shiri Bird Park, as well as the Lion and Cheetah Park, Snake World, Lake Chivero Recreational Park and Bird Garden among others, are equally lure for the soul. With a mix of hiking, bird viewing, sightseeing and perfect picnic spots on offer at the parks, these leisure spots—some located just outside the city, are simply interesting sites for a day out with friends and family. If Harare failed to rock

your world on your last visit, please visit again between April and May when the city adorns itself in the best of colours as it stages the renowned Harare International Festival of Arts. The other entertainment peak period is September when everything stands still for the Harare International Carnival.

NOVE MBER 2016//

47


"No one in the world needs an Elephand tusk but an Elephant"

48

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


... a travelerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guide to Africa

PROTECT OUR WILDLIFE, STOP THE BUYING OF IVORY.

NOVE MBER 2016//

49


By Sam Ad el eke

JUST BEFORE YOU LEAVE: Things to Do and Pack Where are you headed this season? Cape Town? Nairobi? Lagos? Or Marrakesh? Wherever your destination, you can’t afford to forget vital travel items, for this is probably the worst nightmare of every traveller. Make no mistake about it; it can happen to anyone – whether it’s your first or your fortieth trip. This is the holy grail of travelling and you can’t afford the consequences that come with it. So we’ve got a few useful tips about what to do before you set out as well as vital things to pack.

1

Make a list. It could be a mental list, a verbal list on your mobile device or the traditional paper-centric list. Whatever you do, draw up a list. Doing this few days ahead to your trip helps you to remember things you’d otherwise taken for granted or forgotten. As the days draw near, you’ll get to edit or tick off items on the list

2

Now start collecting important travel documents such as passport/visa, hotel reservations, itineraries, transportation tickets, key contacts and addresses, insurance documents and credit cards, among others. You don’t want to forget any of these vital documents

50

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


3

5

Remember the first aid kit. Better be safe than sorry. While no one expects a major incident, stuffing a small bag with the most basic pills and medicine you need wouldn’t be a bad idea, especially if you have allergies and health concerns

Ensure all your valuables go into your hand luggage. Even if the airlines lose your luggage, you don’t want to be traumatized by the thought of losing your laptop, jewelleries, camera, and smartphones, among others

t

4

Save bag space for your purchases. We know you want to pack so much, but we also know you will need space to bring back your travel purchases, souvenirs and mementos. It might be difficult, but trust us, it’s not impossible. You can thank us later

6

Finally, secure your luggage by taping, tagging or padlocking. Many suitcases come with name tags, so just take out time to fill them in; or just tape-roll your luggage from the top to bottom. You can’t be guilty of being over-protective.

he above is not an exhaustive list, so if you recall anything to pack while counting down to your trip, ‘just do it’. Write it down, stuff it in your luggage or just make the call. Trust us, the pain of forgetting to take care of important matters or leaving vital things behind is not pretty. We wish you all the best. And do have a safe trip!

NOVE MBER 2016//

51


WHY

Bulawayo SHOULD BE YOUR NEXT DESTINAT ION

How frequently do you travel and get a superb treat without breaking a bank? In this piece, Michael-Alvin Usifo says Bulawayo is the perfect place have royalty treatment at a bargain-basement price, ďŹ nd out his reasons below.

52

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


FUNFARE IN

B

ulawayo means a win-win! Ask anyone for a place to go in Zimbabwe on a low budget without missing superb experience and those who know ‘the ground’ well enough will recommend this city. Located some 5-hour drive from Harare, Bulawayo is

the perfect getaway for anyone seeking to dive into Zimbabwe’s rich culture, history, experience it’s safari, dig into its cuisine, roll with its friendly people and relax in its hassle-free air. Besides, the city is also seemingly the host of two World heritage sites—Kharmi Ruin and Matobos National Park, and visitors can simply get spoilt in its numerous and affordable hotels and lodges.

Second only to Harare in population and size, Bulawayo never plays second fiddle to any Zimbabwean city when it comes to tourism and taking care of tourists. It is one of Zimbabwe’s oldest cities and unarguably the country’s cultural headquarter. It is also one of the best-planned places in the country and people usually say that visitors can almost never get missing in the

city. You’ll easily identify Bulawayo with its broad streets/roads, purple-flowered jacaranda trees, Victorian architecture and art deco style buildings, but nothing brings it to mind better than its title as the city of kings (and queens). If you wish to use my help with having a royal *weekend experience in Bulawayo, then here is my usual itinerary.

NOVE MBER 2016//

53


Day 1 Arrive in Bulawayo and Head to Matobo National Park

T

here is an airport in Bulawayo if you are coming in by air, and if you intend to use the road, driving into Balawayo is equally safe and you don’t have to worry about heavy traffic. You should go straight to

Matobo NP. It is quite removed from town but you will have the time to be alone and get quality undisturbed time in nature’s ambience there. You’ll find a beautiful lodge at the park where you can stay and use free Wi-Fi.

Trust me when I say their food is nice, but don’t forget to book a safari with them. They will organize a trip into the heart of this world heritage site for you and I bet you will be wowed when you eventually leave.

...you will have the time to be alone and get quality undisturbed time in nature’s ambience there.

54

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


FUNFARE IN

As you embark on this trip, you will notice different rock formations, especially the rocks settings that portray the image of different creatures

H

ope you remembered to book this trip yesterday? Today is the time to ride, get on the 4x4 with the tour team (if there is any—it’s fun going in group actually) and go on this ride for a chance to see the single-horned creature among the big five…i.e. the Rhino! Matobo is home to many Rhinos but because of poaching, the population had reduced drastically. Luckily, a lot is being done to stem poaching and preserve this beast. The location of the animals is a top secret and visitors are usually warned to put off their GPS when snapping them—please heed this warning to help prevent poaching. As you embark on this trip, you will notice different rock formations, especially the rocks settings that portray the image of different creatures—including humans. Feel free to tell the tour guide to slow down for you to take some shots. You should also visit some of the rock painting sites. It’s a trip of a lifetime and you definitely want to keep the memories—so snap all you can! Complete the safari with a trip to the grave of Cecil John Rhode on one of the hills. Rhode called the view from the top of that hill ‘the view of the world’ and I bet you’ll only understand what he meant when you climb the hill. Cool and breath-taking are the humblest words one can use to describe it. I hope you get there with enough memories in your camera because you will snap so many pictures—so many that your camera will plead for mercy! Return to the lodge to pack your stuff and check out if you haven’t done that already, because tonight you’ll sleep in town.

NOVE MBER 2016//

sikelelisafaris.com/destination/big-cave-camp

Day 2

Explore Matobo World Heritage site

55


Day 3 Khami Ruin is not a freestanding wall. The site’s rich history will help you make sense of the ruins...

I

didn’t bother to recommend a lodge/hotel because you can almost find nice hotels and lodges everywhere in the city. If you are visiting during valentine season, I recommend that you stop by at the train station for a romantic trip on the train. This holds only on special days like the Valentine’s Day. The train station is on the road to the Khami Ruin—a World Heritage Site. Anyway, if you miss the fun, don’t miss the pleasure of digging into other parts of Bulawayo starting at Khami Ruin. The Ruin is a perfect

56

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

...you will have the time to be alone and get quality undisturbed time in nature’s ambience there. compensation for you if you have not been to the Great Zimbabwe at Masvingo. Unlike the Great Zimbabwe, Khami Ruin is not a freestanding wall. The site’s rich history will help you make sense of the ruins, so ensure that you go with a tour guide who know his onions, for you to relish every detail. The distance from town to

Khami is about 35-minutes drive. Depending on when you go, you should find some wildlife there too, especially monkeys, baboons, hyena, etc., and of course birds. There is a picnic site at Khami where you can relax after exploring the ruin. When you are done, return to Bulawayo city, freshen up and rest a bit. By late

afternoon, drive around town to see so many interesting places. There is the statue of the late former Zimbabwe Vice President—Joshua Mqabuko Nkomo, at old main street—now JMN Nkomo. Feel free to take some shots of the imposing statue. You can end the day at a bar in town or just return to your hotel to rest.


FUNFARE IN

Day 4 Visit the Natural History Museum and old township

...raw minerals, recreated mining scene and other historical artefacts.

T

he Natural History museum in Bulawayo is like none else. On display in the museum are statues of various animals—they look so real you’ll certainly wonder if the animals were captured and embalmed there. From the big animals to small ones, from crawling insects to large birds; there are so many of them you just can’t resist the temptation to snap them. You will also see raw minerals, a recreated mining scene and other historical artefacts. The snakes seemed to be the online live animals in the museum though. From here, go to the township and tour the herbal market. The oldest township in Bulawayo is Makokoba. Oh! I have almost given all the fun away. Enjoy the surprises that lie in the city as you tour its length and breadth. Finally, you can end the day at a club around Robert Mugbabe Avenue and travel back home the next day.

Usifo Mike-Alvin is a creative writer with a knack for budget traveling and adventure. He travels across Africa and reports for www.afrotourism.com

NOVE MBER 2016//

57


TASTE OF AFRICA 58 - 61 By Amand a Mo utt aki

A Foodie Guide to Fez

Getting lost in one of Morocco's oldest cities and savoring every bite!

58

S.E.E AFR IC A

www.afrotourism.com


Rcif Food Market

It didn’t take long to discover this was just one side of Morocco, a place where the old and new coexist in a unique mash-up. Fez served as the capital of Morocco six different times through history and is often referred to as the spiritual capital today. The medina is where you’ll find most of the historical sites and it’s also where you will get lost. Traveling through Morocco you will discover many foods have the same name but when they are presented vary greatly. Food is hyper-regional and based around the seasons. What’s available in the far south of Morocco may not exist (or be too expensive) in the north. Changes are made to the recipe to adapt it to local tastes and availability. Where can you find some of the street food specialties of Fez? They’re not as hidden as you might think.

which the winding labyrinth of Fez rests, sits the R’cif neighborhood. If you’re seeking amazing street food, this is where to go. You can purchase ready made foods or ingredients. You’ll find t’han, an organ sausage of sorts, as well as links of merguez sausage ready to be grilled, fresh goats cheese, and honey drenched pastries. It’s worth a wander just to see women making oarka (a type of Moroccan phyllo dough) on conical shaped ovens. They skillfully drape the paper thin paper on top until it is just cooked, and whisk it aside. This will be made into flaky b’stilla pies or briouats. In Fez, eating b’stilla is a must. The dish was brought to Morocco by the expelled Moors of Andalucía and known as judhaba. The sultan of Fes is said to have requested the dish be made by one of the Spanish chefs and it sealed its place in Moroccan culinary history. B’stilla is elaborate. Layered oarka creates the base of the dish. Slow cooked, spiced chicken is placed on top along with an egg and onion mixture, almonds, icing sugar and cinnamon. The package is wrapped into a pie shape and baked until the dough is toasted brown and crunchy. It’s then served dusted with more cinnamon and icing sugar. Traditionally the dish would be made with pigeon meat but today chicken is more affordable and appealing to the public. Many riads will offer b’stilla but if you’re out of options check out Thami’s in Bab Boujloud for traditional Moroccan fare including b’stilla. mimosafoods.com/salads-and-working-luncheons

T

he first time I visited Morocco we landed in Casablanca and took a prop plane to Fez. I’ll never forget the cargo net across the back holding in the luggage nor my first impressions of the city. As our van made the descent down the hill on top of which the airport is perched, I gazed out the window. The image of an old man in dusty sandals riding on the back of a donkey while carrying palm fronds will forever be etched in my mind. It was as if we’d gone back in time and I couldn’t help but wonder if this is what the entirety of our time in Morocco would be like.

At the bottom of the hill on

NOVE MBER 2016//

59


Dar Namir Fez

makeitmorocco.com/in-fes/

ingredients. ingredients. Make sure Make sure to take a to peek take inside a peek theinside the mosque too. mosque Entrance too. Entrance is is off-limits off-limits for for non-Muslims non-Muslims but you but you can take acan glimpse take ainside glimpse inside from the from open the doorway. open doorway. With tiredWith feettired fromfeet from walking and walking having and having spent a day spent or two a day or two experiencing experiencing the streets the streets of Fez, it’softime Fez,to it’shave timeato have a more relaxing moreevening. relaxing evening. Not all ofNot the all food of the in Fez food in Fez is on the is street on the – instreet fact – in fact there are there several are several amazing restaurants amazing restaurants like like Numero 7. Numero This concept 7. This concept restaurantrestaurant features afeatures a constantly constantly rotating staff rotating staff of chefs from of chefs around fromthe around the world. They world. create They their create their menus around menuswhat around is what is

Near the Near Kariouine the Kariouine Mosque –Mosque – home to the home oldest to the university oldest university in the world in the – you’ll worldsee – you’ll a see a street with street several withvendors several vendors selling nougat sellingofnougat all varieties. of all varieties. They’ll gladly They’ll let gladly you sample let you sample the different the flavour differentsoflavour that so that you can make you can your make choice. yourMy choice. My suggestion? suggestion? Stick to the Stick types to the types that are naturally that are naturally colored colored (avoid the(avoid brightthe green bright or pink green or pink made with made dyes), with anddyes), splurge and splurge on the almond on thenougat. almondIt’s nougat. sold It’s sold by the weight by the and weight the price and the price varies depending varies depending on the on the

Nougat in Fez

60

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

It didn’t take long to discover this was just one side of Morocco, a place where the old and new coexist in a unique mash-up.

Near the Kariouine Mosque – home to the oldest university in the world – you’ll see a street with several vendors selling nougat of all varieties. available available locally – sometimes infusing infusing locally – sometimes MoroccanMoroccan culinary dishes while other culinary dishes while other times creating completely times something creating something completely different. different. Finding aFinding place toastay into Fez is easy, place stay in Fez is easy, finding THE place to stay into Fez may finding THE place stay in Fez may be trickier. areThere countless riads beThere trickier. are countless riads and hotels at hotels a wide at variety ofvariety prices, of prices, and a wide from budget to frombackpacker budget backpacker to over-the-top luxury. If luxury. given the over-the-top If given the chance, choose stay into a riad. chance,tochoose stay From in a riad. From the outside all look butsame but thethey outside theythe all same look the as soon as walk through door the door asyou soon as you walkthe through you will be greeted uniqueby designs you will beby greeted unique designs


makeitmorocco.com/in-fes

Medina market, Fez

Quick Fact about African Lions

– no two –riads no two are the riads are the same. same. Enjoy a traditional Enjoy a traditional MoroccanMoroccan breakfastsbreakfasts each day,each and make day, and make sure to request sure toarequest gem a gem in the culinary in thecrown culinary of crown of Fez – khlii. Fez Hard – khlii. to Hard to pronounce pronounce but but delicious delicious to eat, khlii to is eat, khlii is cured andcured driedand strips dried strips of meat (usually of meatbeef (usually or beef or sheep) preserved sheep) preserved in fat. in fat. To cook, aTospoonful cook, a spoonful is is added to added a hot skillet, to a hot skillet, melted, and melted, then and then cooked with cooked eggs.with Be eggs. Be careful – careful it can become – it can become addictive!addictive!

Than in Fez

Fez is the kind Fez isofthe citykind thatof city that you can return you can to time return to time and time again and time and again still and still discover something discover something new. new. Expect toExpect get lost, tobut get lost, but consider it consider a part of it the a part of the experience. experience. You’ll be You’ll be back again, back soon. again, soon.

Renowned for its majesty and nicknamed "the king of the jungle," the lion possesses both beauty and strength. Lions vary in color but typically sport light yellow-brown coats.

NOVE MBER 2016//

61


Winner of the CNN/multichoice African Journalist Awards for tourism reporting, Pelu Awofeso unveils 12 hidden and untapped museums in Nigeria that I bet is unknown to 50% of Nigerians themselves.

6

1

5

10

4

‘HIDDEN’ MUSEUMS IN NIGERIA YOU NEED TO SEE

9

I visited a museum for the first time in 1998; to date, I have been in and out of 30, some of them more than once. The National Commission for Museums and Monuments (NCMM) manages 40+ museums nationwide, and there is possibly double that number of museums managed by individuals, groups, local and state governments, so you have an idea the variety that exists. However, there are a couple of interesting museums I have visited recently, they are off the beaten track and visitors to Nigeria should know about.

8

S.E.E AFR IC A

7

3

2

62

11

www.afrotourism.com

12


THE CBAAC MUSEUM I take it that you have 1 heard of FESTAC ‘77. What you probably don’t know is that most of the artworks displayed by the 50 participating countries at that epochal event are housed inside the CBAAC (Centre for Black and African Arts and Civilisation) Lagos office on Broad Street: and that includes the larger-than-life sculpture (up to 20 feet tall) of Queen Idia, the festival’s iconic logo, which is what you first see at the ground floor (just after the reception). Exhibits in the four galleries include prototypes of traditional architecture, textiles, figurines, and lots more. ODU’A MUSEUM AND HALL OF FAME I take it also that you 2 know the Cocoa House (in Ibadan), the first skyscraper in Nigeria (1965). What you probably don’t know is that it is 25 floor high and is home to the Odu’a Hall of Fame and Museum (on the 24th floor), declared open to the public in 2013 by Nobel Laureate Professor Wole Soyinka. As the name implies, what you’ll find here are exhibits that promote the culture, history and heritage of the Yorubas—masquerades, musical instruments, fashion, and royalty, to mention a few. Prepare to be transported back to an era of atupa (oil-lamps) and vicious intra-ethnic wars from the 19th century. ZOOLOGY MUSEUM The University of Ibadan 3 zoo is popular among residents and visitors to the ‘pacesetter state’. What most tourists don’t know is that just a few metres from there sits a well-stocked zoology museum, which has a captivating array of specimens (wet and dry preserved; extinct and non-extinct) of the animal kingdom—from crabs and cranes to mice and millipedes. The sheer variety of the exhibits will make you appreciate wildlife more. Prepare to spend roughly 90 minutes with the in-house guide.

MOTNA In full, that word means 4 Museum of Traditional Nigerian Architecture. It is situated inside the Jos National Museum (Plateau State) and comprises life-size replicas of the building styles of different ethnic groups in Nigeria. To quote the NCMM, MOTNA “is not only beautiful but functional”. What also makes MOTNA a big deal is that it is said to be the only one of its kind in the world. When you have concluded your tour, you may stroll over to the Bight of Benin restaurant (another masterpiece of traditional architecture) for a snack or a meal. THE POTTERY MUSEUM Another museum I will 5 recommend highly is the pottery section of the Jos National Museum, which houses hundreds of earthenware (all shapes and sizes) representative of almost every culture in Nigeria. Just so you know: pottery is not just for storing water; they serve other purposes, including ceremonial and traditional. Sadly, that awesome collection is losing its shine as a result of neglect; so go see it fast before the elements do more irreparable damage. THE YAR’ADUA MUSEUM Officially described 6 as the Shehu Musa Yar’Adua Exhibition, this collection is housed in the sparkling Shehu Musa Yar’Adua Centre (Central Area, Abuja) and celebrates the life, personality and achievements of one of Nigeria’s under-celebrated heroes who died in 1997, aged 54. In one of the many tributes to the man (displayed in the first section), former president Olusegun Obasanjo says: “He lived for the ordinary people of this country. He lived so that this country can make progress. He lived for democracy. And he died for what he lived for”. If you’re like me, that’s the kind of man you should want to read about.

THE SLAVE HISTORY MUSEUM Commissioned a few years ago by the Cross River State government 7 (at the Marina Resort), this museum sent chills down my spine the first time I took a tour of it. This is a museum that touches nearly all of your senses: aside from the graphic rendering of the slaves and their European masters, there is an audio-visual element to the exhibits (At the time I visited, the playback of screams by slaves in pain felt almost real). This museum is about the closest anyone in Nigeria can get to feel the torment of slavery.

Ancient rock art in Niger depicting four round headed figures

THE CURRENCY MUSEUM I was delighted to hear 8 about the commissioning of the ‘money museum’ by the Central Bank of Nigeria in 2009 as part of its 50th anniversary. Showcasing Nigeria’s currency evolution—from Manilas to the Naira—it is located in the bank’s Abuja office and requires visitors to apply in advance. I should see this when next I am in the FCT. SHYLLON MUSEUM OF NIGERIAN ART This museum is still in 9 the works and is a donation by one of Nigeria’s best known collectors (Engr. Yemisi Shyllon) to the Pan Atlantic University in Ajah, Lagos. When the museum is eventually opened to the public, it will kick off with 1000 pieces of art, including works by the likes of El Anatsui, Yusuf Grillo, and Bruce Onabrakpeya; quoting the donor, the Guardian describes the facility as a “one-stop-museum of ancient, traditional, modern and contemporary Nigerian art”.

HUBERT OGUNDE MUSEUM 10 This museum, situated in the country home (Ososa, Ogun State) of the late pacesetting filmmaker officially opened in April 2015 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Ogunde’s death. In it you’ll find Ogunde’s personal effects, photographs, scripts and costumes from his stage and film productions, and the albums he released in his lifetime. Visitors can also take a

CRIMMD MUSEUM up some 11 years 11 Set ago in the Idimu area of Lagos, this museum cum library prides itself as the collector of the largest photo collection of any research or archival institution in Nigeria. It houses, among others, photographs and portraits of the slave trade and its relics, of the famous Berlin Conference of 1884/85; the Nigerian civil war; old Nigerian currency notes and coins; and a rare collection of postage stamps. The adjoining library has the first editions of a good many periodicals in Nigeria.

AROKO GREEN MUSEUM environmentalists 12 For and anyone who is interested in the subject of recycling, this is the museum you should visit. Set up recently on the outskirts of Abeokuta (Ogun State) by artist Olanrewaju Tejuosho, Aroko displays works by Tejuosho, all made from domestic waste. The collection brightens up the dull surroundings really; and to hear the curator explain the inspiration underpinning them is to have a rethink about the trash we generate on a daily basis.

guided tour of the entire facility, which includes Ogunde’s room, the rehearsals spot, multiple changing rooms and two of the vehicles which transported the group across the country.

NOVE MBER 2016//

63


lig ht deht y lig pl yplde or sim ipaosora sim aros Mip att M atar bul ffe butffe enl ta inta nten El co nt coin en ed El oped y en neywlop e wl atethne ds th bu ds bu at ta ste liceattaeste deat ur lic yo ur yo de ou. se . H ou Hse ocated ocated in the in the heart heart of the of the Equatorial Equatorial Cl ub lf Cl lf ub e Go arethGo neth n ar Gr ee Grneene se yan y uran cose lf ur gor lfgoco ou d on rou Forest Forest amidst amidst green green hills hills andand serene serene rodunon enyjoa yroa un n jo rs ncaen lfe rs lfeca es GoGo ar he ct ar, es , 0 ct 10t 010he ab ou abtou wind wind of Mbini of Mbini River River in Equatorial in Equatorial hi ng St.re Sttcrehitcng ye. ar ofethyee ar e ofe th timtim se is uris cose lf ur ip lfgoco shgo onip Guinea, Guinea, Grand Grand Hotel Hotel Djibloho® Djibloho® pi on pish ch am e am -heolch 18ol sh -h lursh lu 18 bo th bo ou rou r th r fol fo idlea is id isea tti ng seng easily easily ranks ranks among among thethe best best Hotels Hotels d danthdethseetti cadtean lote lyca ct lyctlo pe rfe pe rfe hoeusise is ubus Clho e ub Th . eThCl you’ll you’ll find find anywhere anywhere in the in the world. world. lfe. rs gors o lfe d oprgo anr danpr at eu atreu amam e lfgo lf theethgo e lik lik es es ur ur felatfe at With With justjust 20km 20km away away from from thethe newnew seiantl ia eslse esnt thl al wi th wial ad ed lo ad loed pr-ac s, an s, danadpra ac ro om ak ro akom airport airport at Mongomeyen at Mongomeyen right right in the in the e clo e danfedmfealmealclo m,almealan sh op sh,op heart heart of Djibloho, of Djibloho, thethe future future adminisadminiseu. rs . at eu atrs am r am fo rfo zo ne e ne m m tic eticzo k fro drkinfro sh in shgindrg in re fre trative trative capital capital of Equatorial of Equatorial Guinea, Guinea, Grand Grand Hotel Hotel wi wiathreafre t t th irs irs th th yo ur yo ur en ch en ch QuQu ckilta il cota te ck isico qute exisi Djibloho Djibloho provides provides thethe perfect perfect respite respite forfor individuals individuals ’s qu boex lo’s Djloibbo el ib Gr an GrdanHdotHelotDj g on onthgeth e am am ce ce oi oi chr ch seeking seeking leisure, leisure, pleasure pleasure andand getaway. getaway. Corporate Corporate ltrfo spt oi spltoifo d tge n; dange rn ase ctseioctn;ioan teaanl danindteinrn lol ca ofca bodies bodies organizing organizing conferences conferences andand team team bonding bonding cancan lleioctnioofn lo coct m lle iu miuco pr em pr em te l’s 19 ho te hol’s o o H oy H oy 19 en ed oped y en neywlop also also useuse thethe exquisite exquisite facilities facilities available available in the in the hotel. hotel. e wl ats th atethne rasge vege bel ve bera tio na tiolna hol te l e te atethho rs th bar rs baat Otrhe TheThe hotel hotel boasts boasts of 380 of 380 rooms, rooms, 72 72 exquisite exquisite suites suites andand e. he hoe.usOt b ho b us e clu th ethclu byr by ba rba ba, r) , bal r) l (p oo n oo ea nea(p Oz : Oz de :de 50 50 luxurious luxurious villas villas that that areare premium premium value value forfor money money insclu in clu riestie var rie vatie ila rila th sim ne wi th wisim ni ni ez za ez za ne (M r (M irardo M ira Mdo El, El andand world world class. class. ba, r) y r) bb ybbba (lo r (lo ri rBa Sa fa SarifaBa Wlehi le a. hi SpW e a. th ethSp d by cadteby lote Satisfy Satisfy your your hunger hunger andand fulfil fulfil your your gourmet gourmet rdarlodca hach d eThOercOr an, danTh pl pleac e ba r) ba, r) e e is th ac ghlutcbluisb th nitc desires desires at any at any of the of the four four excellent excellent restaurestauLaotidniogh e tid upalscealLa d sc ic danup chan e ic th ethch do .wn . ir wn rants rants offering offering thethe best best culinary culinary experiexperihado ur ir yot ur yo ha an danledt le pa rty to pa to rty ences ences at the at the hotel. hotel. wi th wi th ck ed ck ed is sto re sto Order Order Italian Italian à laà la ntis Ce Cere s nt tnses Fies &tn e aSp&a Fi Th eThSp of ofeth e e e th m m so so by by d d an ne carte carte at at mne es danmdan itian ciles faiti odnerfancil m od mer g fe rin g ofsfe ofrin es ses bu sin e sin L’Incanto L’Incanto or or inethbu ls th na ls nain es sio ofsio pres g g st of be st bepr ea sin to sin es ea coesmto it co it m wh wh en , en exotic exotic s. So s. ,So rv ice seice vaetivseerv notiv lly in no inva ica ica ph ys ph ys lly d up tudneup African African epgintugne kein d ep ans danke strses e es thtethstr in in ou tou to go pleactoe go lyac onpl e ly thtethon dishes dishes at at abtou is ou th,isthisis ab ta,lly enlly mta an danmden Lom, Lom, in ea in.ea . Gu l Gu tolria ua to uaria Eq Eq enjoy enjoy thethe

L 64

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


Ultimate & Unique leisure destination in Equitorial Guinea

GRAND HOTEL DJIBHOLO Grand Hotel Djibloho is a congress, spa, leisure and medical 5-stars resort in the middle of a tropical African forest where luxury and natural beauty meet. The hotel offers all the right formality to enjoy attentive hospitality, courtesy and services the way to meet and enjoy events, banquets and caterings also for families and juniors, friendly, careful, safe and secure.

ra nd Gnd en,tsG, ra ev ts d ev d en s an s an ti ng eeng mti r mr ee FoFo t t ri gh s th s ethrie gh haha ®® lo ho lo ho D jib D jib ot el H ot Hel it sit s as as yo ne erne evyo r er fo rfoev si ze si ze enetr e C tr nc re fe fe re encCeen C on C on -a rt ofrt e--a atof st at stesceal e d sc d al gr an gr an th th r bo fo rfobo ed ed si gn de si degn is is . . ni ng ding e ni iveatdi prat d pr d iv anan ue ts ue ts nqnq baba e th e eth e cl ud inud s in s cl ti on ti on e op e op ThTh lo ho lo ho D jib dD djib an oo m oo m an llrllr BaBa rt ad bead Li be Lirt h nca n ic hicca whwh ri um toum di to diri AuAu at at es ts es ts 0 gu 1, 1, 020gu st st 20 hoho ly ly rt ab foab mrt co m cofo ti ng eeng mti 9 ee th eth9e m y of y of d an d an , an ce ,cean onon taebl e orbl nfta co nf coor wi th h th -ehacwi s- -e s-ac ro om ro om es ts es.ts . r gu s rfogu sesatfo 0 at 60 060se

// A: Djibloho Oyala WELE-NZAS, Equatorial Guinea // T: (+240) 3500 70 300 // M: (+240) 551 694 84 // info@grandhoteldjibloho.com // www.grandhoteldjibloho.com

Luxe à son meilleur Besides, Besides, thethe hotel hotel offers offers basic basic services services likelike airport airport transfers, transfers, laundry laundry & dry-cleaning & dry-cleaning services, services, medical medical centre, centre, carcar rental, rental, babysitting babysitting services, services, business business center, center, VIP VIP lounge, lounge, wired wired andand wireless wireless high-speed high-speed internet, internet, teatea & & coffee coffee making making facilities, facilities, andand many many more. more. So So whenever whenever youyou areare in Equatorial in Equatorial Guinea, Guinea, visit visit Grand Grand Hotel Hotel Djibloho® Djibloho® forfor thethe ultimate ultimate andand unique unique experience experience you’ve you’ve always always craved! craved!

NOVE MBER 2016//

65


Unveiling the Secret Jewels of Africa We travel for experience, fun and to know the secrets that the world holds in distance places. A greater pleasure is gained when the experience is turned into a story that everyone longs to read, and best when it is as unique as a visit to places oďŹ&#x20AC;-the-beaten-track! In this piece, Michael-Alvin Usifo takes us to some secret Africa jewels, what we call the UNTAPPED Africa.

66

S.E.E AFR IC A

www.afrotourism.com


UNTAPPED AFRICA

Africa is a nest of a myriad of attractions that are unknown even to the avid travellers. It is the world’s second largest continent, but curiously, it is also the most off the beaten track! Well, you’ve probably heard or visited Egypt, Morocco or South Africa, conquered many of the continent’s pristine beaches—especially those on its incredible 14 islands. However, there are many other ‘jewels’ kept off many tourism map and travellers’ radar, but which are not the least attractive to see. If you like the idea of boasting that you’ve been to places your friends haven’t even heard of, then it’s time to get your travelling ‘gear’ and hunt down these secret jewels of Africa!

NOVE MBER 2016//

67


68

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

blog.friendlyplanet.com/tag/best-of-south-africa

Think of somewhere discreet for diving and snorkelling or trekking wildlife in heavy jungle, fishing along villages blessed with vivid natural beauty, dilapidated architectural grandeur and disarmingly friendly people, then you have Sao Tome and Principe as the endearing answer. The former Portuguese colony comprises two islands of volcanic origin and a number of smaller islets lying in the watery armpit of West and Central Africa just off the coast in the Atlantic. Talk about a unique destination with unspoilt scenery where only a few tourists’ feet have touched and the archipelago nation comes top on the continent. The United Nations World Tourism Organization said only 8,000 tourists visited the country last year, a figure that placed it first among the least visited countries in Africa. Its novelty notwithstanding, Sao Tome and Principe is disarmingly awe-inspiring and charming, what with its peace, quiet, emerald rainforests, rocks, colonial era architecture, beaches and beachside resorts. Arguably everyone who’s been there wants to go again, while those who haven’t keep looking forward to the opportunity to do so. I am often asked: “if Sao Tome and Principe is well worth its salt, why aren’t many people en-route to the place every year? Julian Glover of the Guardian UK gave me an interesting answer: “Sao Tome and Principe has been overlooked by most of the world (because) It lacks the usual wars, famines and floods that win attention for African states in Europe.” Well, my opinion is, the Island is remote.


UNTAPPED AFRICA

© Filippo Aragone

SAO TOME AND PRINCIPE

NOVE MBER 2016//

69


tumblr.com/search/M'zab

70

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


UNTAPPED AFRICA

BENI ISGUEN, ALGERIA

This is the holy grail of any trip to Algeria. You don’t find pictures of it splashed on the internet, that’s why those who get there consider themselves lucky. In fact, the no-photography policy in this oasis of the Sahara makes it even more intriguing. No doubt, Beni Isguen is the world that has refused the rush of the world. Built in the 10th century, Beni Isguen resisted being despoiled by modernization to remain an African jewel kept secretly in the belle of Algeria. Historians record that the Mozabites were forced out of Tahert in 909 when a devastating fire destroyed their home. They found a new home in M’Zab Valley, where they built five fortified towns on a knoll. Each town is surrounded by pastel-coloured box-like buildings, which are packed in concentric circles around a central mosque. The central mosque itself is built atop a hill and its minaret serves as a watchtower. Of the five towns (together they are called Pentapolis), Ghardaia is the capital and main town, El-Ateuf is the oldest settlement, while Beni Isguen is the most enigmatic, ‘holy’ and traditional. Till date, Beni Isguen maintain its undiluted culture and tradition applying strict rules to foreign mix. Its gates are open to foreigners who are willing to follow the rules.

NOVE MBER 2016//

71


MANA POOLS 72

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


wild-eye.co.za/magical-mana-moments

UNTAPPED AFRICA

Mana Pool is an invitation to dream! It is one of the remotest, but no doubt picturesque, UNESCO World Heritage sites in Africa; this is where amateur or nature photographers have unimaginable fulfilment, clicking away amidst lavishly attractive landscape. Call it Africaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best kept secret, and you are are not far from the fact. Mana Pool is located in a region of lower Zambezi in Zimbabwe, it is tucked under a rich canopy of tall acacias, ancient mahogany and ebony trees, and offers spectacular views of Zambezi river, its floodplains, riverine woodland and the mountains of the Rift Valley escarpment. In Shona, Mana means four; the name Mana pool therefore reflects the four popular pools-Main, Chine, Long and Chisambuk, that are key features of this axis of the World Heritage Site. These pools, and other seasonal shallow pools as well as the protein-rich pods produced by the ana trees that populate the area explains the reason why different wildlife and waterfowls flock the Mana Pool during dry season. Usually, Mana Pool is closed during raining season from January to March, when the floodplains is taken over by lake. As the pools recedes during dry season, the magical vibe of the site comes alive turning it into one of Africa's most renowned game-viewing regions. Experts say Mana Pool National Park is the finest safari spot on the Zambezi River thanks to its wide array of different herds of wildlife, and the UNESCO considers it to be an area of dramatic landscape and ecological processes. However one looks at it, Mana Pool is simply magical. It seemingly freezes time as it treats visitors to ceaseless streams of sizzling wonders. The picturesque National Park located downstream from Lake Kariba is uniquely unspoilt; that it is accessible only on foot helps keep the promise that it will remain so for long.

NOVE MBER 2016//

73


NAMAQUALAND Namaqualand comes alive every spring when the barren area is filled with an unforgettable tapestry of colours. This annual dramatic, exciting and exuberant flowering features orange and white daisies creating one of the most surreal landscapes in the world. Namaqualand stretches over 600 miles between Namibia and South Africa and is the earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s botanical masterpiece.

74

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


500px.com/photo/92055747/namaqualand-daisies-by-ivan-van-niekerk

UNTAPPED AFRICA

NOVE MBER 2016//

75


travelotanzania.com/destinations

76

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


UNTAPPED AFRICA

SELOUS GAME RESERVE IN SOUTHERN TANZANIA

At 21,000 square miles—nearly twice the size of Denmark, Selous GR is the second largest game reserve in Africa, yet, it is largely unexplored by many tourists visiting Tanzania. The reserve is located in southern Tanzania, far from crowd, with rivers and lakes that defines its character and content. The park offers an incredible opportunity to get close to the amazing varieties of East Africa wildlife. In addition to its large wildlife population, this UNESCO World Heritage site also has “an exceptionally high variety of habitats including Miombo woodlands, open grasslands, riverine forests and swamps, making it a valuable laboratory for on-going ecological and biological processes,” according to the UNESCO.

NOVEM BE R 2016//

77


LOANGO NATIONAL PARK, GABON 78

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


voyagegabon.fr/dt_places/parc-national-de-loango

UNTAPPED AFRICA

Often described as ‘Africa’s last Eden’ and popularly referred to as the 'Land of surfing hippos,' Lango NP stands alone in offering a different perspective of Africa. Its 1,550 km² of savanna, pristine white sand beach, forest and mangroves are breathtaking panoramas. Combine that with its large wildlife population-- including elephants, buffalos, hippos, gorillas and leopards, as well as the variety of whales and dolphins that call the NP home and you’ll wonder why Lango NP is still less visited by tourists.

NOVE MBER 2016//

79


80

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

voyagegabon.fr/dt_places/parc-national-de-loango


UNTAPPED AFRICA

FARIN RUWA, NASARAWA, NIGERIA Hausa’s Farin Ruwa means “White Water,” that’s exactly what this irresistible waterfall in Nasarawa state is. By height, Farin Ruwa dwarfs the popular Victoria Falls. Here, the water drops 150 metres (492 ft) compared with Victoria Falls’ 108 metres (354 ft). For the pains of navigating through Wamba Council Area to get to the site, Farin Ruwa offers a magical experience and an ecstatic feeling that only a visit there can give. As you stand by and watch the whitish foam water cascade down the polished brown-coloured rock, the awesome grandeur of the site will simply leave you agape. NOVE MBER 2016//

81


AT NIGHT 82 - 84

By Niyi David

KOLOLI:

Night Times Are Fun Times on Senegambia Stripâ&#x20AC;¦

82

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


T

he sun fades away from the horizon and the temperature drops as the atmosphere is cooled by the breeze from the Atlantic Ocean, some hundred meters away to the right. Dusk soon turns to night but the Senegambia Strip in Kololi is alive, lit by neon signposts and colored lights from the numerous restaurants, bars, casinos, clubs, hotels, ATMs, ancillary shops and taxis bringing in patrons from nearby neighborhoods like Brufut, Fajara, Kotu, and Serrekunda, up to Cape Point, and even as far as Banjul. Anyone who has visited The Gambia, will no doubt agree Kololi is one of the country’s most important destinations. Kololi, a little suburb of Serrekunda, the biggest city in the land is the hub of tourism in the tiny West African country affectionately referred to as the ‘Smiling Coast of Africa.’ The Gambia is the smallest country on mainland Africa, yet it is big on tourism, earning a sizable chunk of its revenue from the industry. Much of the country’s tourism is tied around the 700 mile long River Gambia which runs all the way from Fouta Djallon Plateau in northern Guinea through Senegal, slicing through the midst of Gambia before emptying into the Atlantic Ocean at Banjul. Tourism is a seasonal industry in the country, usually starting in October and closing in May with the coming of the rains, followed by the commencement of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. Within this period, West Africa enjoys the harmattan season, a dry period often characterized by dusty wind and relative drop in temperature in the evening and early morning. Winter is usually around this time in the northern hemisphere, and this accounts for the tourists who come to The Gambia to enjoy a more clement weather. Cruises upriver into the heart of the country, especially on the slave route are popular tourists’ activities, and it is almost impossible to have a holiday in The Gambia without a glimpse of the historic river, since Banjul, the capital is the only port of entry when flying in. The other nearly impossible thing is to

NOVE MBER 2016//

83


AT NIGHT

visit the Gambia without coming to Kololi. Few visitors book their reservations in Banjul, instead they are driven across Denton Bridge to places like Kotu, Fajara, Cape Point and Kololi which are the designated tourists’ areas. These places have some of the best tourists’ facilities in the country and are lined along the Atlantic coast, but Kololi has garnered a

84

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

reputation for its vibrant nightlife, and it’s all thanks to the famous Senegambia Strip. Named after the iconic Senegambia Hotel that dominates its beachfront, Senegambia Strip is a kilometer long J-shaped road off the Bertil Harding Highway down to the Bijilo Monkey Park. Lined on both sides with restaurants, bars, clubs, hotels, casinos, etc., the Senegambia Strip is a

busy destination, especially with its proximity to the beach. Some of the restaurants are open from noon and receive patrons who come by for good food. Being a typical West African country in the tropics, afternoons can be a bit warm at times, in spite of the harmattan, but the nights are always almost perfect for visitors. Apart from that, there are a few things that only the nocturnal ambience can give – after all, you won’t find people dancing in a club in the day time! As evening wraps away the sun under its dark shrouds and the night is lit with different lights, you’ll see a host of feet shuffling up and down the strip in search of good food, fine wine, and excitement to feed their yearnings. The restaurants or bendulas offer romantic indoor seating or open-air dining, and range from European (Italian, Dutch, Danish, German, etc.) to Asian (Indian, Chinese, etc.) and African. A variety of tantalizing cuisines, both local and continental are served. Some of them have live bands to spice up the night and enliven your mood with good music while you enjoy your meal. Several pubs and bars offer a place to enjoy light snacks and down some cold drinks ranging from soda to alcoholic beverages. Julbrew, the local beer is quite popular at several of the spots. For the restless person who desires more than just the pleasure of eating out, or downing a couple of drinks, but who wants to expend some energy on the dance floor, you’ll definitely find some nice clubs around where you can party into the wee hours of the morning on the Senegambia Strip in Kololi.


BRAIN TEASER

CROSSWORD 2 6

3

4

5

Magic Squares

7

8

9

10

11 12 13

Fill in grids so that each column, row and diagonal add up to the given sum.

14 15

16

17

18 19

20

21

22

The sum is 65.

23

11 10 24

25

26 27

28

6

25

13

30 31

32

33

34

17

18 12

29

36

37

38

43

44

ACROSS

DOWN

10. Fourth largest city in Zimbabwe (6) 11. Highest mountain in the country (8) 12. Capital of Zimbabwe (6) 13. First President of Zimbabwe, ________Banana (6) 15. Founder and head of Amakhosi Theatre Productions (7) 16. Town known as Wankie until 1982 (6) 19. Shona for 'one' (5) 22. Middle name of Olympic gold medalist (5) 24. Second largest city in Zimbabwe (8) 27. Banknotes Balancing Rocks can be found here (7) 29. Shona for 'man' (6) 30. Shona for 'Thank you' (7) 31. Ndebele for 'Welcome' (8) 33. Shona for 'Who is it?' (6) 34. Minister of Tourism & Hospitality (6) 39. Shona for 'knife' (5) 40. Shona for 'five' (5) 41. One of the languages spoken in Zimbabwe (5) 42. Shona for 'milk' (6) 43. Former Zimbabwean professional footballer, Peter______ (6) 44. President of Zimbabwe (6)

1. Former Portsmouth FC striker (7) 2. Shona for 'ten' (4) 3. Shona for 'water' (5) 4. Ndebele for 'girl' (7) 5. Shona for 'eight' (5) 6. Zimbabwe's World Tourism Expo (8) 7. Ruling political party (4) 8. Former world no 1 golf player (5) 9. Shona for 'Welcome' (5) 14. World's largest man-made lake (6) 17. One of the main languages (7) 18. Shona for 'fire' (4) 20. Founder of Zimbabwe African National Union (7) 21. Mountain range SE of Mutare (6) 23. Fifith largest city in Zimbabwe (5) 25. Africa's fourth longest river (7) 26. ____Falls, highest falls in the country (7) 28. Famous Zimbabwean lion killed in 2015 (5) 29. ECONET founder (8) 32. ____Hills wth outstanding rock paintings (6) 35. Famous family of tennis players (5) 36. Shona for 'Hello' (5) 37. Staple food made of cornmeal (5) 38. Shona for 'seven' (5)

3

16

33

2

B

6

E P

N

R

J

I

A

13

7

S A

19

18

G

I

M

U

N 20

P O T S

27

T

I

O

T

E P

21

I

12

K

L

A

E

R

16

23

G H

E B E L

A

M U R U M E

M

T

A T 33

E N D A

N D I L

L

41

S H A N U

S

43

29

31

C

S

A N I 36

3 22 20 13

52

40 48

84 12

44 72

36

16 14 7 8

1

5 24

30 cells diameter theta maze

R

D

R

30

64

25 18

17

E

C

9

H W A N G E

W

M Z E M B I

M U K A K A

I

N

G

28

32 60

T

B

B

The sum is 65.

S

Z

A W A Y O

M

Z

C

K

R

R

L E

5

N

V

M H

V

54

H A R A R E

14

22

B

4

M

57 63 9

M U T A R E

B U L

24 26

35

U

15

A

42

10

M

M H L A N G A

W O R T

40

3

G U

M

Y

A

H

34

9

N Y A N G A N I

C A N A A N E

Z A

11

60 66

Y

M

I

H

W

H O N A R

N D L O V U

SOLUTION

1

8

18

7 30

16

41

24 42

14

68 96

3

14

21

39

42

51 72

The sum is 260.

35

40

The sum is 195.

Copyright © 2013 puzzles-to-print.com. All rights reserved.

1

25

Z

B

32

A M U K E L A

E Z

T

37

O

S

39

I

38

N

B A N G A

O

O

D

M

Z

W

44

Copyright © 2016 JGB Service, http://www.mazegenerator.net/

M U G A B E

NOVE MBER 2016//

85


by SE AN STR E AK

C

CAPE

ape Town, home to fine wines, gorgeous mountain ranges and teeming fauna and flora hosts not only natural beauty, but a more undiscovered urban sector too. The locations below are just a fraction of the inspiring, exciting and educating activities this South African city has to offer. WALLY'S CAVE AND LION'S HEAD Lion's Head, a small albeit

86

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

interesting mountain nestled in Cape town between the famous Table Mountain and Signal Hill, offers great activity for the nature centric traveller or fitness junkie. The mountain itself sits at 669m above sea level and has a circular route to the summit which holds a variety of plants and wildlife. While Lion's Head itself is widely known around the world for it's beautiful views and relatively easy climb, the Cape Town locals know of a secondary route up to the top

which also leads to a secluded spot known as "Wally's Cave". The cave itself while small, grants the hiker a beautiful image of Table Mountain and if you look out towards the right side of the cave, you can find a great view of Camps bay which is a favoured tourist attraction for its Orange county-like appearance. The cave has enough room for those willing to stay the night if you bring along some


Hidden gems for the Cape Town tourist: restaurants, seaside activities and more.

Aces 'n spades

TOWN warm clothing and a sleeping bag. Though it's not advised to stay over during the colder South African months of May-August. It's these areas that make up the more interesting parts of South Africa, the off beaten paths and secrets that we like to share with those entering our country from abroad. OBSERVATORY AND WOODSTOCK If you find yourself more of a creative individual then

Observatory or Woodstock might catch your eye. These suburbs in Cape Town come across as poorer income areas at first glance, but are rich with the minds of creative's wandering it's vibrant streets. Observatory hosts a number of restaurants, bars and live music with a reggae feel. Entering one of these buildings, you can hear the banter of musicians, poets, writers and designers, all mingling. When the evening starts creeping in the patrons

If you're looking for somewhere to hit a dance ďŹ&#x201A;oor, jam to some groovy rock n' roll or just have a beer and sing some karaoke then Aces 'n spades is the location for you.

NOVE MBER 2016//

87


Promenade Mondays

can be found opening ears, grabbing beers and sharing ideas all over lower main road. Observatory is a place where prejudice is at an all time low, as there are no concerns as to your gender, colour of your skin or income level. While the area is often filled with students, it definitely caters for those of an older age. Woodstock on the other hand is aimed at a higher income group and has a variety of events that really grab a traveler's attention, some of these events are the market at 'the old biscuit mill' every Saturday morning until early afternoon, and the winter 'Festival' which hosts great food, music and usually attracts models from all over Cape Town.

ACES 'N SPADES NIGHTCLUB AND BAR. If you're looking for somewhere to hit a dance floor, jam to some groovy rock n' roll or just have a beer and sing some karaoke then Aces 'n spades is the location for you. The club itself has a famous piĂąa colada slushie that really helps ease a foreigner into the nightlife of the cape. Aces' is

Wally's cave

situated just off the famous "long street" in the heart of Cape Town and often can be seen filled up from Wednesday up until the early hours of Sunday. The night's escapades vary from karaoke nights to rock n roll DJ's, live music and some groovy songs from the 80's, 90's and early 2000's. The club is over twenty four years and caters to those in their mid twenties but older patrons may also be found enjoying the casual drink. THE SEA POINT PROMENADE The Sea Point Promenade is another potential area for tourists, it features a windy road for trail running or walking with a great view of Table bay and the Atlantic ocean. Just across from the small path is a myriad of high end restaurants with great service and usually a high gloss white and modern feel. The activities along the beachfront are fantastic; outside gyms, famous art, benches with stunning seaside views and ice cream trucks find themselves along the promenade during the daylight hours.

T R AV E L T I P S

88

If you're planning to stay in Cape Town and are into backpacking, then try the various Longstreet backpackers in the heart of the CBD or those on Kloof Street. If you find that an upmarket hotel is more your style, then stay at the Cape Town lodge hotel or the 12 Apostles hotel found South of Cape Town which is situated on a pristine section of South African coastline.

C O O R D I N AT E S + T O TA L D I S TA N C E

Approximate travel time from Nairobi to Pretoria, is 3 hrs, 40 mins

MILES

1815.58

NAIROBI, KE

2921.81

JOHANNESBURG, SF

BEARING

NE

NAIROBI, KE

S.E.E AFRICA

The promenade is also child friendly and has an event aimed at youth who wish to longboard or learn how to do so. The event is held every Monday in the early evening during the summer months of South Africa and hopes to teach children to skate effectively. It's a great bonding experience if you wish to take your child somewhere to explore and not feel uncomfortable. The promenade houses its own mini beaches along the route and they are easily accessible and safe if you'd rather catch some sun and take a swim instead of dining or learning how to skate.

www.afrotourism.com

28.0833

-26.2000 -1.2833


Tent under the stars in South Africa

Sunset Of The Lake Togo

NOVE MBER 2016//

89


LEISURE IN AFRICA 90 - 92 By Mi l l i cent Kai meny i

Why deny yourself the pleasure of traveling? Chances of experiencing a culture shock is always there, for a first-time visitor to a new place, especially when confronted with a practice, an event or a situation which they find strange and totally different from that which they are used to.

90

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


Popular Kenyan blogger Millicent Kaimenyi tries to recapture her love for travelling while inspiring others to take the leap of faith.

E

“isshhh! No! You cannot travel alone. You will look desperate for sponsors like those girls do.” In my country sugar daddies go with the brand name “sponsors.” They provide funds for the girls that they get; whether they are the ones who got you or you (the girls) are the ones who got them. This post is not about them (sponsors) so I will leave it here. The above comments were from a close friend with whom I was sharing my ideas of exploring my passion for travel. We have always planned for trips with our circle of friends, but many have never materialized. The few that did, ended up being poorly organized and at the end it felt like a waste of money and time. Napoleon said if you want to get things done do it yourself. So I took my travel passion into my own hands and decided to make it a reality. Expect more quotes because they are my source of motivation when I get “itchy feet.” “There are no strangers; only friends you haven’t yet met” a quote by William Butler Yeasts which I have seen its manifestations in the course of my travels. My first destination after making up my mind to travel as a blogger was to the Kenyan coast with a new colleague. One day over lunch I mentioned my intentions to travel and she decided we say hi to Malindi beaches. She had a friend down at the coast and to our advantage accommodation and transport around the town was covered. With my “normal” friends that would never have happened. (Not to say that my friends are not good but it would have taken forever.) Country wise Tanzania was my next destination and here I made a bunch of new friends. We had converged from different parts of the world for a common good and it turned out to be an amazing Christmas holiday despite not having my family around. From this visit I can proudly say that I can visit Uganda, Zambia, Namibia, Botswana and Mozambique without worrying about accommodation because they got me covered. What a relief. While some people’s main worry, while traveling is accommodation, mine has been lessened by this global family. During my travel adventures in the beautiful country Kenya I have met many people. Some

NOVE MBER 2016//

91


were good times and it ended there, others have inspired me to travel more through networking, while others have become my mentors by offering blogging tips. Online platforms have also been my motivation in regard to travel. Through following other established travel bloggers I have learnt how I can safely travel solo, how to organize my trips and most importantly how to get cheap deals. Who doesn’t like cheap deals? Can you imagine staying in your bedroom forever and not going to the other parts of the house? This is what happens when you do not travel. Some people are okay with staying in one place due to the comfort they find but traveling is like self-discovery. On my first visit to a Spur in Kenya, I ordered for a chicken espetada and what I was served was nothing compared to what I expected. I had never heard of it before and my experiment left my colleagues dumbfounded at the sight of it but I enjoyed it anyway. Learning new things is one of the best exposure from travel. I have learnt of different kind of meals, some very delicious and some not so tasty. A girl has to be honest! You will not like everything you encounter. Language is a major barrier when traveling and this has made me take up Spanish lessons. I have noticed locals will receive you with joy and help you when if need be when you show efforts of learning their culture especially the

92

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

language. La felicidad es aprender un nuevo idioma happiness is learning a new language. With other languages I am learning the common phrases just to be prepared when an opportunity comes my way. Through traveling I have learnt the art of patience. Things will not always work as they do at home and one has to adapt to such changes. Patience is a virtue that I have fully embraced. On one of my trips the bus I was in broke down due to bad road and we were delayed by three hours. Usually I would get mad and be annoyed the whole time, but this time I took it up as an opportunity to mingle with my fellow travelers. An Asian girl who was seated in front of me told me about how she is going for a holiday with her husband who will later join her. She seemed to be the same age as I and upon further conversing, she told me she got married at twenty out of love. Maybe I will meet my prince charming on my travel adventures. Who knows! If you get a bite from the travel bug, don’t ignore it. Embrace the bite and follow your instincts. Friends and family may not be ready to support you on this dream but follow it regardless. You will get to know things that you would not otherwise know staying in one place and this will reveal the inner you. AFRICA has amazing places to visit and people to meet, why would you deny yourself this pleasure by staying in one place?

Flight Ticke�ng| Hotel reserva�on| Visa processing| Airport protocol Honeymoon & Holiday des�na�ons| Corporate Tours| Academic Tours| Religious Pilgrimages 16B Allen Avenue,P.O.Box 9331,Ikeja Lagos|info@trebettravels.com| www.trebettravels.com +234(0)7085717155; +234(0)9038466568; +234(0)8139039755


The Hassan Tower Opposite the Mausoleum of King Maohamed V. Rabat, Morocco

NOVE MBER 2016//

93


S

by

Blue flouka fishing boats

94

S.E.E AFRICA


If you're looking for somewhere to hit a dance ďŹ&#x201A;oor, jam to some groovy rock n' roll or just have a beer and sing some karaoke then Aces 'n spades is the location for you.

Known for its windswept beach and boho-chic vibe, the whitewashed medina of Essaouira (pronounced Ess-a-weera) has long attracted independent travellers looking for life in the slow lane. However, as local resident Lynn Sheppard explains, behind the hewn stone walls of this city, all is not what it seems...

NOVE MBER 2016//

95


Spice souk

Aces 'n spades

Hindi Zahra at the Gnaoua Festival

Skala fortifications in Essaouira

ESSENTIAL ESSAOUIRA

Local produe at the vegetable souk

WWW.AFROTOURISM.COM

96

S.E.E AFR IC A

www.afrotourism.com

... a traveler’s guide to Africa


Maalem Omar Hayat _ Sonny Troupé

ESSENTIAL ESSAOUIRA

Today, Essaouira (recognisable to Game of Thrones fans as Astapor) has many European and North American residents.

.

DISCOVER

.

EXPLORE

Sardine ball tajine

DREAM

NOVE MBER 2016//

36 97


ESSENTIAL ESSAOUIRA

Essaouira In contrast to many other Mediterranean destinations, Morocco has consistently stayed on foreign governments' safe lists. And a direct air link to London begun in Spring 2015 has finally made Essaouira more accessible. The town's complex and fascinating history, its rich culinary offer based on excellent and unique local produce and a varied and ever-increasing programme of music festivals and cultural events means time to discover essential Essaouira is now.

98

S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


ESSENTIAL ESSAOUIRA

a destination to discover NOVE MBER 2016//

99


CULTURAL DIVERSITY: More ThrillsThan Shocksâ&#x20AC;¦

100 S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


The various spectacular festivals best showcase African cultures and offer the biggest thrills, be it the celebration of harvest, ushering in of a new year, supplication of local deities and dead ancestors, or initiation rites for youths into adulthood. Brightly colored costumes, raucous music, acrobatic dances and a charged atmosphere of revelry with lots of local delicacies to eat and enough local brew and spirits to drink are the hallmarks of these culture fests."

By Niyi David

A

s the world becomes more of a global village, the cultural identity of certain things or practices cannot be mistaken. Scots and kilts go together, chopsticks are Chinese, and the habesha kemis is to Ethiopians what the red shuka is to the Maasai of Kenya. Some cultures consider it offensive to extend your hand to a woman for a handshake, especially if she is married. In some places, wearing knee-revealing or arm-revealing clothes is deemed culturally indecent, while the popular ‘thumbs-up’ sign used as a sign of approval from ancient times is regarded as an insult and akin to giving someone the middle finger in some cultures. Suppose you arrive at a place and are unaware of these things, how do you feel

NOVE MBER 2016//

101


set your hearts racing often. But picture yourself on a Safari game drive through the Serengeti-Maasai Mara to witness the Wildebeest Migration in flesh and blood! Or, how about diving into the Devil’s Pool at the majestic Mosi-oa-Tunya, Victoria Falls? You’ve seen clips on Youtube® and all, but this is you swimming in that pool! That is the magic of being there, where the thrill is everything!

when the locals take offence when you make such a gesture? Let’s tip the scale a little. Imagine being in Kawasaki, Japan during the Shinto Kanamara Matsuri (the Festival of the Iron Phallus) for the first time! Or witnessing La Tomatina, the annual tomato throwing festival in Buñol, Spain? How would the imageries affect your sensibilities? Shock? Thankfully, the internet and social media has largely reduced the chances of

experiencing a culture shock, since most travelers would have gone past this stage by the time they arrive their destinations due to prior information acquired online. However, prior information in itself sets the traveler on edge in anticipation of another kind of experience – a thrill. While a shock is an unexpected experience, a thrill is something one looks forward to. Like anticipating an engrossing football

match involving your favorite team in a cup final. Even if your team won, reading reviews or watching the highlights later cannot rival the thrill of being present at the stadium, watching the action unfold with thousands of co-spectators and fans caught in the grip of nervous anticipation

102 S.E.E AFR IC A

www.afrotourism.com

and wild emotions as you cheer your teams to victory. Nothing beats a live experience. That is what travel is all about – being right there in the thick of an action. National Geographic® does a great job bringing the wild into your sitting room, and the images on your screen does

More Shocks than Thrills… Africa, often tagged the Dark Continent not just because of the complexion of the majority of her population, but also because of certain dark cultural practices. Many of these have since been halted by governmental laws, but a few barbaric ones have refused to die out, especially in remote parts. An example is the female genital cutting, a practice involving the removal of the female clitoris in the belief that it will stop young girls from being promiscuous. A perhaps more unfortunate practice in Tanzania and parts of Malawi involves the killing or maiming of albinos and using their body parts for ritual purposes. In recent media reportage, a sexual cleansing ritual in Malawi which involves a man, (referred to in the culture as hyena) having sex with young girls after their first menses broke out in the middle of 2016. To make matters worse,


All over the world, various cultural practices abound which are seen as weird, bizarre or even barbaric to strangers.

the hyena-man was HIV positive and he allegedly confessed to being fully aware of his status. A shameful cultural practice which prompted the President of the country not to mince words when he called for a thorough investigation of all the men and parents involved in the practice. In his words, “All people involved in this malpractice should be held accountable for

subjecting their children and women to this despicable evil. These horrific practices although done by a few tarnish the image of the whole nation of Malawi internationally and bring shame to us all.” Not all dark in Africa… Away from these few shocking practices which concerted efforts are being made to wipe out, Africa offers a lot more cultural fascination and thrills.

THE DISTINCT 3,000

For instance, take the Gwari (or Gbagi) people in Abuja and the surrounding states in Nigeria, unlike other African tribes they do not carry loads on the head. Rather, the shoulders are employed, because their culture symbolizes the head as deity. The coffee ceremony in Ethiopia and Eritrea is a small family event which takes hours and requires patience, but getting an invite to attend is an indication of being held in high esteem. However, it is the various spectacular festivals that best showcase African cultures and offer the biggest thrills, be it the celebration of harvest, ushering in of a new year, supplication of local deities and dead ancestors, or initiation rites for youths into adulthood. These festivals feature brightly colored costumes, raucous music, acrobatic dances and a

charged atmosphere of revelry with lots of local delicacies to eat and enough local brew and spirits to drink. An interesting sight is the Gerewol festival of the Woodabe tribe in Niger, West Africa a local pageant where the men spruce themselves up to woo the women, who may not necessarily be unmarried, for the night, or as long as the woman wishes. In Madagascar, during Famadihana festival, dead ancestors are exhumed, rewrapped and perfumed amidst fanfare, dancing, drinking and merrymaking. Old scores are settled with banana stems during the Mwaka Kogwa in Zanzibar as the people whip each other to usher in the New Year on a clean slate amid fanfare. January 10 of each year is a special day in Benin Republic, as the West African country is thronged by voodoo initiates and

spectators from neighboring countries and as far as Haiti, Cuba, Brazil and United States to celebrate the Vodun Festival. In Swaziland and parts of South Africa, Umhlanga (the reed dance) which features a host of young maidens carrying long reeds and dancing bare-chested in celebration of their virginity is a showpiece attracting thousands of spectators from far and wide. Like an addiction, the thrill of being there and being one with the culture even if it’s just momentary is hard to resist. The experience of sharing the joy of people and appreciating their traditions and what they hold dear. That is what travel is all about – to search, explore, and engage in the local culture even if it is just as a spectator. That is the magic of being there, where the thrill is everything.

There are an estimated 3,000 distinct ethnic groups in Africa. A large country like Nigeria has more than 370 recognized tribes.

NOVE MBER 2016//

103


NIGERIAN DRUMS F E S T VA L By Sam Adeleke

H

istory was made in April 2016 as Nigeria’s Gateway State – Ogun – launched the maiden edition of the Nigerian Drums Festival. This was a mega celebration of African culture and musical heritage which brought together tourists, drummers and people from all walks of life in Nigeria and beyond. The 4-day event paraded some of the most electrifying performances from drum bands and music stars across Nigeria and Africa. This included Aralola, Aanu the Ekwe player, Unique Fingers band, Oluweri Dance Group, Kegites, 7-year old T-rapper and the Ogun State Dance Troupe - Ogodo Egba, among others. In all, drummers from no fewer than 10 African countries and 19 states of the Nigerian federation participated in this epoch-making event. The Nigerian Drums Festival was conceived as a strategic move by the Ogun state government to draw the world’s attention to the rich cultural heritage and tourism assets abundant in the ‘Gateway State’. The high point of the festival was the unveiling of the world’s tallest traditional drum by the Governor of the state,

104 S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

Ibikunle Amosun. Impressed by the excellence and variety of talents displayed at the festival, the Governor declared that the drums festival will now be bigger and expanded into what will be known as the African Drums Festival. This symbolic announcement effectively signals a paradigm shift and a huge invitation to the world to come experience the beauty and elegance of the Yoruba culture in Ogun state, Nigeria. Explaining the rationale behind the whopping 16 feet length of the drum, the Commissioner for Tourism, Rt. Hon. Bashorun Muyiwa Oladipo, explained that the Number ‘16’ is a significant number in the Yoruba culture. According to him, ‘IFA’, a popular traditional religion in Yoruba land, typifies ‘ODU’ (Corpus) while the notable deity AGEMO is also typified by the number ‘16’ (ALAGEMO MERINDINLOGUN) in the Ijebu part of Ogun state – hence the world’s tallest traditional drum is significantly measured at 16ft. The well-attended occasion also played host to many dignitaries, elites and custodians of the Yoruba culture such as the Ooni of Ife, His Imperial Majesty, Oba Adeyeye Eniitan Ogunwusi, Ojaja II, the Alake of Egbaland, Oba Adedotun Gbadebo and the Osile Oke Ona of Egbaland, Oba Adedapo Tejuoso, among others.


Debut of the Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tallest Traditional Drum

NOVE MBER 2016//

105


UNTAPPED OGUN: Tourist Destinations in the Gateway state OLUMO ROCK TOURIST COMPLEX FACTFILE

Olumo Rock is a massive outcrop of granite rocks of primitive formation from which Abeokuta the capital of the state derived its name. The rock is an historical monument which served as shelter and fortress for the Egba people who at 1830 had settled under the rock

OGUN STATE: A GATEWAY OF FIRSTS Ogun state’s Gateway appellation is a tribute to its frontline role in the history, politics and cultural development of Nigeria. Here are some quick facts that justify this inimitable tagline.

1

Nigeria’s First Lawyer, Sir Adeyemo Alakija (1884 – 1952) hails from Ogun state

2

The First Nigerian Medical Doctor to practice modern medicine in Nigeria (1874), Nathaniel King, hails from Ogun

during the intercity wars. The rock is a monument of faith, unity, source of strength and unfailing protection for the Egba people. The highest point of the rock is 138 metres above sea level with existence of a muster tree growing for over 200 years and surrounding caves.

ORISAGAMU-EWA

YEMOJI RESORT CENTRE

This is a stream from which Sagamu the headquarters of Remo derived its name. The beautiful pot-god has remained a source of the stream which flows throughout the year. The stream was for a long time the source of drinking water for over 75,000 inhabitants throughout the year before the installation of pipe-borne water in 1958. The place is 50 kilometres from Abeokuta.

Sir Adetokunbo Ademola (1966), a son of Ogun, was the First Chief Justice of the Federation

3

The First indigenous Premier of the Western Region under Nigeria’s parliamentary system (1952-1960), Chief Jeremiah Obafemi Awolowo, hails from Ogun state

4

5

The First Black African Nobel Laureate, Prof. Wole Soyinka, hails from Ogun

Madam Efunroye Tinubu and Madam Funmilayo Ransome Kuti were the first women to buy a car and drive a car, respectively and they are both indigenes of the gateway state.

6

“Iwe Iroyin”, Nigeria’s First newspaper, was published in Abeokuta, the capital of Ogun in 1859 by Henry Townsend, a Christian missionary.

7

106 S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

The Yemoji Resort Centre is a natural Swimming Pool carved out of the cool stream of Yemoji located at Imagbon in Ijebu-Ode local government area. The swimming pool itself is about thirty-two metres long and eleven metres wide. It has a depth of eighteen metres to seven metres in some places. The history of the centre dates

back to the colonial era when a group of colonial officials and European employees of some commercial firms formed themselves into Ijebu-Ode Club in 1925 which subsequently developed part of Yemoji River into a Swimming Recreation Centre. With the demise of colonial rule, Africans naturally took over the Administration of

the Club. There is a guest chalet at the centre for tourists. The resort centre has easy access to several high class hotels in Ijebu-Ode which is less than ten minutes’ drive. The swimming pool has been dredged and the banks renovated. Standing-umbrellas with seats are available to provide shade for visitors.


BIRIKISU SUNGBO TOURIST COMPLEX OYAN DAM RESORT Oyan Dam is in Igboora-Odeda Local Government. It has a terrain, vegetation and surrounding suited for the construction of a safari lodge and wildlife park designed to meet the demands of business and leisure. The resort also features a large swimming pool, gymnasium, conference facilities, food and beverage outlet, cocktails including bush walks, bush dinner, bird and wildlife watching, indigenous dances, etc.

Situated at Oke-Eri, near Ijebu-Ode, the Birikisu Sungbo Tourist Complex is the site believed to be the final resting place of the Biblical Queen of Sheba. Just around the tomb is the “Sungbo Eredo” the

defensive rampart measuring 14m high and about 160km long. It was built around the Ijebu Region by the slaves of the Late Birikisu Sungbo (Queen of Sheba) and has been listed as a World Heritage Site by the

UNESCO. This recognition is capable of pushing the country to the fore of ancient history. Research archaeologists from the United Kingdom concluded preliminary studies with confirmation that the volume of

earth removed from the ditch to build the wall is about one million cubic metres more than the amount of rock and earth which went into building the Great Pyramid in Egypt.

OSUURU SPRING WATER, IMEKO Osuuru Spring Water is a spring gushing out from a stone hill with torrential falling on a platform which resembles a flat wooden-like object down the valley. The spring forms one of the sources of water for the people of pre-modern Imeko.

SUNA CULTURAL CENTRE, IMODIIJEBU-ODE The Suna Cultural Centre, Imodi, near Ijebu-Ode, features archaeological finds pertaining to the grave of the First Otunba Suna, a Balogun during the Owu war. The findings include a number of brass arm and leg ornaments and necklaces of brass and glass. The ancient art works in brass, beads and ornaments with which Otunbas adorned themselves in the olden days are now available for the viewing of tourists at the Suna Cultural Centre. The Centre opens from Monday to Friday, between 10.00am and 3.00pm and on Saturday between 10.00am and 12.00noon.

ABEOKUTA GOLF RESORT Abeokuta Golf Resort is a multiple-use resort, consisting 18 straight-hole regulation length Golf Course, Rock-Beach, Bamboo Dome, Conference Centre with state-of-the-art equipment, and other amenities for leisure, business meetings and entertainment.

NOVE MBER 2016//

107


HEROES OF AFRICA 108 - 113 By Sam Ad el eke

FATI ABUBAKAR BITSOFBORNO:

Changing the African Narrative One Photograph at A Time

108 S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


NOVE MBER 2016//

109


W

hat drives a young and promising 29-year old with a master’s degree to the trenches of a war-torn region? What inspires a single lady to leave her comfort zone in London (UK) for Borno (Nigeria) to work as a photographer and aid worker? Some call it compassion and patriotism, others call it selflessness and sacrifice. Either way, you won’t be wrong. This is the story of Fati Abubakar, a native of Kanuri, Borno in Northeast Nigeria. She is our African hero this edition of S.E.E. Africa. It all started six years ago when a self-styled local Islamic sect, Boko Haram (meaning ‘western

Fati Abubakar Founder: bitsofborno

110 S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

education is sin’), sprang up and decided to take on the local authorities in Borno state, Northeast Nigeria. This was in a bid to consolidate their religious ideology and enforce their extremist views as the new way of life on the society – in defiance to the democratically elected government in existence. The sect would later regroup after a number of them were captured and killed including their leader; this led to relocation further deep into the forest and surrounds in Northern Borno, from where they launched various attacks on the local population and law enforcement authorities. The killings, assassinations, explosions from suicide attacks, and reported abduction of the over 200

schoolgirls from a local community Chibok, plus videos of death threats all made global headlines – thus projecting an image of a devastated, distressed and war-raged city. After months of intense battle, the Nigerian military began to gain the upper hand, decimating the rank and file of the sect in monumental proportions. In the midst of all these, including the surge of the Internally Displaced Camps(IDCs), the resilient citizens of Borno had begun to pick up the pieces of their lives. Things gradually began to return to normal including buying and selling, air transport, local festivities, schools, and the likes. But the image being projected by the mainstream media, especially in the


west, remained the same. This imbalance in the western media reportage was what propelled Fati Abubakar who believed she could use social media to address the bias. A graduate of Nursing and Master’s Degree in Public Health, Fati is not a trained journalist. Nevertheless, she believes that she can make a difference and that photography is a significant tool in documenting environmental

factors that influence the public health and lifestyle. She is compelled with the need to project a different perspective of the stories emanating from her city, not for commercial purposes, but because of the special bond she has with this place she calls home. Historically, African narratives have been largely controlled by mainstream media from other regions of the world consistently painting pictures of gloom and doom with a dust of hope. But since the emergence of social media, especially the image sharing Instagram app, storytelling has become democratized all over the world. And early adopters with compelling stories have been gaining global attention irrespective of their race or location.

Fati recognized the latent power of this medium and chose to exploit it in her quest to curate and share a different visual perspective of life and living in Borno. Fati’s love for photography is infinite, especially its power as a medium for storytelling. And that is what keeps her going on a daily basis. Another compelling factor for Fati is the resilience of the Borno people.

She wanted the world to see the determination to lead normal lives (instead of depending only on food aid) despite the distress and misery caused by the insurgency. Indeed, the survival stories of the Borno people are worth documenting and telling. This is why Fati believes that every photograph of hers must speak to the soul of the beholder. For her, every picture is a rekindling of memories, the capturing of an unfolding story and the framing of a nostalgic legacy worth archiving for generations to come. In the course of her work, Fati has been able to attract cash and kind donations from her social media following in various parts of the world to support her efforts in

alleviating the sufferings of the survivors. Of a truth, Fati might not be your traditional superhero with superpowers flying all over to save the world from alien invasion; she is, however, a modern day hero faced with a special task of projecting a unique image of hope, survival and resilience. And despite the fragile security situation, Fati has been defying all odds and potential dangers that could have discouraged her. Thankfully, the local vigilante group often look out for her from time to time. Fati has also somewhat attained a mini-celebrity status, as a result of her work, which has endeared her to the locals who gladly pose for a photograph whenever she is spotted. Indeed, Fati Abubakar is a role model and a classical example of the newly emerging crop of twenty-first century African leaders. She has proven yet again that you do not need positional leadership to make a difference in your sphere of influence. That all you need is to discover and

align your passion with compassion, deploying the resources at your disposal to make a difference in your world. When Fati’s parents sent her to school in London, they probably never guessed that their beloved daughter would be doing what she is doing today. And Fati could have played the ostrich by staying back to lead a peaceful life, and even chosen to quietly send donations to Borno from abroad. But she decided to take the plunge, even at the risk of her life. Heroes like Fati are needed all over the continent. Heroes like her are not extraordinary people; they are ordinary people doing life-changing things and going the extra mile for their communities using the available resources at their disposal. So the big question is: What Do You Have? And What Are You Doing With What You Have? If Fati Abubakar can do it, then you don’t have an excuse. Take the plunge today and start making a difference in your world.

NOVE MBER 2016//

111


bub A i t a hF

QU E S TION S AN D AN SW E R S W R IT H FAT I A B U BA K A R

wit

akar

Q Give us a brief background of yourself? A Fati Abubakar is a documentary photographer, photojournalist, public health humanitarian health worker from Nigeria. She specializes in documenting cities, towns, highlighting both the positives and negatives of each location. She focuses on health perspectives, using photography as a medium to highlight the problems at community level. She also has an interest in documenting cultures, conflict, urban poverty, rural development and humanitarian issues. She has a special interest in counter narratives for underrepresented communities. She has embarked on a personal project to showcase her hometown of Borno State, Nigeria at the time of Bokoharam. A project which has been titled ‘Bits of Borno’ on social media has gained critical acclaim and has been published in media outlets including The New York Times, BBC, Reuters, CNN, Voice of America, Newsweek Europe, Africa is a Country blog, Nigerian newspapers such as ThisDay and the Blueprint. She has been commissioned to work with UNICEF, International Alert, Media Information and Narrative Development (MIND). Her work with MIND on water and environmental issues such as waste disposal titled ‘Water Wahala’ was exhibited in March, 2016. I studied Nursing in University of Maiduguri and then Public health in London South Bank University. I grew up in Maiduguri. Q What triggered your desire to come back home? A I decided to come back home after my studies because I was homesick and the news about Bokoharam made me worried about my parents and extended family.living in Maiduguri. I wanted to also come back and give back to my community. I want to work in communities and this was a crucial time for all of us to come and help our hometown cope with the humanitarian crisis. Q How does your average day begin and end in Borno? A My day starts with preparing for work. I have a 9-5 job. Also prior to starting work, I would start my day at 10am and be out photographing all day till 6pm. Then I get back home to edit my work and upload to my phone for further uploads to the pages. Q How do you protect yourself from been a target of the sect knowing that your work has now garnered international attention? A I have thrown caution to the wind. Whatever is meant to happen to you will happen wherever

112 S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


BITSOFBORNO

NOVE MBER 2016//

113

QU E S TION S AN D AN SW E R S W R IT H FAT I A B U BA K A R

you are. There's no protection if its meant to be. Q What keeps you going considering the level of devastation and despair in the North East? A The fact that people see our resilience and how strong we are living in this crisis is what keeps me going. The world can see that we are moving on. And some donations coming to the page will let me know that people do care and want to help. Its very encouraging. Q Have you thought of quitting? If yes, tell us more. A I've not thought of quitting. I want to be in humanitarian aid for a lifetime. Q Who are your role models? A My role model is Steve McCurry. An international photographer who documents cultures all over the world. Q What are the most dangerous experiences you've had so far in the course of your work? A I've not hard any dangerous experiences. I go to villages a lot and I just live like there's no tomorrow. Q What are the major problems you have encountered and how can it be solved? A The major problem is the fact that equipment for photography is very expensive. You have to work extra hard to save and buy anything you need. Q What is your message to young people who admire you and your work? A My advice would be: 'Do it for the right reasons. Do it because it makes you happy. Do it because you want to contribute to your community, because you want to preserve cultures and document for your communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s archives. I think they should have the right reasons first, and also make sure that this is what you love. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to conform to the traditional version of what a female should be. You should define for yourself what you want to be. And if being a photographer is what you want to be, I think you should throw caution to the wind and make sure you keep going and [do] not listen to destructive criticism.


Diary

DIARY DIARYOF OFAA HOT HOTAIR AIR CREW CREW By Mojereola Mustapha

I had rolled onto the TV’s remote control and turned the TV on. Right at that moment, on the screen, was the most terrifying news.………..an aircraft missing!

114 S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


i

! y h w e m k s a e n o o Let n

ls for the day. If re common mea we t no s Richard wa be with really few weeks later, you were lucky to A lic n ge io an ct ess my indu you get to do fun redom. Only an fun-loving crew, only there to witn was dying from bo I at th I d s ha g in a range, bin crew. I me. So bored wa things like shootin ceremony as a ca touch could help d he r as aces and be brainw ch day waiting fo visiting historic pl allowed myself to went through ea ing is I did not fly . at en th pp nrgettable ha tio fo to rta un nt monuments, on air transpo something differe tion. ny. I did rta pa po m ns co tra ig’ common when ‘b of re a ns in we experiences the safest mea want another job e fic of g ily in ths of be destinations in st in another da n’t it? After mon visiting different Is not want to get lo tI e I th r. see the world bu e an aviato up 4am to beat days. I wanted to tutored, I becam routine of waking I s. ed w go nt ne La wa e I ol th w quickly s and a wh synonymous wi was amazed at ho returned to Lago notorious traffic w, . rld ys no wo da e ck w th after a fe Looking ba flying around to get back home life commenced. fantasized about g in all of the in rts ay pa pl o nt leg of the eg t re r las ffe te e di al Hence, on th there was an and waking up in ed nt as s wa I es , had to dr ts, I could barely see the world instructional fligh of our hearts. You world. I wanted to , rld ss wo e tle th ul ss with fa home to Lasgidi rent parts of wait to get back the flawless hoste to wake up in diffe If rk e. wo liv . Going to ’s Amala and see how others and eat my mom hair and make-up smell the air and y r nl he O ot e. t a minut at it is like in Ewedu soup. was fun. Oh! Wai only I could see wh lf ant is a se nd ur te yo at t en s late in the gh ov fli pr a g d We arrived Lago after you ha worlds! But bein y th m wi all t t gh ushered to the ng-haul fli uld dream abou evening and were worthy of that lo fantasy, one I wo b re jo a we d u fin yo d if ght. I got the keys doomed ppens, I woul hotel about midni Mary (you were life. Whatever ha a e be th ay of for the night and location the world; m to my hotel room unable to tell the to take me around ld P t. ou SE sh e at Th th . my bags to the lif seconds!) each year and could barely pull defibrillator in 2 couple of travels rn wo a , re ise ec we more pr sessions enough. I was tired, to be question-answer make me happy to d we lo al re s ngers we crew wa out. Those passe must before any elf raft. rc ai ge hu aged to drag mys e an th m d I insatiable! step onboar d an ly re or do Ba ed my ooming! to my room, open Then was the gr ely et pl m e double bed and co th re on we s elf flung mys black tight ve k ac bl ly re minutes must ha ossy, ba dozed off. A few different from gl r te ise al no e e th ticed th rm was passed when I no tights! The unifo mplete co in s d rolled onto the ha wa I It . g. TV from the ego coverin e sticks, rol and turned th TV’s remote cont without the red lip le on ab t, cc en pe that mom nails, im TV on. Right at well-manicured s for the ht tig k e most terrifying ac th bl s ly wa re , the screen hair and ba In e lik aircraft missing! looked news.………..an ladies. The men d an d be Q G of d out out of a a second, I jumpe something right s the hot wa en om. I washed my th ro y th nl ba O e ran for th magazine. ter and went back . face with cold wa crew ticked to go l, al r fte A . tions to the bed. I loved the destina to see ed nt t is going on?” I wa I at wh “Oh! No.” “Wha that was rk wo of t lo a d been a plane wever, thought. There ha places. It was, ho a , ce en H re around Ota in mour. missing somewhe under all the gla of ts se o on the floor and first tw Lagos! I slumped rethink after the . , es Y ts. gh fli , help me,” I cried bound wailed. “Oh God outbound and in r do fo t n’ wn ca do I g e! tin or no sit anym “I am not flying a lot of work and part was n Then the phones fu e y.” Th wa d. o en N this job! hours on d ch ea n tio y colleagues calle stina began to ring. M arriving at the de . ws e ne th e d th an d ls ar d he r hote to find out if I ha time- the five sta , u ew cr yo n en bi th ca d w e ne ep, an The four of us, th hours of good sle n tio , es m qu gy e e Th th . om ur in gathered in my ro wake up to an ho ep. Noon is sle e s as they walked or lip r m d ou an of t on each breakfas e th by g gin loun d we hugged was: into the room an spent shopping or ks in dr il ta ck co nt to do this job? le of do you really wa pool with a coup s er rg bu d an s chip and new friends;

, w o n k u o Y “ , d i Richardyssa are waiting in line these gu cabin crew role”. for a

. d e k s a I ” ? t a h t s i “Wh,aat new airline is starting out aanntds they are “Oh g cabin crew, flight at end recruitin stesses.” or air ho ised. r p r u s s a w I . ed k s a I “Real y?an”d the job would fit you o!” “Yes ” . s s e t s o h r i a n a s a e m “No aonheaw…ouYld hoiurewil be hired o!” “H ” . o g s et L . e er h t s i n i s u o “Look, my c ot going to join that long, unending , “No, I amd nrather fol ow you to see your coui!sin” queue. I’ake our way to the bank. C’est fin then we m

NOVE MBER 2016//

115


My Trip to

Zanzibar Kelechi Ugbeva Partner, KCU Legal

Bio

Kelechi Ugbeva is an international business lawyer that specializes in tax and commercial law. She enjoys travelling around the world as a hobby.

116 S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


Z

anzibar was my first choice when my husband and I decided we needed a proper holiday. So the decision to vacation in Zanzibar was a very easy one. And why not, do a quick search on the internet and you will be served with scintillating images of stretches of white beaches, the bluest and clearest seas and not to mention imagining that feeling of being in an exotic island faraway from the bustling of Lagos city life. With our getaway destination settled, then came the planning of what fun activities we’ll be engaging in. This holiday was planned to be special and it required fun activities to make it feel so. So I began my search for the best travel company in the

country with the right tour operators that would at least provide us with a bit of what we had in mind. I didn’t have to look far though because I knew about Afro Tourism; the go-to travel and tourism company, and remembered their focus is on African destinations and decided to give them a trial. I visited their website www.afrotourism.com and was wowed by what was available there. Afro Tourism’s partnership with my Zanzibar tour operator is nothing more than a dream made in hospitality heaven. Sincerely, I had no idea there would be so much to choose from and after careful consideration we chose the package closest to our needs. On arrival in Zanzibar we were very pleased to discover that all the

promised activities where right up to the letter. Our hotel was situated in front of the beach and we had the time of our lives trying to have all the fun in the world. First up in the line of activities was swimming, the sea looked even better than any of the images I saw pre-trip, that sea has the purest sea water I’ve ever seen and it felt warm when my feet sunk into it. We also did a bit of snorkelling while at it. Although it was a short trip, we tried to squeeze in as many of the booked fun activities as we could manage. We enjoyed parasailing as well. During nightfall we took a tour of the beach surroundings armed with our coconut drinks as the sea waves crashed around bringing with it cool soothing breeze. Before the trip ended we found time to take the highly recommended Spice tour and visited the former slave encampment. Zanzibar is certainly the one place to experience if you haven’t done so yet.

NOVE MBER 2016//

117


Reflection: How to Be an Africa Travel Consultant

O

ne of the easiest jobs I have found around is being a travel consultant. With an internet service and a smartphone, you can almost speak authoritatively about anywhere in the world—and if you choose to stand out, consider focusing on Africa. How do you go about it? It’s easy, get a corner office even if it’s just a kiosk in an obscure area of town, ensure your firm’s displayed name has words like safari, timeless, experience or primordial—of course, don’t forget to end it with the catchy phrase INTERNATIONAL LIMITED or GLOBAL INCORPORATED. Next step is to create a website. Splash it with pictures of monkeys and

white tourists, especially ladies in bikinis by the beach. Ensure you have a stone-faced man in the background— make sure he is a black, masculine man with fierce looking face; this will provide security assurance for your eventual clients. Everyone already has a specific image of Africa and you don’t want to break the norm—something that may affect your business negatively. So, when you have to

baboons displaying acrobatic skills on trees located in semi-jungle. Add pictures of lions and elephants roaming in a large undisturbed landscape, and show beaches dotted with leftovers and empty drink cases. You will need to also feature pictures of

feature images of African streets, ensure you capture potholes-ridden roads and mud houses with thatch roofs. It’ll be great if you get pictures of men sitting under a baobab tree, playing draught with a keg of palm-wine by their side. If the men are drinking palm wine at 10am while the women are pounding yam with babies strapped to their backs; even as many kids are playing

around with torn pants in the compound, that will be the ‘Real Africa’. Only the hotels and places you think tourists will visit should be at the end of well-tarred roads. If the focal place is Lagos, Kinshasa, Johannesburg or any of Africa’s ‘notorious’ cities, ensure you get an image showing the aerial view of the city. If the image does not feature hectic traffic,

sTORY BY: Michael-Alvin Usifo

school-age children selling petty stuffs in-between rolls of logjam traffic, scruffy-looking cops wielding firearms—preferably AK 47s, forcefully collecting money from drivers before allowing them to pass, as well as fat (or gaunt) women—selling goods by the roadsides, don’t use it. This will help your client consult you on which area of the continent to visit.

Cut off the Egypt, Tunisia and Morocco from the continent and add it to your Arabian tours. Feature Victoria Falls, the Okavango, African Islands – e.g. Seychelles, Mauritius, etc as Europeans gift to Africa. Elaborate on slave trade and how the ancient slave-harbours—the exact sites of evil deeds of previous African leaders that Europeans helped to helm, is now a wondrous historical place that everyone should visit. To attract traffic to your site, splash it with plenty of African myths! Tell your audience how African forebearers dropped from the sky and lived on trees using leaves as clothes; share the stories of the African tortoise—especially how

it lost its smooth shell to greed. Don’t forget to add the stories of witches! Africans like witches, maybe we are in fact all witches.

Well, when your money starts trickling in, don’t forget to send me a cheque for this consultancy service. 118 S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com


ASTA DESTINATION EXPO

Your Connection to the

U.S. Travel Agency Market

24-26 February 2017

Nairobi, Kenya Kenyatta International Convention Centre

Attend ASTA’s Destination Expo 2017 and open the door to new partnerships.

98%

of travel agent attendees of ASTA’s Destination Expo plan to use the travel supplier contacts they gained at the ADE for future bookings

INCREASE YOUR U.S. SALES BY ESTABLISHING new business relationships with highly qualified travel agents who sell outbound travel from the U.S. ASTA Destination Expo is the perfect event to increase your global exposure and generate future sales leads.

ASTA Destination

EXPO

NAIROBI, KENYA Feb 24–26, 2017 Optional Post Masai Mara Safari 26-28

www.ASTAADE.org Register Today! ASTA.org

104 S.E.E AFRICA

www.afrotourism.com

Travelsense.org

@ASTAAgents


...when you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to

Djibloho Oyala WELE-NZAS, Equatorial Guinea // T (+240) 3500 70 300 // M (+240) 551 694 84 // info@grandhoteldjibloho.com // www.grandhoteldjibloho.com

Live

below LUXURY

S.E.E. Africa Magazine  

Explore Africa through the eyes of travellers with real experiences...